India's Shipping Sector

The Technology & Economic Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to Technological and Economic developments in India. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
vina
BRF Oldie
Posts: 6045
Joined: 11 May 2005 06:56
Location: Doing Nijikaran, Udharikaran and Baazarikaran to Commies and Assorted Leftists

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby vina » 04 Oct 2015 13:50

Once again "TRANSSHIPMENT" is the key term here, that poster after poster is ignoring. Even the 15 km spur line from Nemom yard is in Phase II, as per Mr A's request. Surprised me a bit, since state govt had IRCON working on it for past two years, out of state funds. "D notifications" for LA was almost sent out along that 15 kms


Ok. Mr A. can feed his Gujarat and Goa ports in the West Coast and the east coast ports including soon Katupalli/Chennai out of Vizhingam, and it can fly.

However, notice JNPT/Mumbai , which a biggie and also Kolkata are left out. Okay, Mr Gadkari better get cracking on coastal shipping big time.

Bade
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7212
Joined: 23 May 2002 11:31
Location: badenberg in US administered part of America

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Bade » 04 Oct 2015 18:36

There is the direct rail line from ICTT too, so Walayar checkpost and road conditions is not the reason alone, though improvements there will no doubt help. If Vizhinjam flies for transshipment then the existing ICTT can be converted to a big shipyard in the least with CSL being close and a outer harbor built near Vypin Islands as per plans.

Theo_Fidel
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7605
Joined: 31 Mar 2006 02:15
Location: MO,US,NCJ TN

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Theo_Fidel » 04 Oct 2015 21:53

almost the only thing that tranships thru columbo port is indian traffic, some bangladesh stuff as well.. ...almost no world traffic transships through columbo... vinzhinjam will live or die on yindia traffic... ..why would world traffic come here... singapore is closer, faster, more high tech on one side and Gulf is closer on the other and even asia now prefers the unpgraded panama route for EU.... ...singapore has subsidy and technology plan to load ship in 6 freaking hours by 2025... ..first rule of business, don't underestimate the adavantages your competition has and is receiving...

in any case lets keep some perspective on the total annual tranship revenue available. last I heard less than $400 Million for our region.... ..the main problem is the 5 day add in term of exports travel time... ..ideally goi should subsidize this to maintain our export competitiveness... ..every country around the world does this, but not yindia....

ofcourse it does not help that vallarpadam takes 2 days! to load a ship while singapore takes 12 hours, even Columbo is in the less than 24 regime.... ...afaik adani is bulk goods port type, he does not get a lot of container traffic and DP world mundra has captured almost all the container traffic int hat area...

arshyam
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2853
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arshyam » 04 Oct 2015 22:55

Javee wrote:For Vizhinjam to succeed the entire EU/US bound traffic from the southern states should be routed through it. I don't know how feasible it is to send the feeders from Chennai, but from Tuthukudi it is possible.
Thoothukudi (Tuticorin) is definitely possible, but its volumes aren't enough to sustain Vizhinjam. And Colombo is very aggressive in pricing, so it will put up a serious fight for traffic out of Thoothukudi. But Adani seems to think there will be enough transshipment business in Vizhinjam, and his company has taken a terminal in Ennore port, and is also buying Kattupalli's port ops from L&T. Is the plan to route traffic from these ports to Vizhinjam? I am not sure how that will help since Adani does not run shipping lines, but maybe they may offer some discounts for traffic transhipping through Vizhinjam. It's just a guess, but these moves are interesting.

Javee wrote:But need to see how GA sahib will make it a success when DP world couldn't make it work at Cochise ICTT. Just to compare Colombo did about 2 million TEU's while Cochin ICTT did about 27k TEU's. This shows both the potential and challenges for any SI transhipment port.
Is the Kochi ICTT a SEZ (with easier labour laws) or do they have the usual trade unionism?

hnair wrote:- "Transshipment" does not need hinterland cargo. The idea is to have a logistics hub (for lack of a better word) to offload 18,000 TEU and beyond vessels on India's shores, onto smaller feeder vessels and rails. Vizhinjam and Colachel are the closest to the trunk shipping route for that purpose. And also with depth that does not need huge opex dredging. In essence, Vizhinjam and Colachel will be like one of those largish railheads and junctions that one sees in farflung places of India(without large passenger base), but for containers
I think this is the key. Vizhinjam and Colachel will be plugged into the rail network, and it may be faster to move containers from Chennai/CBE and load onto large vessels directly at these transshipment hubs. Why load on to a smaller vessel in Chennai and again transfer onto a larger one, when one can go direct by rail to the larger one?

hnair wrote:- Mr A's group has plans for a largish SEZ (and it is largish as per current reports) over in Kanyakumari district. So hinterland cargo is a future prospect.
Okay, this makes more sense. So Vizhinjam will eventually become a regular port, doing transshipping as well as exports from the hinterland. I mean, like I said in the previous para, Vizhinjam and Colachel's advantage over Colombo will be the direct rail access, which can speed up shipments by a few days, which are today lost in loading on to a smaller vessel at Chennai and going to Colombo. Secondly, the GoTN seems serious about driving investments into southern TN (see my next post), and build up the Madurai-Thoothukudi industrial corridor, anchored by a large industrial zone in Nanguneri, near Tirunelveli. If this takes shape, a hinterland economic engine will take shape, which will require port access. Colachel/Vizhinjam and Thoothukudi are somewhat equidistant from Nanguneri, and exporters might prefer getting on to the big ships direct out of these ports. Thoothukudi may actually lose some business, or at best, not gain additional business due to this corridor.

hnair wrote:- **Probably** Colombo was given a headstart by the earlier NSA, since LTTE endgames were going on and Colombo desperately needed some economic boost. He and the Grand Chettiar seem to have rejected Mr A's earlier successful bid during UPA times, maybe on this premise. Vizhinjam timeline suffered terribly amids these geopolitics. Colombo's grace period is over.
I have heard this reasoning elsewhere as well. Vizhinjam has been talked about for a long time now, without much movement. Now Colombo will need to pull up its socks and look at some serious competition from across the strait.

vina wrote:All this Kochi port business is laughable and Vizhingam even more so.
Not really. As said above, Vizhinjam can evolve into a regular port due to inland investments. See above, and my next post.

vina wrote:Vizhingam is still born as the current state is. The absolutely ONLY way out is to avoid the Coimbatore-Palakkad-Down the length of Kerala business altogether and use the road and rail infra on the TN side fully and go down the NH-7 to Madurai and then get to TVM/ Vizingham via Tenkasi -Shenkottah/Punalur/Aryankavur/Kollam side where the rail line has been made BG I hope (when I last rode it some 30 years ago, it was a very scenic MG line) . You absolutely need a smooth I5 over the mountains into LA kind of upgrade for the Shenkottah-Kollam via Punalur thing for road traffic. That is the only way that this Vizhingam business can be made viable.
Again, not really. You seem to forget the route between Nagercoil and Thiruvananthapuram, which is mostly flat and fast. This is the home of both Vizhinjam and Colachel. And the lines feeding into Nagercoil are all BG, connecting from Chennai/Madurai/Tirunelveli, and mostly doubled and electrified. If this route is fully doubled and electrified from Chennai, it can act as a freight corridor to feed into these ports. This is one of the few IR sections that has sufficient spare capacity and is under utilized by freight traffic. There is a lot of passenger traffic, but currently are restricted to overnight trains to Chennai for the most part. The day time is relatively free, thanks to the excellent intra-state bus connectivity in TN. Also, add more line capacity to the spurs to Karur/Erode and Salem, you have something going here. Western TN can feed into these ports, if getting to Kochi is difficult.

The Shencottah-Punalur section is currently closed and under going gauge conversion, albeit very slowly. Even if completed, I doubt it will help serve much freight traffic, considering newer and easier routes have opened up in the past few decades. This line will only be branch line, serving the local farm communities and the towns of Shencottah and Quilon. The days of relying on the MG Quilon Mail out of Egmore to get to Trivandrum are long gone.

As for roads, the NH-7 goes all the way to Kanniyakumari, and the other roads are reasonably well developed. Upgrading the Nagercoil-TVC highway (NH-47) is a must, of course, but tunnelling through the ghats may not be necessary.

vina wrote:Oh and Ommen Chandy better tell Mrs Gandhi to stop being a dog in the manger and pass the GST in the Rajya Sabha double quick. As a huge consuming state, Kerala stands to gain massively with this GST business and if it aims to be a trans shipment hub, it simply cannot be so without it.
Agreed. Due to land problems, Kerala may not want to bet on large industrial areas like TN, but they should use their geography to become a trading hub. Same as in the past, when most of India's exports to the west went from ports along the Kerala coast. In the present scheme of things, identify ports to serve a particular geography in the hinterland, and go after that traffic aggressively. Kochi should try to get a larger piece of the pie from the CBE/Tirupur and even Bangalore, while the southern Vizhinjam can work on getting traffic from southern TN in the future. Since that area is not industrially developed yet, transshipment is a good option to start with. But the future lies in getting the export traffic from TN. TN of course will want to build up its own ports, but they all suffer from shallower depths and need frequent dredging, and require the dog leg around SL and maybe transshipment to go west. Kerala offers that advantage, which they are not exploiting today.

Bade wrote:There is the direct rail line from ICTT too, so Walayar checkpost and road conditions is not the reason alone, though improvements there will no doubt help. If Vizhinjam flies for transshipment then the existing ICTT can be converted to a big shipyard in the least with CSL being close and a outer harbor built near Vypin Islands as per plans.
The rail line from ICTT is fine, but the real problems are the main southern railway lines from Ernakulam to Wadakkanchery and again from Palakkad to CBE outer through the Walayar gap. Enormous passenger train traffic on the first stretch, that has to stop in innumerable medium sized towns dictated by the most urbanized state, which ends up adding to the general congestion and slows down operations. Our goods trains suffer from slow speeds as is, but they are even slower in this stretch. The Walayar gap is a problem of geography, which innumerable sharp curves on a line built over a hundred years ago necessitating permanent speed restrictions at various sections on the route. The passenger train traffic here is also quite high, so the same problem of congestion continues. SR has tried to relieve this problem by operating the lines between CBE and Palakkad as "twin single lines", which means both tracks are bi-directional and can push more traffic in one direction when needed. Normally, double line sections are uni-directional, i.e. one dedicated track for each direction. But that will only go so far, since ever increasing traffic means there will be very few instances of free slots to push traffic on both lines in the same direction. So the line ends up being used as a regular double line for the most part.

IMHO, for the Kochi ICTT to succeed, a DFC is needed from Jolarpettai (JTJ) to Kochi. JTJ acts as a catchment for Bangalore, Chennai (to an extent), the upcoming Chennai-Bangalore industrial corridor, and the giant western TN region anchored by CBE. Kochi can definitely play a role in exporting from this area.

arshyam
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2853
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arshyam » 04 Oct 2015 22:57

A graphic showing the distribution of future investments, MoUs for which were signed in the TN GIM last month. Even if only a small number of these proposals are realized, it shows the current thinking in GoTN on building up the southern part, considering the north and west are relatively better developed.

Image
Source: New Ind Exp via SSC

(hnair saar, can you help re-size the image, since I am not able to?)
Last edited by hnair on 05 Oct 2015 10:51, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Size looks good to me. Let us see if anyone else has issues

Bade
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7212
Joined: 23 May 2002 11:31
Location: badenberg in US administered part of America

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Bade » 05 Oct 2015 00:18

arshyam, from the livemint link in the previous page answers your question about SEZ at ICTT Vallarpadam.
When the cabotage relaxation finally came about, the customs and SEZ authorities were at each other’s throat over jurisdictional issues that affected the clearance of trans-shipment containers.

The ICTT is located within a SEZ to ensure fiscal concessions and procedural ease at par with competing international terminals. Firming up mutually agreed procedures between customs and SEZ authorities took more time.

Shipping lines never forgot the agony they went through, being caught between the customs and SEZ.

The turf battle between customs and SEZ went to such an extent that in one particular incident French container line CMA CGM SA had to offload 60 containers loaded on to one of its mainline foreign vessel and had to ship it on an Indian vessel.

arshyam
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2853
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arshyam » 05 Oct 2015 03:21

^^ Thanks Bade sir. So it's not really Kerala's fault, both Customs and SEZ dept are under the Centre. Interesting.

Javee
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2331
Joined: 13 Jan 2003 12:31
Location: NJ

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Javee » 05 Oct 2015 08:12

Cochin ICTT had special concessions, but somehow something stopped them from going bang on. They were planning one more transhipment terminal in Vizag of all the places for East coast, not sure whose idea was that. Chennai is much closed to high seas traffic with all road/rail connectivity, so if there is one port in East to be explored, it should be one of the Chennai ports.

Chennai outbound freight traffic has a lot of automobiles, hard and soft goods, and CPT already has a dry port at Sriperumpudur Sez and is expanding port ops by building new terminals, I don't think they will be interested in rail/feeder to Vizhinjam but rather bring in a main vessel to CPT themselves.

Today, sending merchandise from central TN to Chennai or Tuty takes about 1 day on road, 1+day to load depending on port congestion, 2+days for feeder to main line, depending on Colombo congestion. During peak couple years back it costed us a full $1000 in extra freight charges including congestion charges and 2+days delay to overall schedule. If Vizhinjam can connect to a main vessel faster and cheaper, the entire central TN/KA lot would go through it, a simple no brainer. It also means less touch points in the supply chain, as quite bit of hard yet delicate items go through Chennai/Tuty ports and we have faced issues because the road-feeder-mainline transfers are slightly more risky for these merchandise.

hnair
Forum Moderator
Posts: 3394
Joined: 03 May 2006 01:31
Location: Trivandrum

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby hnair » 05 Oct 2015 10:15

arshyam wrote:^^ Thanks Bade sir. So it's not really Kerala's fault, both Customs and SEZ dept are under the Centre. Interesting.


Intensive, costly OPEX dredging (physical reason) put on CPT's head and DPW running a "blocker operation" (business reason) is what got ICTT undone :( Rest are all figleafs, conveniently put on faceless peoples.


chaitanya
BRFite
Posts: 143
Joined: 27 Sep 2002 11:31
Location: US
Contact:

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby chaitanya » 07 Oct 2015 19:49

National War Memorial, new AIIMS & bonus for railway employees: 7 things Cabinet cleared today

5) The Cabinet also cleared mechanisation of East Quay berths at Paradip Port on Build, Operate and Transfer (BOT) basis, under Public Private Partnership (PPP) mode' for handling thermal coal exports. The estimated cost of the project is Rs 1,437.76 crore of which Rs 1,412.76 crore will be spent by the concessionaire. The remaining Rs 25 crore will be spent by the Paradip Port Trust on dredging.

The mechanization of EQ 1, 2 and 3 Berths will increase their capacity from the existing 7.85 million tonnes to 30 million tonnes. The project is scheduled to be completed within three years. This mechanisation project will go a long way in improving the operational efficiency in Paradip Port and thereby reduce transaction cost for thermal power plants dependent on coal supply through Paradip Port.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9862
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arun » 10 Oct 2015 09:58

X Posted from the Indian Navy thread.

Our Ministry of Defence has put out a press release stating piracy High Risk Area (HRA) with effect from 01 December 15 will be shifted back to 65E from 78E. In a separate article, Hindu (Clicky]) reports that the current HRA comes as close as 35 nautical miles to our coastline.

MoD informs that “with the revision of the HRA, some of India’s maritime security concerns viz floating armouries and proliferation of private security are likely to be addressed. In addition, Indian ship-owners are likely to benefit significantly on account of savings on insurance and associated operating costs.” :

Revision of Piracy High Risk Area (HRA)

Suraj
Forum Moderator
Posts: 11586
Joined: 20 Jan 2002 12:31

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Suraj » 13 Oct 2015 05:08

In two years, JNPT's capacity will be doubled by the additional of the new terminal:
PM Narendra Modi lays foundation stone of JNPT’s Rs 7,900 cr 4th terminal in Mumbai
Modi laid the foundation stone at Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT), situated off the financial capital’s eastern seafront, for the Rs 7,900 crore fourth terminal project to be carried out in two phases.

The port aspires to be among the top 15 of the world with the implementation of several infrastructure projects, including the fourth terminal. At present it is ranked 31st.

The terminal will help the exim trade, and comes at a time when the country is aspiring to be a manufacturing powerhouse which is clear through the government’s flagship ‘Make in India’ initiative.

The fourth terminal project is being executed by Bharat Mumbai Container Terminal, a subsidiary of Port of Singapore, on a design, built, fund, operate and transfer basis under which JNPT will get a 35.9 per cent share in revenues.

With the two-phased project, the overall container handling capacity of JNPT will more than double to 10 million standard units from the present 4.5 million, Union Shipping Secretary Rajive Kumar had said yesterday.

Work on the project has been divided into two phases, entailing an investment of Rs 4,719 crore and Rs 3,196 crore, respectively, and work is expected to be complete by the end of 2017.

The project involves construction of two berths of one km in each of the two phases and land acquisition is also minimal as 70 hectares of land will be reclaimed from the sea for each of the berths.

At present, JNPT operates one of the three terminals at the port while the other two are done by D P World and APM Terminals, Kumar had said, adding that addition of the fourth terminal will mean three of the biggest port operators being present at the port.

In effect the new terminal will have a capacity of 5.5 million TEUs, increasing the overall capacity from 4.5mTEUs to 10mTEUs. The biggest container port in the world is Port of Shanghai, with a capacity of 35mTEUs. But they are spread across multiple ports, with the major port being Yangshan Deepwater Port off Shanghai, which has 15mTEU capacity. So JNPT with 10mTEU within a single port will be quite large. Port of LA and Port of Long Beach are each 6-7mTEU. Likewise, the previous biggest port - Singapore - has multiple terminals at Pasir Panjang, Tanjong Pagar, Keppel and Brani. Right now, JNPT actually ranks below Colombo in port capacity, but terminal 4 will make it more than 2x bigger than the latter, and just behind Rotterdam and Dalian in capacity. The 2017 completion timeframe means it will be ready before the WDFC, of which JNPT is the western terminus.

Bade
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7212
Joined: 23 May 2002 11:31
Location: badenberg in US administered part of America

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Bade » 22 Oct 2015 00:16

Vallarpadam All Set to Weather the 'Storm'
http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/ ... 089960.ece
To put this in perspective, 30 moves per hour is higher than even Colombo, the largest and the busiest port in South Asia, where the average is 27 moves. Chennai’s productivity is 24-25 moves/hour while Nhava Sheva (JNPT), the largest container port in the country, handles 24-25 moves/hour.

“Our competition is with Colombo, Jebel Ali (UAE) and Salalah (Oman) and not with the other Indian ports,” Singh told ‘Express’, making his intentions clear on the long-term target for the port.

With more and more vessels coming to Kochi, the connectivity which Vallarpadam offers is by far one of the best in South India. In comparison, the terminals in South India handle way lesser number of vessels, he said, adding that ICTT has been showing steady positive growth over the last six consecutive months.

In terms of vessels handled, Vallarpadam has been showing an increase every month this year. In August, it handled 51 vessels and 52 vessels in September, which is the highest number of vessels handled in a month in the history of Vallarpadam. The international terminal handled 3,68,000 TEU containers in 2014-15, compared to 3,44,420 in 2013-14, increase of 23,580 (nearly 7 per cent) over the previous year. Revenue (income) for the terminal was ` 197.05 crore in 2014-15, of which, Cochin Port Trust received its share of ` 58.16 crore.

Again, to put this in perspective, the JNPT was lying idle with no cargo in the first two years of operation, while Mundra, the country’s second largest port, could attract just 5,000 TEUs in the first two years. Vallarpadam is just into the second year of the concessional agreement of 30 years.

Bade
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7212
Joined: 23 May 2002 11:31
Location: badenberg in US administered part of America

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Bade » 27 Oct 2015 23:13

Are India’s public-sector ports being weakened to favour Adani Ports?
http://qz.com/534019/are-indias-public- ... ani-ports/
In May, for instance, the Gas Authority of India (GAIL) announced it would set up its LNG terminal at Dhamra, and not at Paradip. The decision came as a shock to Paradip, partly because, as a former official of Paradip said, GAIL had already signed a memorandum of understanding with Paradip. “GAIL was in the process of final selections of partner for the project,” he said on condition of anonymity. The investment of Rs5,600 crore would have added 10 million tons to Paradip’s existing capacity of 108 million tons, he added.


What is happening in Paradip is not new.

In the first quarter of 2013-2014, for instance, Adani’s flagship port in Gujarat, Mundra, overtook the neighbouring port of Kandla to become India’s largest port in terms of tonnage handled.

Reporting on that development, this reporter found that the development was as much the result of the Adani Group taking decisions with “purpose and strategic intent” as the state government and the public sector company making a series of self-defeating decisions.

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3125
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Kakkaji » 01 Nov 2015 22:22

Promoting coastal shipping of cargo to save Rs 40,000 crore: Government

NEW DELHI: As much as Rs 40,000 crore could be saved by promoting cargo transportation by enhancing coastal shipping in 10 years under the ambitious Sagarmala project, a port-led development scheme, as per government estimates.

Sagarmala is an ambitious project to promote port-led direct and indirect development of coastal states and to provide infrastructure for transporting goods via ports quickly, efficiently and cost-effectively.

"Higher coastal shipment of coal by 100 million tonne per annum (MTPA) and higher coastal shipment of other commodities (cement, steel, fertiliser, food grains, POL) by 50 MTPA" alone could result in savings to the tune of Rs 11,500 crore by 2025, an official document on Sagarmala has said.

Building of new coastal capacities for 120 MTPA steel and cement in southern Gujarat, Central Andhra Pradesh, northern Karnataka, Odisha and northern Andhra Pradesh would result in savings of another Rs 8,500 crore, it said.

Apart from these, the government plans saving Rs 7,500 crore by increasing "share of railways in modal mix from current 18 per cent to 25 per cent, creating "transshipment hub at Southern tip" and building "three new container ports" at Vadhavan, central Andhra Pradesh and Sagar. It said these will reduce the cost to export by Rs 3,000 per container.

The government last month has announced to spend Rs 70,000 crore on development of major ports only which have received 104 suggestions from international consultants to increase efficiency.

Once implemented, this will result in cargo traffic increasing three-fold while the ports will also go under performance audit.

Last month, Road Transport and Highways Minister Nitin Gadkari has said, "Mahanadi Coalfields Ltd in Odisha is expanding its output capacity to 260 million tonnes from the present 60 million tonnes and if the coal is transported through water, this will save Rs 7,000 crore annually."

He has said two ports - Kandla and Paradip - were being developed into Green smart cities and the government is eyeing at Rs 4,500 profit from ports this fiscal.


Gadkari is on the ball.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9862
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arun » 09 Nov 2015 09:32

Government of India (GOI) report titled “Indian Fleet – Growth of Gross Registered Tonnage (GRT) from 1951 to 2014” from August 2015 . Posted as I have not spotted it here.

Gross Registered Tonnage of India’s Merchant Fleet has been steadily dropping after peaking in 2011.

Below GRT figures for the Indian Merchant Fleet are in thousand tonnes :

2011 - 11,061
2012 - 10,417
2013 - 10,383
2014 - 10,309

From here:

Indian Fleet – Growth of Gross Registered Tonnage (GRT) from 1951 to 2014

Other GOI fleet related information can be gleaned from here:

Indian Fleet statistics

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3125
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Kakkaji » 06 Dec 2015 08:23

Kerala Port gets a central gift; cabotage laws relaxed

VIZHINJAM: The prospects for Vizhinjam Port in Kerala got a big boost when Nitin Gadkari, Union minister of shipping and surface transport relaxed the cabotage laws.

He declared that the port will get a special relaxation from the cabotage law, a norm that insists on ships registered in India to only ply between Indian ports.

SaiK
BRF Oldie
Posts: 35641
Joined: 29 Oct 2003 12:31
Location: NowHere

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SaiK » 07 Dec 2015 00:15



so did they start the project on Nov 1 2015 as promised?

Rahul M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 16333
Joined: 17 Aug 2005 21:09
Location: woh log gawad hai, unpad hai !
Contact:

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Rahul M » 07 Dec 2015 09:24


I guess that puts paid to qz.com's malicious report above about GOI intentionally sabotaging PSU ports in order to favour adani.

also

5) The Cabinet also cleared mechanisation of East Quay berths at Paradip Port on Build, Operate and Transfer (BOT) basis, under Public Private Partnership (PPP) mode' for handling thermal coal exports. The estimated cost of the project is Rs 1,437.76 crore of which Rs 1,412.76 crore will be spent by the concessionaire. The remaining Rs 25 crore will be spent by the Paradip Port Trust on dredging.

The mechanization of EQ 1, 2 and 3 Berths will increase their capacit ..

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/art ... aign=cppst

Bade
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7212
Joined: 23 May 2002 11:31
Location: badenberg in US administered part of America

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Bade » 07 Dec 2015 21:23

The cabbotage laws relaxed is for Vizhanjam which will take another 1000 days to start functioning. The Vallarpadom one expired a few months ago. So in effect nothing to crow about. If I understood it correctly, inland shipping would get helped a lot more if this is applied to all ports. Even Gadkari seemed confused about this request as there are two sides lobbying for exact opposite ;-) so excuse me if I am wrong on this. Even Vallarpadom has CG investment and was approved during ABVs time I think.

If Vallarpadom has plans for an outer harbor too as claimed and is seeking funds and project approval, it will be interesting times ahead. The only significant advantage for Vizhingam is the depth over Vallarpadom, the outer harbor will remove that deficit for Cochin Port.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3728
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 23 Dec 2015 03:03

Cochin Shipyard secures licence to make LNG ships.

Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) has successfully completed a Mark-III Flex Mock-Up, which has been certified by GTT (Gaztransport et Technigaz), France, thereby completing all requirements to be licensed by GTT to build LNG ships for any client world-wide using their patented membrane containment system known as the Mark-III Technology.This makes CSL, the first Indian shipyard in India to obtain this coveted license from GTT, a shipping ministry release stated today.



The yard has the technical strength and the basic shipbuilding capability to undertake construction of these complex vessels but LNG vessel construction needs upgradation of existing facilities/ systems in the yard and implementation of various protocols. Towards this CSL has forged partnership with Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI), Korea, which is amongst the leading yards in the world.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3728
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 27 Jan 2016 17:30

Andamans may soon have Rs 1,800-cr dry-dock.

The government is all set to develop a dry-dock on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands at a cost of up to Rs 1,800 crore to help reduce the repair and maintenance costs for local vessels.

"We do not have good facilities for ship repair on the East Coast, unlike on the West Coast, as a result ships have to sail as far as to Malaysia or Singapore for such work," a senior ministry official told PTI. The official said government will develop the facility either through the Cochin Shipyard or form a new entity, which can involve an investment of Rs 1,600-1,800 crore.

The immediate clientele which is being targeted is a fleet of 80 ships and boats under the Andaman and Nicobar Islands administration and other ships plying on the Eastern Coast. At present, the cost of undertaking the repairs in Southeast Asian countries is very high and the ship owners have to pay for the journeys to and fro, which results in a loss of forex, the official said, calling this as a project of "strategic" importance.

Union minister Nitin Gadkari had first spoken about the project at an industry meet over the weekend, saying it would massively reduce cost to a tenth.

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 16 Feb 2016 00:19

Distya Akula 1st Indian tanker to load Iran oil post sanctions

NEW DELHI: Distya Akula, a crude oil vessel co-owned by Elektrans Group, has become the fist Indian tanker to load Iraninan crude post removal of US sanctions against the Gulf nation.

"MT Distya Akula is the first Indian Suezmax tanker to load 130,000 MT(metric tonne) of Iranian crude for Litasco, the trading arm of Russia's Lukoil three weeks after the removal of sanctions against Iran," the company said in a statement.

The vessel has a deadweight tonnage of 150,000 tonnes.

The loading of the crude has taken place from February 5 to 11, 2016. Previously, Distya Akula was in the Persian Gulf heading towards Al Basrah port in Iran on January 31, 2016.

Post loading, the vessel will travel from Kharg Island in the Persian Gulf to Constanta on the Black Sea, the company said.

Built by Mitsui Ichihara Engineering and Shipbuilding, Japan, Distya Akula has a capacity of carrying a full load of about 149,000 metric tonnes of oil cargoes equivalent to about 6,000 oil carrying road trucks of standard size.

In partnership with Arya Industries, Gauri Ships - which is part of the Elektrans Group - co-owns and operates Distya Akula, Suezmax crude oil tanker, the statement said adding with a crew complement of 24, she is flying the Indian flag.

"We have always been at the forefront of innovation. Distya Akula's assignment as the first Suezmax tanker to lift Iranian oil in the wake of the removal of sanctions against Iran, is indicative of our ambition to embark as a global leader," Daniel Chopra- Chairman and Managing Director of Elektrans Group said.

Elektrans Group, from owning and operating Indian flag vessels to third party vessel management, offers solutions that furnish the current requirements of the global shipping community.

"The accomplishment is symbolic of our robust foothold and connects that range across the globe. In an endeavour to explore unforeseen avenues, we consistently innovate to enhance the services rendered to our clients," said Puneet Arya- Joint Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Arya industries.

Cheers Image

arshyam
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2853
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arshyam » 13 May 2016 18:32

Some progress on Sagarmaala:

Sea of opportunity awaits Tamil Nadu as Sagarmala project gets boost - C Shivakumar, TNIE

CHENNAI: Tamil Nadu may get coastal economic zones (CEZs) in Chennai, Cuddalore and Thoothukudi ports, according to plans drawn up by the Union Shipping Ministry under the NDA government’s flagship Sagarmala initiative.

Sagarmala, meaning string of ports, was a dream project of former Prime Minister Vajpayee, conceptualised in 2003 and put on the back-burner by subsequent Congress-led UPA governments. It has been revived now by the NDA government and the basic idea is to develop economic zones for industries in the reach area of ports of the country. The project also envisages developing transport modes connecting industries and ports for easy export and imports.

It is reliably learnt that the Union Shipping Ministry has identified14 potential regions close to ports where the CEZs can be set up. Twelve major industries covering energy, material and discrete manufacturing have been identified on the basis of the suitability of import of raw materials and export of finished products via the ocean mode of transportation. In the influence areas of Chennai, Ennore and Katupalli ports, Tiruvallur, Chennai and Kancheepuram districts have been identified as potential districts for setting up the CEZs. Petrochemicals, electronics, steel and ship building have been identified as possible industries that can come up in the zones.

In the central part of the State, seven districts, including Trichy, Nagapattinam and Thanjavur have been identified as potential districts for setting up the CEZs and will be linked to the Cuddalore port and the proposed port at Sirkazhi. Possible industries identified for the region are leather processing, power and refining. The growth would be centred around Cuddalore Port.

In the south, Kanyakumari, Tirunelveli and Thoothukudi districts have been identified as potential districts for the CEZs and will be linked to the Thoothukudi and upcoming Enayam port. Apparel and refining were the target industries in this region.

According to official sources, the CEZs have been demarcated to align with planned industrial corridors and the Shipping Ministry expects the 14 CEZs could add US $110 billion to Indian merchandise exports through high potential industries. The locations have been mapped to relevant major and non-major ports in the region that can optimally facilitate the movement of cargo from the industrial locations.

What are CEZs?

Coastal Economic Zones are spatial-economic regions around a group of major and minor ports, extending 300-500 km along the coastline and 200-300 km inland from the coastline
CEZs are demarcated to align with planned industrial corridors and can add over US $110 bn to Indian merchandise exports through identified high potential industries
A total of 14 potential CEZs have been identified along the coastline of the country with each coastal state having one or more CEZs
A few CEZs will be taken up as pilot projects with lessons learned from these to be replicated across other CEZs. Industrial clusters falling within CEZs are energy, materials and discrete manufacturing
To meet India’s projected long-term energy needs, three coastal power clusters and one or two coastal refinery clusters can be developed by 2025
An estimated 40 million tonnes per annum of steel and cement each can be located along the coast by 2025. India has set itself a target of boosting exports from US $465 bn in 2014-15 to US $900 bn by 2020 and discrete manufacturing clusters aim to support this goal Industrial clusters can generate 40 lakh direct jobs and 60 lakh indirect jobs

A Nandy
BR Mainsite Crew
Posts: 133
Joined: 06 Sep 2009 23:39

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A Nandy » 23 Aug 2016 20:21

http://www.thehindu.com/business/ports- ... 018255.ece

Subsidiaries to develop inland waterways will facilitate easy foreign funding

The Centre is framing a policy to enable all major ports to set up subsidiary companies to develop inland waterways. This is part of its plan to cut logistics costs for exporters by moving more cargo on water instead of over land.

The establishment of separate units will facilitate easy foreign funding for inland waterway projects by capitalizing on the financial credentials of the government owned ports, Union Minister for Shipping, Highways and Waterways Nitin Gadkari said on the sidelines of a summit organised by the Indo-American Chamber of Commerce on Monday.

Rammpal
BRFite
Posts: 290
Joined: 23 Sep 2016 12:21

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Rammpal » 21 Dec 2016 07:04

http://www.motorship.com/news101/ships- ... gn-project

"..GE’s combined gas, electric and steam turbines (COGES) will feature in a Korean project to develop a liquid propane gas (LPG) fuelled ferry design that the company claims will cut operational costs by 35%. - See more at: http://www.motorship.com/news101/ships- ... a96.dpuf...

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 21 Jan 2017 19:15

Reliance Defence delivers bulk carrier to leading shipping company

NEW DELHI: Reliance Defence and Engineering Ltd (RDEL) today announced that it has delivered a newly built panamax bulk carrier to one of the largest international shipping companies.

"Reliance Defence and Engineering Ltd has successfully delivered yet another 74,500 DWT new-built Ice-class Panamax Bulk Carrier viz 'Sea Amber' on January 17, 2017 to an international customer," a company statement said.

Reliance Shipyard has delivered till date seven similar size, Ice-class Panamax Vessels to its international customers.

The ship has been built as per one of the best-in-class international standards meeting the toughest environmental emission norms as well as fuel economy (EEDI standard).

These are the largest dry bulk carriers of its class ever built in India. RDEL is the only Indian Shipyard to achieve this landmark.

Reliance Shipyard with the largest dry-dock of the country has successfully mastered the block-construction technique through unique 'modular construction technology' for building large ships for both commercial usage and navy.

The Shipyard meets the latest "Performance Standards for Protective Coating (PSPC)" which ensures most advanced painting solution protecting the marine life while providing the enhanced life to the ships, it added.

Cheers Image

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 13 Feb 2017 22:02

Chabahar Port expected to open in a month: Afghan Consul General

NAGPUR: The strategic port of Chabahar in Iran which is being developed to build a transport-and-trade corridor through Afghanistan giving India an access to global markets is expected to be opened in a month's time, said Afghanistan Consul General Mohammad Aman Amin.

"The port is likely to open in a month's time and it will provide impetus to the trade between India and Afghanistan," said Amin here today.

The construction of this port assumes significance as it will allow bypassing the route through Pakistan for accessing markets in Europe and Central Asia and also save on time and cost of doing business. India had in May 2016 signed the historic deal with Iran and Afghanistan.

Amin spoke to media on the sidelines of the inaugural ceremony of 10-day training programme for the officers of the Afghanistan Revenue Department (ARD) at National Academy of Direct Taxes (NADT) in Nagpur.

The programme is an innovative endeavour between NADT and the Embassy of India, Kabul (MEA) as a goodwill gesture and is being organised for the first time.

Amin also hoped that a Mumbai-Kabul flight service will be started very soon.

He said "India and Afghanistan share a historical relationship and India has always helped Afghanistan in its times of trouble. The relations between the two countries have improved in the last two years."
Cheers Image

A Nandy
BR Mainsite Crew
Posts: 133
Joined: 06 Sep 2009 23:39

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A Nandy » 05 Apr 2017 10:19

Narendra Modi government to develop NorthEast’s first express highway along Brahmaputra, eyes Rs 40K cr investment
Union Minister of Roads, Highways and Shipping Nitin Gadkari today said the Narendra Modi government has taken a decision to dredge the Brahmaputra river from Sadia in Upper Assam to increase navigational channels up to Chittagong port in Bangladesh.

The project would ensure that the Brahmaputra National Waterway-II has direct access to Haldia port in West Bengal and Chittagong port in Bangladesh, and would boost trade with South East Asian nations, he said adding, discussion has already been held with the Bangladesh Government on dredging of the river.


http://www.financialexpress.com/economy ... nt/615071/

From earlier:
111 proposed waterways in the National Waterways Act of April 2016: http://www.indiacode.nic.in/acts-in-pdf/2016/201617.pdf

Time to start a new thread on the National Waterways of India with maps, bids, progress etc like http://themetrorailguy.com/ :)?

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 01 May 2017 13:22

X Posted on the Analyzing CPEC & STFUP Threads

Iran offers India to run phase one of Chabahar Port

NEW DELHI: India's presence in the strategically located Iranian port of Chabahar — Delhi's primary gateway to landlocked Afghanistan — is all set to get a big boost.

Tehran has recently proposed to Delhi to manage phase one of the port built by Iran even as the two sides are still negotiating terms and conditions of Delhi's role in expanding phase two of the port where the Modi government wants to invest Rs 150 crore, or $235 million. ET has learnt that Tehran has offered Delhi management rights for two years for phase one of the port and such rights could be renewed by another decade.

But port management proposal is not just only development regarding Chabahar Port, there will be hectic activities with a trilateral meeting being planned between Iran-India-Afghanistan on operation of Chabahar Port in May. Last year, the three sides had signed an agreement for operation of Chabahar Port.

Besides, a summit to attract investments for the Special Economic Zone in the port complex will be held mid-May in Iran. Delhi-Kabul-Tehran could also hold trilateral consultations on the future of Afghanistan soon with Indian foreign secretary S Jaishankar planning to visit Tehran in the future close on the heels on series of consultations organised by Moscow on dealing with the Afghan situation and use of Mother of All Bombs by the USA against the ISIS. The visit of the US NSA to India also provided India an opportunity to understand Washington's plan for the landlocked country.

Incidentally these meetings in Iran are expected to occur ahead of the presidential polls where the incumbent Rouhani is seeking re-election.

India's allotment of $235 million for phase two of Chabahar is divided into two parts — $150 million Line of Credit (LoC) from the EXIM Bank for development of port complex and $85 million — allotted later following contract between the two sides for supply of equipment to develop two berths in the port complex.

Image

Adani Ports & Special Economic Zone Ltd. operator of India's largest port, and Essar PortsBSE 0.15 % are among the companies that have expressed an interest in managing and operating two terminals at Chabahar. JM Baxi Group, known in India for its chartering, broking and other shipping services, has also shown interest. The India Ports Global Limited, the company mandated to drive India's investments in overseas, on March 17 invited firms to express interest if they want to be considered for a strategic partnership.

India has been negotiating with Iran for releasing initial tranche from $150 million worth LoC ever since MoU was signed with Shipping Minister Nitin Gadkari's visit to Tehran in May 2015 weeks before the Persian Gulf country signed the landmark nuclear deal with the global powers. The contract between the two countries for developing the port -- that will rival Pakistan's Gwadar Port --was finalised when the Indian PM visited Tehran in May 2015.

This strategic port will allow India to circumvent Pakistan and access Afghanistan and Central Asia directly via sea. India is also constructing railway line between Chabahar and Zahedan to connect Port to rest of the Iranian railway network.

Cheers Image

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 12 Jun 2017 20:25

In three years, major ports double operational profit

NEW DELHI: The focus of Modi administration on port and port-led development has resulted in a revival of the financial fortunes of major ports in the past three years. The 12 major ports put together have nearly doubled their operational profit of close to Rs 2,500 crore in 2013-14 to Rs 5,070 crore in the last financial year.

The upswing has happened as a consequence of the many steps that the shipping ministry took under Nitin Gadkari to fix the systemic and operational deficiencies.

The most significant of these was the reduction of vessel turn-around time from four days in 2014-15 to less than threeand-half days. Turnaround time is a process in which a ship unloads freight and reloads for the next trip.

According to shipping ministry data, the net profit of these ports has more than doubled in the past three years - from Rs 1,219 crore in 2013-14 to Rs 2,871 crore in last fiscal year. These ports have also increased their market share, which was declining in comparison to private and minor ports. They have also outshone non-major ports as far as cargo growth is concerned. Last year while non-major ports registered only 2% increase, major ports saw 5% growth.

The data shows that operating margin which had seen a persistent decline—falling from 42% in financial year 2007-08 to 28% in 2013-14—has been restored to a 10-year high of 43%. "All this has been accomplished with improvement in efficiency and minimal capital infusion. The increased profits have helped shipping ministry increase its investment in new ports and access infrastructure," said a ministry official.

While the major ports lost cargo share to private ports every year since 2008, they still handled close to 60% of India's total cargo. But with their financial performance declining year on year, it was perceived that major ports were waiting to become another non-performing public undertaking.

The shipping ministry launched Project Unnati in 2014 under which efficiency of equipment was studied and every activity was scrutinised to identify excesses/mistakes. "We found that ship loaders in Paradip were being run at less than 50% of their potential capacity. In Kandla, where ships were being sent back as berths meant to handle them were packed, it was found that with minor adjustment, the same infrastructure can handle more than double the volume.

Project Unnati identified over 104 such initiatives across 12 major ports. These initiatives are being monitored regularly by the minister," a ministry official said.

Cheers Image

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 05 Aug 2017 19:50

India hopeful of making Chabahar port operational by 2018

NEW DELHI: The government is hopeful that the strategic Chabahar Port will be operational by 2018, Union minister Nitin Gadkari has said.

The Road, Transport, Highways and Shipping Minister Gadkari is in Tehran today to represent India at the oath taking ceremony of President Hassan Rouhani.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had earlier congratulated Rouhani on his re-election as the President of Iran and affirmed India's commitment to strengthen the special relations between the countries.

"India and Iran have been historically sharing special ties ... We are keen on developing Chabahar Port and are hopeful of starting operations in 12 to 18 months," Gadkari told PTI.

Gakdari is keen on expediting development of the Chabahar port, located in the Sistan-Baluchistan province on the energy-rich Persian Gulf nation's southern coast that can be easily accessed from India's west coast, bypassing Pakistan.

The visit assumes significance as India has accelerated work at the Chabahar port and finalised some tenders for installation of key equipment at Chabahar Port.

"Civil construction work has started there. We have finalised tenders worth Rs 380 crore for equipment out of Rs 600 crore and once the port becomes operational it will become a growth engine," the minister has said.

Gadkari said that he was also hopeful of certain approvals from the Iranian government for expediting work and added that once Chabahar becomes operational the trade and business between both the nations would see a boost.

For greater trade and investment flow with Iran and neighbouring countries, the Cabinet last year cleared proposals for development of Chabahar port including a US$ 150 million credit from Exim Bank.

It also authorised the Shipping Ministry to form a company in Iran for implementing the Chabahar Port Development Project and related activities.

As per the MoU signed between the two nations in May last year, India is to equip and operate two berths in Chabahar Port Phase-I with capital investment of US$ 85.21 million and annual revenue expenditure of US$ 22.95 million on a 10-year lease.

Ownership of equipment will be transferred to Iranian side on completion of 10 years or for an extended period, based on mutual agreement. The Iranian side had requested for provision of a credit of US$ 150 million in accordance with the MoU.

As per the pact, operations of two berths are to commence within a period of maximum 18 months after the signing of the contract.

Besides the bilateral pact to develop the Chabahar port, for which India will invest US$ 500 million, a trilateral Agreement on Transport and Transit Corridor has also been signed by India, Afghanistan and Iran.

Cheers Image

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 03 Nov 2017 23:26

X Posted on the Terroristan Thread

Indian Wheat for Afghanistan Arrives at Chabahar Port

India’s first consignment of wheat to be sent to Afghanistan arrived at Iran’s southeastern port of Chabahar on Wednesday morning.

after the Trilateral Agreement on Establishment of International Transport and Transit Corridor was signed by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani in Tehran in May 2016.

Officials from the three countries, including ambassadors of India and Afghanistan in Tehran, Saurabh Kumar and Nasir Ahmad Nour, respectively attended the welcoming ceremony for the arrival of the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines’ vessel BEHSHAD from India’s western port of Kandla, IRNA reported.

India’s External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj was joined by her Afghan and Iranian counterparts Salahuddin Rabbani and Mohammed Javad Zarif through a joint videoconference, to ceremonially flag off the shipment from India on Sunday.

“The shipment is part of a commitment made by the government of India to supply 1.1 million tons of wheat for the people of Afghanistan on a grant basis,” India’s Ministry of External Affairs stated.

According to officials with Ports and Maritime Organization of Iran, the direct transportation of goods from the port of Kandla to Chabahar would result in saving $750 per 40-foot container and a one-day reduction in the time of transportation and the costs of transport from Chabahar to Kandla would also be cut by $500 for each 40-foot container.

The Indian premier wrote on Twitter that the launch of the trade route “marks a new chapter in regional cooperation and connectivity”.

The Chabahar transit route is intended to improve landlocked Afghanistan’s trade connectivity with India and other countries in South and Southeast Asia. It will also help India to access the markets of Central Asia and Europe through Afghanistan, bypassing Pakistan.

Islamabad at present allows trucks from Afghanistan to carry goods through Pakistan only up to Wagah (a checkpoint on the Pakistani side on the border) and not up to Attari (a checkpoint on the Indian side of the border).

The goods have to be unloaded from trucks coming from Afghanistan in Wagah and loaded again on other vehicles to be brought to Attari and finally into India.

The Afghan trucks then return empty to Afghanistan, as they are not allowed to carry goods from India.

Islamabad has repeatedly rejected calls by New Delhi and Kabul to allow hassle-free two-way trade between Afghanistan and India through Pakistan.

During his visit to New Delhi last Tuesday, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani warned that if Islamabad continued to deny entrepreneurs from his country access to India and rest of South Asia, his government, too, would retaliate and close transit for the traders of Pakistan through Afghanistan to Central Asia.

In June, India and Afghanistan launched a dedicated air freight corridor to boost bilateral commerce averting bottlenecks created by Pakistan on land connectivity between Central and South Asia.

Chabahar Port, located in Sistan-Baluchestan Province on the southeastern coast of Iran, is a port of great strategic utility for India. It lies outside the Persian Gulf and can be accessed from India’s western coast. It is Iran’s only oceanic port.

As per the trilateral transport and transit deal, Indian exporters will be allowed to utilize Chabahar Port and access markets in Afghanistan through Zahedan.

New Delhi last year agreed to provide provision and operationalization of credit of $150 million from EXIM Bank for the development of Chabahar Port.

India will equip and operate two berths in Chabahar Port in Phase I with a capital investment of $85.21 million and annual revenue expenditure of $22.95 million on a 10-year lease.

Cheers Image

A_Gupta
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10407
Joined: 23 Oct 2001 11:31
Contact:

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A_Gupta » 16 Nov 2017 01:03

http://www.financialexpress.com/industr ... te/933116/
In a fillip to the government’s coastal shipping initiative, Ashok Leyland (ALL) on Tuesday sent a second batch of 185 trucks via the sea route to Mongla Port in Bangladesh, a growing market for the company. FE had first reported on October 26 when ALL had sent the first batch of 188 trucks via the coastal route to Bangladesh. The company’s exports to Dhaka has gone up from 500 commercial vehicles (CVs) per year over the last many years to 5,000 per year at present. However, a senior ALL official told FE the cost of sending the vehicles via the sea route is slightly higher versus road transport, but of late, the company had been facing some delays at the India-Bangladesh border on land. He said, “Border crossing was taking additional days/weeks and we had to park the trucks which cost more money. We are now working with the government and concerned agencies on bringing down costs via the sea route.” But the official also said the advantages of the sea route include a transportation time of just two and a half days, compared with over four days to reach Bangladesh via road, less damage to the vehicles during transit and a reduction in pollution levels. Binu Joshua Thomas, a consultant for shipping firm LFonds India, said the sea route would result in a savings of 10 lakh km of carbon footprint by the end of November.

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 13 Jan 2018 04:38

Adani Ports dredging fleet emerges as India's largest: APSEZ

Adani Ports and Special Economic Zone today said it has added two new dredgers to become the largest fleet in the country.

"Adani Ports and Special Economic Zone Limited (APSEZ), India's largest port developer and part of Adani Group today announced the addition of two new 8000 m3 Trailing Suction Hopper Dredgers (TSHDs)," the company said in a statement.

These dredgers are among the largest in the Indian Fleet of TSHDs, the company said.

The Royal IHC, world leader in dredge building, designed and engineered the state-of-the-art TSHDs as per APSEZ specifications and delivered it to the Adani team at Holland last month, the company said, adding that both the dredgers have arrived at Adani's Hazira Port after their maiden voyage through the Suez Canal route.

"We at Adani are proud to dedicate the two new dredgers to the nation, taking our fleet strength to 19 dredgers; it is the largest dredging fleet in the country. This will substantially increase our capacity for dredging in APSEZ.

"These TSHDs are a big asset, as they will also support dredging efforts in other Indian Ports and will further facilitate in Port led initiatives of the Government," said Karan Adani, CEO, APSEZ.

Adani Hazira Port Pvt Ltd (AHPPL) is strategically located close to the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) along the West coast, which accounts for a major part of the country's trade.

The port handles all types of cargo including bulk, break-bulk, bulk liquid chemicals, petroleum products & edible oil, containers, automotive and crude.

Cheers Image

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 622
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby jaysimha » 08 Feb 2018 12:10

Major ports registered an increase of 4.58 percent during April 2017-January 2018

Major ports in India registered an increase of 4.58 percent during the period from April 2017 to January 2018 and total 560.97 million tonnes of cargo was operated, as against 536.41 million tonnes of cargo in the same period last year.



During the period from April 2017 to January 2018, eight ports like Kolkata, Paradip, Visakhapatnam, Chennai, Kochi, New Mangalore, JNPT and Deendayal have registered an increase in total traffic.

Cargo traffic operated on major ports:

Cochin port recorded the highest increase (18.36 percent). After this, Paradip (16.01 per cent), Haldia with Kolkata (13.47 per cent), New Mangalore (7.37 per cent) and JNPT (5.95 per cent).
Traffic growth on Cochin port was mainly due to the increase of traffic of POL (24.54 percent), containers (11.45 percent) and other diversified cargo (1.02 percent).
During April 2017-January 2018, Deendayal (Kandla) harbor operated the highest traffic ie 90.99 million tonnes (16.22 percent stake). After this, Paradip with 84.57 million tonnes (15.08 percent stake), JNPT with 54.52 million tonnes (9.72 percent), Mumbai with 52.71 million tonnes (9.40 percent stake) and 52.44 million tonnes (9.35 percent stake) with Visakhapatnam The number comes. Overall, these five ports operated about 60 percent of the main port traffic.

The highest-share holding of POL (33.74%) After this, containers (19.70%), thermal and steam coal (13.72 percent), other diversified cargo (12.09 percent), coking and other coal (7.60 percent), iron ore and pellets (6.72 percent), other liquid (4.15 percent) The number of prepared fertilizers (1.17 percent) and FRM (1.11 percent) comes in.


***

VK / AM / RRS / DK-6582

Image
Image
Image

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 622
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby jaysimha » 27 Feb 2018 10:15

Image

Image

Image

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 622
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby jaysimha » 27 Feb 2018 18:13

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease. ... lid=176789
PrintXClose
Press Information Bureau
Government of India
Ministry of Shipping
26-February-2018 11:25 IST
Shri Nitin Gadkari Lays the foundation stone for National Technology Centre for Ports, Waterways and Coasts at IIT Chennai

NTCPWC is being set up at a cost of Rs 70.53 crore and will give technological support to ports and maritime sector

Shri Nitin Gadkari, Minister for Road Transport & Highways, Shipping and Water Resources, River Development & Ganga Rejuvenation laid the foundation stone for setting up of a National Technology Centre for Ports, Waterways and Coasts (NTCPWC), at IIT Chennai today. The Ministry of Shipping and IIT Chennai also signed an MoU for this at the event today.

NTCPWC, being set up under the Shipping Ministry’s flagship programme Sagarmala, will act as a technology arm of the Ministry of Shipping for providing engineering and technological inputs and support for Ports, Inland Waterways Authority of India and other institutions. It will carry on applied research in the areas of 2D and 3D Modelling of ocean, coastal and estuarine flows, sediment transport and morphodynamics, navigation and maneuvering, dredging and siltation, port and coastal engineering-structures and breakwaters, autonomous platforms and vehicles, experimental and CFD modeling of flow and hull interaction, hydrodynamics of multiple hulls and ocean renewable energy. The centre will provide indigenous software and technology, make technical guidelines and standards and address port and maritime issues with models and simulations. The centre will not only help generate new technology and innovations but also work towards their successful commercialization. It will provide learning opportunities for the people working in Ministry of Shipping.



NTCPWC is being set up at a cost of Rs 70.53 crore to be shared by Ministry of Shipping, IWAI and the Major Ports. Ministry of Shipping’s grant is towards capital expenditure for creating facilities like Field Research Facility (FRF), Sedimentation and Erosion Management Test Basin and Ship/Tow Simulator. The centre will be self sustainable in three years through industry consultancy projects for Indian and global port and maritime sector.



The setting up of NTCPWC would give a boost to the development of indigenous technology relevant to the port and maritime sector in India. This would also be a major shot in the arm for the Government’s ‘Make in India” programme, and provide a push to its Sagar Mala programme

Envisioned as a world class state-of-the - art centre, NTCPWC will be a hub for latest technology tools and reduce our dependence on foreign institutions. It will also reduce the cost of research drastically and result in cost and time savings for work in the port and maritime sector.



******

NP/

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5193
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 09 Mar 2018 02:03

To put this in perspective, 30 moves per hour is higher than even Colombo, the largest and the busiest port in South Asia, where the average is 27 moves. Chennai’s productivity is 24-25 moves/hour while Nhava Sheva (JNPT), the largest container port in the country, handles 24-25 moves/hour.
Again, to put this in perspective, the JNPT was lying idle with no cargo in the first two years of operation, while Mundra, the country’s second largest port, could attract just 5,000 TEUs in the first two years. Vallarpadam is just into the second year of the concessional agreement of 30 years.
The international terminal handled 3,68,000 TEU containers in 2014-15,


1. Mundra has achieved 40 TEUs Per Crane Per Hour.

2. Mundra Handled : In FY2014-201615 2.87 Million TEU.

In FY 2015-2016 Handled 3.35 Million TEUs

In FY 2016-2017 Handled Close to 4.00 Million TEUs

In 9 Months of 2017 Handled about 3.75 Million TEUs

The above Figures are for the Three Container Terminals and does not include the Terminal given to DPW up to about 2035.

The second advantage Mundra has is that it is in a “Desert” Area and there is all lot of scope for Expansion. Vallarpadam is situated in Prime land which grows Coconuts, Rubber, Spices and thus the land Costs are Astronomically High. Vallarpadam has a Depth of 14.5 Metres and the Three Mundra Terminals – one with Adanis, one joint venture with MSC and one joint venture with CGM. The Depth at the three Container Terminals is 18 Metres.

Then we have Vizhinjam : Should have Depths possibly up to 20 Metres and should be able to accommodate the envisaged Malacca Max Vessels.

Do you think Vallarpadam has scope for Expansion as well to increase its Depths to 18 Metres and receive the Malacca Max Vessels?

Cheers Image


Return to “Technology & Economic Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: anandsgh, sooraj and 11 guests