Indian Roads Thread

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Aditya_V
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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 06 Sep 2011 12:05

SSridhar, the saving fuel is just an excuse, many of them rev thier engine when the buses are stationary and do a lot of hard braking etc.. The truth is people feel they can get away with breaking a law. Many people infact pride themselves in Chennai for brealing lines and cutting signals, thinking they are very smart and have saved time.

Take for example, the one way at Haddows road, Nungambakkam high road, anytime after 9PM a bunch of 2 wheelers and cycles do a very smart think of coming down the wrong side of blind turn opposite cakes and bakes where Haddows Road joins Nungambakkam High road, I see many near accidents but never would they fellow coming down the wrong side ever acknowledge he did the wrong thing.

It seems with people at the top being involved in criminal actvities, our system is going towards lesser policing where law abiders suffer and law breakers benefit.

P.S- thats why our media always tilts towards clemency and sympathy for law breakers.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Singha » 06 Sep 2011 12:29

I have seen old people, women and schoolkids forced hastily off footpaths by bikers who ride on the footpaths to get around jams or filter through to the head of the pack at traffic stops.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 06 Sep 2011 14:15

Aditya_V wrote:SSridhar, the saving fuel is just an excuse, many of them rev thier engine when the buses are stationary and do a lot of hard braking etc.. The truth is people feel they can get away with breaking a law. Many people infact pride themselves in Chennai for brealing lines and cutting signals, thinking they are very smart and have saved time.

I agree. In any case, the driver should have known that plying on the wrong direction on NH45 would kill him and his passengers. It was not worth anything, even if the 'pressure' were to be true.
Sriman wrote:. . . but there is just a reckless streak among a lot of drivers on the road right now. Scary times ahead.

I constantly see MTC buses overrunning the signal at great speed early in the mornings (on Sardar Patel road) until the traffic cops begin to appear by 6:30 or so. In fact, most other drivers also do the same and look mockingly at those patiently waiting so early in the morning at the signals. Sometimes, I feel that doing so is even dangerous. Recently, I wrote to MTC complaining about this and asking them to advise these drivers that jumping signals just because there was no cop there was not smart and those waiting at the signal were not foolish. Besides, I said that MTC must counsel their drivers that if he kills/maims even one person due to his rash & negligent driving, he will be burdened with guilt for the rest of his life. MTC said that they have instructed their mobile squads accordingly. I was heartened to receive even a response. But, a month after that, I do not see any mobile squad checking MTC's atrocious drivers. There is absolutely no need to drive so maddeningly at 5 AM. There is no time pressure.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 06 Sep 2011 14:29

Yes, I think the biggest problem with Bad driving habits is extreme selfishness and king sized EGO. No concern about the others where the park or block the trafiic waiting to take a left Turn via the leftmost lane while the plonk themselves and wait for thier signal, the absolute need to overtake any and everyone on the road.

I think this is mainly due a sense of entitlement passed by popular mass media and politics.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Sridhar K » 11 Sep 2011 17:24

For TN STCs, there are a couple of things

1) the fuel efficiency drive has been on in most of TN STCs with some divisions like Kumbakonam targeting as high as 5KMPL. This is one reason why most of TN STC buses don't do speeds of more than 60 KMPLs, lug the engines (change gear early), try minimal breaking by swinging lanes, skipping signals if possible. Only a few drivers don't care about FE figures but they do get reprimanded big time.

2) Scheduled running times and mandatory number of trips per day for MTC Chennai: These have not been updated for years and the drivers have to complete the prescribed no. of trips day. With today's traffic, they end up doing 12-16 hrs a day in city traffic everyday and this affects the drivers driving habits big time.

SSridhar saar on waiting at signals: That is a pertinent point. I face the same issue on GST road after 10 PM in the night. The bus on Sardar Patel road must be 21G and it is a gone case. I usually spot them and stay away from them.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Theo_Fidel » 11 Sep 2011 21:11

Aditya_V wrote:I think this is mainly due a sense of entitlement passed by popular mass media and politics.


Not really. Most of them you talk to them and they are quite meek people who turn into demons on the road. Even government bus drivers, who are mostly lower middle class and are first time vehicle owners themselves. Most reports have said that this is the consequence of first generation vehicle ownership. The drivers don't understand the risks they are taking because they think they have absolute control and they escape without an accident 9 times out of ten. It is a lack of education. Education must change their perception of invulnerability and God like control over the vehicle. If they are afraid of the road they would show the rules more respect.

Every country that went through first generation vehicle driving had similar problems. From Europe to USA to Japan to China and now India. It will take a while for the death rate to become painful enough that driving habits change. Even in Chennai it is mostly the country immigrant/small time driver types who commit the vast majority of infractions. Auto - wallahs are a curse all by themselves.

Rather than arresting, fining and throwing into jail, which IMO achieves absolutely nothing, a eduction/terrify project might get better dividends. There should be graphic hoardings on the roads warning people of consequences. Victims should be brought on television to give their stories. There should be a chapter on traffic safety in High School. And there should be large civil society organizations that attack people who violate the social law and put others at risk. Just as everyone takes off their shoes at the Temple, a similar social pressure must exist to follow laws. Historically this is the only thing that has worked.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 12 Sep 2011 11:48

Back from weekend trip to Chennai- Mayiladithurai- Kumbakonam - Chennai. Must say driving habits of most drivers on GST Road seems to have improved compared to 6 months ago. The new NH66 from Tindivanam- Pondicherry was lovely to use. Pondi- Cuddalore 20KM beyond is pathetic. 20KM Before Mayiladithurai to Kumbakom is very narrow and filled with Traffic.

On coming back those planning the Kumbakonam- Chennai trip be aware, the Upper Anicut is now very narrow and lower Anicut is under maintence and had to a mud bridge which is a few feet above the Stream Bed. All STC buses for Kumbakonam Chennai now go to Mayiladhudurai- SriKazhi- Vadlur- Neyveli.

P.S- with Metro works causing log jam on Mount road - GST road, saved easily half an hour each way using the Chennai By Pass road.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Gaurav_S » 06 Oct 2011 12:12

Prized Road Projects On Delhi-Mumbai Route

The Kishengarh-Udaipur-Ahmedabad project cost has been set at around Rs. 5,500 crore. NHAI officials estimate GMR would be sharing around 50 per cent of their revenues with the authority. GMR refused to comment on the project.

There are many reasons why companies are optimistic about this project. M. Murali, director general, National Highway Builders Federation says, “The Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor and Gujarat’s aggressive industrial drive are indicators that this region will have a strong demand. Any player who wins a bid on this stretch would be optimistic.”

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Vasu » 18 Oct 2011 13:02

sorry, nothing good to report still on the infra front.

At less than 9 km a day, it is still in the slow lane

The 20-km a day target for highway construction remains a distant dream for the government with highway construction recording only 8.75 km a day progress in construction in the current fiscal.

The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) and the road transport ministry together have constructed 1,314 km of highways in the current financial year till August 31.

Road construction at this pace is an improvement from eight km a day constructed in 2010-11. “Our construction activity is badly hit during the monsoon months. If we have constructed this much during the first four months (including the monsoon months) of the fiscal, we will definitely be able to construct much more,” said a senior ministry official, who did not want to be named.

Highway construction in the last financial year was 2,920 km, which was an improvement from 2,738 km in 2009-10. The highway construction target for the current year has been set at 3,570 km — 2,500 km for NHAI and 1,070 km for the road transport ministry.

Of the target, the highways ministry has completed the constructed of 624 km and NHAI has been able to complete 690 km. NHAI constructs roads under the National Highways Development Programme, whereas the road transport ministry constructs roads through Border Roads Organisation and state public welfare departments.

NHAI has announced it will award 59 projects covering 7,994 km with a total cost of around Rs 60,000 crore — much less compared to the target of 96 projects covering 12,000 km worth Rs 100,000 crore for the last financial year, when Kamal Nath was at the helm.

The NHAI also plans to raise Rs 10,000 crore through tax-free infrastructure bonds from the market to fund their road construction plan. Raising funds is a part of NHAI’s financial plan to raise Rs 63,000 crore in the next 20 years.


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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Anabhaya » 18 Oct 2011 17:19

Singha wrote:Rajesh, do you know how the road is from avinashi to conoor? afaik this the more direct route from salem to conoor rather than entering coimbatore


You need to take the SH80 after Avinashi and hit Mettupalayam via Annur. From Mettupalayam you either choose to go uphill via Conoor or take the Kothagiri route. SH80 is just two lanes but rather easy to manage - the traffic is much less once you cross Annur. Classic Kongu country.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby shaardula » 18 Oct 2011 17:56

Theo_Fidel wrote:
Aditya_V wrote:I think this is mainly due a sense of entitlement passed by popular mass media and politics.


Not really. Most of them you talk to them and they are quite meek people who turn into demons on the road. Even government bus drivers, who are mostly lower middle class and are first time vehicle owners themselves. Most reports have said that this is the consequence of first generation vehicle ownership. The drivers don't understand the risks they are taking because they think they have absolute control and they escape without an accident 9 times out of ten. It is a lack of education. Education must change their perception of invulnerability and God like control over the vehicle. If they are afraid of the road they would show the rules more respect.

Every country that went through first generation vehicle driving had similar problems. From Europe to USA to Japan to China and now India. It will take a while for the death rate to become painful enough that driving habits change. Even in Chennai it is mostly the country immigrant/small time driver types who commit the vast majority of infractions. Auto - wallahs are a curse all by themselves.

Rather than arresting, fining and throwing into jail, which IMO achieves absolutely nothing, a eduction/terrify project might get better dividends. There should be graphic hoardings on the roads warning people of consequences. Victims should be brought on television to give their stories. There should be a chapter on traffic safety in High School. And there should be large civil society organizations that attack people who violate the social law and put others at risk. Just as everyone takes off their shoes at the Temple, a similar social pressure must exist to follow laws. Historically this is the only thing that has worked.


great grasp. thanks.
another thing is traffic engineering needs real attention in india. currently, it is an after thought even at the highest level.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Kukreja » 18 Oct 2011 23:16

Vasu wrote:sorry, nothing good to report still on the infra front.

At less than 9 km a day, it is still in the slow lane

The 20-km a day target for highway construction remains a distant dream for the government with highway construction recording only 8.75 km a day progress in construction in the current fiscal.

The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) and the road transport ministry together have constructed 1,314 km of highways in the current financial year till August 31.

Road construction at this pace is an improvement from eight km a day constructed in 2010-11. “Our construction activity is badly hit during the monsoon months. If we have constructed this much during the first four months (including the monsoon months) of the fiscal, we will definitely be able to construct much more,” said a senior ministry official, who did not want to be named.

Highway construction in the last financial year was 2,920 km, which was an improvement from 2,738 km in 2009-10. The highway construction target for the current year has been set at 3,570 km — 2,500 km for NHAI and 1,070 km for the road transport ministry.


an alternate and more optimistic view :P
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes ... federation
Construction of highways, which had dipped to dismal levels in the past few years, has picked up pace and official data shows that 11 km of roads are being added every day.

If the trend is sustained, the UPA government could well be on track of achieving 20 km per day by the time it completes its second term in 2014. The pace of construction is likely to accelerate about two-fold in the next two years, thanks to a significant increase in bidding of projects since 2010.

Meticulous project management during the past two-and-a-half years, transparency in the bidding process and faster awarding of contracts have helped step up road building. Declining activity in other construction sectors such as real estate have shifted the attention of contractors to road construction, experts say.
--
The ministry's performance improved after the NHAI awarded record length of projects in the past two-and-a-half years. During the current fiscal year, the NHAI has awarded 2,591 km of highways, and another 1,700 km is likely to be awarded in the next two months.

"It has increased because of the corrective steps taken by the government to encourage private players to participate in bidding. With all other sectors, involving civil construction such as real estate, not doing well, the developers' focus has shifted to highways," said M Murali, secretary general of the National Highways Builders Federation.

Experts said C P Joshi, who took charge of the ministry from Nath, has maintained continuity. They say the ministry and NHAI have ushered in transparency in the bidding process which has helped in boosting sentiment.

Now, construction is in progress on 16,000 km, and the ministry has to award 11,050 km during the current fiscal year. Hence, work will be over on 20,000 km within the next two years, and UPA-2 can easily achieve the target of constructing about 7,000 km annually.


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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 20 Oct 2011 17:29

shaardula wrote:another thing is traffic engineering needs real attention in india. currently, it is an after thought even at the highest level.

Absolutely. Most of our NHs are not engineered properly and even roads within cities too. The roads just 'happened' haphazardly. An attempt is being made on the killer NH45 stretch between Chennai & Villupuram to iron out the road engineering issues. Another notorious stretch is the East Coast road between Chennai & Marakkanam where poor road engineering is a major reason for fatalities (apart from drunken driving). The traffic police have collected a database of accident spots, nature of accidents etc. for this purpose. Hope something comes out.

On the issue of instilling road discipline, there are three important problems I see. One is a lack of awareness of rules, another is the absence of an innate desire to follow the rules and a third is missing safety consciousness. We have huge problems in all these three. Significant sections of rule-knowing Indians believe that rules can be violated for various reasons, either because there is no policeman around, or observing the rule will slightly increase their travel time or fuel costs etc.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 21 Oct 2011 07:57

DPR of Bangalore-Chennai Expressway by March, 2012
The ambitious Bangalore-Chennai Expressway project, which will cut down travel time and fuel consumption, is picking up steam with work on the detailed project report (DPR) likely to be completed by March.

The green field project would also act as a catalyst of development in the 260-km route from Hoskote near Bangalore to Sriperumbudur, nearly 40 km from Chennai. It is estimated to cost a whopping Rs.6,000 crore. Of this Rs.5,000 crore would be towards the construction work alone —at the rate of Rs.20 crore per kilometre.

The proposed six-lane expressway would serve as an alternative to the present popular NH 7 from Bangalore to Krishnagiri, NH- 46 Krishnagiri to Ranipet and NH 4 Ranipet to Chennai route, which is 372 km long and witnessing a significant increase in traffic. The project, proposed under the National Highways Development Project Phase VI, would take the Kolar, Chittoor route and have 12 major intersections in all. It would be a toll road facility.

National Highways Authority of India, Chief General Manager, I.G. Reddy, told The Hindu that the process for land acquisition has been initiated and villages involved along the proposed alignment of the expressway in the three States have been finalised and proposal for publication of 3 (a) Notification is under preparation.

“The Central Government has given in-principle approval for the project. Environmental clearance has to be sought for the project as a portion of the alignment was passing through reserve forest area. Already no objection certificates have been obtained from the governments of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka for the project. The alignment has been fixed, detailed engineering study for the project is on and soil tests are also underway,” Mr. Reddy said.

Egis-BCEOM International S.A. and SECON Pvt. Ltd. are the consultants for preparation of DPR.

The expressway that would come up on Build Operate Transfer (BOT) basis is designed for six lane divided carriageway with 1.5 metre unpaved shoulder and 3 metre paved shoulder. A six metre wide median has been proposed for safety and for future widening. Public consultations to elicit the opinions of the residents affected due to the proposed alignment have also been completed, he added.

Meanwhile, sources in the Industries Department said that the DPR for the first phase of the Chennai-Bangalore Industrial Corridor of Excellence (CBICE) from Chennai to Ranipet is ready. The DPR for the remaining stretch is under preparation. It would pass through Chennai-Ranipet-Hosur-Bangalore.

The Central Government had planned the corridor along National Highways 4, 7 and 46, linking Chennai and Bangalore through Nellore and Chitradurga. However, the State Government chose to go with the traditional route. Plans have also been drawn up to develop the Madurai-Tuticorin-Tirunelveli corridor and the Coimbatore-Salem corridor.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Prasad » 21 Oct 2011 08:46

I suppose if they run a direct east-west road from chittoor to chennai via sholinghur, arakkonam, they could cut travel times like anything!

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Singha » 21 Oct 2011 09:58

current NH4 from sirperumbudur onward into chennai is very crowded with trucks. this part is kind of semi urban to urban and road definitely needs widening and more properly managed intersections.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 21 Oct 2011 15:55

Singha wrote:current NH4 from sirperumbudur onward into chennai is very crowded with trucks. this part is kind of semi urban to urban and road definitely needs widening and more properly managed intersections.


And no cows should be allowed to feed on grass growing on the divider stretch of 10 feet. Seen 1 accident have have had a near miss due to this on that stretch.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 02 Nov 2011 08:28

Expressway between Chennai & Bangalore in the pipeline
The Ministry of Road Transport and Highways is in the midst of finalising an expressway project connecting Chennai and Bangalore. The governments of Tamil Nadu and Karnataka have, according to sources, prepared a proposal for the purpose and final touches are being provided. A formal scheme is yet to be drafted by the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) though.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SBajwa » 07 Nov 2011 00:56

Chamba - Pathankot Highway news

Image
http://www.tribuneindia.com/2011/201111 ... chal.htm#9

The condition of the Chamba and Dalhousie-Pathankot highway is deteriorating as several portions of the highway are full of pot-holes and even without parapet walls, thereby causing fear to vehicle drivers. The highway has been in a bad shape for a long time, irritating tourists and transporters thronging to Dalhousie, Chamba, Khajjiar and Bharmour hill stations for holidaying.

A drive from Pathankot to Dalhousie reveals that the highway has become risky to drive, thereby hampering the tourist inflow to the picturesque hill stations of Dalhousie, Khajjiar, Chamba and Bharmour.

After the recent incessant rains in the region, roads have been damaged badly and it is difficult to ply light as well as heavy vehicles on these.

Certain portions between Dradda and Chamba had been metalled, officials stated. The 6-km patch from Dalhousie to Banikhet had been brought under tarring recently.

The Chamba and Dalhousie-Pathankot highway is the only lifeline which links the entire district with the outside world. Besides, it also sustains the heavy rush of vehicles belonging to various hydroelectric projects undertaken or commissioned by the National Hydroelectric Power Corporation in the Chamba region of Himachal Pradesh.

Moreover, rural roads and bridges are rapidly deteriorating, because of which the fatality rate arising out of frequent accidents has increased.

The road authorities, however, maintain that the state government has drawn a plan to fund road repairs and bridges maintenance in the district.

HP PWD, Dalhousie Circle, Superintending Engineer RS Choudhary informed over the phone that a long portion of the Chamba and Dalhousie-Pathankot highway from Goli to Katori Bungalow had been included in the plan to be renovated by next year.

The government had a meagre provision of hardly Rs 15 lakh for the upkeep of the highway, but since it was a deposit work, the NHPC had already deposited Rs 6.8 crore for its maintenance and facelift, the SE revealed.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Sachin » 07 Nov 2011 15:18

SSridhar wrote:Significant sections of rule-knowing Indians believe that rules can be violated for various reasons, either because there is no policeman around, or observing the rule will slightly increase their travel time or fuel costs etc.

This statement should be cast in gold :). Infact this is applicable for not only Motor Vehicle Act, but pretty much every rule/law in India. I have pretty much given up hope on India having a very law abiding society, if the current model of "policing" is diluted even further. Cant really think from where a start needs to be made in this case.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby anishns » 08 Nov 2011 03:04

Just wanted to add to the above comment by Sachin.

I was in Mumbai last week and apparently there has been a huge decline in DUI cases on the streets of Mumbai....Strictly because of effective enforcement by the law authorities. It seems that your car gets impounded and you spend the night in jail in addition to paying a hefty fine, even if you've small traces of alcohol found on your breath. The local pandu decides whether you are drunk and not some TFTA breath analyzer...

It's so extreme these days that one of my friends, who is well connected in Thane district mentioned that one of his "VIP" friends told him that he could call him in the middle of the night for help, even if he had committed murder....but, if he was caught driving while drunk to simply not bother!

So, I guess IMHO everything is possible as long as you have a big danda and the will to make mango abdul follow some basic rules...


Sachin wrote:This statement should be cast in gold :). Infact this is applicable for not only Motor Vehicle Act, but pretty much every rule/law in India. I have pretty much given up hope on India having a very law abiding society, if the current model of "policing" is diluted even further. Cant really think from where a start needs to be made in this case.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby nachiket » 08 Nov 2011 03:21

anishns wrote:
So, I guess IMHO everything is possible as long as you have a big danda and the will to make mango abdul follow some basic rules...



..and provided the enforcer can keep his urge to accept a bribe from the abdul in check. :P

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Sachin » 08 Nov 2011 10:45

anishns wrote:I was in Mumbai last week and apparently there has been a huge decline in DUI cases on the streets of Mumbai....Strictly because of effective enforcement by the law authorities.

Socialist Republic of Kerala have taken the enforcement of DUI laws to the extreme. Every single section in M.V Act, and even the IPC are used to the maximum potential. This also seems to be strictly monitored by the senior police officers. And the police have clear statistics on how checks against drunken driving have reduced the number of motor accidents.

In Kerala, the police first check for alchohol using breath analyser (or the police men at the spot gets the smell and decides). Generally they catch 1-3 people and they are all marched to a government hospital where there blood samples are checked. The vehicle and the drivers are taken to the police station. The drivers would be given police bail, if two people (who are tax payers) can give the surety. Or else it is time to get inside the lock up. The case is heard by the magistrate and the fine is decided by him (usually Rs.3000/-).

One smart lawyer in Kozhikode gave a case and won, by saying that the maximum fine and punishment for drunken driving as per M.V Act, makes it a bailable offence and so the police cannot detain any person in the station. The police work over time, and re-reads the IPC which has a section related to "being found drunk in a public place". This is an offence which has a different punishment, and it also requires sureties from two people to let go the accused.

So the new funda is:-
1. Police men any way check the vehicle at a public place, and found drunk inside a vehicle in a public place is an offence as per the IPC. So that is the reason to be taken into custody.
2. Driving drunk is another offence as per M.V Act, which attracts a very high fine. So this becomes the main charge in the charge sheet, with the police using the provisions in IPC to detain the person unless, two people can give surety.

Bar owners now arrange for auto rickshaws to drop off their patrons, some keep a battery of drivers ready to drop the people in their own cars. Some regular patrons have also asked their wives to learn driving.

nachiket wrote:and provided the enforcer can keep his urge to accept a bribe from the abdul in check

In Kerala there seems to be a drive from the highest levels of police that at least in drunken driving, chances of bribery are less. The unofficial news is that every SI has an unwritten order that he can only call it a day after he have booked two offences under other provisions of M.V Act, and at least one for drunken driving.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 09 Nov 2011 16:27

TN planning to have a 'willing-to-donate-organ' column in driving licence
The state government is considering a proposal to seek the willingness of a driving licence applicant to donate his organs in the event of brain death. Transplant surgeons have been pushing for such an option, which they feel would increase the number of potential donors and create awareness .

MOHAN Foundation, an NGO working on organ donations , had written to the health and transport departments in this regard. The health department has forwarded the request to the transport department, which is seeking legal opinion from the Centre, said transport commissioner Sudalai Kannan.

There is no compulsion for the applicant to say 'yes' , says urologist Dr Sunil Shroff, who heads the foundation . Since September 2008, relatives of more than 200 accident victims declared brain dead, have consented to donate the vital organs of the brain dead. Doctors say the donation rate in the state is 1.3 per million. The number of donations has risen significantly , but still doesn't match the demand for transplants .

"There's a variety of reasons why people don't register for organ donation. These include some myths that they would be born without the organ in the next birth. Though many hospitals have a registry , many are not aware of it," he said.

Most transplant surgeons feel that the state has the ability to fulfill the demand if every family of brain dead victims consent to donate organs.

The National Crime Records Bureau report says Tamil Nadu, which accounted for the maximum (15.1%) of road accidents in the country, also reports the maximum numbers each month. On an average, 15,000 people die in road accidents in the state. {This is a very dubious record for TN, something to be really ashamed of}

By signing the form, nearly 12 lakh new applicants will learn about road safety, brain death and organ donation. So far, the government has left it to the hospitals, grief counselors , doctors and patients to campaign for organ donations . After brain death, blood relatives decide whether they want to donate.Heart transplant surgeon Dr K M Cherian says the government has to actively campaign for organ donation.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 09 Nov 2011 18:37

SSridhar wrote:TN planning to have a 'willing-to-donate-organ' column in driving licence



The National Crime Records Bureau report says Tamil Nadu, which accounted for the maximum (15.1%) of road accidents in the country, also reports the maximum numbers each month. On an average, 15,000 people die in road accidents in the state. {This is a very dubious record for TN, something to be really ashamed of}



Sir, take a trip on the Chennai- Trichi, Chennai Bangalore or ECR when you have the time. You will see even more Ego than what you see inside Chennai city, this Ego will go to suicidal cases where guys with families will be conducting unoffical races with each other.

These stats will not surprise anyone given high Ego with wrong side driving etc.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 09 Nov 2011 19:07

Aditya_V wrote:Sir, take a trip on the Chennai- Trichi, Chennai Bangalore or ECR when you have the time.

Yes, I know. I regularly drive on these stretches.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 10 Nov 2011 14:08

SSridhar wrote:
Aditya_V wrote:Sir, take a trip on the Chennai- Trichi, Chennai Bangalore or ECR when you have the time.

Yes, I know. I regularly drive on these stretches.


Just curious, I have had this problem and witnessed a few accidents, just past Poonamalee Bypass a lot cows are allowed to graze on grass going on the Median which suddenly run accross the road, have you encountered this problem??

Theo_Fidel

Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Theo_Fidel » 10 Nov 2011 20:46

Sridhar,

I read earlier that the number of accidents per vehicle has actually dropped by half or something over the past 10 years. It is just that there are so many new vehicles that that the numbers just keep going up. The other problem I've noticed is the long extended wet season we have compared to the short monsoon the rest of the country has. Driving on Mount road, absolutely no one even slows down for wet weather. There is no sense that this could be dangerous or I have to be careful. The sheer number of 2-wheelers too makes even the smallest accident fatality prone.

My Dads driver is this meek little chap who doesn't speak even 2 words during the day. Yet behind the wheel and on the road he turns into a demon using the choicest cuss words and speeding by vehicles as close as possible.He has gotten 2 tickets over the past year but has no effect on him. So my Dad got a special Garland consecrated at a Temple and hung it on the front grill. He is a little more careful now as does not want to damage it and bring bad luck on himself.

Once people are aware and have a stake in keeping the system safe they become careful drivers automatically.

Take a look at this link on the break down of accidents by type.
http://www.tn.gov.in/sta/ra3c.pdf
http://www.tn.gov.in/sta/ra3a.pdf

The vast majority of fatalities are caused by the drivers carelessness. This means there is scope to educate and turn this around.
Also the vast majority of fatalities are @- Wheelers and Cars, with Trucks following close behind. Any education campaign should focus on 2-wheeler & car esp. recent drivers to get better results.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 10 Nov 2011 22:11

Someone has to take the initiative and demonstrate civilised driving. Of letting people pass you, of slowing down for a cyclist or pedestrians( it's done, but not enough) , of not honking needlessly. If one person starts, it will spread- being optimistic here!

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby krishnan » 11 Nov 2011 17:21

Varoon Shekhar wrote:Someone has to take the initiative and demonstrate civilised driving. Of letting people pass you, of slowing down for a cyclist or pedestrians( it's done, but not enough) , of not honking needlessly. If one person starts, it will spread- being optimistic here!


:lol:

Its other way around..before you known you will become one among them

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Aditya_V » 11 Nov 2011 19:51

Varoon Shekhar wrote:Someone has to take the initiative and demonstrate civilised driving. Of letting people pass you, of slowing down for a cyclist or pedestrians( it's done, but not enough) , of not honking needlessly. If one person starts, it will spread- being optimistic here!


There are many who have taken such initiative including me who have received explelative " Savvue Charke" for slowing traffic down.

Pedestrians, I have slowed many times, especially in rainy season when they need avoid puddles and come to middle of the road, however, I noticed when they see a car, they feel they can take a lot of liberties but simply putting their hand out and walking across irrespective of signal or whether its a place where people can cross.

and once you give way to one, and endless followers take the liberty, especially in overtaking, or if you give way for vehicle taking a turn and is stuck, the followers will ensure you get stuck also.

Only way out, is Physical barriers such as dividers, racetrack type barricades coming out in between signals to ebnsure people adhere to stop lines.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 15 Nov 2011 17:31

Aditya_V wrote:Just curious, I have had this problem and witnessed a few accidents, just past Poonamalee Bypass a lot cows are allowed to graze on grass going on the Median which suddenly run accross the road, have you encountered this problem??

Yes, I have always seen them in that section. In fact, I have seen them on NH45 too. There was a photograph a couple of days back in Dinamalar about cattle grazing in the median on Chennai Bypass.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 15 Nov 2011 18:08

Theo_Fidel wrote:I read earlier that the number of accidents per vehicle has actually dropped by half or something over the past 10 years. It is just that there are so many new vehicles that that the numbers just keep going up. The other problem I've noticed is the long extended wet season we have compared to the short monsoon the rest of the country has. Driving on Mount road, absolutely no one even slows down for wet weather. There is no sense that this could be dangerous or I have to be careful. The sheer number of 2-wheelers too makes even the smallest accident fatality prone.

Theo, I agree that the number of vehicles has exponentially increased but that is no consolation for the equally increasing accidents as well, in absolute terms. On the Highways, in and around Chennai, most accidents are caused by driver fatigue, over-speeding, and drunken driving. The big ticket accidents are caused by buses & coaches which hit stationary vehicles, especially trucks, on the road. There is no shoulder in most stretches and parked trucks jut half into left extreme lane. Besides, the drivers of the parked vehicles, do not switch on hazard lights and worse, switch off all lights making it even more difficult. The coaches are body-built with absolutely no safety aspects taken into consideration. the idea is to increase the number of seats at direct cost to safety.
Also the vast majority of fatalities are @- Wheelers and Cars, with Trucks following close behind. Any education campaign should focus on 2-wheeler & car esp. recent drivers to get better results.

My skepticism comes from a general apathy of people towards safety and road rules. As I said before more than once, well educated people are equally to be blamed for violating road rules.

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Re: The New Chennai ORR - Progress Report

Postby SSridhar » 15 Nov 2011 18:55

The Chennai Outer Ring Road project proceeding apace
The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) has approved the designs for three interchanges put up on the 29.65-km-long Phase-I of the Outer Ring Road (ORR) at Vandalur, Nazarathpet and Nemilichery, the points where national highways cut across the ORR.

"Work on construction of the interchanges is expected to commence in 3-4 months,” the official source said.

The interchange on the National Highway 4, the Bangalore Road, would be the biggest of the three. The existing Bangalore road has four lanes. Once the ORR is completed, the traffic has to cross the Bangalore road. In future, if the road is expanded to six lanes this interchange would be able to handle the substantially increased traffic flow.

Work on ORR phase I from Vandalur on NH-45 to Nemilichery on NH 205 is being implemented on Design, Build, Finance, Operate and Transfer basis and the road component is expected to be completed within the stipulated time. Of the around 30-km-long road, 18 km has already been formed and black topping completed on four km. Of the 100 culverts, 40 have been completed, of 21 pedestrian underpasses 16 have been completed and almost all eight vehicular underpasses have been constructed.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SBajwa » 17 Nov 2011 21:27

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2011/20111117/punjab.htm#12

A bridge that will connect border dists
Anirudh Gupta

Ferozepur, November 16
Due to lack of direct rail or road connectivity between Ferozepur and Amritsar, the two important border districts, the residents of both these places have to take a detour. This makes the distance between these two districts around 120 km. After the construction of the new bridge over the Sutlej, between Kot Pattan Budda and Muthianwala, the distance will be just 90 km. Officials in the PWD Department said that following the construction of this bridge, lakhs of people from Ferozepur and the border areas, besides Tarn Taran and Amritsar districts will benefit immensely. People from Ferozepur are at present using the Zira-Makhu-Harike-Tarn Taran route to reach Amritsar.

The residents of border villages using boats to cross the Sutlej to go to Amritsar will be relieved of the hassle of commuting through indigenously built boats, especially when the Sutlej is in fury. The only existing bridge on Sutlej upstream this new site is situated near Harike headworks which is 640 metres long. CM Parkash Singh Badal will lay the foundation stone of this bridge on November 18.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SBajwa » 17 Nov 2011 21:35

Shopkeepers of Phase V block traffic
Our Correspondent

Mohali, November 16
Two former municipal councillors and shopkeepers of the Phase V market blocked the traffic here today in protest against the failure of the Greater Mohali Development Authority to provide an entry to the market from a main road under construction in the area.

Gurmukh Singh Sohal and Kuldip Kaur Kang, former councillors, said they had urged senior officials of GMADA earlier to provide an entry from the main road but to no avail. They claimed that district planning committee chairman NK Sharma had also given directions in this regard but these, too, had been ignored by the GMADA officials.

They said that when they approached a JE of GMADA today to provide an entry to the market, the official allegedly misbehaved with them. They demanded action against him.

-----

They are actually widening the road to four lanes from two lanes., by shortening the parking area/footpath/etc. This is the main road in mohali that goes across the whole city. There are shops/markets on right side (Towards Phase V, sector 60) while temples/gurdwaras/schools/government offices on the left side (Towards Phase IV, sector 59). Access to the markets is not only needed but essential.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby SSridhar » 04 Dec 2011 17:31

Spot the violations !

Image

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Gus » 27 Dec 2011 09:05

drove an estilo from chennai to erode. NH4 via Krishnagiri and then NH47. NH4 was ok, there were patchworks in some areas. NH 47 was good. Shoulder area was not enough to park even a small car safely. the divider was good with bushes planted to block out oncoming traffic lights. did not drive in the night to test though.

Saw a few patrol jeeps and vans parked with police lounging casually in the shade. Don't think they actually catch anyone for traffic violation. maybe some poor guy who stops by himself..

road signs were adequate for Indian standards. I was not lost or had to ask for directions even once. Reliance gas stations looked good with food outlets etc.

The worst part were the car drivers. Very impatient and bullying types. They would honk at you when you are on the right lane overtaking. And when you overtake and move over to the left lane, the phucker would be moving over to the left lane too, trying to overtake you on the left...soooo impatient to even wait for half as second so they can overtake on the right. all the while incessantly honking. planning to get a iron rod so I can scrape their car when it is passing by.

some two wheelers, especially the tvs 50 types who are not used to or don't care, driving slowly on the middle of the two lanes when they really ought to be driving at the edge of the left lane, were annoying until you honked once and they would nonchalantly move to the left slowly.

overall it was not bad as I thought it would be. the low traffic on xmas morning probably helped a lot.

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Sachin » 27 Dec 2011 20:52

Gus wrote:Saw a few patrol jeeps and vans parked with police lounging casually in the shade. Don't think they actually catch anyone for traffic violation. maybe some poor guy who stops by himself..

:). In fact coming from the "socialist republic" I find the Tamil Nadu Highway Police a very peaceful lot. They are always out there on the roads, but have never seen any aggressive "law enforcement" from their side. In Kerala as soon as you step into the state, drivers always have to be on the look out for jeeps hiding behind bushes, or on the curves on the road. There are nearly 40 Highway Police vehicles, and the local jurisdictional police also regularly steps in. What I understand is that there is a constant follow up on the "MV Petty cases" & the fines collected and there is heavy pressure on the police men. So much so that people have started cribbing that police men are enforcing traffic laws strictly not for the betterment of people, but to generate revenue for the state.


some two wheelers, especially the tvs 50 types who are not used to or don't care, driving slowly on the middle of the two lanes

Oh.. did you not see these TVS 50 types, coming on the wrong side of the road with a very nonchalant expression (as if they are on the right side, and we are the wrong ones).

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Re: Indian Roads Thread

Postby Yogi_G » 28 Dec 2011 10:07

The onset of the cheap cargo carriers (mahindra gio, tata ace) by the auto majors has been a boon for the logistics companies agreed, but they are becoming a slow nightmare. These vehicles, I believe, do not need to be weighed like regular larger trucks do and in both cities and highways I have found many times overloaded vehicles chugging along slowly at 25-30 KMs. These vehicles are clearly underpowered for some of the loads they are put through. Add to it the inherent lack of understanding of lane discipline and a desi hero films inspired sense of entitlement -- you have a mess everyday on the streets and highways. At their low speeds they stick on to the right lane and never yield to honking. God needs to help us onleee


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