Infrastructure News & Discussion

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putnanja
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 22 Jul 2008 02:49

Cos from Dubai, HK, China, Pak may be barred from port projects

NEW DELHI: The government has decided to ban all companies from Dubai, Hong Kong, China and Pakistan from investing in port infrastructure projects in the country. Consequently, the ports and shipping ministry will reopen bids for at least 10 port projects.

Although FDI proposals from these countries have been rejected earlier on a case-to-case basis, the government is now introducing a blanket ban on companies from these countries at the bidding stage itself. The country-specific ban will be introduced as part of the international bidding document. The move will impact investment plans of major port development companies like DP World and Hutchison in India.

Based on security threats to Indian naval bases, private players from Dubai, China, Hong Kong and Pakistan will no longer be permitted to invest in over 250 ports being developed on a public-private-partnership model in the country. According to government sources, this will be applicable for all facilities, including cargo handling, ground handling and other services, apart from infrastructure development. A joint decision to this effect has been taken by the ministries of defence, home affairs and shipping and department of industrial policy and promotion.

“The government allows 100 per cent FDI for port development, but there are about four countries that may not get the green signal from security agencies in the future. Since most of the ports are next to naval bases, it is possible for foreign companies to gather vital information on the day-to-day activities of Indian naval bases,” the official said.

This seems to have already taken shape in the case of the Ennore Port container terminal bids. Despite its expertise, DP World was surprisingly left out of the six shortlisted companies for the development of the terminal, which may have been due to security-related issues and Ennore’s proximity to major naval bases along the east coast.

The government currently allows 100 per cent FDI in port development. “Under the national maritime development policy, the government has invited investment worth Rs 34,000 crore from private players, 90 per cent of which is expected to come from FDI,” he said. The nine port projects that are at present being evaluated by the government and put under the scanner are worth more than Rs 5,000 crore.

MN Kumar
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby MN Kumar » 01 Aug 2008 19:50

At last some good news for the Hyderabad Metro Rail project.

Maytas-Nava consortium wins bid for Hyderabad Metro Rail
Nava Bharat Venture and Maytas Infra-led consortium has finally became the L1 bidder for the Rs 11,814 crore Hyderabad Metro Rail project, according to NVS Reddy, managing director of the company.

“The officers’ committee has submitted its report to the state government for its final approval. We hope to issue letter of approval (LoA) in the next 10 days,” Reddy said. There after, the company has to announce the financial closure in the next six months, he added.

Announcing the three-member committee decision to the media, Reddy said it had considered all the pros and cons including legal options before finalising the bid. “We have taken all the precautions including expert opinions on legal, technology and financial aspects, before finalising the bids,” Reddy said.

While GVK-led consortium had backed out after qualifying in the technical round, the remaining four bidders—Nava Bharat, Magna Allmore, Reliance, and Essar—have participated in the financial bids for the metro rail project.

Interestingly, the Nava Bharat-led consortium has agreed to pay Rs 30,311 crore to the government during the concession period of 34 years, while Magna Allmore had agreed to pay Rs 250 crore to the government towards equity in the SPV company.

However, the two other bidders--Reliance had sought a grant of Rs 2,811 crore from the government and Essar had asked a grant of Rs 3,100 crore. Hence, the committee had finalised the bid in favour of the Nava Bharat consortium after satisfying in other areas such as legal etc, Reddy clarified.


Considering cost escalation due to delay, the state government had revised the project to Rs 12,410 crore as against Rs 9,696 crore in November 2007. However, the Centre had limited the cost at Rs 11,814 crore while disagreeing to the state charges.

Metro rail is proposed on three routes—Miyapur to LB Nagar covering 29.87 km connecting 27 stations, Secunderabad to Falaknuma covering 14.78 km connecting 16 stations and Nagole to Shilparamam covering 26.51 km connecting 23 stations—with 66 stations and 71.16 km of track. The project is expected to be operational by 2011 as per the revised schedule.


The promised amount of 30k crores to the govt. by the consortia seems too huge. It turns out to 891.5 crores p.a. This was reason the bids were delayed as the Govt. was seeking some clarifications on this.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 02 Aug 2008 00:34

If you all want to check what is being planned in the Gujarat International Finance Tech-City, I urge you all to visit this link at SSC India. Some of the members have been putting in good effort to find these images and get some good info on the project.

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=552518

Something to look forward to -
Image

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Muppalla » 02 Aug 2008 21:10

India's first solar housing complex

Rajarhat, the new township coming up on the outskirts of Kolkata, is a series of gated residential colonies, each more high-profile than the next.

All the big local builders have flagged their presence here, and so have a number of reputed national ones. But there's one recently completed development that's truly revolutionary.

This is Rabi Rashmi Abasan, India's first "solar housing complex". Piloted by the West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Authority (WBREDA), the 26 villas in this complex are a showcase for the exciting possibilities that BIPV - building integrated photovoltaic - technology offers for residential projects of a similar nature.

BIPV refers to solar panels integrated into the architecture - mostly into the roof, the facade or the glazing - that convert the sunlight to which they are exposed through the day into electricity.

According to Lyn Toh, spokesperson for SunTechnics India, the firm that supplied the hardware at Rabi Rashmi: "BIPV makes a building highly energy-efficient and reduces carbon emissions, while ensuring basic functions of standard building elements, such as water tightness, light transmittance and thermal insulation."

BIPV is all the rage in the West. Indeed, it makes a lot of sense in a world that's fast running out of oil and coal - the two, extremely polluting sources of energy that have powered industrialisation.

According to S P Gon Choudhuri, director, WBREDA, BIPV constitutes around 15 per cent of the around 5,000 mega watts of installed capacity of solar power, and is growing at 50 per cent annually.

So each house in Rabi Rashmi will generate 2.2 kwh - which will account for 40 per cent of the power needed to run the standard household electrical appliances. Whenever these are not being used, the power generated will be fed into the grid.

In addition, each house has a solar water heating system which is good enough to supply 100 litres of hot water every day. The design of the houses uses elements of "solar passive architecture" to keep the house cool in summer.

Essentially, this means ensuring cross ventilation so that the cool breeze from the water bodies to the south can circulate through the house, and making the most of natural light. "The houses are carbon neutral," says Gon Choudhuri.

BIPV sounds great, but like all good things it has downsides too - primarily the high cost of installation. As Toh says, "The cost of an installed BIPV system can vary from $12-20 per watt peak, or even higher, depending upon the complexities of installation or type of solar modules. The payback will significantly depend upon the local utility's willingness to buy the green energy at a preferential feed-in tariff [the rate at which the power utility buys the power from the producer]. This is what drives the urban PV market the world over, and we envisage that it is going to happen in India as well in the years ahead."

At Rabi Rashmi, the cost of each house - around Rs 45 lakh - was quite a notch higher than similar developments in the vicinity.

Says Debabrata Dutta who's bought one of the houses, "We were given an estimate that we were paying about Rs 6 lakh more for all the BIPV paraphernalia, which was okay because we would be paying far less for our electricity and recovering the cost in a few years."

As for maintenance, WBREDA has contracted SunTechnics India and Mackintosh Burn, the civil contractor for the project, to help the residents' association for five years.

Given the costs, the maintenance and all that, it takes some amount of push by government to make people turn to such technologies. That's been the experience in the West where a number of European countries, the US and Japan offer financial incentives to encourage the adoption of BIPV, whether as subsidies on the cost of installation or as a generous "feed in" tariff.

The West Bengal government's contribution in this regard has been two-fold. It put in around Rs 50 lakh, which went into the street lighting, the landscaping and so on. Of the rest of the total project cost of around Rs 12 crore (Rs 120 million), Rs 11.5 crore (Rs 115 million) came from the sale of the houses. "In that sense," says Gon Chaudhuri, "Rabi Rashmi was a completely commercial project."

But the government has also stepped in with a feed-in tariff of Rs 5.60 per kilowatt hour, which is the peak slab for domestic power in the state.

"There is a benefit of Rs 7 per kilowatt hour to the residents," the WBREDA director calculates. Incidentally, West Bengal, he adds, is the only state in the country which allows domestically generated solar power to be fed into the grid. "No other state allows this."

But as Lyn Toh of Suntechnics says, "We must realise that switching to solar is not just about payback. It is also about taking that all-important first step towards securing your own energy source and about making a 'green' choice."

Already Gon Choudhuri says DLF and a few local builders have signed MoUs with WBREDA to build similar houses in the state, and officials from the Centre and other states are trooping down to Rajarhat to check out Rabi Rashmi.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby SaiK » 02 Aug 2008 21:37

to me, infrastructure means facilities, roads, traffic management, water supply, electricity and utilities for high end communication for the future.. and least preference on how things look, building plans, etc. those skycrapers have little value in the ways of good facilitated living.

we have long way to go in the basic requirements.. and we are looking at just mere building shape and design and architecture & aesthetics alone.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 04 Aug 2008 11:17

SaiK wrote:to me, infrastructure means facilities, roads, traffic management, water supply, electricity and utilities for high end communication for the future.. and least preference on how things look, building plans, etc. those skycrapers have little value in the ways of good facilitated living.

we have long way to go in the basic requirements.. and we are looking at just mere building shape and design and architecture & aesthetics alone.


Sai, I am assuming your post in in reference to the GIFT skyscraper I posted. Sticking only to GIFT, please do visit the link and read about how everything has been planned from the ground up.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby BhairavP » 04 Aug 2008 19:28

In other news:
http://www.rediff.com/money/2008/aug/04costly.htm

A Mumbai lane, where India's richest person Mukesh Ambani is building a $2-billion home, has joined the league of the world's 10 most expensive streets, but is outranked by over three-times costlier London's Billionaires Row where steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal owns three houses.

Altamount Road in India's financial capital Mumbai has been named as the 10th costliest in a survey of the world's top 10 most expensive streets in the world, while London's Kensington Palace Gardens has been ranked at the fourth place.

While the tree-lined street in south of Mumbai is a favourite of India's 'very rich,' Kensington Palace Gardens area in West London is popularly known as Billionaires Row. It has been home to Late Princess Diana and NRI-billionaire Mittal owns three houses on this street.

#


Street


Cost per sq mt

1


Avenue Princess Grace, Monaco


$190,000

2


Severn Road, Hong Kong


$121,000

3


Fifth Avenue, New York City


$80,000

4


Kensington Palace Gardens, London


$77,000

5


Avenue Montaigne, Paris


$54,000

6


Ostozhenka, Moscow


$40,000

7


Via Suvretta, St Moritz


$38,000

8


Carolwood Drive, Los Angeles


$30,000

9


Wolseley Road, Sydney


$28,000

10


Altamount Road, Mumbai


$25,000

* A peek into Mukesh Ambani's $2 bn Mumbai home

In the survey conducted by Wealth-Bulletin, a United Kingdom-based online news and analysis provider for global wealth management industry, Avenue Princess Grace in Monaco has been named at the top with a price tag of $190,000 per square metre.

It is followed by Hong Kong's Severn Road with a price of $121,000 per square metre (sq mt) at second and New York City's Fifth Avenue at third place ($80,000 per sq mt).

Kensington Palace Gardens has made to the fourth place with a price tag of $77,000 per sq mt, while the same for the last-ranked Mumbai's Altamount Road is $25,000 per sq mt.

Noting that the Mumbai lane has always been a popular choice for homes of India's very rich, Wealth-Bulletin said that the street was 'catapulted into the ranks of the world's most expensive when India's wealthiest individual Mukesh Ambani unveiled plans last year to build a residential apartment block on the street at a cost of around $2 billion.'

'The extraordinary, 27-floor building, called Antilia, will be as high as a normal 60-floor skyscraper, have elevated gardens and three helicopter pads,' it said, adding that the prices in Antilia were likely to be at least 25,000 per sq mt or even more.

Other streets ranked costlier than Mumbai's Altamount Road in the list include Avenue Montaigne in Paris, ranked fifth at $54,000 per sq mt, Moscow's Ostozhenka (sixth at $40,000 per sq mt), Via Suvretta in St Moritz (seventh at $38,000 per sq mt) and Carolwood Drive in Los Angeles (eighth ranked at $30,000 per sq mt).

The survey revealed that the prices for the top homes in the best locations appear to have decoupled from the gloom and doom being felt in the wider property market.

'The bursting of the housing market bubble is growing louder, causing increasing concern among a widening spectrum of the population, but for the really wealthy the downturn might have little or no impact on the prices they are paying, or selling for homes,' it said.

Noting one needs to be a billionaire, or not far behind, to live in these streets, Wealth-Bulletin said Moscow's Ostozhenka Street and Mumbai's Altamount Road 'would not have even been considered for the list a decade ago, but their inclusion today shows just how important these cities have become for burgeoning billionaire class in India and Russia.'



Glad we got in on Altamount Road 40 years ago :)

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 08 Aug 2008 02:19

Hyderabad to get 71-km metro `free of cost`.

Delhi’s 65-km metro cost the state and central governments Rs 10,500 crore. In comparison, Hyderabad is about to get a 71-km metro without the central or state government paying a rupee. Instead, the Andhra Pradesh government will receive Rs 1,240 crore (calculated at present value) by simply giving the concession to a private consortium.
The state cabinet approved the concession agreement and the winning bid at its meeting in Hyderabad earlier this week. The winning consortium is led by the city’s Satyam group, which has so far focused on its software business.

This dramatic bid result was so unexpected that the bid documents had not even considered the possibility of the government being the net financial gainer. Instead, the central government had expected to fork out about 20 per cent of the project cost of Rs 12,410 crore as a capital subsidy, with the possibility of a further 10 per cent funding from the Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission. The state government, in turn, had been prepared to fork out about 10 per cent of the project cost.

The combined saving for the Centre and state is, therefore, about Rs 4,800 crore or more, over and above which the state government will now receive Rs 30,300 crore from the concessionaires over the life of the concession. Discounted (at 13.5 per cent a year) to get its present value, that money is worth Rs 1,240 crore today.Officials who have steered the project argue that the Hyderabad experience opens up a completely new way of building metro services in the big cities, at zero cost to governments and city administrations.

In contrast, Bangalore’s 42-km metro is a state-funded project costing Rs 6,500 crore. Mumbai has given the contract for the 11-km first phase of its metro project (costing Rs 2,356 crore) to a consortium led by the Reliance Anil Ambani group, with a government-paid capital subsidy of Rs 650 crore.

Five consortia had been shortlisted for the Hyderabad metro concession, which is to run for 35 years, with a possible extension by another 25 years. Of these, a GVK-led consortium did not bid finally.An Essar-Alsthom consortium asked for a subsidy from the government of Rs 3,100 crore, while a Reliance Energy-Bombardier consortium wanted Rs 2,811 crore. The bid that came closest to the one by Satyam was from a Malaysian-led group which included Siemens and Nagarjuna, which had offered to pay the government Rs 151 crore.

The tariff has been set at Rs 8 to Rs 20. The tariff on the Delhi Metro for comparable distances is Rs 6 to Rs 22.

The project team that is celebrating its success now was led by NVS Reddy, a railway accounts service officer in Hyderabad, while the political leadership was provided by the Andhra Pradesh chief minister, YS Rajshekhar Reddy. In Delhi, the mentoring with regard to the concession agreement and the specifications manual was provided by Gajendra Haldea of the Planning Commission.

Based on the success of the Hyderabad model, Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia is understood to have written to the Prime Minister, suggesting that this be the model followed for other metro projects—[b]a view that is apparently being opposed by the Ministry of Urban Development (what else can we expect), which prefers the Delhi metro model.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Rishirishi » 08 Aug 2008 03:08

Vipul wrote:Hyderabad to get 71-km metro `free of cost`.

Delhi’s 65-km metro cost the state and central governments Rs 10,500 crore. In comparison, Hyderabad is about to get a 71-km metro without the central or state government paying a rupee. Instead, the Andhra Pradesh government will receive Rs 1,240 crore (calculated at present value) by simply giving the concession to a private consortium.
The state cabinet approved the concession agreement and the winning bid at its meeting in Hyderabad earlier this week. The winning consortium is led by the city’s Satyam group, which has so far focused on its software business.

This dramatic bid result was so unexpected that the bid documents had not even considered the possibility of the government being the net financial gainer. Instead, the central government had expected to fork out about 20 per cent of the project cost of Rs 12,410 crore as a capital subsidy, with the possibility of a further 10 per cent funding from the Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission. The state government, in turn, had been prepared to fork out about 10 per cent of the project cost.

The combined saving for the Centre and state is, therefore, about Rs 4,800 crore or more, over and above which the state government will now receive Rs 30,300 crore from the concessionaires over the life of the concession. Discounted (at 13.5 per cent a year) to get its present value, that money is worth Rs 1,240 crore today.Officials who have steered the project argue that the Hyderabad experience opens up a completely new way of building metro services in the big cities, at zero cost to governments and city administrations.

In contrast, Bangalore’s 42-km metro is a state-funded project costing Rs 6,500 crore. Mumbai has given the contract for the 11-km first phase of its metro project (costing Rs 2,356 crore) to a consortium led by the Reliance Anil Ambani group, with a government-paid capital subsidy of Rs 650 crore.

Five consortia had been shortlisted for the Hyderabad metro concession, which is to run for 35 years, with a possible extension by another 25 years. Of these, a GVK-led consortium did not bid finally.An Essar-Alsthom consortium asked for a subsidy from the government of Rs 3,100 crore, while a Reliance Energy-Bombardier consortium wanted Rs 2,811 crore. The bid that came closest to the one by Satyam was from a Malaysian-led group which included Siemens and Nagarjuna, which had offered to pay the government Rs 151 crore.

The tariff has been set at Rs 8 to Rs 20. The tariff on the Delhi Metro for comparable distances is Rs 6 to Rs 22.

The project team that is celebrating its success now was led by NVS Reddy, a railway accounts service officer in Hyderabad, while the political leadership was provided by the Andhra Pradesh chief minister, YS Rajshekhar Reddy. In Delhi, the mentoring with regard to the concession agreement and the specifications manual was provided by Gajendra Haldea of the Planning Commission.

Based on the success of the Hyderabad model, Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia is understood to have written to the Prime Minister, suggesting that this be the model followed for other metro projects—[b]a view that is apparently being opposed by the Ministry of Urban Development (what else can we expect), which prefers the Delhi metro model.


There has to be a catch here.

12000 crores interest alone is at least 1200 crores (at discount interest rate of 10%). Let us say that the metro has 2 million travelers per day and the averge ticket is 15 rupee. That adds up to 3 crores per day. If it is opperational 360 days it only adds up to a bit over 1000 crores (from which one has to also cover opperating cots). So how is this possible?

One way could be by reducing the investment costs by developing real estate. Metro does create a lot of traffic of people. And also the prices of an area always go up, when a metro comes. Perhaps it could be possible to levy a small charge of say 30 000 rupees per flat that is within 500 meters radius

I would love to see the calculation that has been made.

If Satyam can manage to do this, then they will have racked a major problem.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby yvijay » 08 Aug 2008 06:34

Maytas Takes Metro Home
You are right. It seems they have a lot of land around hyderabad. They are asking for the line to be extended to outskirts where they have land to take the advantage of appreciation.

Now, the group is believed to be looking at expanding the project on two routes not just to make its bid viable but also to get more value for its properties by providing connectivity. Satyam, the parent company of Maytas, owns thousands of acres on the city outskirts which the latter is developing into real estate ventures.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 09 Aug 2008 18:00

Japan clears assistance for Chennai Metro

The Japanese government has given its approval for concessional assistance to the Chennai Metro rail project and the loan agreement is expected to be signed in September this year.

The total project cost is estimated at Rs. 11,124 crore, of which the Japanese loan component will be Rs. 8,646 crore and the first instalment will be Rs. 853 crore. The State and the Central governments will be sharing the balance cost.

The Planning Commission has given in-principle approval for the project and the approval for Central funding is expected soon. It will take at least six years for the project to be completed from the date of commencement of the work.

According to Chennai Metro Rail Company sources, the detailed project report, prepared by the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation, was approved by the State government in just seven days. A special purpose vehicle was formed in one month and the project was presented for financial assistance. Another feature of the project was that special steps had been taken to provide liberal financial assistance to about 450 slum dwellers, who might be resettled as a result of the project. All displaced persons would be given ownership flats as well as cash assistance and skill training. It had been decided that the land required for the project would be acquired mostly by negotiation, paying a fair compensation as per market conditions.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby vsudhir » 23 Sep 2008 19:05

x-post

Sreedharan calls Hyderabad Metro a scandal, sparks row (India Today)

Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) managing director E Sreedharan calling the Hyderabad Metro Rail project a "scandal" in the making has caused embarrassment to the Andhra Pradesh government and has triggered upheaval in political circles.

Stung by Sreedharan's charges in a letter to Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia, the Congress government has sought an unconditional apology, failing which it threatened to sue him.

Sreedharan's objection to the way the government allowing private consortium to commercially exploit prime land has also brought into focus the sensitive issue of land.

Sreedharan, who served as a consultant for Hyderabad Metro project, remarked that making "available 296 acres of prime land to BOT (build, operate and transfer) developer for commercial exploitation was like selling the family silver". He also felt that the land concession could lead to a "big political scandal some time later".

"It is apparent the BOT operator has a hidden agenda which appears to be to extend the metro network to a large tract of his private land holdings so as to reap a windfall profit of four to five times the land price."

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 23 Sep 2008 20:10

His contributions to the Railways and DMRC are immense but that does not mean that Sreedharan can develop a massive ego and go about certifying all other metro options as being wrong and "not in public interest".
If Maytas is going to make profits by extending the metro to its vast land holdings, whats wrong? Is not the city of Hyderabad getting the Metro free and instead making available thousands of crores for other "public interest" Projects?

He similarly tried to convince(misguide) the Maharashtra Govt to forego the Public-Private route for the second phase of the Mumbai Metro project.Maharashtra Govt had to look into his proposed model(Govt Funding Onlee) and decided it was not feasible.(Resulting in unnecassaary delay in the process by one year :evil: )

AP govt seeks Sreedharan`s apology over Metro `scandal’

Hyderabad, Sep 23: Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) managing director E Sreedharan calling the Hyderabad Metro Rail project a "scandal" in the making has caused embarrassment to the Andhra Pradesh government and has triggered upheaval in political circles.

Stung by Sreedharan's charges in a letter to Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia, the Congress government has sought an unconditional apology, failing which it threatened to sue him.

Sreedharan's letter, in which he expressed reservations over the way government awarded contract to Maytas-led consortium, is likely to provide ammunition to the opposition's attack on the government as they gear up for next year's elections.

The main opposition Telugu Desam Party (TDP), which announced a two-month long state-wide campaign from Oct 2 against corruption in the government, alleged that Chief Minister YS Rajasekhara Reddy himself was involved in this "scam".

Sreedharan's objection to the way the government allowing private consortium to commercially exploit prime land has also brought into focus the sensitive issue of land.

Sreedharan, who served as a consultant for Hyderabad Metro project, remarked that making "available 296 acres of prime land to BOT (build, operate and transfer) developer for commercial exploitation was like selling the family silver". He also felt that the land concession could lead to a "big political scandal some time later".

"It is apparent the BOT operator has a hidden agenda which appears to be to extend the metro network to a large tract of his private land holdings so as to reap a windfall profit of four to five times the land price."

The opposition parties, including Praja Rajyam floated recently by Telugu superstar Chiranjeevi, were targeting the Congress government for selling government land to private companies in the name of mobilising resources.

Sreedharan's letter surfaced four days after the state government signed a concession agreement with Maytas-led consortium, which was awarded the contract to build the ultra modern rail system at an estimated cost of Rs.121.32 billion on a BOT basis in public private partnership (PPP) mode.

The BOT developer agreed to pay Rs.303.11 billion to the state government over the concession period of 35 years, which could be further extended by another 25 years.

"Mr Sreedharan should tender an unconditional apology. Otherwise, we will take the legal course and file a defamation case against him," said C.V.S.K. Sarma, the municipal administration and urban development secretary. Sarma, who is also the chairman of the Hyderabad Metro , was addressing a news conference Monday evening.

Sarma said Sreedharan's comments had brought a bad name to the government and the project.

"The project is being done in a transparent manner and at every stage DMRC as prime consultant, has been fully participating, giving its advice in preparation of reports, tenders and bids. Not a single time did they raise any objection or doubt," he said.

Sarma said the government had saved Rs.100 billion as the DMRC had estimated that the grant could be as much if prime land exploitation was not permitted.

Though DMRC issued a denial late Monday, the state government was not satisfied as the text of Sreedharan's letter was already carried in a section of media.

"We would like to clarify that the DMRC neither smelt a scam in the way that the BOT contract was awarded for the Hyderabad Metro nor did E. Sreedharan, MD of DMRC say that the BOT model would backfire," the Delhi Metro said in a statement.

"Sreedharan had, however, pointed out that Hyderabad's success in BOT model should not be cited as an argument for changing the policy of the government for funding metro projects in the country," it said. (why? he feels threatened that somebody is encroaching on what is his percieved turf ?? :evil: )

The consortium with Navabharat Ventures, Ital Thai and IL&FS as other partners refused to seek any grant from the government of India though the latter sanctioned Rs.23.63 billion or 20 per cent of the project cost under Viability Gap Funding (VGF) scheme.

Expressing his concerns over the private sector's direct involvement in building the metro rail, the DMRC's MD cautioned that BOT mode could backfire.

"World-wide the experience has been that no metro project has succeeded so far on BOT basis. ...Our sole example of Mumbai Metro-I has not given us the required confidence in the BOT route," said the DMRC chief. (Why is he commenting on this even before the thing is operational ?)

"The example of Hyderabad Metro is quite misleading as the negative viability gap funding has resulted solely on account of 296 acres of prime land being made available to the BOT operator for commercial exploitation."

Expressing doubts about BOT projects for being "expensive in long run", he said the "main beneficiary" in such projects would be the private party. (So what is your Grouse? You a CPM supporter :evil: )

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Katare » 23 Sep 2008 21:33

AP govt could have auctioned 296 acre of prime land and than used that money to fund the viability gap of metro in that case it would have been part owner of the metro. In current scenario it has given land for future royalties.

Sridharan is right when he says that the model here is not yielding free metro or negative grant but govt is paying as much if not more for the metro. It has paid with land instead in cash and we don't know how much the land is worth. So it'll definitely create political scandal later on which would put entire project on hold.

I think his letter to Planning commission was to ensure that people understand the reality of "free-metro" and not get carried away in future projects.

He was criticized earlier by many for his views on sky-bus project. He was proven right in that case too. He may be wrong on this but one must not forget the man has habit of being successful and right on what he does. 8)

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Rishirishi » 24 Sep 2008 03:46

Katare wrote:AP govt could have auctioned 296 acre of prime land and than used that money to fund the viability gap of metro in that case it would have been part owner of the metro. In current scenario it has given land for future royalties.

Sridharan is right when he says that the model here is not yielding free metro or negative grant but govt is paying as much if not more for the metro. It has paid with land instead in cash and we don't know how much the land is worth. So it'll definitely create political scandal later on which would put entire project on hold.

I think his letter to Planning commission was to ensure that people understand the reality of "free-metro" and not get carried away in future projects.

He was criticized earlier by many for his views on sky-bus project. He was proven right in that case too. He may be wrong on this but one must not forget the man has habit of being successful and right on what he does. 8)


second that. The metro is a vital part of the infrastructure and should be made available to all, at cost price. The private companies are there just for the profit and will only do things that bring profit. This may not be in the interest of the general public.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Nayak » 29 Sep 2008 13:11

Subway magic created in 24 hrs
29 Sep 2008, 0630 hrs IST, Aarthi R,TNN
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BANGALORE: No noise or publicity. But this 3.6 mtr x 3.6 mtr magic subway for pedestrians, opposite the Hebbal police station, was laid in a record 24-hour operation that started on Friday morning. While BBMP shying away from publicity - following their 'magic box' underpass experience - can be expected, what's interesting is that the operation on a busy road with more than 1.35 lakh vehicles plying everyday was completed without much diversion or complaints.

What did it take to create the magic this time? Nearly 100 workers, eight trucks, six lorries , two cranes and two earth-movers were part of this silent day-long operation that began as early as 5.30 am on Friday and ended by 6 am on Saturday.

The silent success story has surprised many. "When I left for work by this road at 10 am on Friday, all I saw was a diversion board. I left expecting a few months of regular inconvenience . Surprisingly, on my return at 10 pm, I found most of the work completed' ' said Chandru , who lives nearby.

Even cable work by BSNL, that was stated as a six-day operation, was completed by 10 am on Sunday - yet another 24-hour operation on field. Being the first of eight such pedestrian subways planned for the city, the project at Hebbal cost Rs 40 lakh. "With the available technology, we can build such magic subways in just two days, but a lot of this depends on feasibility of the land. This place had just the BSNL cables interfering. There are places where drains and waterways may cause delays ,'' BBMP chief engineer (roads) K S Krishna Reddy said, adding that laying magic subways will soon be routine activity.

More than 70% of the work on this subway is complete. What remains is building a ramp into it on either end, that will take another 15 days. With the festive days in between, there might be a few 'no-work ' days.

According to BBMP commissioner S Subramanya , all the magic subways planned will follow a similar hassle-free procedure with not much obstruction to people or traffic. Five such subways are being planned at Basaveshwara Circle alone. "The attempt is to insulate pedestrians and cyclists from vehicular traffic ,'' he said. The palike is also looking at having subways around Vidhana Soudha and at High Grounds.


TURNAROUND

Earlier in the year, BBMP's announcement of completing its magic-box underpasses in 72 hours was met with sarcasm. After initial enthusiasm, the civic agency found water lines running at the spot - Cauvery Junction on Bellary Road - the relocation of which needed more than 15 days. The 72-hour deadline got extended to 45 days! This time, they did not want to make much noise over its magic subway and quietly completed the work. Way to go BBMP!

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 30 Sep 2008 00:44


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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 06 Oct 2008 20:05

Sunil Jain: Give us a break, Mr Sreedharan.

In a fairly well-publicised letter to Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia, Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) chief E Sreedharan has lambasted the Hyderabad public-private partnership (PPP) model, arguing that his state-owned model is the best one, that the Hyderabad model can “lead to a big political scandal”, that the idea’s to reap a windfall profit from the land allocated, and so on. He points out that while the Maytas consortium has agreed to pay the government Rs 30,300 crore over the project’s life (in terms of net present value, that’s Rs 1,240 crore), much of this is due to the fact that the government gave the metro 296 acres of land it can use for development — had this not been so, Sreedharan says Rs 10,000 crore more would have been required in terms of viability gap funding. Most who read the letter, the contents of which were liberally leaked to the press, would assume none of this applied to the DMRC — indeed, the finance ministry’s so impressed by the argument, it is actively examining the merits of this vis-a-vis the PPP model being pushed by the Planning Commission.

A closer look at the Delhi Metro annual report makes it clear that most of these arguments are self-serving, apart from of course the fact that the DMRC model, where the Union and Delhi governments own just 50 per cent each of the equity, means that no one’s really in charge of the project — this has its own implications in terms of accountability and vigilance, but that’s the subject of another column. Let’s look at the sops the DMRC’s getting and compare them with the Hyderabad ones that have so shocked the DMRC chief.

In 2006-07, DMRC had a total loan base of Rs 6,648 crore, on which the average interest rate was 1.44 per cent and equity of Rs 3,702 crore, which had earned no dividend so far and looks unlikely to ever earn one. If you assume a market interest rate of even 12 per cent and the same return for equity (though equity returns are usually much higher), this means DMRC is getting an annual subsidy of more than Rs 1,000 crore. Nearly 90 per cent of the loan is a concessional one from the JBIC of Japan, but the exchange rate risk (which is significant in a project of such a long gestation) is borne by the Government of India.

DMRC never paid any excise/customs/sales taxes on capital equipment either — assume this to be a conservative 20 per cent and that’s a one-time saving of another Rs 2,000 crore, or another Rs 240 crore per year subsidy assuming the same 12 per cent interest rate. It also gets electricity at half the commercial rate, a saving of another Rs 25 crore per year. All this, by the way, when DMRC’s annual revenues are just Rs 543 crore, of which Rs 252 crore is from real estate transactions!

Contrast this with the Hyderabad case, where Maytas will raise all funds at commercial rates, has the same tariffs as the DMRC and will still pay the government a net present value of Rs 1,240 crore. So, the savings from the PPP route are obvious.

But if you’ve been following Sreedharan’s arguments, you’ll have noticed the fatal gap in my argument — there’s no mention of the 269 acres of real estate the Hyderabad metro’s got, what Sreedharan calls the selling of family silver. According to the DMRC chief, had this land not been given, Maytas would have asked for Rs 10,000 crore instead of offering to pay the government.

What’s important to keep in mind here is that the Delhi Metro itself got a huge amount of land — the 2006-07 annual report talks of 960 acres of land in just one place! In other words, whatever the Hyderabad metro got, Delhi Metro got many times that. And while the Hyderabad metro didn’t get any land to lease/sell (it can develop/lease only the space above the metro stations/depots), the Delhi Metro’s also transferring the leases of chunks of land for as many as 90 years — this is tantamount to selling government land. While DMRC’s auditors have said that this amounts to selling property and violates the law, the CAG says it is okay — the short point, however, is that DMRC’s land deal is a lot sweeter than Hyderabad could ever imagine. Not surprisingly then that the Municipal Corporation of Delhi has levied a Rs 452 crore property tax on DMRC, which the latter has contested, citing the chief secretary’s decision that this would not be levied — the New Delhi Municipal Corporation has followed with a Rs 33 crore demand. Not paying taxes on the land, in turn, boosts Delhi Metro’s profits even more, and it’s unlikely the Hyderabad one will ever get any tax breaks like this. Interestingly, real estate income in 2006-07 accounted for 53 per cent of DMRC’s total revenues, nearly 70 per cent of EBDIT profits — in terms of pre-tax profits, real estate profits were 11.6 times the overall profits.

What’s most galling is that while the DMRC chief is so fulsome in his praise for his model, he doesn’t care to mention that even as he’s getting these hundreds of crores of annual sops, the metro’s struggling to meet even its physical targets. While the original target for Phase I was to carry 2.18 million passengers by 2005, this was lowered to 1.5 million in 2005 — the 2006-07 report says the ridership was 610,000! So, as the criticism of PPP projects builds up, you’ll do well to keep these facts in mind.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Katare » 07 Oct 2008 01:56

Nice!!! :mrgreen:

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 10 Oct 2008 19:29

Metro Line 3 faces obstacles in planning stage itself.

While Line 2 awaits Centre’s nod, third corridor faces issues like locating plot for car shed and environmental concerns

Even as the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA), the nodal agency for the Mumbai Metro Rail project, struggles to decide on a model for implementation of the third corridor, obstacles in executing this underground route are gradually beginning to surface.

The MMRDA, which is currently awaiting written communication from the Centre to kick-start work on the second Metro rail route — Charkop-Bandra-Mankhurd— in the city, is now faced with a series of challenges on the third metro corridor between Colaba and Mahim in the planning stage itself. It includes issues like locating the plot for car shed and environmental concerns. “There are many ifs and buts in the third corridor. The Colaba-Mahim route has many issues like a car depot land and environmental issues as there would be huge quantity of debris and muck coming out as we need to go around 50 meters deep for the corridor...where and how to dump this waste, etc,” said Ratnakar Gaikwad, Metropolitan Commissioner.

Since the third corridor requires a huge viability gap funding (VGF) of around Rs 9,000 crore, the execution has become quite a task for the MMRDA officials, sources said. “Colaba-Mahim is heavily dependent upon the VGF from financial institution like Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) on minimal interest rates, regardless of the model taken up for implementation,” Gaikwad said.

He added that currently the MMRDA is focusing on starting the work on the second corridor, which is behind the schedule by nearly two years due to the Public Private Partnership (PPP)-DMRC model debate. “There are arguments for and against the PPP and the government-funded models,” Gaikwad said, adding that since the Centre could not fund 20 per cent VGF for adopting the model like the Delhi Metro, the MMRDA had to go back on the PPP model for the second route.

Meanwhile, the debate sparked by DMRC chief E Sreedharan regarding a government-funded model for Metro rail projects has had little impact on the think-tank within the Maharashtra government. “The government-funded model is actually a good model, but funds from the Centre are an issue. We’re studying the possibility of using land as a resource to fund the remaining Metro corridors that can be done without Government of India’s funds,” Gaikwad said.

However, the first private player led by Reliance Infra to build the Versova-Andheri-Ghatkopar corridor pointed out that the first route of Delhi Metro, which is on a government-funded model, took five years to complete despite DMRC chief’s claims that the first Metro Line, Mumbai Metro One, is progressing at a slow pace. “Despite challenges, Mumbai Metro One Pvt Ltd (MMOPL) is geared up to complete the Line 1 project in three years’ time against the concession requirements of five years. Incidentally, DMRC took five years to complete their first section in year 2002,” stated K P Maheshwari, Director, MMOPL.

According to Maheshwari, Metro rail construction in Mumbai is challenging given the congested roads and issue of utilities. “Mumbai city, commercial capital of the country, is different from other cities like Delhi, Chennai on various considerations. The road area in the city is approximately seven per cent against 25 per cent in Delhi. All the roads are heavily packed with various utilities like water, sewer, gas, power, telecom lines. The construction work is to be carried out in narrow roads in close vicinity of residential and commercial buildings. The construction activities are to be coordinated with multiple civic agencies. All this put together makes the construction work a big challenge in design and construction and hence not directly comparable to Delhi,” Maheshwari said.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 27 Nov 2008 06:04

Japanese Agency clears Chennai Metro Project

The Chennai Metro Rail project has been cleared by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), formerly known as Japan Bank for International Cooperation.

An agreement to this effect was signed by the Union Government and the Japanese Government in Tokyo on November 21.

The estimated cost of the project (in March 2007 prices) is Rs.11,124 crore. Of this, the Central and State governments together are expected to contribute about 40 per cent and the balance will be met by a loan granted by the Japanese agency.

A detailed project report (DPR) had already been prepared and it envisages the creation of 2 initial corridors one from Washermenpet to the Chennai airport and the other from Chennai Central to St.Thomas Mount.

Tentatively, the project is programmed for completion in 2014-2015

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby vsudhir » 05 Jan 2009 00:20

Bangalore Metro on track, says Karnataka CMO

Amid fears the Bangalore Metro project may be off track to meet its 2011 deadline, a top official from the chief minister's office told India Today that the state Government will pitch in with funds and a tracking mechanism to make sure that the city's seven million population gets a chance to use the metro train two years from now, atleast the first phase of the project.

The Centre, which has a significant share in the Rs 6,400 crore 33-km metro project, will also direct the Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Ltd (BMRCL) to work in tandem with contractors to ensure projects are completed on schedule: Reach one (Byappanahalli to Chinnaswamy cricket stadium on Cubbon Road] began on January 2007 with a April 2009 planned completion but going by the current pace of work experts believe it would be a Herculean task to see this stretch ready for commuters use from March 2010.


One of the specialties is the futuristic designs for six metro stations in the city -- MG Road, Trinity Circle, Ulsoor station, Byappanahalli, CMH road and Old Madras Road. The he Trinity Circle station is to resemble a cocoon [designed by Zachariah Consultants]; and, the MG Road station, designed by architect Naresh Narasimhan, "strikes a balance between utility and aesthetics, an urban insert between a boulevard and a theatre. Narasimhan has also planned a transport museum atop this station called Dynamo along with a terrace cafe.


Metro's energy requirement per passenger km is only one-fifth of that of road based systems. And officials add that commuters can breathe easy because metro runs on electric power. The economic rate of return is 22.33 per cent: it means that metro will save Rs 1,200 crore every year because of less strain on roads, savings in travel time, reduction in number of accidents and traffic decongestion.


More power to the Metro. Hope to see Metros in India's top 10 cities up and running by 2020.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby SaiK » 05 Jan 2009 10:15

hope more metro lines are thrown open in all those top cities, de-congesting the archaic road and traffic system. city planning and capacity planning is absent permanent though.. we ignore the growing middle class totally, and cater towards only the rich and poor., bribery for the former, and booze for the later. end of job!

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby CalvinH » 05 Jan 2009 11:03

More power to the Metro. Hope to see Metros in India's top 10 cities up and running by 2020.


Amen to that. I traveled in Delhi metro and it was awesome. The rush was great at peak times but the journey was comfortable. DMRC is planning to increase service but nothing beats metro in a place like Delhi. No wonder all sub-cities around Delhi want Metro to be extended to them.

Time for autowallahs to look for a different business (of extortion) :D . Only rickshaw will remain to provide last mile journey to home from the metro station and if the feeder service works well then they are next in the line.

Time to buy RE near (proposed) metro stations. Metro would be the preferred mode of transport in days to come.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby bart » 05 Jan 2009 14:20

How do they plan to make a practical and actually usable metro in an already congested city like Chennai, where building the overhead railway that used hardly any new technology took around 20 years? That too when it had an already existing path over the koovam river.

Besides, hardly anyone uses the train, since it doesn't cover the routes where 90% of people want to go. So if a metro is going to be really useful, it needs to have decent coverage, similar to London underground, where you have tube station within reasonable walking distance of most places.

Moscow, London etc, IIRC were built over a 100 years ago, and even if they were built today they wouldn't have anything remotely near the congestion challenges of a city like Chennai or Mumbai.

So how will it be constructed? Not saying it cant be done, but curious to know how it is possible within the limits of what is practically possible in Indian urban scenario. (Keeping in mind that we cannot just barge in and bulldoze large swathes of land pandapoker style - for example the Chennai to Bangalore GQ stretch was built in 2 years but the 5 km stretch from Maduravoyal to Koyembedu which links the GQ to Chennai is still not finished in 6 years since it involves breaking existing houses on either side of the road).

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby SaiK » 08 Jan 2009 20:15

http://deccanherald.com/DeccanHerald.co ... 111278.asp

it is not easy to replace 10000 trees. this is not the 20th century.. there is enough technology to shift the trees rather. dig up, transplant them.

why is that people dont want to change?

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby CalvinH » 08 Jan 2009 21:58

bart wrote:How do they plan to make a practical and actually usable metro in an already congested city like Chennai, where building the overhead railway that used hardly any new technology took around 20 years? That too when it had an already existing path over the koovam river.

Besides, hardly anyone uses the train, since it doesn't cover the routes where 90% of people want to go. So if a metro is going to be really useful, it needs to have decent coverage, similar to London underground, where you have tube station within reasonable walking distance of most places.

Moscow, London etc, IIRC were built over a 100 years ago, and even if they were built today they wouldn't have anything remotely near the congestion challenges of a city like Chennai or Mumbai.

So how will it be constructed? Not saying it cant be done, but curious to know how it is possible within the limits of what is practically possible in Indian urban scenario. (Keeping in mind that we cannot just barge in and bulldoze large swathes of land pandapoker style - for example the Chennai to Bangalore GQ stretch was built in 2 years but the 5 km stretch from Maduravoyal to Koyembedu which links the GQ to Chennai is still not finished in 6 years since it involves breaking existing houses on either side of the road).


I am not sure of the chennai scenerio but congestion and accessibility are major issues with most of Indian cities. If you want to see how this can be done through Metro just have a look at Rajiv Chowk-Delhi Univ section. The section passes through and is now connecting some of the most densly populated areas in Delhi i.e Old Delhi. Not only the area is choked but also the buildings are very old and many of them are nearly 100+ years old. Metro is using underground corridor through that area. Everyone was asking the same question of 'How' when a connectivity to old Delhi was debated and if you have been to that area then you will probably think its impossible but its a reality now and its simply amazing.

Delhi metro is so successful because it passes through some of the most congested and populated neighborhoods/routes. These are the places where people actually live and work and need affordable and decent transport to/from. It also connects some of the most visited market areas like Karol Bagh, Old Delhi and CP. Most of these major shopping areas are just walking distance from the nearest metro station. This is a first person account.

Metro is in fact the only solution for commute problems in major Indian cities now.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 05 Feb 2009 21:08

REL-Hyundai may beat HCC on sealink to Haji Ali.

The consortium of Reliance Infrastructure Ltd and Hyundai has emerged as a preferred bidder for the construction of the Worli-Haji Ali sea link -- the extended arm of the much delayed Bandra-Worli sea link.

The consortium has quoted a viability gap much lesser than that of the other contender, a consortium of Hindustan Construction Company (HCC), British firm John Laing and Korean giant Samsung.

The financial bids for the 4.7-km-long Worli-Haji Ali sea link were opened on Wednesday at the Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation (MSRDC) office in Bandra. According to the financial model designed by the MSRDC, the winning bidder has to buy the Bandra-Worli bridge by paying Rs1,634 crore upfront. It can then construct the Worli-Haji Ali sea link and collect toll from Bandra-Worli for a period not more than 40 or 50 years.

The cost of the two bridges has been estimated roughly in the range of Rs4,500 to Rs5,000 crore. The bidders were asked to derive the viability gap funding (VGF) figure which would be needed to be paid by the MSRDC. Reliance-Hyundai quoted a figure of Rs1,392 crore whereas HCC-John Laing-Samsung quoted Rs2,466 crore as their viability gap requirement.

"Once our consultants (Arup CES and Ernst & Young) give a final go-ahead for the VGF, the proposal will be sent for approval to the state cabinet. However, neither bidder has specified the concession period in which they expect to earn their dues through toll collection; this decision too needs to be taken. But since Reliance-Hyundai's quote is almost Rs1,000 crore less than the other consortium's, they are likely to bag the contract," said a top MSRDC official requesting anonymity. Officials from HCC -- which has constructed the Bandra-Worli bridge -- were not available for comment.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Rishirishi » 09 Feb 2009 04:21

Vipul wrote:REL-Hyundai may beat HCC on sealink to Haji Ali.

The consortium of Reliance Infrastructure Ltd and Hyundai has emerged as a preferred bidder for the construction of the Worli-Haji Ali sea link -- the extended arm of the much delayed Bandra-Worli sea link.

The consortium has quoted a viability gap much lesser than that of the other contender, a consortium of Hindustan Construction Company (HCC), British firm John Laing and Korean giant Samsung.

The financial bids for the 4.7-km-long Worli-Haji Ali sea link were opened on Wednesday at the Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation (MSRDC) office in Bandra. According to the financial model designed by the MSRDC, the winning bidder has to buy the Bandra-Worli bridge by paying Rs1,634 crore upfront. It can then construct the Worli-Haji Ali sea link and collect toll from Bandra-Worli for a period not more than 40 or 50 years.

The cost of the two bridges has been estimated roughly in the range of Rs4,500 to Rs5,000 crore. The bidders were asked to derive the viability gap funding (VGF) figure which would be needed to be paid by the MSRDC. Reliance-Hyundai quoted a figure of Rs1,392 crore whereas HCC-John Laing-Samsung quoted Rs2,466 crore as their viability gap requirement.

"Once our consultants (Arup CES and Ernst & Young) give a final go-ahead for the VGF, the proposal will be sent for approval to the state cabinet. However, neither bidder has specified the concession period in which they expect to earn their dues through toll collection; this decision too needs to be taken. But since Reliance-Hyundai's quote is almost Rs1,000 crore less than the other consortium's, they are likely to bag the contract," said a top MSRDC official requesting anonymity. Officials from HCC -- which has constructed the Bandra-Worli bridge -- were not available for comment.


Wasent the cost of Delhi metro something like 5000 crores for the first phase?. Would that not have been a better solution

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby jkarthik » 09 Feb 2009 14:05

Wasent the cost of Delhi metro something like 5000 crores for the first phase?. Would that not have been a better solution


That is also happening. There is a metro line that connects all western suburbs to Colaba, along Link road. This is in additon to the metro. This is part of a full set of express highways that eventually link up Borivli to Nariman point - the next step to this is a link from Haji Ali to Nariman point. Govt is debating whether this should be across the sea, or burrow under Malabar Hills through a tunnel to reach marine drive. If this comes thru, as well as a couple of flyovers being planned, you shd b able to drive signal free from Borivli to Chowpatti at least.

They are running Chinese and Tata BRTS buses along WE highway now, which will continue down these expwys.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 09 Feb 2009 21:05

jkarthik wrote:
That is also happening. There is a metro line that connects all western suburbs to Colaba, along Link road. This is in additon to the metro. This is part of a full set of express highways that eventually link up Borivli to Nariman point - the next step to this is a link from Haji Ali to Nariman point. Govt is debating whether this should be across the sea, or burrow under Malabar Hills through a tunnel to reach marine drive. If this comes thru, as well as a couple of flyovers being planned, you shd b able to drive signal free from Borivli to Chowpatti at least.

They are running Chinese and Tata BRTS buses along WE highway now, which will continue down these expwys.


Its Election time, so Milind Deora is suddenly making noice for his South Bombay Constituency.

Personally i hope the good for nothing guy is dumped by the electorate.

The residents around Malabar Hill, Priyadarshani Park and Pedder Road have found new support in their opposition to the proposed underground tunnel under Priyadarshani Park. Member of Parliament Milind Deora has come out openly in their support and said that the state government should try and construct an underground tunnel right from Haji Ali to Nariman Point.

Speaking to DNA after a visit to review the progress of the much delayed Bandra-Worli Sea Link, the young parliamentarian said that the Maharashtra state road development corporation (MSRDC) as well as the state government should learn their lessons from the enormous delays caused in the sea link project.

"I am pushing forward for a direct underground tunnel which would connect to the Worli-Haji Ali sea link. I have already conveyed my demand to the chief minister as well as senior MSRDC officials. No development which may prove fatal to the city's health should go ahead. Precisely due to such ignorance on behalf of the state government, the Bandra-Worli project got delayed beyond limits. The state government and the corporation should quickly learn from their mistakes," said Deora.

In the fourth and last phase of the Western Freeway, which is from Haji Ali to Nariman Point, the external consultants have favoured a sea link from Haji Ali to Priyadarshani Park. Moreover, they have given a green signal for the feasibility of a tunnel going under Malabar Hill and opening up at Marine Drive. The feasibility report also says that tunnel using the "cut and curve" technique should be constructed under Marine Drive right up to Nariman Point.

When asked about this report, Deora criticised the corporation by saying that if such a report has been received, the corporation should make it public. "If unnecessary secrecy is maintained in such a case, there are bound to be protests, allegations and litigations which will cause criminal delay in the completion of the project," said Deora.

When asked if there was any political agenda behind his visit, he said: "I have been meeting MSRDC officials and contractors for the past over four years. I have an interest in the development of infrastructure and that is what has resulted in me coming here. There is absolutely no political agenda in this visit."

Deora's South Mumbai constituency will have Worli as its part in the forthcoming general elections.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Arya Sumantra » 17 Feb 2009 20:00

I just looked at the pictures of the newly built Srinagar International Airport here on this thread
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=800524&page=2
This airport is built at the cost of Rs 60 crores. IIRC B'lore airport cost Rs 2500 crores. Correct me if I am wrong with the figures. How does one explain such a huge difference in cost?
Of course the Capacity and the traffic handled by the two airports is very different. That explains some difference. Besides land aroud B'lore would be expensive too. But still the difference seems too huge

ChandraS

Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby ChandraS » 17 Feb 2009 20:34

^ Srinagar airport has been around for long now. It was only renovated and upgraded to handle international flights. BIAL was built up from scratch as they wanted a separate place from HAL and also room for future expansion. Hence the difference in cost.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 28 Feb 2009 00:07

Twin corridors for Navi Mumbai Metro in Phase 1.

Delhi Metro Rail Corporation’s (DMRC) preliminary study on the feasibility of a metro rail in Navi Mumbai has revealed that two corridors can kick off initially.
The two corridors in Phase I suggested by the consultant to the City and Industrial Development Corporation (CIDCO) are Nerul-Uran and a ring route from Belapur to Mansarovar via Kharghar and Kalamboli.

“DMRC has suggested taking up metro corridors phase-wise. While other corridors would only be needed after 2021 after a relook at the masterplan,” said G S Gill, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, CIDCO. The 27-km Nerul-Uran corridor is expected to be completed by 2015.

The proposed elevated metro rail corridors are indicated to cost around Rs 140 crore per km. The cost of construction for the Mumbai metro is between Rs 200 crore to Rs 250 crore/km, while the underground corridor proposed from Colaba to Bandra would cost three times that of an elevated corridor in Mumbai. “The entire stretch would be elevated thus making it cost efficient,” Gill added.

Navi Mumbai needs a metro rail project for better transportation in view of the proposed international airport near Kalamboli and the upcoming central business district in Belapur, which houses government as well as corporate houses. The DMRC that also prepared the masterplan for Mumbai metro rail project had voiced its reservations on a public private partnership model being adopted for the city has recommended the PPP-model in Navi Mumbai :-?. “We’ve not gone in detail into the implementation model but it differs depending upon region. The DMRC has recommended PPP,” Gill stated.

CIDCO has earlier shunned the Central Railway midway of the Nerul-Belapur-Seawood-Uran project in the region and opted for metro rail. “The embankment work on the Nerul-Uran stretch was going on, which will now have to be changed a bit,” he added.

Vipul
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 05 Mar 2009 22:07

Centre OKs viability gap funding for 1st Metro line.

Mumbai:The Centre has cleared the decks for the Mumbai Metro by agreeing, as a special case, a viability gap fund (VGF) for the Rs 2,356-crore Versova-Andheri-Ghatkopar corridor.

Raj
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Raj » 08 Apr 2009 04:13

GMR`s AP-2 highway project commences operations
GMR Group’s Adloor-Yellareddy to Gundla-Pochanpalli Highway project (AP – 2), has commenced commercial operations with effect from 26th March, 2009. This is the Group’s third highway project in Andhra Pradesh.



This 102 km stretch on NH 7 between Adloor Yellareddy and Gundla Pochanpalli on Hyderabad – Nagpur Highway was executed on a Build Operate Transfer (Annuity) model with an investment of Rs. 700 crore. The concession period for the project is 20 years and it took two and a half years to complete it.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 08 Apr 2009 08:15

Koreans to build Kalpsar.

If and when the project gets built it will truly change the face of Central Gujarat and Saurashtra.The gap between competitors Gujarat and Maharashtra as India's most prosperous state(i do not mean per capia income)would then be impossible for maharashtra to bridge.

Related newsitem.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby vsudhir » 08 Apr 2009 08:19

[quote="Vipul"]Koreans to build Kalpsar.

Wow.

Hitesh
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Hitesh » 08 Apr 2009 19:11

I am pro development but damming up this thing is a huge colossal mistake. We do not want to emulate the Chinese when they built the Three Gorges Dam.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby ashish raval » 08 Apr 2009 20:32

The main aim of the project is to provide all-year round irrigation and drinking water to parts of Saurastra not fully covered by Narmada dam. It will also mean that the farmer of Gujarat will reduce the dependence on the rain for irrigation. Earlier the farmers used to take one crop a year and big dam like Kalapsar project means that issue of water is sorted out for the state for centuries to come. It is not a matter of right or wrong all the countries of the world including USA/China/Egypt have huge reservoirs despite of opposition and are now enjoying the fruits of it by irrigating the land which had very low productivity. Another benefit of it is that in the viscinity of dam, the water level rises and for a dry state like Gujarat it is a blessing.


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