India's Shipping Sector

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jaysimha
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby jaysimha » 27 Mar 2018 11:00

Request for Proposal for
Selection of System Integrator for Development and Maintenance of
Long Range Identification and Tracking System (LRIT)
Directorate General of Shipping
Ministry of Shipping

http://dgshipping.gov.in/WriteReadData/News/201803230355015280306RFP_LRIT_230318.pdf

My question : is this not we were supposed to have long long ago........
were unions blocking this / or upavasis purposely stalled it??

Peregrine
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India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 09 Apr 2018 00:43

Cargo traffic handled by major ports up 4.77% in FY18

Buoyed by pick up in demand, India's 12 major ports saw cargo traffic rise by 4.77 per cent to 679.35 million tonnes (MT) during the just concluded fiscal, as per ports body IPA.

These top ports under the Centre had handled 648.39 MT of cargo during 2016-17.

Increased demand from various sectors including coal, containers, fertilisers and POL (petroleum, oil and lubricant) was the main reason behind the growth in traffic, as per Indian Ports Association (IPA) data.

Coking coal volumes handled by the 12 ports surged by 8.62 per cent to 50.59 million tonnes (MT) during the last fiscal while container volumes too rose 8.08 per cent.

Fertiliser volumes saw a growth of 7.22 per cent during the fiscal.

As per the figures, Kandla port handled the highest traffic volume at 110.09 MT during 2017-18, followed by Paradip Port (102.01 MT), JNPT (66 MT), Visakhapatnam (63.53 MT) and Mumbai Port (62.82 MT).

Chennai port handled 51.88 MT of cargo while Kolkata Port including Haldia handled 57.88 MT.

Volume of seaborne cargo is essentially in the nature of derived demand and is mainly shaped by the levels and changes in both the global and domestic activity.

India has 12 major ports -- Kandla, Mumbai, JNPT, Marmugao, New Mangalore, Cochin, Chennai, Ennore, V O Chidambarnar, Visakhapatnam, Paradip and Kolkata (including Haldia) which handle approximately 61 per cent of the country's total cargo traffic.

Note : The above figures do not include the cargoes handled by the Minor Ports. Last Year i.e. 2016-2017 the Minor Ports Handled 485.213 MT.

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Peregrine
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 09 Apr 2018 01:46

Theo_Fidel wrote:almost the only thing that tranships thru columbo port is indian traffic, some bangladesh stuff as well.. ...almost no world traffic transships through columbo... vinzhinjam will live or die on yindia traffic... ..why would world traffic come here... singapore is closer, faster, more high tech on one side and Gulf is closer on the other and even asia now prefers the unpgraded panama route for EU.... ...singapore has subsidy and technology plan to load ship in 6 freaking hours by 2025... ..first rule of business, don't underestimate the adavantages your competition has and is receiving...

in any case lets keep some perspective on the total annual tranship revenue available. last I heard less than $400 Million for our region.... ..the main problem is the 5 day add in term of exports travel time... ..ideally goi should subsidize this to maintain our export competitiveness... ..every country around the world does this, but not yindia....

ofcourse it does not help that vallarpadam takes 2 days! to load a ship while singapore takes 12 hours, even Columbo is in the less than 24 regime.... ...afaik adani is bulk goods port type, he does not get a lot of container traffic and DP world mundra has captured almost all the container traffic int hat area...
Theo Fidel Ji :

Sir Ji, Mundra Port has the following Terminals :

DPW : Mudra International Container Terminal

CT1 - D P World : Berths (no.) : 2, Depth Alongside : (m) 13.5, Terminal Area (ha) 32.
Containers Handled – 1.11 TEUs.

Particulars for 2016 - 2017 - Adani's Mundra

CT 2 - Adani Mundra Container Terminal - Quay Length : 2 Berths, 631 Mtrs, Capacity
1 Mn TEUs, Ground Slots : 4,014 TEUs - Quay Cranes : 6 Super Post Panamax (22 across)
Rubber Tyre Gantry Cranes - 20 – All Converted to Electronic Drive

CT 3 - Adani International Container Terminal – Poss with MSC : 2 Berths, 810 Mtrs, Capacity : 1.3 Mn TEUs – Ground : 8260 TEUs – Quay Cranes : 6 Super Post Panamax (24 across), Rubber Tyre Gantry Cranes : 18- All Converted to Electronic Drive

CT 4 - Adani CMA Mundra Terminal – Quay Length : 2 Berths, 650 M – Quay Cranes : 8,00,000 TEUs - 4 Post Panamax – Rubber Tyre Gantry Cranes : 12

Cargo Handled : 113.72 Tonnes, Containers by the Three Adani Terminals : Approax : Four Million TEUs

Mundra has Handled CVs of about 18,000 TEUs and has up to 18 Metres Draught at Container Berths. I believe that the Container Handling is 40 TEUs per Hour Per Crane.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vips » 14 May 2018 06:16

Freight villages will change the logistic narrative of India: IWAI’s Pravir Pandey.

The government has asked the Inland Waterways Authority of India (IWAI) to develop so-called freight villages, a concept borrowed from European countries. The state-run IWAI will also provide inland waterways connectivity to these logistic hubs. In an interview with Mint, IWAI vice-chairman Pravir Pandey talks about freight villages, the World Bank-backed National Waterways 1 (NW1) project on river Ganga and the engineering marvels being created along waterways. Edited excerpts:

What are freight villages?

A freight village is an area where all activities relating to transport, logistics and the distribution of goods both for national and international transit are carried out by various operators. The concept has been widely used in European countries and (is) completely new to Asia. In fact, India will be the first country in Asia to come up with a freight village.

We are building the first freight village in Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh. The village will provide connectivity through all three modes of transportation. Road, rail connectivity through Eastern Dedicated Freight Corridor, and water connectivity through the country’s longest waterway NW1. Another freight village is also coming up at Sahibganj in Jharkhand.

How will the freight villages change logistics?

IWAI is acquiring extra land of around 100 acres along the multimodal terminals of Varanasi and Sahibganj. We will just develop basic infrastructure. Private sector would be asked to establish their units where they can manufacture, pack and export or transport their products. It will reduce last-mile connectivity cost substantially. We already have several FMCG players, including Patanjali, many logistics companies and international companies who are keen to develop their units in freight villages, although I cannot name them right now. In fact, freight villages will change the logistic narrative of India.

Do you think inland waterways will get a chunk of transportation share?

Inland waterways are going to change the transportation dynamics in India and IWAI is fully preparing for it. We have hired a German firm to design vessels especially for Indian inland waterways and they have come up with 13 designs, which can run in low draft and have high carrying capacity. Our designed vessels can carry up to 2,000 tonnes of cargo, which is equivalent to 140 trucks or a full railway rake. These designs have been tested and cost around Rs 15crore (in total). Despite being an intellectual property right of the Indian government, from June onwards, it will be in public domain free of cost for ship owners to manufacture these and run in Indian waterways.

Several trials for cargo transportation like cement and automobile, have been conducted and companies are quite happy with the performance. They are keen on using waterways and are waiting for them to be operational soon. Following trials, we have got several other requests from various sectors who would like to transport their products through waterways.

Critics are sceptical about inland waterways with low water and dying rivers.

I would differ with them here. Inland waterways are going to introduce the concept of room for rivers in India and help them to rejuvenate. We are going to introduce regular dredging and have already changed its whole concept. Now, we are giving full stretches of 100km and above for dredging for 5 to 7 years where the company will be responsible for maintaining 3 metre depth and 45 metre width of river. It’s a bit more expensive but we have transferred our risks to the private sector. If the vessels cannot pass, then no payment to the contractor. The first such project worth Rs150 crore has been awarded to Adani Ports and SEZ.

Also, one needs to understand that inland waterways are not like roads that can be constructed overnight. It will take 15-20 years for inland waterways transportation to get matured. If you imagine what will be the rail and road situation after 20 years, you will realise how waterways will be helpful. Besides, we have a special focus of running inland waterways vessels on methanol, so that it is environment-friendly and has the support of NITI Aayog too.

Are there any engineering marvels being constructed in India’s inland waterways?

This whole Jal Vikas Marg project is worth Rs5,369 crore or $8 million. Half of it will be borne by World Bank and the rest by the government of India. Under the National Waterway 1, there are several engineering marvels that are coming up. But the best one is the navigation channel at Farakka which would be India’s Suez or Panama canal. It is a challenging engineering project which will be inland waterway’s engineering marvel.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Prasad » 14 May 2018 11:55

As promising as this sounds, I can't help but wonder at how much of an ecological toll this will extract :(

Vips
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vips » 14 May 2018 21:54

It will be a trade off for sure. Valid environmental concerns should be addressed. At the same time jholawalas and pseudo intellectuals should not be holding country to ransom as not developing is not an option.

Peregrine
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India's Shipping Sector

Postby Peregrine » 30 Jun 2018 02:01

Adani Ports Completes Acquisition of Kattupalli Port

Adani Ports and Special Economic Zone Ltd, (APSEZ) Friday announced that it has executed a share purchase agreement with Larsen and Toubro Limited to 97% shares of the Kattupalli Port, Tamil Nadu.

Kattupalli is located 30 kilometers towards north of Chennai and has connectivity with hinterland of North Tamilnadu, Chennai, Bangalore region and South Andhra Pradesh

“We are going to start our construction to diversify the cargo of the port and will be adding 40 MMT of new capacity in next 3 years,” said CEO Karan Adani.

A statement said APSEZ plans to transform Kattupalli into a multi commodity port to handle cargoes like containers, automobiles, break bulk, general cargo, liquid cargo and project cargo.

Presently the port has two berths with quay length of 710 meters, 6 Quay cranes, 15 RTG cranes, 5120 ground slots with the capacity to handle 1.2 million TEUs per annum.

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Prasad
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Prasad » 30 Jun 2018 15:27

The shipbuilding portion got sold too?

arshyam
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arshyam » 30 Jun 2018 21:37

^^ Nope, only the port. The SY is still with L&T. Though going by the current pace of Naval orders (or lack of), how long is anybody's guess.

Vips
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vips » 03 Jul 2018 04:53

L&T should get into a JV with a foreign shipyard which specializes in building Commercial/Container Ships.

Kashi
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Kashi » 03 Nov 2018 19:54

Nitin Gadkari @nitin_gadkari

This should have been the biggest news of the week in India. For the first time since independence, a container is moving on inland vessel. PepsiCo is moving 16 containers from Kolkata to Varanasi on vessel MV RN Tagore, over river Ganga. Such a huge accomplishment!#SagarMala


https://twitter.com/nitin_gadkari/statu ... 8218208256

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A Nandy
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A Nandy » 03 Nov 2018 23:01

Wow thats great news, have they finished the dredging work already. How much depth do boats like the above need?

Cant wait for the day when we have waterways as developed as these:

Image

http://www.maritimegateway.com/10-water ... r-gadkari/

Indranil
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Indranil » 05 Nov 2018 11:16

So happy to see this. I was waiting for this for a long time.

Indranil
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Indranil » 06 Nov 2018 06:14

A Nandy wrote:Wow thats great news, have they finished the dredging work already. How much depth do boats like the above need?

Cant wait for the day when we have waterways as developed as these:

Image

http://www.maritimegateway.com/10-water ... r-gadkari/

Just found out that a classmate has been working on this project for the last two years. He said the dredging has just begun. But the design of low draft vessels has been completed and the blueprint is freely available for anybody to construct these ships. They are trying to build an entire ecosystem around this. If it sustains, it will be great.

But whether it will be able to sustain is still a big question.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Kashi » 06 Nov 2018 08:15

I would have thought that dredging would have been done prior to the first barges sailing upstream.

A Nandy
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A Nandy » 07 Nov 2018 01:21

I guess they need volumes to profit like any other business. Speed and capacity of the boats too. And maybe the length of the longest boats they can use. The ones I have seen in other rivers of the world can be really long. The Dutch use their canal network very efficiently and have huge boats sailing up and down from Rotterdam port. Maybe a mix of incentives for family businesses along the waterway, tourism, waterside restaurant + houses :wink: and fishing may work.

https://www.government.nl/topics/freigh ... d-shipping
Inland shipping as part of the logistics chain
It is important that inland shipping entrepreneurs cooperate with other logistics parties (shippers, road hauliers, inland ports, terminal operators) in order to become an integrated part of the chain. This chain must be organised in a manner that ensures an optimum use of the strengths of inland shipping: large volumes of containers, no problems with congestion and low CO2 emissions.


http://www.deltawerken.com/Inland-water ... g/359.html
Inland waterway shipping is very important for the processing of goods that enter the Netherlands. More than 35 percent of the goods that enter and leave the Netherlands are shipped by means of inland waterways shipping. In total, this equates to 1 million containers every year, totalling 9 million tonnes – i.e. 9000 kg per container. Except for the ordinary inland waterway goods, such as fodder, petrol, sand and gravel, nowadays more expensive goods are shipped. Examples are: electronic equipment, cars and even large trucks. Of all border-crossing transport between the Netherlands and its neighbours, almost two-thirds is via water. In larger countries, aviation will be dominant instead.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Suraj » 07 Nov 2018 02:08

If someone has the time to search through historical news and information, this would be a very interesting topic here - there was once a thriving network of inland waterway commerce in India. That was destroyed by the British, who sought to destroy local commerce and redirect business towards the task of extracting and exporting raw material, for which the rail lines were built.

A history of what inland waterways were prominent, what were the major ports, etc, would be very revealing. It's already known that many famous pre-steam era ships were built in India. These include:
* HMS Minden, aboard which Francis Scott Key wrote the US national anthem, during the war of 1812.
* HMS Cornwallis, aboard which China signed away the 'unequal treaties' of 1842 to UK, heralding their 'century of humiliation'
* HMS Asia, flagship of the Anglo-Russian side during the Battle of Navarino, the decisive sea battle of the Greek War of Independence against the Ottomans.
A maritime and shipbuilding technological and engineernig tradition more advanced than European pre-steam era cannot have developed without a vigorous domestic maritime industry.

This isn't a request to bring about breastbeating about the destroyed tradition, but to shed light on the capabilities that existed.

A Nandy
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A Nandy » 08 Nov 2018 17:08



Good all round view of past, present and future:

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby A Nandy » 12 Nov 2018 21:07

PM Modi has inaugurated India's First Multi-Modal Terminal at Varanasi.

https://twitter.com/PIB_India/status/10 ... 8483519488

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