Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

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Bade
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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Bade » 20 Jun 2015 17:55

With the inner city areas not providing for paid multi-level parking lots to avoid parking on the streets, there is little hope of better traffic management on the narrow roads in our cities.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby chaanakya » 20 Jun 2015 19:28

Barcelona presents a viable model for urban regeneration and for making of Smart Cities in India with its emphasis on Padestrians, Cyclists and Multi Modal Transport and Public spaces. It is also the Host of Conference on Smart Cities held annually . It has transformed from being a degraded urban agglomeration to a Rejuvenated Smart City. Restoration of La Rambla should be a matter of study by Indian Planners on how to think of people rather than Vehicles. Change came due to 1992 Olympic.

of course like all models of development , we need to draw right lessons and implement it in our context rather than copying everything regardless of its applicability in our situation.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 20 Jun 2015 19:43

3 flagship schemes to be launched on June 25.

Link
Last edited by Suraj on 20 Jun 2015 23:11, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Fixed link. Please put links between [ url= ] and [ / url ]. Don't copy and paste unformatted links.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Theo_Fidel » 20 Jun 2015 21:39

Bade wrote:With the inner city areas not providing for paid multi-level parking lots to avoid parking on the streets, there is little hope of better traffic management on the narrow roads in our cities.


These will be expensive. Are people willing to pay. Typical construction costs will approach Rs 2500/sqft even forget land costs! So a single car space will need ~ 400 sqft per spec and cost Rs 10 lakhs a piece. Investor will have to make returns of ~ 20% to make it worthwhile. So 2 lakhs per car. 10 hours of parking per day x 365 ~ 4000 hours per year. 2 lakhs/4000 = Rs 50 per hour. How many people will pay this?

And it still doesn't answer the question of how they can get there if the roads are congested.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Vriksh » 21 Jun 2015 19:02

In New York and many western cities the feeling of space is created by removing non transparent fences around buildings. In India every building has a tall brick wall around it which obstruct visibility and wind. Whereas in the west I found that the sidewalk nudge right upto a building. Don't know it that is what creates a far more open look and the transparency in outlook. Even private property such as layouts etc are not fenced with people respecting undemarcated boundaries with subtle clues such as trees etc

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Bade » 21 Jun 2015 19:59

This aesthetic feature also gives a sense of community. Even gated communities give the same vibes when in already. Walls in India attract posters and bill boards of all kinds adding to the cluttered look. Our cities look so terrible as a result.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby SaiK » 22 Jun 2015 07:41

https://amp.twimg.com/v/4e3e25a6-1904-4 ... 04e660dbc9
WE SHOULD GROW LIKE THIS!!!! see it in full screen ..

well only the down town part though.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Theo_Fidel » 22 Jun 2015 20:14

Vriksh wrote:In India every building has a tall brick wall around it which obstruct visibility and wind.


I dunno. Most of EU has walls around houses, esp the Southern EU and they have plenty of social life. I think done well, such structures are an useful part of the Urban landscape. What should be resisted is the blank featureless cement plaster wall that is hostile to all life. Instead a varied structure with fencing, coppices, crenelations, fenestrations, rusticated patterns, works well. On the whole Indians like to decorate their compound walls and the variety of new designs are wonderful. They should not be resisted IMHO. Personally I love their quirkiness. In my native every house has a wonderful dry/wet stack country stone wall and it gives a wonderful sense of place. I know I’m home by the breaks in the walls, the odd shaped rock in one and the stone ladders that are built into my side street. That said a certain amount of standardization should be possible. Maybe a material pallet of local stone and masonry techniques, height limits, etc

How can one say this is not wonderful beauty. 8)
Image

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Singha » 22 Jun 2015 21:13

to get people into public transport, each metro station and major bus adda needs a car park of 5000-1000 cars and 25000 bikes with automated and efficient ticketing and passes. atleast in the end stations of each line where most daily commuters come from.

also they are busy building metros through old elite areas of blr but none where its needed most - outer ring road. its too late for overhead pillars now, it has to be underground at much greater cost.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Picklu » 22 Jun 2015 21:27

Exactly. TenderSURE would have be wonderful on the service roads of ORR for a large part.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 24 Jun 2015 19:57

Why is TN getting 12 smart cities?

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Theeran » 25 Jun 2015 00:01

The state is highly urbanized. As much as 50% I think. My guess for the 12 - Chennai, Coimbatore, Madurai, Tiruchi, Salem, Erode, Tiruppur, Ooty, Tirunelveli, Thanjavur, Vellore, Kancheepuram.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Suraj » 25 Jun 2015 00:09

The 2011 census has rural:urban data:
RURAL URBAN DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION: CENSUS 2011
However there is no detailed state-wise breakdown in the presentation. Perhaps there's another detailed PDF on the census site with it, but I'll leave that to someone else to find.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Theeran » 25 Jun 2015 00:26

Here is the data for TN - http://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/censusinfodashboard/stock/profiles/en/IND033_Tamil%20Nadu.pdf

Rural 37,229,590 51.6%
Urban 34,917,440 48.4%

We can safely assume a million moved in the last 4 years. That should bring it right next to 50%.

Here is an article stating TN to be most urbanized state - http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/Census-2011-Tamil-Nadu-3rd-most-urbanised-state/articleshow/9292380.cms

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Suraj » 25 Jun 2015 01:36

Thanks!

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 25 Jun 2015 18:02

I am unable to understand the logic behind this decision. UP with 200 million is only 25-30% urban but is getting the most smart cities while WB and Bihar which are at or near 100 million people are getting only 4. IMO it should be based on population and follows the logic for almost all other states. Only TN is the exception. even KL which is highly urban is getting only 1. I think TN should have gotten 6 and Bihar, WB 7 each.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby niran » 25 Jun 2015 18:40

Supratik wrote:I am unable to understand the logic behind this decision. UP with 200 million is only 25-30% urban but is getting the most smart cities while WB and Bihar which are at or near 100 million people are getting only 4. IMO it should be based on population and follows the logic for almost all other states. Only TN is the exception. even KL which is highly urban is getting only 1. I think TN should have gotten 6 and Bihar, WB 7 each.

the logic is to develop current cities saar not to develop new cities UP is mucho ahead from Bihar in this regard.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 25 Jun 2015 19:10

Does TN even have 12 large cities to develop? There should be some metric to decide. If it is population based WB and BH should have gotten more. If it is based on urbanization UP shouldn't get so many.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 25 Jun 2015 19:30

^^Yes. Then there are innumerable smaller towns the accommodate the remaining urban population.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Muni ... Tamil_Nadu

Anyway, for the record:

12 smart cities to come up in Tamil Nadu - PTI, The Hindu
Uttar Pradesh will get to nominate maximum number of cities to be developed as smart cities, followed by Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra.

The government has assigned number of cities each State/Union Territory can nominate under the 100 Smart Cities project as well as those to be developed under the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) scheme.

Uttar Pradesh has been given the opportunity to nominate 13 cities to be developed as smart cities, while 64 cities in the State have been identified under AMRUT scheme, according to a senior Urban Development Ministry official.

Tamil Nadu comes second with the allocation of 12 smart cities and 33 AMRUT cities.

While Maharashtra has been allotted 10 cities, Gujarat and Karnataka are eligible to develop six cities each.

Under AMRUT scheme, 37, 31 and 21 cities have been identified in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Karnataka, respectively.

Delhi has got one city each for smart city and AMRUT.

According to the criteria finalised by the government, West Bengal and Rajasthan get to nominate four cities for the smart city project; Bihar, Andhra Pradesh and Punjab three cities; Odisha, Haryana, Telangana and Chhattisgarh two cities; and Jammu and Kashmir, Kerala, Jharkhand, Assam, Himachal, Goa, Arunachal and Chandigarh one city each.

Similarly, under the AMRUT scheme, 31 cities have been identified in Andhra Pradesh; 30 in Rajasthan; 28 in West Bengal; 27 in Bihar; 19 in Odisha and Haryana; 18 in Kerala; 17 in Punjab; 15 in Telangana and 10 in Chhattisgarh.

Surprising that Kerala gets only 1, considering it is also highly urbanised: http://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/ce ... Kerala.pdf

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby chaanakya » 25 Jun 2015 21:17

Deleted
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Reason: Politics go in the politics thread.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Suraj » 25 Jun 2015 21:20

Please don't use this thread to debate the opposition politics. There's a separate thread for all that .

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby RamaY » 26 Jun 2015 06:36

X-posting.

A_Gupta wrote:http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2015/06/24/chinas-back-to-the-countryside-policy-a-step-toward-reducing-rural-urban-disparity/
"China’s “Back to the Countryside” Policy: A Step Toward Reducing Rural-Urban Disparity"
Earlier this week, the Chinese government announced a set of policies aimed at encouraging migrants from rural areas to the cities to return to their hometowns and start businesses. The policy guidelines direct local governments to encourage migrant workers (as well as university graduates and discharged soldiers) to take the capital, skills, and experience they’ve acquired in urban areas back to underdeveloped rural areas and engage in entrepreneurship. These policies—think of them as the newest iteration of Deng Xiaoping’s “let some get rich first”—are a solid step towards promoting genuine market-driven development.

People’s Daily reports that under the new policies local governments will employ the following five measures aimed at expanding rural entrepreneurship by returning migrants:

    1. Reduce “barriers to returning to rural areas” by providing training to returning migrants and reducing administrative fees for starting a business.
    2. Cut taxes for qualifying enterprises and individuals.
    3. Expand support for such enterprises, by providing subsidies, connecting them to local business networks, and helping them set up ecommerce platforms.
    4. Provide financial support for qualifying enterprises and individuals, by providing subsidized loans and expanding credit availability in rural areas.
    5. Increase support for entrepreneurial parks in rural areas.

The policy comes at a time when the rate of migration to the cities is slowing. While migrant wages in China continue to grow, the rate of growth of the migrant workforce has declined for several years running, dropping from 5.5 percent growth in 2010 to just 1.3 percent in 2014. Government data also show that the number of rural residents employed near their hometown hashtag grown at a faster rate than the migrant population over that time frame.



We have had our share of Urbanization Vs taking technology to Rural India discussions on this forum.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 27 Jun 2015 09:33

So I was watching a news clip about the smart cities project in News7Tamil. The reporter was saying that the number of cities per state was decided on the basis of states expressing interest, and apparently TN showed a lot of interest, hence the allocation of 12 and 33 under AMRUT. He quoted Venkaiah Naidu of saying something to that effect, and his multiple meetings with Jaya. There may be 2-3 smart cities around Chennai itself.

If this is the case, it explains why WB and Kerala got so few - land acquisition and associated problems would have prevented these states from being very optimistic.

Source

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Suraj » 27 Jun 2015 09:37

That's a very intelligent way to go forward with the process. Let the states self-select based on their expressed level of interest. No point in handing states something they've no real interest in, ability to implement, or both.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 27 Jun 2015 09:45

^^That's what I thought too, since the centre won't have much insight into individual states' challenges and preferences. It also fits in with Modi's approach to devolve things to a lower level and let states compete with each other.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Vriksh » 28 Jun 2015 15:34

Theo_Fidel wrote:
Vriksh wrote:In India every building has a tall brick wall around it which obstruct visibility and wind.


I dunno. Most of EU has walls around houses, esp the Southern EU and they have plenty of social life. I think done well, such structures are an useful part of the Urban landscape. What should be resisted is the blank featureless cement plaster wall that is hostile to all life. Instead a varied structure with fencing, coppices, crenelations, fenestrations, rusticated patterns, works well.


Did not see walls in Urban areas of Germany, France or even in Thailand. In Urban areas of EU/USA there is a definite absence of walls separating private property from public. What walls do exist are Grill work fences of a much higher aesthetic than seen in India. The side-walk is the defacto delimiter between private and public space wall in most locations I have been to.

The pic you posted would be a far more beautiful if the wall space had given way to 2ft wide sidewalk framed by trees on both side IMO. Imagine your kids being able to walk across to the neighbors kids and join their play. Though I think as a society our penchant installing grills and physically blocking access to private property is a result of the state and society unable to inculcate/respect/protect private property or personal safety.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 29 Jun 2015 19:04

And finally....

And, the Metro gets going - Sunitha Sekar, The Hindu

Image

Image

Image

(Photo credits: The Hindu)

Hundreds of anxious people thronged the Alandur station trying to catch a glimpse of the launch and take the first ride in the metro rail.

After a wait of six long years, the first Bluish-Silver coloured rakes of the Chennai Metro Rail whizzed across the skyline over 100 Feet Road after it was inaugurated at Alandur Metro Rail station by Chief Minister Jayalalithaa a few minutes past noon on Monday.

The station was decked up for the event and many, including CMRL officials, waited for the Chief Minister to flag off the train through video conferencing. Excited people thronged the Alandur station trying to catch a glimpse of the launch and take the first ride in the metro rail. Anita, the mother of A. Preethi, who drove the inaugural train, broke down out of sheer happiness... “I am feeling proud now,” she said speaking to The Hindu.

Fares for the 10 km stretch from Chennai Moffusil Bus Terminus to Alandur ranged from Rs. 10 to Rs. 40. M. Sujitha, a medical college student, who took a ride in the first service, was elated. “Now I don’t have to grapple with traffic when I travel to my college in Ashok Nagar,” she said.

Initially, there will be nine trains running between Koyambedu and Alandur with a frequency of about 10 minutes, officials said. The trains will halt for 30 seconds in each station. Though Chennai Metro Rail trains can travel at a maximum speed of 80 km/hour, they are expected to run about 35 km/hour. Each Chennai Metro Rail train can carry about 1,200 people.

In 2009, the Chennai Metro Rail had an ambitious start with towering expectations from the public; but as the construction progressed, the project ran into various hurdles ranging from cash crunch faced by contractors to the delay in construction and land acquisition.


And this:
Young woman steers Chennai’s first metro train - PTI, The Hindu

More details and pictures here:
Chennai's first metro ride begins - Internet Desk, The Hindu

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 30 Jun 2015 10:21

Planes, trains and automobiles:

Image

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 03 Jul 2015 23:38

Tendersure to expand to 50 roads in Bglore. Hyd and Chen exploring similar model.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Shreeman » 08 Aug 2015 14:27

I dont know where else this would fit, but this is certainly not a poor place. On a recent bout of misguided wandering about I saw something very remarkable. And the need for one thing that would make this even more remarkable.

The one thing:

F$ck the nay sayers. They have a motive. It would not be apparent to anyone visiting from abroad or those watching every day. But it is now perfectly ordinary for a young girl, dressed in what they would call "provocative western clothes" to go about her business alone at any hour. This could be traveling home alone. Or itcould be driving a scooter, in rain, practically through a foot deep puddle and in between illitrate driver driven autos and cabs. And no one bats an eyelid.

You see I saw the difference from two generations ago, when a girl deciding to go jogging in shorts was just not a thing. Women have historically ridden the pillion. And sure plenty of such riding was still being done. But there are independent women, in statistically significant numbers, going about traditional male jobs. They are still fewer in number. And walking into a self serve grocery store, none of the 50 idle standing employee fools would be a woman. But there are numerous, a good sized fraction, women in retail now. This is a new thing by my observation.

And this independence can not be lauded enough. If there is anything that will save india -- from the million cults, from illitracy, from the influence of dirty politics or rotten religion -- it is this. Another generation, these girls will overrun the standing around culture that is youth employment. And make gender equality no worse than in any other society.

Take a moment to thank anyone you see pushing the glass ceiling. Even if they may interpret you taking an unnecessary interest.

Now the one other thing:

It is in the "small dark" realm of sdre. You see, things have to end not outside your door (as in grameen seva outside metro stations or water selling trolleys at bus stops), but at least 1 km from your door.

It is this rush, to enter the narrow and sometimes dark entrance, as if it holds some heretofore unencountered pleasure that results in all lack of civility on the road. Plan and control 1km from the airport, the train stations, the bus stops -- wider roads, controlled lanes, separate elevated/marked parking, drop off/pickup. God knows enough "security" is standing around doing zilch.
Do this and you will overcome all visible signs of "lack of development" or lack of road sense, or courtesy towards your fellow traveller. This "security" closing of all entry and exit points to resemble the mouth of an ant hill is retarded and counter productive.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby SaiK » 09 Aug 2015 04:41


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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 22 Aug 2015 21:37

Finally, some much needed big thinking:

With 8,878 sq km, Chennai Set to Turn Giant Megapolis - C Shivakumar

CHENNAI: The metropolitan city of Chennai, home to the oldest municipal corporation in the world, is set to become a true megapolis, the biggest in the country, by amalgamating neighbouring districts and even Arakkonam Taluk to form a 8,878 sq km metropolitan area.

The proposal to expand the Chennai Metropolitan Area to encompass the whole of Chennai, Tiruvallur and Kancheepuram districts and Arakkonam Taluk in Vellore district is likely to get the green signal from the State government soon.

Currently, the Hyderabad Metropolitan Region, which was formed combining the four districts of Rangareddy, Mahboobnagar, Nalgonda and Medak, is the largest metro area with 7,222 sq km under its jurisdiction. Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority has the second largest area of 4,355 sq km.

At present, Chennai Metropolitan Area is 1,189 sq km, to which 7,700 sq km would be added, making it the biggest. In fact, such would be the proposed size of the area that it would be bigger than even the London Metropolitan Area which is a little over 8,300 sq km. “We are working on something like Chennai Capital Region Development Authority, similar to that of the National Capital Region in New Delhi,” an official source told Express. This could also mean enacting a separate act like that of National Capital Region and Bengaluru Regional Planning Authority Act, and would have a separate institutional set up higher than the Chennai Metropolitan Development Authority (CMDA).

The objective of expanding the metro region is to earmark areas for economic development, generate employment, provide infrastructure integrated with major land use patterns to serve the region, besides a system of hierarchy of settlements in the whole region, assessing their development potential, and assigning future population and activities for further growth.

The huge expansion could pose a formidable challenge for the authorities on regulating development in such a vast area. Sources pointed out that though Tamil Nadu Town and Country Planning Act provides for constitution of a regional planning authority, it will be grossly inadequate for the proposed Chennai Mega Regional Planning and Development Authority.

Image


Theo saar, looks like they were listening in to our conv about what's mofussil w.r.t. Chennai, the proposed area includes everything that I had in mind. :D

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 23 Aug 2015 13:18

Does Chennai have a city planning and execution board which follows a master plan like the NCR region? Otherwise it is meaningless. In Kolkata we have a megapolis covering till Burdwan only on paper and a master plan that no one follows. It is a big mess. Hope Chennai does better.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby prahaar » 23 Aug 2015 14:11

What are the chances of Mumbai-Navi Mumbai-Thane-Kalyan-Dombivli-PCMC-Pune to develop a similar megapolis architecture? It can grow to 50 million from the current 25 in next 20 years. Such mega clusters may however come to dominate state politics even more than they do currently.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 23 Aug 2015 15:35

It is already a megapolis and I would rate the Mumbai MMR to be second only to NCR in planning with a great deal of infra already in place.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby arshyam » 23 Aug 2015 19:18

Supratik wrote:Does Chennai have a city planning and execution board which follows a master plan like the NCR region? Otherwise it is meaningless. In Kolkata we have a megapolis covering till Burdwan only on paper and a master plan that no one follows. It is a big mess. Hope Chennai does better.

It has a metropolitan authority called CMDA as the article said. So far, they haven't done a great job in planning. Too many local bodies along the city periphery means less say for planned and zoned development. Though IIRC, they did contribute to the first Chennai masterplan in the seventies, due to which we built an Inner Ring Road which is now true to its name: it is so congested now that is definitely inner, and is having a metro line now. But beyond that, probably not that much different from how the other metros in India do: just muddle along for the most part. Most of Chennai's suburbs have planned layouts with 30' ft streets and no thought to wide main thoroughfares, etc. and just grow haphazardly.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby vera_k » 23 Aug 2015 19:46

prahaar wrote:What are the chances of Mumbai-Navi Mumbai-Thane-Kalyan-Dombivli-PCMC-Pune to develop a similar megapolis architecture? It can grow to 50 million from the current 25 in next 20 years. Such mega clusters may however come to dominate state politics even more than they do currently.


There's separate metro regions being developed for Mumbai and Pune. The planning authority for Mumbai region has existed for a long time, while the one for Pune region came into force this year.

1. Mumbai - approx. 5000 sq. km.

2. Pune - about 7000 sq. km.

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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Theo_Fidel » 23 Aug 2015 21:50

Chennai expansion is not done yet so lets cross our fingers. IIRC the last expansion took a solid 20 years before all the political stars aligned.

One needs to be aware of how Chennai's land planning process works. It is not solely private or public but a private-public process. Keep in mind when I say planned I'm using a very loose definition of planning.

The impossibility of putting in proper wide roads is due to the increasing fragmentation of rural land ownership. Back in the 1970's, when Annanagar, KK nagar, Shastri Nagar and Besant nagar were acquired the average chunks of land were in the 10-20 acre range. In the 80's the land was down into the .5 acre to 1 acre range and Chennai's private-public land acquisition process turned into a nightmare. In the private-public process the planning department lays out the streets and plots under strict guidelines on how much land can be public and how much land must be left for sale. IIRC 60% of the land must be left for sale by the private party. and it is the private party that platts the land and the city has to notify it as long as the minimum guidelines are met. So Chennai is a minimum planning city. Now imagine the night mare when an entire persons 1/2 acre property parcel ends up as road. Urban planners adjust by shifting the road or giving it an odd twist or going non-linear, etc. In the beginning it was not a huge problem like it is now. You can see this when you drive thru Valasravakkam which was planned in the 1980's. Not a single street could be run straight like Annanagar just to the East of it. Things get worse in Oragadam which was laid out in 1990's. You can see how the parks and open spaces disappear as it becomes impossible to put them in place.

Now the only way forward is to acquire the entire acreage, which would be many Rs1000 crores now. The way forward is to pass a law aggregating properties into large land chunks and then the planning is done and land sold as a collective and the land owners paid out off the collective income. This would require a complete rewrite of present laws. Such a proposal was sent up the chain many times from the 1980's but there was no appetite for it. The large land owners would have lost and so quietly it was buried. People often talk about the land owner-builder lobby without taking the time or bothering to understand the issues involved. Some understanding of the issues would have pushed a proper revision of urban planning.

The other problem was that while Annanagar, KK nagar, Shastri Nagar and Besant nagar were being planned, the plan was for a population going from 500,000 to 850,000. Today the population is 10 times that. The vast majority could not afford to live in these areas so they moved into the villages in the area which had/have exemptions from the city planning process.

Prasad
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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Prasad » 23 Aug 2015 23:02

Planning is a misnomer. "organic growth" is what it can be called euphermistically. The entire city is a flustercluck. You have wee roads that cater to a row of small houses that have now become multi-story, multi-apartment complexes. Phuck water, power planning then. Or anything else. Stuff like community parks and playgrounds are totally gone then. Theoji outlines what the problems were. And frankly, the areas that chennai is swallowing don't really inspire any confidence either. They'll be the same bunch of problems maginified a decade later.

Supratik
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Re: Indian Urban Development and Public Policy Discussion

Postby Supratik » 24 Aug 2015 20:20

They should follow CBN's land pooling scheme being used to build the new AP capital. Why is it easier to build 6-8 lane roads in MMR and NCR but not in Chen? I would assume the same problem to exist everywhere. I can say what IMO is the problem in Kolkata. Due to no development work for 30-40 yrs Kolkata is surrounded by urban ghettos interspersed with fragmented agri land. So to built anything now you will have to demolish a lot of things.


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