India's Power Sector

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Dileep
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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Dileep » 05 Apr 2020 19:44

So, we started seeing "power grid experts" in social and antisocial media, right along with the bunch of "Infectious disease experts" hain jee?

My cousin (who started our 'hereditary trade' (kula thozhil in mallu and Tamil) of engineering. Before him, we were farmers) is an expert in this field for his entire career and retired a couple of years ago from power grid corp. He laughed at the opinion of all these "experts" and refused to even talk about it.

When loads go down, the generating stations 'throttle back'. The load dispatch will decide which one does what extent. Once load increases, they will 'throttle up' taking more load. Happens every day, every hour, all the time, mostly automagically these days. The company I worked at USA used to build fiber optic communication infra for this automation.

A grid failure is entirely different. If the generating stations lose 'sync', they will take a bit of process to bring back online. For example, if the regional grids are isolated, bringing them back to sync will take some careful maneuvering.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby nandakumar » 05 Apr 2020 19:54

Dileep wrote:So, we started seeing "power grid experts" in social and antisocial media, right along with the bunch of "Infectious disease experts" hain jee?

My cousin (who started our 'hereditary trade' (kula thozhil in mallu and Tamil) of engineering. Before him, we were farmers) is an expert in this field for his entire career and retired a couple of years ago from power grid corp. He laughed at the opinion of all these "experts" and refused to even talk about it.

When loads go down, the generating stations 'throttle back'. The load dispatch will decide which one does what extent. Once load increases, they will 'throttle up' taking more load. Happens every day, every hour, all the time, mostly automagically these days. The company I worked at USA used to build fiber optic communication infra for this automation.

A grid failure is entirely different. If the generating stations lose 'sync', they will take a bit of process to bring back online. For example, if the regional grids are isolated, bringing them back to sync will take some careful maneuvering.

Just for context. During English Premier League football season practically every household in England (roughly 10 million) Is hooked on to watching the football ball match. At half time they diligently get up and switch on the electric kettle to make tea. That is a 10,000 MW spike in power demand.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mort Walker » 06 Apr 2020 01:11

Where is the grid collapse that so many power experts/epidemiologists predicted? :roll:

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby suryag » 06 Apr 2020 01:24

You illiterate/ignorant Mortji the Mudi request wasnt followed hence no grid collapse

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Picklu » 06 Apr 2020 04:03

https://twitter.com/RajKSinghIndia/status/1246844612951412736?s=20
The demand went down from 117300 Megawatts at 2049 hrs to 85300 Megawatts till 2109 hrs; that is a reduction of 32000 Megawatts. Then it started increasing. Frequency was maintained within a band of 49.7 to 50. 26 Hz, which means the voltage was kept stable.


The above was Tweeted by

Code: Select all

Minister of State (IC) Power and New & Renewable Energy, MOS in the Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, GOI. Office: @OfficeOfRKSingh


It can not be more official than this.

Our power grid consumption in normal times are 270+ GW. The system working at 117 GW is operating at roughly 43% capacity.

Even at this level, it could go down to 31% i.e. a drop of staggering 28%

Please tell me a single system any one of you have designed/created/operated that is capable of handling such fluctuations within matter of 10/15 minutes.

This is a bloody 28% drop on a system already running at 43% capacity!!!
Beyond any back of the envelop calculations thrown around for switching off light bulbs!!!! Yeah, right! 2-3% indeed!!!

As I said, it was really a stress test of the system; and a pretty brutal one.

The close involvement of the minister himself is the proof that there were a deeper agenda behind this.

And the communication from the minister himself publicly on Twitter with this result also is part of our strategic deterrent communication.

Kind of like Vajpayee declaration of laughing Buddha,

We are declaring to the whole world the capacity and capabilities of our power distribution infra and its resilience

That our power infra, even when running below 50% capacity, can still handle a further 28% drop in demand without any glitch.

Any nation trying to go against us have to be ready to handle an adversary of this caliber. Our essential infrastructures can take a lot of damage and still remain standing to dash out retribution. We are not as weak as some of the OECD nations try to project.

Last time, when the US and Russia were busy with Cuban missile crisis , our northern neighbor took advantage.

Now,when the world is down with corona, they better not try another with a Doklam type instigation.

From that perspective, the above tweet is as significant as the news of laughing Buddha, Agni 5 and ASAT tests and Arihant going operational petrol.

Not getting this and restricting this to petty politics is not really the caliber of BRF.

Picklu wrote:I have a gut feeling that this is also a calculated risk taken by the govt to stress test our power distribution infrastructure using this Corona opportunity of lower usage due to industrial shutdowns. Such opportunities do not come every day.

Every modern day corporate does this using "chaos monkey"/"simian army"/"DR and BCP drill"/"Penetration testing".

We did such a stress test for our finance and accounting infra via demonitization.

Corona is already doing such a test of our public health infra.

We have done a test of our public communication effectiveness test via previous "clap for 5 mins" exercise.

Now, we will test our power grid stress test.

Will there be issues? Off course, the whole point is to find the weak links in the chains.

But, we will come out "Anti Fragile" from each of these tests, to use the term coined by Taleb.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby sudarshan » 06 Apr 2020 04:32

Picklu wrote:...


Very interesting indeed. But this is a demand drop of 28%. Whereas in a war-time situation there would be a supply hit. I.e., capacity being taken violently offline, and the remaining capacity having to take up the demand. Does the above stress test apply to that scenario as well, or is it merely hinting that the grid is sophisticated to take any type of scenario?

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Picklu » 06 Apr 2020 09:16

sudarshan wrote:
Picklu wrote:...


Very interesting indeed. But this is a demand drop of 28%. Whereas in a war-time situation there would be a supply hit. I.e., capacity being taken violently offline, and the remaining capacity having to take up the demand. Does the above stress test apply to that scenario as well, or is it merely hinting that the grid is sophisticated to take any type of scenario?


After 9 past 9, the demand came back and the grid scaled up ....

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 06 Apr 2020 12:36

A few more interesting insights presented by this gent....

https://twitter.com/DrTongia/status/1246869020139114496

Visit twitter for images (graphs etc), putting only text here.


Rahul Tongia
@DrTongia

1/n) #9pm9minutes PRELMINARY Analysis
http://carbontracker.in timestamps are limited!
Key points:
1)Total demand fall DUE TO EVENT was ?~29 GW.
2)Demand fall started before 9 pm
3)Most balancing was done by hydro [BIG TIME]
4)Grid rise (aka “recovery”) finished ~10:30 pm

(2/n) Demand fall was not just due to lighting.
Too much fall, and some of load fall began as early as 8:45. All evenings “normally” decline 3.5-5.5 GW after peak ~7:30. Fall after 8:45 was measurably more than normal trend. See http://carbontracker.in for other days.


(3/n) [speculation] Folks were switching off loads to protect their devices. Really doubt so much load is lighting! That too participating.
Fall during the 9 minutes was less than the total event - if one wants to estimate "household lighting" in India.

(4/n) Ramp rates are difficult to calculate without better data (we have 3-6 minute time stamps only), but 16.658 GW fall over 3 minutes indicates (with some time error possibilities) a ramp down of 5.55 GW/min, or 4.85%/minute. IMPRESSIVE.

(5/n) Ramping down continues after 9:06 pm. Suggests something more than pure lighting participation (?). Other loads? Feeder management? Or maybe just time-stamp issues. Await full analysis by
@PosocoIndia

(6/n) Load return wasn’t swift – modest until 9:15, then rose, with continued slight rise for a while. See a mini-peak 10:30 (later than previous days).

(7/n) RAMPING - For the most aggressive time block, HYDRO provided LOTS of grid support, both directions. Gas was impressive – not in aggregate as it has a low base but 3.5 relative rate of coal when normalized for operating capacity.


(8/n) Few observations: RE was either curtailed/added OR the gods aligned quite well for the most part! Adding load was more controlled perhaps.
[Speculation] People may switch off in advance compared to turn back on with a delay (?). Consumers alone may not explain rise times.


(9/n) Overall, a great performance, likely not just
@PosocoIndia
but with state LDCs as well. BRAVO.

This also bodes well for grid flexibility (high RE, maybe) – BUT NOT if this involved too much feeder management! Hydro was at a sweet spot – not yet “must run” ala monsoon.

(n/n) - Shoutout to not just essential services providers, but also my colleagues for http://carbontracker.in and data analysis/visualization - Utkarsh Dalal, M. Tabish Parray, and Rishabh Trivedi.


ADDENDUM: The fall may be higher than 29 GW, which was based on lower-resolution data we collect at http://carbontracker.in.
@OfficeOfRKSingh
tweeted 32 GW. Even correcting for any trend decay each evening, it's still more than 29 GW. In one word - IMPRESSIVE grid management.



PDF of whole thread is made and uploaded here.

https://pdfhost.io/v/E0gyupNbg_Thread_by_DrTongia__1_n_9pm9minutes_PRELMINARY_Analysis_Electricity_Gridpdf.pdf

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby sudarshan » 06 Apr 2020 19:07

Picklu wrote:After 9 past 9, the demand came back and the grid scaled up ....


That's right, I missed that part. Thanks.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 16 May 2020 00:59

Revised tariff policy likely to be rolled out within a month, says Power Minister R K Singh
PTI|Last Updated: May 15, 2020, 08.08 PM IST


New Delhi: The revised tariff policy has been cleared by a group of ministers and it is likely to be implemented within a month, Power Minister R K Singh said on Friday. The policy provides for steps like penalty for unscheduled power cuts by distribution companies.

"The tariff policy which had been sent to Union Cabinet, was referred to an informal group of ministers (GoM). That GoM has cleared it. So we propose to take it to the next Cabinet (meeting)....and hopefully it should be there within a month," Singh said.

He was speaking at a digital interaction with CEOs from the power and renewable energy sectors, under the CII's Energizing India Series.

The revised tariff policy provides for penalty for unscheduled power cuts, except in the case of technical faults or act of God (natural calamities).

The government intends to provide '24X7 Power to All' at affordable rates. Therefore, there is a provision in the tariff to cap transmission and distribution losses. Once the tariff policy is approved, the discoms would not be allowed to pass on these losses beyond 15 per cent.

The policy would also encourage time of the day tariff where consumer would be charged more during peak hours. This would also enable the consumers to reduce their electricity bill by consuming more electricity during non-peak hours.

Talking about the recent relief given to discoms reeling under financial stress due to slump in demand amid the lockdown, Singh said, "We have asked our central public sector undertaking (CPSU) power generators to defer fixed charges from the discoms. After the economy opens up, those fixed charges would be paid by discoms in equal installments without interest. This would be huge relief."

"We have asked our CPSUs (gencos) to give 20 to 25 per cent discount to discoms on cost of power. We want discoms to pass it on to consumers. This will be reflected in the first bill of the consumers after economy reopens (after lockdown is over)," he added.

He also told the industry representatives that the power ministry is making open access simpler as any such application would be processed within 30 days under the new tariff policy.

He also talked about removing custom barriers to give incentives to solar and wind energy equipment manufacturing.

There would be higher penalty for not complying with RPO (renewable purchase obligation) and the states would start bidding for clean energy projects themselves, he added.

The industry representative made a case for bringing power under the Goods and Service Tax (GST) regime and also asked for indirect subsidy for setting up clean energy projects.

They were of the view that direct subsidy is probabilistic and not definite, so the government should offer differential tariff for clean energy projects.

They also pitched to enhancing the deadline for project development in view of the coronavirus lockdown.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/revised-tariff-policy-likely-to-be-rolled-out-within-a-month-says-power-minister-r-k-singh/articleshow/75761990.cms?utm_source=ETTopNews&utm_medium=HPTN&utm_campaign=AL1&utm_content=23

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 25 May 2020 11:33

View: Cleaner, and now cheaper, solar power beats coal
By Swaminathan S Anklesaria Aiyar, TOI Contributor|Last Updated: May 24, 2020, 01.11 PM IST


The Covid crisis has diverted attention from a major breakthrough that should leave all smiling. The latest auction for 400 MW of solar power, including storage, has been won by ReNew Power with a levelised tariff of Rs 3.52/unit over 15 years. The equivalent thermal power tariff would have been closer to Rs 4.5/unit. Solar energy has beaten coal-based power hollow, and would do so even if taxes and cesses on coal were lifted. The bulk of future power generation can be solar without subsidies.
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During the day, India now has excess power capacity. Solar generation is given priority, while thermal stations have to back down till sunset. Priority to solar power makes economic sense since it entails no running costs, whereas thermal power entails fuel costs. But thermal plants that once ran 75% of the time have been forced to back down to just 55-58% to accommodate rising solar production. This hidden cost of solar power cannot be borne fully by the thermal sector, which needs a new tariff formula to cover capital costs on generation and transmission when forcibly idled.
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In the giant 1,200 MW Bhadla solar park in Rajasthan, the winning auction in 2018 was just Rs 2.44/unit. But it had no provision for storage, something experts estimated would add Rs 2/unit to the tariff. That meant solar power was not cheaper than thermal power and could not be switched on and off at will, as thermal plants could.

However, the new 400 MW deal won by ReNew Power includes enough storage to ensure 80% capacity utilisation over a year and not less than 70% in any month. This is not quite 24/7 power, but is as efficient as thermal power and much cheaper. That is why it is a breakthrough.

ReNew Power will be using lithium-ion storage batteries to store excess power during the day and releasing it later to achieve its capacity target.

The biggest problem Indian solar companies face is the high rate of interest. This matters a lot in an industry with high capital costs. RBI has lowered its lending rate, but banks are too risk-averse to lend to solar companies, which still pay 10-11% interest on the bulk of their borrowing from public sector entities like Power Finance Corporation and Rural Electrification Corporation. By contrast, solar plants in the Middle East can borrow at just 4% in their own currencies. If Indian companies could access money as cheaply, the cost of power plus storage could fall to just Rs 2/unit, transforming the competitiveness of Indian industry. India must aim for this.
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The World Bank no longer lends for coal-based plants but is keen on renewables. It cannot lend directly to private sector companies. One solution is to negotiate massive loans from the World Bank to Power Finance Corporation and Rural Electrification Corporation, earmarked for on-lending to the solar companies with a small mark-up.

World Bank loans to India can be repayable over 19 years with a 5-year moratorium and interest at LIBOR (now just 0.17% in dollars) plus 1.4%. Small loans are also available from the Bank’s Clean Technology Fund and IFC, the Bank’s private sector lending arm. But past Bank loans have been less than $100 million – peanuts for a solar industry that now needs billions. The Bank should step up solar lending hugely.


https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/view-cleaner-and-now-cheaper-solar-power-beats-coal/articleshow/75935467.cms

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 25 May 2020 11:38

A tale of disconnected dots: The regulatory algorithm behind Electricity Amendment Bill 2020
ET CONTRIBUTORS|Last Updated: May 24, 2020, 10.27 AM IST


The Ministry of Power recently floated an amended version of the Electricity Act, after consecutive unsuccessful attempts to introduce changes in 2014 and 2018. Hailed as sweeping structural reforms by many, the proposed amendments have recently been subject to resistance by many states, including opposition by Tamil Nadu, Telangana and even Bihar, an ally of the Central Government.

The Electricity (Amendment) Bill 2020, according to the MoP, is brought in to address “critical issues weakening the commercial and investment activities in the electricity sector”. It prescribes multiple policy tools to achieve this objective.
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Firstly, there is a concerted effort to centralise decision making in the power sector. The provision to dilute the power of State Governments by setting up a National Selection Committee for appointment of Chairperson and members of state regulatory commissions reflects this narrative. Furthermore, empowering the National Load Dispatch Centre to oversee payment security mechanisms before dispatch of any power also reaffirms this direction.

The objective seems to bring uniformity in the broader direction of governance of this sector, whereby the states are aligned to the vision of the Centre. However, a significant critique is the dilution of state level concerns by digressing from the decentralised, un-bundled governance structure that has been envisaged through previous legislations.

Secondly, there is an element of expanding the scope of privatisation in the power sector. The provisions relating to establishment of franchise or distribution sub-licensee models of discoms are a step in this direction. The underlying reasons seem to be two-fold, firstly that more private investments would flow into the distribution business and secondly, privatisation of utilities would bring in operational and financial efficiency in this sector.

Although, the immediate objective of enhancing investment potential in the sector is a likely outcome from this amendment, the much larger objective of de-stressing the discoms needs careful consideration. The critique to the argument that privatisation ensures efficiency, stems from the fact that electricity is a public good and for universal access the State has to step in to ensure last mile delivery. In addition to it, several national and international experiences also suggest that the unintended consequences of privatisation including rent-seeking and friction between consumers and suppliers, leads to a difficult situation for policymakers. Therefore, a careful assessment of circumstances under which privatisation could yield desirable results is a pre-requisite for standardising such a system. Independent monitoring and evaluation of existing distribution franchise models can be the first step in this endeavour.

Thirdly, there are proposed changes that aim to do away with some of the common bottlenecks hampering the scope of private investments in the power sector. These include establishment of an Electricity Contract Enforcement Agency (ECEA), doing away with subsidy regime by mandating cost-reflective tariffs and institutionalisation of payment security mechanisms. These are some of the long-outstanding demands of investors in the power sector and can be considered a progressive move. The formation of ECEA also highlights the urgency of enforcing the sanctity of contracts in the Indian power sector, especially after the Andhra Pradesh episode.

The key to achieve these objectives of contract enforcement lies in enhancing the capacity of stakeholders to plan, design, implement and monitor contracts. Similarly, the abolishment of subsidized tariff has political and social implications. The states may perceive it as a threat for their political strategy of promising power at subsidized rates or for free. On the other hand, consumers may perceive it as a threat to their cash flows, resulting from inefficiencies or delays in direct transfers of allocated subsidies.

Finally, to give clean energy a greater push, there is a mention of a national renewable energy policy in the legislation itself. This will certainly provide a policy preference to India’s clean energy ambitions but more clarity is needed in this regard. An example to learn from is the European Union Green Deal which provides a detailed roadmap with clear timelines and sources of finance to achieve a climate neutral Europe by 2050. For it to become binding and operational, a legislative approval is required unlike in India, where a legislative mention is used to expedite the transition.

Thus, the given amendments may be a move in the right direction, but lack a structured roadmap for bridging the gaps between the existing problems and the proposed solutions. Joining these disconnected dots is the need of the hour to do justice to the long-standing reforms required for a sustainable power sector and growing national economy.


https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/a-tale-of-disconnected-dots-the-regulatory-algorithm-behind-electricity-amendment-bill-2020/articleshow/75935378.cms?utm_source=ETMyNews&utm_medium=HPMN&utm_campaign=AL1&utm_content=20

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Rishirishi » 26 May 2020 03:12

e latest auction for 400 MW of solar power, including storage, has been won by ReNew Power with a levelised tariff of Rs 3.52/unit over 15 years


Does this mean that it is cheaper to build new solar parks, then running the current coal plants ?

Billions must have been invested in coal, not to forget the mining. Can this have an adverse economic impact?

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby VinodTK » 26 May 2020 04:43

Rishirishi wrote:
e latest auction for 400 MW of solar power, including storage, has been won by ReNew Power with a levelised tariff of Rs 3.52/unit over 15 years


Does this mean that it is cheaper to build new solar parks, then running the current coal plants ?

Billions must have been invested in coal, not to forget the mining. Can this have an adverse economic impact?

It is expensive to operate coal power plants, very few countries are building new coal power plants because of outdated technology (no new technology / innovation coming in), and environmental impact.
China is the biggest operator of coal power plants. In India most of the coal based power plants are owned by state/Govt. run organizations.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mort Walker » 27 May 2020 03:39

Nearly 60% of India’s power comes from coal. RES has not delivered as promised. Without coal you can sit in the dark, no industry, no employment, no food and sick - if you wait for RES. Coal will be India well past 2030 at the rate RES is coming. It’s not going to happen and will remain a RES jihadi wet dream.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 28 May 2020 13:13

NTPC in race to buy Delhi discoms from Reliance Infra

By Sarita Singh, ET Bureau|Last Updated: May 28, 2020, 08.02 AM IST

NEW DELHI: NTPC has entered the race to acquire ’s majority stake in Delhi electricity distribution businesses. The state-run major has written to Delhi Electricity Regulatory Commission (DERC) expressing willingness to acquire 51% in BSES Rajdhani Power () and BSES Yamuna Power (BYPL), provided the sale process is transparent, sources said.

Sources said Italy’s group, Torrent Power and Greenko have submitted non-binding bids for buying BSES Delhi discoms.

NTPC has only been keen on buying stressed private power projects that moved to bankruptcy court. Early this year the company outbid the Adani Group in the race for the Avantha Group's 600 mw Jhabua power plant in Madhya Pradesh with a Rs 1,900 crore offer. In its letter to DERC secretary Mukesh Wadhwa, NTPC said it has decided to foray into distribution sector and is keen on acquiring distribution assets. NTPC and BSES did not offer any comments.

Anil Ambani-led Reliance Group is looking to sell assets to pay off lenders. Reliance Infrastructure, which owns 51% each in BYPL and BRPL, said it aims to be a zero debt company in the next financial year.

Reliance Infrastructure sold its Mumbai power distribution business to Adani Transmission Ltd for Rs 18,800 crore in August 2018. Reliance Group and Tata Power supply power to about 93% of Delhi. The two BSES companies cater to 4.4 million customers in , handling peak power demand of 4.8 GW.

These companies were acquired in 2002 during privatisation of Delhi distribution utilities. The distribution losses of Delhi are one of the lowest in the country at 9%. As of March 2020, the combined revenue of BSES discoms is Rs 15,250 crore with an EBITDA of Rs 2,050 crore and their total debt is Rs 1,900 crore. However, the two BSES Delhi discoms have nearly Rs 30,000-crore regulatory assets or deferred tariff hikes that are yet to be approved by the regulator. In FY18, DERC approved Rs 12,000 crore of such claims.
(This story has not been edited by economictimes.com and is auto–generated from a syndicated feed we subscribe to.)


https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/ntpc-in-race-to-buy-delhi-discoms-from-reliance-infra/articleshow/76055870.cms?utm_source=ETTopNews&utm_medium=HPTN&utm_campaign=AL1&utm_content=23

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 03 Jun 2020 11:40

State discoms end Force Majeure period, restart power purchases
BY SARITA C SINGH, ET BUREAU | UPDATED: JUN 03, 2020, 09.05 AM IST


New Delhi: With picking up, state power distribution utilities are ending the period and have restarted they had earlier suspended.

However, private power companies have started exploring legal options to contest non-payment of fixed charges by states for about 60 days of the force majeure event, sources said.
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The power companies have said less demand due to Covid-19 does not qualify under the force majeure events listed in power purchase agreements with distribution companies.

“States invocation of force majeure clause to avoid paying fixed cost is flawed as electricity generation, transmission and distribution has been declared essential activity,” Association of Power Producers director general Ashok Khurana said.

He said the government asking central power generating stations to voluntarily consider giving rebate on fixed cost for lockdown period clearly shows that fixed cost is payable during this period.

The power ministry last month asked central power generators and transmission companies to offer a one-time 20-25% rebate on fixed charges to distribution companies for the initial 40-day period of lockdown..........
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Electricity demand dipped to as low as 2,600 million units, down 28% year-on-year, during the lockdown. It gradually grew to about 3,800 million units till May 26 due to reduced lockdown restrictions on industries. However, towards the end of May, it started to decrease due to rains across India. Power demand touched 3,193 million units on May 31 and stood at 3,247 million units on Monday.

They utilities told the power plants that their electricity will not be scheduled and the projects should stop declaring availability of electricity. They also denied paying fixed charges to power plants during the period of force majeure.

The power companies had earlier responded to force majeure notices issued by the distribution companies

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/state-discoms-end-force-majeure-period-restart-power-purchases/articleshow/76163964.cms

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Haresh » 04 Jun 2020 19:35

Energy From Mountains | Renewable Energy Solutions

https://bigthink.com/surprising-science ... ore-energy

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby KL Dubey » 04 Jun 2020 22:01

Mort Walker wrote:Nearly 60% of India’s power comes from coal. RES has not delivered as promised. Without coal you can sit in the dark, no industry, no employment, no food and sick - if you wait for RES. Coal will be India well past 2030 at the rate RES is coming. It’s not going to happen and will remain a RES jihadi wet dream.


Not at all - the overall trend now is different. Share of coal in the total power generation is steadily falling, and that of RES has dramatically increased in the last few years. I would have mostly agreed with you if it was the pre-NaMo days in which nuclear was the only real option to get out of thermal power.

Nobody is "waiting" for RES, it is already here and expanding rapidly. The cost of power generation from RES in India is now lower than coal. Moreover, we are well on our way to meeting or exceeding our renewable electricity obligations under the climate change agreement.

https://ieefa.org/ieefa-india-indias-electricity-sector-transformation-has-made-progress-in-2019-20/

https://www.theclimategroup.org/news/corporate-renewable-energy-sourcing-way-100-renewable-electricity-india

If industry/companies demand renewable electricity (which now makes sense from cost perspective, not just climate change) then the supply will shift. Banditji told us back in 1950s that coal plants and the like were "temples" but not anymore.

As far as electricity is concerned, I firmly believe India can greatly reduce dependence on fossil/thermal power. Most of this will happen with renewables, and if the goremint's nuclear power expansion plans are as successful as the solar energy one, then it can contribute too.

Mort Walker
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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mort Walker » 05 Jun 2020 05:09

RES is not growing as fast as expected. Solar tariff rates are dependent on cheap Chinese panels which is not sustainable. RES is only competitive with coal when the sun shines and the wind blows. It becomes less competitive when compared natural gas. Getting 450 GW of RES by 2030 will remain a goal.

By the end of 2022, the goal was to have an installed capacity 100 GW of solar and 60 GW of wind. As of today it is 35 GW solar and 38 GW of wind. The 2022 goal is not going to be met and it is unlikely the 2030 goal of 450 GW will be met. Keep waiting for RES.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby viveks » 22 Jun 2020 16:25

A thought occurred to me a few days back and so wanted to share. The river interlinking project has been initiated by the government to better manage water resources within the nation. This will allow water from rivers which have more water into rivers which have water scarcity.

I was thinking that since we are building so many tunnels for metro and other railway projects within J&k. Why don’t we develop underground tunneling for interlinking rivers, thereby have a network of underground tunnels that help transfer water from one river to another. The source could have a gated water well whose top would be on the bottom of the river. That way when the gate got open water would fall into that underground well and be pushed towards the connecting river. This way we could also develop an underground hydro electric plant as well.

isubodh
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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby isubodh » 22 Jun 2020 22:42

viveks wrote:A thought occurred to me a few days back and so wanted to share. The river interlinking project has been initiated by the government to better manage water resources within the nation. This will allow water from rivers which have more water into rivers which have water scarcity.

I was thinking that since we are building so many tunnels for metro and other railway projects within J&k. Why don’t we develop underground tunneling for interlinking rivers, thereby have a network of underground tunnels that help transfer water from one river to another. The source could have a gated water well whose top would be on the bottom of the river. That way when the gate got open water would fall into that underground well and be pushed towards the connecting river. This way we could also develop an underground hydro electric plant as well.


Think of one inter-river tunnel and calculate the approximate cost. Now think is that the best way to spend that amount of money or there more beneficial usage possible. Come up with some rough calculations and many can share opinion which will clear your plan.

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby Mollick.R » 04 Jul 2020 13:53

Ban on power equipment imports from China, Pakistan: Power Minister R K Singh
BY ET BUREAU | UPDATED: JUL 04, 2020, 08.52 AM IST

New Delhi: India will not allow import of power equipment from China & Pakistan, power minister R K Singh announced Friday morning, citing recent transgression in border areas and cyber security threats. Imports from other nations will need permissions.

“Today we manufacture everything that is required for power generation, transmission and distribution. In 2018-1, we imported Rs 71,000 power equipment of which Rs 21,000 crore are Chinese. We cannot tolerate this that you have a country which transgresses into our country and yet we create jobs in that country, when we have the ability to manufacture it (equipment) ourselves. We have decided not to buy from prior-reference countries. Any equipment imported will need permission. And we will not give permissions for equipment from China and Pakistan.

Singh also said that the electricity grid was vulnerable to attacks. “Power system is vulnerable to malware attacks, which can shut down our communications, data base and defence systems. That is why all imports need to be inspected and few countries need to be banned,” Singh said in his speech in Hindi adding other countries also restrict imports of critical power equipment.

An executive order moved by the White House in May blocked and mitigated transactions involving bulk-power system electric equipment manufactured or supplied by a “foreign adversary”.

Singh sought support from state governments in stopping imports of tower elements, conductors, transformers and meter parts which are available indigenously.

He said high imports, particularly from China, was concern in renewable energy sector too. He said China sells equipment at artificially low rates for dumping and hurting Indian manufacturing. He said the government plan to impose duty of 25% on solar equipment imports from August 1, which is proposed to be raised to 40% from next year.

ET reported on Thursday that in his meet with various state power ministers on Friday, Union power minister R K Singh is likely to ask states to comply with the Central public procurement norms in placing orders.

The government is keeping a close watch on the tendering of the Rs 55,000-crore emission control equipment by the thermal power sector that has placed large orders on Chinese companies in the past.

Most private and various state power companies are in discussions with Chinese companies for the emission control gear. Power utilities of states like Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Maharashtra have sought global bidders for procurement against the Centre’s public procurement norms. While Gujarat has placed order with a Chinese firm, Haryana recently cancelled its Chinese order.


https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/ban-on-power-equipment-imports-from-china-pakistan-power-minister-r-k-singh/printarticle/76765037.cms

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Re: India's Power Sector

Postby KL Dubey » 10 Jul 2020 23:27

‘Sure, pure and secure’: PM Modi inaugurates Asia’s largest solar plant in MP’s Rewa

https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/sure-pure-and-secure-pm-modi-inaugurates-asia-s-largest-solar-plant-in-mp-s-rewa/story-D0PL4ssjPZ3UH7LNsfxZiO.html

^^Great boost to the solar mission and renewable energy. Even more importantly, he also described plans to achieve independence in solar power equipment:

https://www.livemint.com/news/india/india-to-end-imported-solar-power-equipment-dependence-pm-modi-11594367542246.html


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