India's Shipping Sector

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 11 May 2009 19:04


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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Gaurav_S » 11 Jun 2009 08:28

Pipavav set to pip Mumbai port

The proposed Central Spine, a 10-lane road linking Ahmedabad and Pipavav, will provide the much-needed hinterland connectivity. Out of 287 kms, Gujarat intends to build the stretch up to Bhavnagar (152 km) and is seeking Central support for the Bhavnagar-Pipavav (135 km) belt.


Nikhil Gandhi, who built this port, later sold his stake to Denmark-based AP Moller Maersk, the world's third largest port operator.

But, connectivity remained an issue. A study by IIM-A in 2007 said bad roads were one of the main reasons Gujarat's own trade preferring Mumbai to ship their containerised cargo.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Jamal K. Malik » 02 Jul 2009 00:06


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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Jamal K. Malik » 02 Jul 2009 20:02

Govt considering disinvestment in Shipping Corporation
http://profit.ndtv.com/2009/07/01202905/Govt-considering-disinvestment.html
As part of shipping reforms, it is believed that Cochin Shipyard Company will also launch an initial public offer to raise Rs 1,000 crore for constructing offshore projects.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Jamal K. Malik » 03 Jul 2009 01:31

Convert port trusts into PSUs
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/11405/convert-port-trusts-psus.html
In a major policy reform, the Economic Survey has asked the Centre to list port trusts that run major ports on the stock exchange by selling equity shares to public.


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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arun » 06 Sep 2009 10:24

662 mts X 65 mts is a very good sized drydock:

Pipavav to open dry dock next month

G Seetharaman / DNA
Saturday, September 5, 2009 3:37 IST

Mumbai: Pipavav Shipyard's dry dock, India's largest and one of the world's biggest, will be operational in October, N Ravichandran, deputy chairman, SKIL Infrastructure, co-promoter of the shipyard, said. The dock, for which work began in April 2007, was to be completed by the fourth quarter of the last fiscal.

This kind of delay is common, now the final touches are being given to a portion of the dock," Ravichandran said.The dock, which is 662 metre long and 65 metre wide, can at once be used for two Panamax ships and two small ships. ………………

DNA

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Ananth » 07 Sep 2009 04:13

arun wrote:662 mts X 65 mts is a very good sized drydock:


Arun, thanks for the report. Let pipavav shipyard work on ULCC and its cousins to get expertise in modular ship building and other techniques. Once they have mastered the techniques, those welders, pipe-smiths and rest of the ship builders will form an effective HR pool to build big warships. I don't know in this era when a kid sitting in Boulder, Co using the satcomm is able to land a bomb on Dera-mahab-Ali, how effective the super-carriers would be. But surface denial is an important capability and India must display restlessness at not having acquired techs. Time is very opportune right now to build skills, and build them fast.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arun » 09 Oct 2009 16:46

Govt awards seven port projects worth Rs 1,800 cr

Sharmistha Mukherjee / New Delhi October 9, 2009, 0:44 IST

In a major thrust to expand capacity at important ports in the country, the Ministry of Shipping has awarded seven projects worth over Rs 1,800 crore, to be developed through the public-private partnership (PPP) route.

Another 19 projects, estimated to cost around Rs 18,000 crore, are expected to be awarded on similar PPP basis by early 2010.

These 26 projects together will expand capacity at the major ports in the country by 42 per cent, or 245.97 million tonnes per annum. The ministry intends to double capacity at major and non-major ports in the country to 1,590 mt by 2012 from the present 795 mt. …………………….

Of the seven projects awarded, those for the construction of deep draft iron ore berth (Rs 591 crore) and deep draft coal berth (Rs 479 crore) at Paradip port have been entrusted to a consortium of the Noble Group, MMTC and Gammon Infrastructure and Essar Shipping Logistics, respectively.

Others include setting up of mechanised iron ore handling facilities at berth 14 at New Mangalore port (Rs 277 crore) by Sical Logistics, development of berth 7 for handling bulk cargo at Mormugao port (Rs 252 crore) by a consortium of the Adani Group and Mundra SEZ and mechanization of berth 2 and 8 at Haldia Dock Complex (Rs 150 crore) by ABG Infralogistics Ltd. These projects on completion will enhance capacity at the ports by nearly 42 million tonnes per annum. ..............................

The 19 projects which are under bidding include development of multipurpose cargo berths 14-16 at Kandla port (Rs 755 crore), development of EQ-10 berth for handling liquid cargo (Rs 55.38 crore) and WQ-6 for handling dry bulk cargo (Rs 114.37 crore) at Vizag. Another five projects valued at over Rs 1,200 crore are scheduled for awarding to develop facilities at Vizag.

Besides these, container terminals are proposed to be set up in Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Maharashtra. One new container terminal will be constructed at the Jawaharlal Nehru Port (JNPT) at a cost of Rs 6,700 crore, while another standalone container handling facility would be developed at the NSCIT Terminal of the same port for Rs 600 crore.

This apart, Rs 3,686 crore would be expended for a container terminal at Chennai, Rs 1,407 crore and Rs 268 for terminals at Ennore and Tuticorin, respectively. ………………………

Business Standard

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 13 Nov 2009 20:57

HSL plans Rs 4,000-cr shipyard for large crude carriers.

State-owned Hindustan Shipyard plans to build a dockyard for large crude carriers at an estimated cost of Rs 3,000-4,000 crore, a top official said.

The proposed shipyard, which will be built on a public-private-partnership model, is expected to receive cabinet approval by the end of this fiscal, HSL's chairman and managing director Naresh Kumar said in Mumbai on the sidelines of SMM India's shipping trade fair.

"We will be building one shipyard in AP or Orissa. We expect the cabinet approval for this by the end of this fiscal," Kumar said, adding the shipyard is expected to become operational in three to four years.

Once the project receives the cabinet's nod, the shipyard will start the process of inviting bids, he said.

The first phase of the project would involve ship repairing while the work on building VLCC vessels will start in the second phase, he said.

The estimated project cost for the first phase is Rs 1,000 crore.

At present, Hindustan shipyard has an order book of Rs 2,000 crore, which includes one from Chennai-based Godorth Martin Limited to construct a bulk carrier of 53,000 tonne, expected to be completed by 2012, he said.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 01 Jan 2010 19:26

Mundra on course to become India's top port of call.

Go to the website of the Indian Ports Association (IPA). There you will come across statistics about the ports in India. This data can be misleading, because it does not give information about privately held ports.

Had that data been given, it would have been the beginning of a public embarrassment for the government. It would have confirmed this publication’s statement almost a year ago, that the Mundra Port could soon grow bigger than any other merchant port in the country.

In fact, this has become quite evident from a mere glance at the way volumes have moved through Mundra Port.Compare this performance with other ports.

Mundra has already begun to account for 14% of cargo moved by all the minor ports put together. This may not be a big deal. But it is an indicator of things to come.

Take the case of coal. Within the next two years, Mundra will have to import nothing less than 35 million tonnes of coal annually merely to feed the requirements of the two mega power plants of Adani Power (4,662 mw) and Tata Power (4,000 mw), both located at Mundra itself. That item alone will propel it to the rank of one of the top three ports in India.

In order to cater to this demand, Mundra is already building a dedicated coal terminal, the largest of its kind in the world, capable of handling 1,500 tonnes an hour. This will be in addition to the coal Mundra imports for other power plants in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Rajasthan.

Take another item, oil and other liquid (petrochemical and edible oil) products. The New HPCL Mittal Energy (HMEL) plant at Mundra already has a tank farm which can store 3.5 lakh kilolitres (kl), and is building another 7.2 lakh kl for its crude oil. Mundra already has 10.25 lakh kl of tank farm capacity of both HPCL and Indian Oil, making it the largest private sector tank farm location in India.

The Adani group’s own liquid storage requirements (for bunkering and for edible oil required by Adani Wilmar are being increased from the present 81 tanks aggregating 3.45 lakh kl to 6.9 lakh kl. HPCL has a pipeline connecting Panipat to Mundra, while HMEL will connect its storage tanks to Bhatinda in Haryana and the NCR, Delhi.

No merchant port in India is likely to take away this business, as none in the country can berth very large crude carriers, which require a minimum depth of 29 metres, Mundra’s single point mooring (SPM) offers a depth of 32 metres. The port can accommodate four more SPMs, and one is already being built exclusively for HMEL.

Look at container traffic. Last year, Mundra Port accounted for 78% of all container traffic handled by all the minor ports in the country. This number is bound to increase rapidly in the coming years for several reasons.

First, its geographical location. Mundra remains the closest port for industrial and agricultural centres in North and West India. The paucity of passenger traffic along Kutch and Rajasthan makes its railway routes relatively free for cargo railway traffic. When the Dedicated Freight Corridor is ready (expected by 2017), Mundra is likely to remain the biggest beneficiary.

Mundra is also India’s largest port for cars —- Maruti Suzuki at the present, and possibly for at least three other vehicle manufacturers in the near future (Tata Motors, Ashok Leyland and Nissan are in discussions). During the first quarter of 2008-09, Mundra Port handled 16,181 cars. In order to cater to this surging demand, Mundra is building a ro-ro (roll-on-roll-off) berth dedicated exclusively to vehicles.

Moreover, the existing 4 berths are expected to up container traffic this year from 0.7 million TEUs to well over a million.

December itself should see the monthly average of 1,600 TEUs swell to 2,300 TEUs at Mundra. Within the next three years, the port expects to cater to 2.5 million TEUs. Capacity, however, will be expanded to cater to 6.56 million TEUs.

“Some people in the port business talk about capacity utilisation, which is joke,” says Capt Umesh Abhyankar, chief operating officer of Mundra Port. “We plan to operate at not more than 65% of our capacity, so that any ship can call on us with just one hour’s notice.” (Hats off for the superb planning, Imagine becoming the largest port in less then a decade and having plenty more capacity to spare)

Finally, what Mundra offers is lots of land and lots of skilled workers. Without space for storing, loading and evacuation of cargo, a port cannot function. Mundra and other Adani group companies together control over 30,000 acres of land.

It has permitted Mundra to offer space to Maruti-Suzuki for its pre-delivery-inspection bays. It also allows companies like Thermax to construct huge equipment —- like the 600 tonne boiler it recently fabricated and Mundra for export, and is in the process of constructing another weighing 800 tonnes. It has space for coal, fertilisers and foodgrain, in addition to temperature controlled storage.

Add to this the efficiency at the port, and it is easy to understand why Mundra has already become the most profitable port in India. Today, its cranes achieve around 35 moves an hour, which is the international standard. Container vessels turn round within 14-16 hours, compared with longer periods at most ports in India. Liquid tankers turn around within 18-20 hours —- almost 6-10 times faster than any other merchant port in the country.

“By 2012-13, we hope to do 100 million tonnes a year,” adds Abhyankar. Mundra’s growth story will have more achievement to talk about soon.

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Dhows

Postby sinha » 11 Jan 2010 09:31

I used to wonder seeing the Dhows at Port Rashid in Dubai as well as at the Creek Customs Counter whether they are built at all or not now a days. when I asked around, they all pointed to repairing center. Then I chanced upon this article in the pink paper. Wow - 30 dows/year. Disappointed that all engine fits still happen in ME.
Rising Sea Commerce Keeps Mandvi afloat

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Raja Bose » 24 Jan 2010 10:26

The largest tanker in the world, Seawise Giant/Jahre Viking/Knock Nevis awaits destruction at Alang. This ship is over half a kilometer long and in fact longer than the height of Petronas Towers (once the tallest buildings in the world) and ofcourse Empire State Building and Sears Towers!

Image

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jan 2010 07:25

The new Karaikal Port gets rail connectivity
The first rail cargo from the Karaikal port was flagged off here at Keezhavanjoor on Wednesday.

The rail connectivity is expected to augment efficient handling of container and cargo traffic of Karaikal Marg Port that commenced its operations in April last year. The port has a 1.7-km-long railway siding with three lines capable of handling 3 million tonnes of traffic through rail.

With the first cargo flagged off, the port would export its first order from BHEL, Tiruchi, say sources.

The total cargo capacity of Indian Ports in the country was expected to reach 1,500 million tonnes by 2012. This is slated to augment business potential, Mr. Naryanasamy said.

Marg Karaikal Port has commenced Phase II of its operations that envisages three berths and and mechanised coal berths to handle a capacity of 21 million tonnes.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jan 2010 07:53

4 Port Expansion Projects Cleared
The Centre’s high-level public private partnership appraisal committee (PPPAC) headed by Finance Secretary Ashok Chawla has approved four port expansion projects in three States envisaging a total investment of Rs.4,120.29 crore. According to an official statement here on Wednesday, the major approval among these was for the development of a mega container terminal at Chennai port at an estimated cost of Rs.3,125 crore. Another project clearance pertaining to Tamil Nadu was for development of the second north cargo berth at Tuticorin port at a cost of Rs.332.16 crore for handling bulk cargo.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Carl_T » 26 Feb 2010 10:55

Basic question - How do shipping firms gain a competitive advantage over their comps? Or is it similar to the airline industry where each firm is selling a similar product with little to differentiate?

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby manish » 26 Feb 2010 11:26

Carl_T wrote:Basic question - How do shipping firms gain a competitive advantage over their comps? Or is it similar to the airline industry where each firm is selling a similar product with little to differentiate?

I will attempt to answer this, but with a clear disclaimer upfront - I am no expert in this, and am certainly no pee yech dee to be in 'Shipping Strategy' from any leading university anywhere :D

Shipping industry is in some ways similar to the airline industry as you described, but it would be a very superficial view of the industry IMHO. When you talk of the shipping industry, you need to differentiate between the host of different models that shipping firms operate with. The basic ones would be:

Shipping Line - like an airline, its sole business is carrying stuff for others. Companies like Maersk Line, NYK Line, Great Eastern etc come to mind.

Captive Shipping Companies - shipping arms of companies that rely so heavily on marine transportation that they have decided to have the capability in house - many of the commodity biggies like Cargill do this. In the Indian context, companies like Essar Shipping (loosely - they do cater to third parties) or the recently formed Tata NYK could be examples.

Within these two broad categories, there are a whole host of different models employed. Some own the vessels and operate them by themselves. Some charter (lease) the vessels from other owners and ply them for others or for themselves. Some companies only crew and manage ships for others whereas some owners just charter their ships out.

Some companies operate on hybrid models where some of the ships work as liners (working regular routes with fixed schedules), some or dedicated for in-house cargo whereas the rest could be on long term Contracts of Affreightment to some other company that needs to move a large amount of cargo over a period of time.

Now the question of gaining competitive advantages would depend on the operating model, since that would decide what competitive advantage means to a given company. A captive shipping arm exists solely to provide competitive advantages to the parent, whereas a 'plain' shipping co would worry about competing with other shippers. But in most cases, things wouldn't be as simple as price competition due to the B2B nature of things in the industry - your customers are mostly going to be large businesses with considerations other than simple transportation charges.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Carl_T » 28 Feb 2010 09:29

manish wrote:
Now the question of gaining competitive advantages would depend on the operating model, since that would decide what competitive advantage means to a given company. A captive shipping arm exists solely to provide competitive advantages to the parent, whereas a 'plain' shipping co would worry about competing with other shippers. But in most cases, things wouldn't be as simple as price competition due to the B2B nature of things in the industry - your customers are mostly going to be large businesses with considerations other than simple transportation charges.

Thank you for the informative response. In case you know, what are some examples of considerations that firms would have? I had thought the only considerations would be price and time.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arun » 21 Mar 2010 12:10

That is a very large expansion in port capacity. Is the Minister being realistic?

'Ports capacity to reach 1.5 billion tonnes by 2012'

……………………. "We are hopeful of raising ports capacity to 1.5 billion tonnes by the end of the Eleventh Five Year Plan ( 2007-12) and expect to take 12 major ports capacity to 1 billion tonnes from the present 574.77 million tonnes (MT)," Shipping Minister G K Vasan told PTI on the sidelines of CII meet here. ……………………..

PTI

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Carl_T » 22 Mar 2010 22:42

Has anyone researched the firm International Shipholding (ISH)? The firm has sexy financials, lot of cash, strong revenue, income, and CFO growth. A possible investment candidate IMO.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Akshut » 22 Mar 2010 23:45

^^ Just out of curiosity, do you have any stake in the company?

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Carl_T » 22 Mar 2010 23:50

:rotfl:

No, not at all.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 14 May 2010 01:13

Dubai Ports World's India container port to challenge Colombo.

Dubai Ports World said it may invest $1 billion in its Indian port to enable handling of the largest container ships as the company tries to challenge Colombo’s grip on India's maritime trade with Europe and China.

A news report here, quoting officials in India, said DP World spent about Rs 13 billion ($288 million) on the first phase of the Vallarpadam facility, which will have an initial capacity of 1 million twenty-foot equivalent containers a year.

"What we are trying to do is compete in the regional and international market," Anil Singh, the company's India head, was quoted by Arabian Business as saying.

"It will change the logistic pattern of the country," he said, adding, "The new terminal at Vallarpadam in Kochi, which is due to open in August, will be able to handle the 13,000-container capacity ships commonly used on Asia-to-Europe routes."

Presently, these long-haul vessels are unable to stop in India, which forces the nation's importers and exporters to spend an extra $150 million a year ferrying goods to and from Colombo, Singapore or Dubai, Singh said.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SSridhar » 15 May 2010 07:36

Ennore Port expansion by September: Chairman
The programme includes setting up of iron ore terminal (Rs.360 crore) in two phases, coal terminal (Rs.400 crore) and multi-purpose berth and cargo terminal (Rs.110 crore).

Soon after the completion of the ongoing projects, EPL will next take up capital dredging to enable 1.50 lakh cape vessels to enter the port. It would cost Rs.230 crore. After the dredging, the port will have berth depth of 18 m and channel depth of 20 m.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Neshant » 17 May 2010 02:26

I bet what actually happened was these pirates were given a bullet to the back of their heads and thrown into the sea never to be found. However its a little too controversial to say what really happened. Much easier to say they were cast adrift.

-----------
Somalia rips Russian navy for casting captured pirates adrift

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/wor ... le1568683/

"Pirates vow revenge on any Russians they capture after crew of hijackers abandoned in Gulf on Aden without navigation equipment or much hope of survival."

A military official said they were stripped of their weapons and navigation equipment. Russian media later quoted a military source saying the pirates were now likely dead.

“We want an explanation from Russia on the death of our citizens,” Abdirasak Aden, an official at Somalia’s Information Ministry, told Reuters.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby prashanth » 17 May 2010 22:21

This is annoying. This Aden gentleman of somalian 'government' wants 'fair trial' for his pirates. A slap on the wrist and immediate aquittal eh?

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SSridhar » 18 May 2010 11:53

Vallarpadam terminal crosses major milestones
The International Container Transhipment Terminal Project at Vallarpadam has crossed two major milestones, the first being the arrival of six rubber-tyred gantry cranes (RTGs) and the other, the completion of all the 11 bridges on the new highway connectivity.

The six cranes form the first consignment of the fleet of 15 units which would be deployed at Vallarpadam.

Senior port officials said that the current container handling operations at the Rajiv Gandhi Terminal are likely to be shifted to Vallarpadam terminal site in July.

The road connectivity project, being executed by NHAI at revised Rs872crore, links Vallarpadam to Kalamassery on National Highway 47 over 17.2 km of difficult terrain. The two-lane connectivity is scheduled for commissioning by June, as the physical progress of the work is 86 per cent as on April 30.

Likewise, the capital dredging work is likely to be completed by July to attain 14.5 metres draft to facilitate 8000 + TEU capacity container vessels.

The rail connectivity with a route length of 8.86 km from Edappally to Vallarpadam has already been completed by Rail Vikas Nigam Ltd with the test running of loco engine on March 31.

On the date of commissioning of the ICTT project, the officials said that it is expected to be inaugurated by the Prime Minister in August.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby putnanja » 10 Jun 2010 02:23

Pipavav to build world's biggest dry dock

AHMEDABAD: Eyeing business from domestic and international shipping lines that ply through the busy sea route between Dubai and Colombo, Pipavav Shipyard (PSL) is all set to construct a new dry dock in Gujarat, which is expected to be the world’s biggest dock to undertake repair and maintenance of vessels operating in the region.

Roughly the size of seven soccer fields, the dock will be bigger than Hyundai’s in South Korea.
...
...
Presently, Hyundai has the world’s largest dry-dock at Ulsan, South Korea which is 490m(1,600 feet) long, 115m across and 13.5m deep. A dry dock is a narrow basin or vessel that can be flooded to allow a load to be floated in, then drained to allow that load to come to rest on a dry platform.
...
...
The work on the new dry dock, which is about 680m in length and 60m wide, is expected to begin in a couple of months and may cost over Rs 1,000 crore, an official said.
...
...

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SSridhar » 16 Aug 2010 07:22

'Landlord Port' model gaining momentum
The Indian port sector is overwhelmingly under the influence of the ‘Services port model,' with port trusts acting as port authority as well as a port operator. However, in recent years, there is a gradual movement towards acceptance of ‘landlord port model,' with granting of certain terminal concessions and of other port-related services in some of the major ports.

The proposed VISL (Vizhinjam International Seaport Ltd) more or less subscribes to this model

The landlord port model is designed with a view to decreasing the investment costs for port operators, thereby making the port attractive for additional operators as well. Instead of the port providing both commercial and regulatory functions, the private sector is invited to set up and operate commercial facilities while the port authorities continue to own the land and basic infrastructure assets as well as discharge their regulatory functions.

Many Indian ports also lack the deep water draft facility. Thus, the large vessels are berthed at Colombo, Singapore or Dubai and the cargo is later shipped to India in smaller vessels, which in turn increases the freight cost.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby VinodTK » 03 Sep 2010 06:59


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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 10 Sep 2010 22:42

GMB to develop greenfield port in Valsad.

AHMEDABAD: State-run Gujarat Maritime Board (GMB) on Friday said it will develop a greenfield port in Valsad district of South Gujarat on public private partnership (PPP) mode, at an investment of Rs 1,750 crore.

“Strategically located, 140 kilometres from Mumbai’s Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT), on the southern tip of golden corridor in Gujarat, this port is expected to have 3-5 million tonnes of cargo handling capacity annually,” a GMB official told PTI.

“A 16-metre draft is available at the site, which is good for developing both container as wells as general cargo berths there,” he said adding, the location is advantageous because of its proximity to Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor, passing from Gujar at.

“The pre-feasibility study for the project site was done way back in 1996 by Wapcos,” he said adding, this port shall also get advantage of excess traffic flow at JNPT in Mumbai due to its location.

“Now that the expression of interests (EoIs) have been invited for this green field project, GMB will soon begin the process for obtaining environmental clearances for the project from the Union Ministry of Environment and Forest (MOEF),” a GMB official said. - PTI

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Ameet » 29 Sep 2010 12:55

India plans to invest $20 bn to expand 13 major ports

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 643199.cms

"Imports of coal and oil will be one of the key drivers of development in port and shipping sector. This will provide immense opportunities for construction of new terminals, captive jetties and for acquisition of tankers, Liquefied Natural Gas and bulk carriers," he said.

Vasan has set a target for the Indian shipbuilding industry to account for 5 per cent of the global ship building market share by 2017, up from the current 1 per cent.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vipul » 23 Nov 2010 01:41

Bharati Shipyard may acquire 51 pc stake in Tebma.

Bharati Shipyard, one of India's leading ship-building company today said it has proposed to acquire majority 51 per cent equity stake and management control in south-based Tebma Shipyards Ltd for a consideration of Rs 75.75 crore.

Earlier, Bharati Shipyard had successfully acquired Great Offshore for Rs 880 crore, after fierce takeover battle with ABG Shipyard Ltd.

Bharati Shipyard is infusing fresh equity capital into Tebma Shipyards, at a price of Rs 19.20 per share of face value of Rs 10 each, thereby proposing to expand the post- issue equity capital base of Tebma to Rs 77.36 crore, a company statement said here.

The current equity capital of Tebma Shipyards stands at Rs 7.78 crore.

"This significant acquisition of Tebma Shipyards, is of strategic importance to us, as we get access to their ready- made and modern shipyards at Malpe in Karnataka, Kochi in Kerala and Chengalpet in Tamil Nadu," Bharati Shipyard's Managing Director, P C Kapoor said.

The combined Bharati-Tebma entity, with a total of 9 shipyards will now be in a formidable position to offer cost- effective solution to their global and domestic customers, Kapoor said.

arun
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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby arun » 22 Dec 2010 08:31

Indian Shipping Statistics.

Landmark tonnage of 10 Million crossed. 10,108,066 GT as on Sept 01, 2010:

Development of Indian Shipping Tonnage

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby chackojoseph » 19 Jan 2011 14:27

World's largest heavy lift vessel 'MV Svenja' docks in Mumbai

lifting capacity of a total of 2,000 tonnes and speed of 20 knots

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Aditya_V » 19 Jan 2011 15:04

arun wrote:Indian Shipping Statistics.

Landmark tonnage of 10 Million crossed. 10,108,066 GT as on Sept 01, 2010:

Development of Indian Shipping Tonnage



WTF :evil: :evil: Why is Mercator Lines Stock doing so badly for me-> Fuel Prices?

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vasu » 20 Jan 2011 12:43

MARG's Rs 900-cr shipyard-cum-port to be ready next yr

Diversified MARG Ltd expects its proposed Rs 900 crore ship yard-cum-minor port at Mugaiyur near here to be operational by 2012.

The ship yard-cum-minor port is situated at Mugaiyur on the East Coast Road. The company has invested about Rs 900 crore in the project, he told PTI here in an interaction.

Once operational, this would be the second port for MARG which began its operations in the Eastern region with the Karaikal Port in Puducherry.

In 2006, MARG Ltd entered into an agreement with the Puducherry Government for the Karaikal Port to handle four million tonnes of cargo per annum. The phase I of the project comprised two berths as completed in April 2009 at a cost of Rs 416 crore.

MARG was planning expansion of the Karaikal Port and under Phase II it would add two more berths at an estimated cost of Rs 1,569 crore, Reddy said.

Under the second phase, over 50,000 square meters of covered warehouses for storage of fertiliser, cement, sugar and project cargo would become operational.

According to company officials, Karaikal Port is envisaged to have a total of nine berths capable of handling 47 million tonnes per annum and developed over three phases.

The second phase of the Port is likely to be operational in October this year and the total capacity of the Port would reach to 21 million tonnes.


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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby SSridhar » 05 Feb 2011 07:29

Package to promote Indian shipbuilding soon: Vasan
The Union Minister for Shipping, Mr G.K. Vasan, today said that the Ministry had formulated “a package to promote Indian shipbuilding industry”, which would be taken to the Cabinet “very soon”.

Alongside, the Ministry is also working on a new policy to promote coastal shipping, he said.

Speaking at a ‘Ports and Maritime Investment and Business Conclave', organised here by the Confederation of Indian Industry, Mr Vasan said that the Ministry also intended to develop the Colachel port (in Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu) “in collaboration with the Government of Tamil Nadu”.

He pointed out that the deep-draft Colachel port is strategically located close to the international maritime routes.

Mr Vasan also recalled that the recently-released Maritime Agenda, 2020 — a vision document — had set some important goals.

These include increasing port capacity to 3.2 billion tonnes, which will require an investment of Rs 3,00,000 crore., raising Indian tonnage four fold to 43 million GT and enhance Indian's share in global shipbuilding to 5 per cent and the share of Indian seafarers to at least 10 per cent.

In the deliberations that continued after the Minister left, many participants, including Mr S. Hajara, Chairman and Managing Director, The Shipping Corporation of India, said they thought the Maritime Agenda, 2020, was more a wish-list than a clear-cut road map to meet the goals set.

A key point made to back this view was the absence of any programme to train people into the shipping business.

While one participant said that the industry would need some 50,000 seafarers (such as captains, engineers), another noted that the sector would need not just seafarers, but also an army of people for supporting industries
{This is how many plans are formulated. Only dreams are expressed without worrying about how to develop the basic building blocks that will allow reaching those dreams}

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby Vasu » 05 Feb 2011 10:09

And Mr. Hajara is an alum of IIM Calcutta and not just any babu put in there by the ministry, so he knows what he is talking about.

Was going through the list of the world's busiest container ports on Wiki in 2009, and its amazing that China has 8 ports in the top twenty! If you add Hong Kong, it becomes 9. India has one representation in the top 50: JNPT at 24 with a little over 4 million TEU. Still a long way to go!

And before anybody thinks of deriding me for trying to be ==, this is not it. It is indeed impressive with the way China has scaled their port tonnage, which India is only getting onto now. The rise of private Indian port operators has been a good sign in recent times, and they are constantly scaling up.

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Re: India's Shipping Sector

Postby manish » 05 Feb 2011 13:23

Vasu wrote:And Mr. Hajara is an alum of IIM Calcutta and not just any babu put in there by the ministry, so he knows what he is talking about.

Was going through the list of the world's busiest container ports on Wiki in 2009, and its amazing that China has 8 ports in the top twenty! If you add Hong Kong, it becomes 9. India has one representation in the top 50: JNPT at 24 with a little over 4 million TEU. Still a long way to go!

And before anybody thinks of deriding me for trying to be ==, this is not it. It is indeed impressive with the way China has scaled their port tonnage, which India is only getting onto now. The rise of private Indian port operators has been a good sign in recent times, and they are constantly scaling up.

One reason we do not have any ports in Top 10 is because our international trade (esp. container trade which is primarily focused on finished goods impex) is very low in comparison to China. Our ports primarily handle dry bulk and POL products, so that capacity is there. Container trade at PRC ports was around 130 million TEUs last year compared to India's ~8+ million TEUs and our performance is in line with this.

PRC consumes all categories of cargo in humongous proportions to keep its export machinery running. Most of the world's iron ore, coal (both dry bulk) , containers are all bound to/from PRC along with a sizable chunk of POL.

Simply put, we do not have the need nor the capability to make it to Top 10 in the near future. In container trade we are far behind, but look for coal import volumes going forward - we won't be that far behind and in fact we are already big enough to start affecting freight rates for certain types of ships on certain routes.


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