India's Contribution to Science & Technology

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Aldonkar
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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Aldonkar » 30 Nov 2021 19:48

Amber G. wrote:Google, Microsoft, Adobe, IBM, Palo Alto Networks, and now Twitter run by CEOs who grew up in India...Many from my alma mater IIT - Wonderful to watch the amazing success of Indians in the technology world .. Thanks to good schools and the opportunity America offers.

Also Illumina, a company in the news due to the use of its products in genome sequencing Covid 10 virus. The CEO is Francisco De Souza who has a Indian father, Greek mother and was born in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia). Also Ivan Menezes, CEO of Diageo (UK) the largest drinks co. He is a US citizen but was born in Mumbai. His elder brother was CEO of I think Citicorp some years ago. The media always overlook Christian Indians because their names are Western/Hispanic.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby anupmisra » 30 Nov 2021 21:55

Paul wrote:Always wondered why 2nd Gen Indian Americans are not able to match to their FOB cousins......


Give them time.

BTW, I think you meant "1st generation Indian-Americans". As I am a naturalized citizen, my son who was born in the US would be 1st generation. Today, the 1st generation is generally in their twenties or under, but are getting into top universities. However, to your point, I have come across a few 2nd gen Indian-Americans whose grandparents moved to the US in the 60's and 70's. These 2nd generation kids have little to no affinity with India.

So, in all fairness, give them time.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 30 Nov 2021 22:56

anupmisra wrote:
Paul wrote:Always wondered why 2nd Gen Indian Americans are not able to match to their FOB cousins......


Give them time.

BTW, I think you meant "1st generation Indian-Americans". As I am a naturalized citizen, my son who was born in the US would be 1st generation. Today, the 1st generation is generally in their twenties or under, but are getting into top universities. However, to your point, I have come across a few 2nd gen Indian-Americans whose grandparents moved to the US in the 60's and 70's. These 2nd generation kids have little to no affinity with India.

So, in all fairness, give them time.


We have Prof Amar Bose, perhaps the most famous of these but MIT, Google, Facebook, Twitter, have *plenty* of these 2nd/3rd generations in *very* important posts. (Due to racist past immigration laws, 1960's was the time when immigration, in significant numbers, from India. That was about 60 years ago.

I know plenty of Indian Americans (who consider themselves 'desi') who (and their parents and grand_parents) were born in US. (My own extended family - if you count my parents who moved here to be with their children - can count 5 generations)

PLENTY of them doing quite good.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Paul » 03 Dec 2021 17:46

An article that somewhat but not completely aligns with the thrust of my argument.......2nd Gen Indian Americans cut off from their India roots do not have the ______ that their FOB counterparts have.....due to their cultural deracination. I think that they need to make more trips back home to assilimate the India advantage.


A lesson for those parents who have inculcated the look down on India feeling amongst their progeny.

http://www.businessworld.in/article/Are ... 7k.twitter

Are We Blunting Our Children’s “India Advantage”

Perhaps that indescribable magic behind iconic Indian origin professional managers, academics, professionals, entrepreneurs on the world stage and at home who have acknowledged this India Advantage as a key ingredient in their becoming successful global Indians.


One stark social contradiction that can be seen often in affluent metropolitan India is that as the world moves into an Asian or an Indian century, a section of society seems to be unwittingly eroding their children’s natural “India Advantage”. An advantage that is the unique alchemy inside homes during growing up years that combines an ethno-cultural way of life with the modern and contemporary. A way of life that gave strong foundational roots to build a successful career anywhere in the world. And which perhaps is also that indescribable magic behind iconic Indian origin professional managers, academics, professionals, entrepreneurs on the world stage and at home who have acknowledged this India Advantage as a key ingredient in their becoming successful global Indians.

Contrast that with being globally aware and locally ignorant which seems to be the new normal. It is not uncommon to routinely encounter suave young adults, intelligent and worldly-wise but clued out about most things Indian. An ethno-culturally incongruent section of youngsters with speech and thought aligned virtually to a distant world. A world where Connecticut and Birmingham are pronounced to near perfection but Calicut and Birbhum draw a blank and thoughts drift amidst alien shores without at least one firmly anchored locally as a foundation and in doing so perhaps inadvertently frittering away that crucial India advantage.

Since early personality is largely shaped by parental influence at home, providing children with a simulated growing up environment alien from their immediate and natural could potentially put their child’s future at risk. Cultural incongruence can misalign personality make one pretentious and adversely impact career. And in any case if India is where much of play will happen then what better natural advantage than the knowledge of pitch condition and lay of land to win at the game.

Media, technology, globalization, changing social attitudes and busy working parents are commonly attributed causes for this cultural incongruence. All undeniably correct but shouldn’t part culpability be shared by the growing-up environment at home because that after-all has a disproportionate impact on developing a young mind. Much at home seems designed to simulate an alien environment that transports a child’s imagination to a world that is different from what they exist in. Picture books have unfamiliar characters, devices stream AV content from foreign lands, pop-icons and role models are distant, food and socializing norms are westernized, holiday destinations are abroad and even festivals are imported.

But it is not as much the imported which poses a risk but the increasingly conspicuous absence of the other, the local, which has the potential to blunt that critical India advantage. This significant other was an informal lifestyle ecosystem made up of a variety of ethno-cultural reminders during growing up years. Vernacular communication, copies of Amar Chitra Katha lying around, depending on where you came from, a P.L Deshpande, a Feluda or a Premchand beckoning from the bookshelf, a Gita, a Kural or some other spiritual books peeping at you from the pooja room and that constant trilogy of festivals, food, and attire. A Sitar or a Tabla in the corner and daily rituals like Arti and Sandhya Vandana added a distinct flavor and LTA restricted to anywhere within India and holidays to towns where grandparents or the family deity lived or to some pilgrimage center contributed to geographical awareness.

This local flavor at home during growing up was an essential ingredient in the alchemy that made up the unique India advantage. But that alchemy seems disturbed. The imported has edged out the local inside homes and which is perhaps the main cause for spawning a globally aware but locally ignorant section of youngsters.

Can a virtually acclimatized lifestyle inside a western cocoon yield dividend? For excellence in the virtual can well be below average in the real. And real India in the Indian century with its opportunities will be hyper-competitive and demand excellence. Expensive college fees abroad or buying into expensive immigration programs can only offer temporary insurance to escape the cauldron of intense competition that is India. But a confident awareness of ethno-cultural roots is perhaps the firmest launchpad for take-off into the heat and dust that will be the Indian century. After all, so many Indian and Indian origin achievers have used it for a successful launch. Why not give the same benefit to our children from early years.

Because in the end for success it’s all about originality over imitation, natural over pretention, and individuality over personality. To remain connected with your deeper roots as you soar tall. And like starships have the advantage of ground control as they explore the universe, let your child have the India advantage as she finds her place in the world. It is her natural advantage. She was born with it. Let’s not take that away from her.

The author is a business strategist. He tweets as @vikramlimsay

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 04 Dec 2021 03:38

Several Indian Americans Entrepreneurs, Innovators and Entertainers in Forbes List of 30 Under 30
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(Plenty of them second/third generations, who grew up here in US).

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 07 Dec 2021 00:15

Manish_P wrote:I think it is likely that this is that Prof. Verma.

Prof Verma's alma mater - IIT Kanpur Felicitating Prof Hc Verma..(From a recent Institute news - with Shiksha Sopan team and a few Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur colleagues.): Good we are valuing our teachers.
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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Vayutuvan » 07 Dec 2021 06:07

Amber G. wrote:Several Indian Americans Entrepreneurs, Innovators and Entertainers in Forbes List of 30 Under 30
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(Plenty of them second/third generations, who grew up here in US).

Both Ms. T. Doshi and Ms. U. Shivaraman work for large companies - Google and Uber respectively. Why is that a big deal?
Mr. Sid Yadav founded a company which is somewhat mitigating.

I found these three in "the 2022 consumer technology 30-under-30" at this link.
https://www.forbes.com/30-under-30/2022/consumer-technology

Mr. Akshar Bonu founded "The Custom Movement" which had a funding of $150K

Crunchbase wrote:Funding Round
Aug 19, 2019
The Custom Movement raised $150,000 / Pre Seed from SV Angel and Y Combinator


During the heydays of the Internet (ca. 1998-2002), anybody who inserted a few jargon words like "HTML", "Web Browser", "Dynamic Web pages", "PHP" got $500K at the end of a fifteen-minute presentation.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Vayutuvan » 07 Dec 2021 06:26

Dr. P. Rajpurkar has done work in "deep learning", "deep AI". Let us see how this low-hanging fruit harvesting works out in the long run. Paint me skeptical. We all remember how Sanjiv Siddhu's company i2 fared after initial successes of harvesting low-hanging LP application fruits. Now it is called Blue Yonder or something with annual revenue of barely $350 million. It is a consulting company - not a product company anymore. At the height, i2 had yearly revenues of $2 billion, IIRC.

Mr. Raunak Nirmal
Raunak Nirmal, an India born Sikh American who has made it to the 30 Under 30 list for Forbes magazine, in the category of Retail and E-commerce.

Nirmal is the CEO of Acquco, "an institutionally-backed acquisition company" that he founded in 2020, according to the company's website.


The above is not really a big "contribution to technology and science", A good business idea may be. That is yet to be seen.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Paul » 07 Dec 2021 17:54

Sidhu runs another IBP solutions company called O9 solutions.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 01 Jan 2022 01:35

Born on this day in 1894: Indian physicist Satyendranath Bose. In 1924 Bose sent a seminal paper to Einstein in which he derived Planck’s radiation formula without recourse to classical physics. Einstein extended the paper’s concepts, signaling the creation of Bose-Einstein statistics.
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Bose-Einstein statistics applies to particles like photons which don’t have half-integer spin. It underlines critical phenomena like lasers and superfluidity in liquid helium. It took until 1995 for Bose-Einstein condensation to be experimentally verified.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 09 Jan 2022 01:19

Today is birth centennial for Harbind Singh Khurana - Noble prize winner for cracking genetic code and synthesizing the first artificial gene.

His story is remarkable - born in a village of <100 people, mostly illiterate, dodging Partition and then succeeding.

Interestingly three great scientists and nobel prize winners, I admire (Dr S. Chandrasekhar, Dr. Salam and Dr Khorana) - were born in what is now Pakistan.. They have been completely ignored by that land of Pure but this well written article in Dawn, written by his grand-nephew is worth reading.

Dr Har Gobind Khorana at 100: Re-evaluating a shared heritageImage

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby vimal » 09 Jan 2022 10:21

Har Gobind Khorana not Harbind Singh Khurana.

https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medic ... graphical/

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 11 Jan 2022 05:59

^^Thanks - (I can not edit my typo anymore)

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 19 Jan 2022 07:06

I attended (virtually) IIT Kanpur's Convocation where Chief guest was PM Modi - (Also present were CM Yogi Adityanath, and ex ISRO chief). One part surprised me most was the "degrees/certificates" were not paper copies but digital certificates (delivered by PM with push of a button to thousands of graduating students). Even in other advance countries very few universities do that now.

Watch:




(IT Kanpur students received digital degrees based on an in-house blockchain-driven technology that has been developed by the IIT-K under the National Blockchain Project in India. Hence, these digital degrees are highly-secured, verifiable globally, and are unforgeable, according to recent reports)

Interesting the main leader who is driving all this leading technology is Prof Agrawal - SUTRA fame!

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Vips » 26 Feb 2022 04:29

Physicist Deepak Dhar Becomes First Indian to be Conferred with Prestigious Boltzmann Medal.

Stalwart Indian physicist and Emeritus Professor at the Department of Physics, IISER, Pune, Prof Deepak Dhar will be conferred the prestigious Boltzmann Medal for his contribution in the field of statistical physics.

The Boltzmann Medal is given every three years by the C3 Commission on Statistical Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) at the Statphys Conference.

The Award, comprising a gilded medal, honours outstanding achievements in statistical physics. The award will be given during Statphys 28 to be held in Tokyo from August 8 to 12.

IISER, Pune announced the award on its Twitter handle and Facebook page late on Thursday evening after Prof Dhar received a letter from the IUPAP. However, the IUPAP website had no mention of the award.

Prof Dhar shares the prize with John Hopfield, an American scientist.

When IANS spoke to Prof Dhar to congratulate him, especially as he is the first Indian to get the prestigious award, the scientist said: "The award was instituted in 1975 or so. We have had people such as Satyendra Nath Bose ... one should not ignore the great work that they have done in this field."

The 1951-born Dhar is known for his research on statistical physics and stochastic processes. He is an elected fellow of all the three major Indian science academies - the Indian Academy of Sciences, the Indian National Science Academy, and the National Academy of Sciences, India - as well as of The World Academy of Sciences.

The Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has awarded him the 'Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize' for Science and Technology for his contributions to physical sciences in 1991.

Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India, K VijayRaghavan tweeted: "Professor Dhar is one of the brightest physicists around. He shares the prize with John Hopfield, of whom the same can be said. From Allahabad University, IIT Kanpur, California University and then TIFR, he has left a great imprint in each place."

A science graduate from the University of Allahabad (1970) and a master's in physics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur in 1972, Prof Dhar moved to the US for his doctoral studies.

In 1978, he returned to India to start his long career at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) as a research fellow the same year and over the years, became a full professor.

Post-retirement, he continues his association with TIFR as a distinguished professor of the institution. He also serves as a distinguished visiting faculty at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Vips » 12 Apr 2022 19:03

Domestic patent filings outnumber international applicants in India for the first time in 11 years.

For the first time in 11 years, the number of domestic patent filings has exceeded that of international patent filings in India in the three months to March 2022.

This is a significant milestone in the context of the IP innovation ecosystem, according to a statement from the Ministry of Commerce and Industry on April 12. “For the first time in the last 11 years, the number of domestic patent filings has surpassed the number of international patent filings at the Indian patent office in the January-March 2022 quarter,” it said.

This means that out of 19,796 patent applications filed, 10,706 were filed by Indian applicants as against 9,090 by non-Indian applicants.

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Graph 1: Quarter-wise patent applications filed by Indian applicants vis-à-vis non-Indian applicants.

Filing of patents increased more than 50 percent - from 42,763 in 2014-15 to 66,440 in 2021-22 — in a span of seven years. There is also nearly a five-fold increase in grant of patents in 2021-22 (30,074) as compared to 2014-15 (5,978).

Further, the time for patent examination has also been reduced from 72 months in December 2016 to five to 23 months at present for different technological areas.

Overall, India’s ranking in the Global Innovation Index has increased to 46th in 2021 — up 35 ranks — as compared to the 81st spot in 2015-16.

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Graph 2: Filing and grant of patent applications over the years

Commending the “consistent efforts” by the Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade (DPIIT) and Intellectual Property (IP) office, Union Minister of Commerce and Industry Piyush Goyal said their coordinated efforts “will take India a step closer to its ambitious target of being in the top 25 nations on the Global Innovation Index”.

Goyal also acknowledged the DPIIT’s efforts to strengthen the IPR regime in India by fostering innovation and reducing compliance burden.

“The coordinated effort by DPIIT and the IP office has led to an increased IP awareness among all strata of the society. These efforts have on one hand led to an increase in the number of IPR filings, on the other, reduced the pendency of patent application at IP offices,” he said.

Some key initiatives taken up by the government over the years that have bolstered India's IP regime include fee concessions such as 10 percent rebate on online filing, 80 percent fee concession for start-ups, small entities and educational institutions, and provisions on expedited examination for startups and micro, medium and small enterprises (MSMEs) along with other categories.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 22 Apr 2022 00:41

Another great -
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There's little doubt that Meghnad Saha deserved a Nobel Prize for his equation shown below -- Relating the temperature in stars to their elemental ionization states eventually unlocked the door to stellar energy and nucleosynthesis.
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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Rakesh » 26 Sep 2022 04:13

https://twitter.com/DeshGujarat/status/ ... pxiyMr05Vg ---> Prime Minister will inaugurate the Regional Science Centre in Bhavnagar which is spread in 20 acres.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby vijayk » 30 Nov 2022 00:22

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/in ... 827619.cms
Researchers from IISER-Thiruvananthapuram and IIT-Indore have developed a new artificial light-harvesting system that can efficiently capture light for power conversion by mimicking photosynthesis, the process by which plants absorb sunlight and produce sugars. The research has been published in the prestigious 'Royal Chemical Society - Chemical Science' journal.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby suryag » 18 Dec 2022 02:05

Panini's final rules decoded
This is a great achievement if indeed true. I had done NLP long long ago and the basic premise of it hasnt changed with only incremental optimization happening over the last two decades, however, this will change that.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Cyrano » 06 Jan 2023 01:55

The reaction of our learned Sanskrit scholars is mixed to say the least. For a good analysis of the claims made by Oxford watch this:

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Vayutuvan » 06 Jan 2023 08:35

suryag wrote:I had done NLP long long ago and the basic premise of it hasnt changed with only incremental optimization happening over the last two decades, however, this will change that.


Are you still working in NLP (not Nonlinear programming here in the context but rather) Natural Language Processing? Both NLPs are connected at a fundamental level but I digress!

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Amber G. » 25 Jan 2023 21:26

xpost:
India confers Padma Vibhushan (second-highest civilian award) to Dilip Mahalanabis for pioneering the use of ORS that saved many lives globally. He demonstrated the effectiveness of ORS while serving in refugee camps during 1971 Bangladesh liberation war.
He was a pediatrician known for pioneering the use of oral rehydration therapy to treat diarrheal diseases. Mahalanabis had begun researching oral rehydration therapy in 1966 as a research investigator for the Johns Hopkins.
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