Infrastructure News & Discussion

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tandav
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby tandav » 09 Oct 2016 13:58

The biggest problem in building out infrastructure (or doing any work for that matter) in India is I think the complete disregard of bureaucrats to do things on time. A simple contract award can take anywhere between 1-12 months to get Work Order after tender is awarded. There seems to a massive chain of veto holding interests that holdup work and cost time.

Secondly making payments on time is an alien concept both in personal, public and private sector in India (Kal/Baad mein aao... aaj nahin hain syndrome). To resolve the payments issue I have proposed that contracts are written to ensure that payments be made first and burden of proof that work has not been done falls upon the employer rather than the present case where the vendor has the burden of proof that the work has been done. This typically manifests itself when a vendor raises an invoice and suddenly the client wakes up and starts finding fault in the works done which were absolutely fine before the invoice was raised.

Contract payment system proposed
1) NECS/ECS mandate be signed by client to the vendor which allows monthly payments (as per predecided schedule and amount) to be deducted directly from client account while the work is progressing.
2) Client can terminate the contract (by submitting a NECS stop order form and/or a NECS reverse transfer of a certain amount) if they find the work is substandard or incomplete and process action to recover payments rather than the present case where vendors have to move heaven and earth to get their payments.
3) National contracts/invoice registry system (have some real nice startup ideas around this but need technical help to get it off the ground)

Prem
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Prem » 23 Nov 2016 04:41


Prem
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Prem » 29 Nov 2016 00:21

https://www.newscientist.com/article/21 ... set-to-go/
India’s grand plan to create world’s longest river set to go

Engineering projects don’t come any bigger than this. If India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, gets his way, work could soon begin on a project to link large rivers in the Himalayas and Deccan Peninsula via 30 mega-canals and 3000 dams.When the work is finished the water network will be twice the length of the Nile, the world longest river, and it will be able to divert water from flood-prone areas to those vulnerable to drought.But geologists and ecologists in India question the science behind the Inter Linking of Rivers (ILR) scheme. If it goes ahead it might lead to ecological disasters and coastal erosion that would threaten livelihoods and endanger wildlife.And yet New Scientist has learned from the officials close to the project that work on the pilot link is likely to “start any time soon”, with final clearance from the ministry of environment and forests expected imminently.Versions of the ILR scheme date back more than 60 years to the days of British rule in India. In its latest incarnation the plan is to link 14 rivers in north India and 16 in the western, central and southern parts of the country, creating a water network some 12,500 kilometres long. The idea is to reduce droughts and floods and create 35 million hectares of arable land in the process, as well as the means to generate 34,000 megawatts of hydropower.

This project is backed by Narendra Modi, who became the country’s prime minister in 2014. Since then India’s National Water Development Agency has completed detailed project reports for three key initial river links – the pilot link between Ken and Betwa rivers in northern and central India; Daman Ganga and Pinjal rivers in western India; and Par and Tapti rivers in western and central India. A feasibility report of a fourth link between three Himalayan rivers – Manas, Teesta and Ganges – is in the final stages of preparation.But many researchers question the science behind the scheme. They say there isn’t a simple division between river basins that carry too little and too much water – and that climate change has triggered changes in rainfall patterns with unpredictable knock-on effects on water flow.They argue that it would be unwise to set in stone a vast new canal network at a time of dramatic environmental change.A study published in July builds on this. Climate modelling once predicted that India’s dry areas will become drier and its wet areas wetter, but this is no longer the case.

A team of scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay and Madras found a significant decrease in the monsoon rainfall over major water surplus river basins in India. The team’s computer simulations showed that the water yield in surplus river basins is decreasing but it is increasing in deficit basins.”What may appear as water deficient today may become water surplus in the future due to climate change,” says study author Sachin Gunthe at Indian Institute of Technology, Madras. “So, how do you justify inter-linking?”Geologists are concerned, too. Over the millennia India’s landscape has gradually evolved with the natural flow of water. “Most rivers are fed by monsoon rains and have built large floodplains and deltas over the years,” says Vedharaman Rajamani at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi. “Pushing rivers around through ILR disrupts the supply of sediments and nutrients downstream.”“Rajamani says the presence of excess fresh water in the Bay of Bengal delta is especially crucial, as it helps create and maintain a layer of low salinity in the bay, which is one of the several complex, interlinked factors that influence the onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Artificially manipulating the natural system could disrupt the monsoon rainfall in the region, he says.Rajendran says that the huge amount of water in dams would increase the water pressure in the cracks and push on crust below, possibly increasing the risk of earthquakes in the already quake-prone Himalayas..Ecologists are concerned too. A pilot project in the ILR scheme – the Ken-Betwa link – would be built at the cost of destroying an estimated 4100 hectares of forest. This might include 58 square kilometres of the Panna Tiger Reserve – 10 per cent of the reserve’s area. And yet it got the official approval in September.The government, however, has stayed dedicated to the idea. Interlinking rivers is an attempt to boost water supply to the needy states, says Vijay Goel, junior minister for water resources.But while the project looks grand on paper whether it turns out to be a success or a disaster remains to be seen.

JE Menon
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby JE Menon » 29 May 2017 22:57

Report on planned trade infrastructure - ports, rail and road

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es4F-6PZ51w

Vasu
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 24 May 2018 09:36

Wonderful leg-up for the logistics sector. DHL sets up a wholly owned trucking company in India aiming to own 3,500 trucks by 2020.

DHL launches transportation company; aims to own 10,000 trucks by 2028

"We have been checking all the different markets we are in worldwide. And looking at what's been going on terms of technology. We have been looking at our customers, our value chain, the white spots where we can add something. That was the main idea that led to SmarTrucking...to do something that's missing, especially in India...to cover this white spot we had in terms of trucking. Bringing in more expertise in terms of the tech perspective and doing something more in terms of people and HR. The whole story is 10 years. This is the focus we have: to think about the next decade. We have a few milestones and control points to see if the business is doing well," said Juergen Gerdes, CEO of the Post-eCommerce-Parcel division of DPDHL.

Gerdes said SmarTrucking is a unique model of a 100% owned fleet for DPDHL which usually follows the asset-light model of leasing vehicles. He added he expects the company to transport 100,000 tonnes of cargo and cover a distance of 4 million kilometers across India daily.

"This industry is under-invested in terms of technology. We are setting up what we want to do in terms of techlog--technology enabled logistics," said Neeraj Bansal, CEO of SmarTrucking.

arshyam
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby arshyam » 24 May 2018 19:50

GST effect?

Vips
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 24 May 2018 20:31

There has been a quite revolution in the Logistics sector with more high-tonnage/high haulage/multi axle trucks coming in place of old ones.This is across the replacement as well as the new trucks market.

Suraj
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Suraj » 24 May 2018 22:39

Sales of M/HCVs (medium and heavy commercial vehicles) hit an all time high in 2017-18 . After the previous business cycle petered out in ~2011, commercial vehicle sales took 6 years to overtake the previous annual sales record, which was finally smashed in 2017-18. The current fiscal 2018-19 is looking like another strong year.

GST and the elimination of bottlenecks in interstate commerce makes a massive difference.

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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 08 Jan 2019 18:49

Armed with Guinness record, Navayuga now eyes global markets.

Engineering and construction firm Navayuga Engineering Company (NEC), which on Monday secured the Guinness World Record for largest continuous concrete pour at Polavaram irrigation project, will now eye global markets with world-class equipment and expertise in completing critical projects in record time.

Polavaram irrigation project in Andhra Pradesh is the world's largest flood discharge dam currently under construction, involving Rs 57,000 crore in outlay including land acquisition, rehabilitation and resettlement. The project would irrigate a total of 42 lakh acres of ayacut in two phases, supplying water to all 13 districts of Andhra Pradesh. Ayacut is the area served by an irrigation project.

The irrigation project, considered the lifeline of Andhra Pradesh, involves 48 gates, each 20 metre high spanning 1.19 kilometres, requiring pouring of 36.7 lakh cubic metres of concrete, 50,000 tonnes of steel and 9.3 lakh tonnes of cement, which was all completed in in record time. It also includes a 930 MW hydel power project.

NEC Managing Director Chita Sridhar told ET the company is currently looking to execute Rs 30,000 crore of projects on hand over next three years to break into India's top ten engineering and construction companies. NEC is executing around Rs 3,400 crore of civil works of Polavaram project, apart from Rs 3,000 crore of hydel power project on EPC (engineering, procurement and construction) basis.

On Monday, NEC, the flagship of Rs 25,000 crore Navayuga Group, secures the Guinness World Record for pouring 32,315 cubic metres of concrete in 24 hours at Polavaram project, announced Rishi Nath, adjudicator at Guinness World Records. It surpassed the previous Guinness World Record of 21,580 cubic metres of concrete continuous pour by the consortium of Abdul Wahed Bin Shabib, RALS Contracting LLC and Alfa Engineering Consultant in Dubai during May 2017.

The engineering marvels that NEC boasts of completing way ahead of the deadline include India’s longest river bridge Dhola-Sadiya, complex river management system Dibang-Lohit River Management System, the longest highway tunnel project Quazigund to Banihal, and the largest port on India’s east coast, Krishnapatnam Port.

“All these projects were highly complex engineering and construction marvels that we completed way ahead of the prescribed timelines, reducing the timelines by at least a third,” said Sridhar, “We could record such accomplishments thanks to not just our own engineering designs but also specially designed engineering tools in-house.”

“The incredible engineering feat of world’s most concrete continuous pouring in 24 hours achieved on Monday was accomplished with around Rs 2,000 crore of machinery and over 4,000 men enabling us to exhibit our engineering and construction capabilities to the world,” said Sridhar. “The dam construction of large irrigation projects normally involves six years of time and we can now offer to execute such projects within four years.”

NEC is looking to bid for dam projects and hydel projects in Africa, Bhutan besides other countries. In the overseas market, NEC is currently executing a few works in Qatar.

Navayuga group owns Krishnapatnam port on India’s east coast, and is currently building Machilipatnam port in Andhra Pradesh and Astaranga port in Orissa, also on the eastern seaboard of India.

“The works of Machilipatnam port are expected to take off soon and we are confident of completing the project within 18 months,” said Sridhar.
NEC hopes to complete most civil works of Polavaram irrigation project by June this year and start exploring similar projects where the equipment can be deployed.

Hoping to touch a topline of Rs 6,000 crore this fiscal, NEC is eying finishing about Rs 30,000 crore of projects to hand over the next three years. “We expect to achieve Rs 10,000 crore of topline in couple of years.”

Singha
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Singha » 13 Jan 2019 12:24

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/work-nor ... atibaruah/

openings in NE for smart cities project planning office.

--
quiet revolution is the right word.

with GST , places in central india like nagpur are emerging as logistical hubs, apart from usual places like metros (close to biggest markets) and sea ports.

some of it is still low tech as the patanjali warehouse in this video, but the scale is visibly there....better inventory mgmt and racking systems will surely come for quicker turnarounds and better stock management





soothing huh to see that second video ? 8)

a huge project called MIHAN is coming up


Singha
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Singha » 13 Jan 2019 12:32

what we need now is better freight corridors between MUM-CCU, DEL-HYD-MAS, BLR-MUM by tripling or doubling of tracks (like the pathetic single line BLR-MUM). no need for separate corridor like DFC but atleast 1-2 more parallel lines along existing routes. will improve the avg speed of all trains.

we need to be the worlds biggest road and rail builder for a decade. let mountains of steel and concrete be poured everywhere.

jaysimha
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby jaysimha » 04 Jun 2019 14:54

http://www.indiainvestmentgrid.com
Image
Image
New India has emerged as the world's leading investment destination. The India Investment Grid (IIG) showcases a menu of investment options across India on a single interactive platform. An initiative to enhance the ease of doing business, IIG connects potential investors to project promoters across India

Singha
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby Singha » 04 Jun 2019 17:29

there is no visible movement on retendering of the vital ORR metro (that too just half of it) in blr after L1 winner IL&FS became insolvent.
this was supposed to be done months ago by BBMP.
this when the line will be viable and overused from day1 and corporates in each tech park have already donated money and land for the stations.

arvin
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby arvin » 09 Jun 2019 08:25

Singha wrote:there is no visible movement on retendering of the vital ORR metro (that too just half of it) in blr after L1 winner IL&FS became insolvent.
this was supposed to be done months ago by BBMP.
this when the line will be viable and overused from day1 and corporates in each tech park have already donated money and land for the stations.


The previous funding scheme has been scrapped and
BBMP is seeking central funding for the line. For that they need to adhere to some central norms like CMP and UMTA as per this report.

https://www.metrorailnews.in/centre-to- ... o-project/

Knowing the pace at which bbmp works lets hope they implement it soon.

It would be interesting to see which of these projects gets completed before 2030 , 25 km ORR line or 1700 km chengdu - Lhasa line.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sichuan–Tibet_railway

A Nandy
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby A Nandy » 12 Jun 2019 09:39

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 746832.cms

Under the Jal Jeevan Mission, both ground and surface water will be used to meet the requirement. Union drinking water secretary Parameswaran Iyer said in villages where the quality of water available is good, piped water will be sourced and supplied at the village level. In other areas where water quality is poor, there will be a trunk water supply system for a cluster of villages and piped water will be sourced from other villages or locality. The communities such as village panchayat would manage the operation and maintenance of the facilities wherever feasible.

Officials said the focus of the scheme will be to recharge groundwater through point recharge sources, basic treatment and re-use of grey-water for agriculture, de-silting minor irrigation tanks and rejuvenation of water bodies. “There will be a huge focus on the campaign for creating awareness and behaviour change for the conservation of water,” an official said.

tandav
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby tandav » 12 Jun 2019 13:42

A Nandy wrote:https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/centre-announces-scheme-to-supply-piped-water-to-every-house-in-villages-by-2024/articleshow/69746832.cms

Under the Jal Jeevan Mission, both ground and surface water will be used to meet the requirement. Union drinking water secretary Parameswaran Iyer said in villages where the quality of water available is good, piped water will be sourced and supplied at the village level. In other areas where water quality is poor, there will be a trunk water supply system for a cluster of villages and piped water will be sourced from other villages or locality. The communities such as village panchayat would manage the operation and maintenance of the facilities wherever feasible.

Officials said the focus of the scheme will be to recharge groundwater through point recharge sources, basic treatment and re-use of grey-water for agriculture, de-silting minor irrigation tanks and rejuvenation of water bodies. “There will be a huge focus on the campaign for creating awareness and behaviour change for the conservation of water,” an official said.


This needs a countrywide contour mapping at 2m height difference to be made... we need to create a network of water holding structures whose over flows are interconnected. This will reduce the erosion of soil and help improve ground water tables, Each entrance to water body should be protected with vortex / passive silt traps to ensure that water holding capacity is maintained and mud does not enter the water structure... this improves the potability of the water

jaysimha
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby jaysimha » 12 Jun 2019 15:01

^^^^
Efforts are already on in this regard.
Some of the web sites of GoI mentioned here for records(assume not all info may be in public domain).
May be this calls for a separate thread to discuss this issue.

National Hydrology Project http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease. ... lid=138630
http://nhp.mowr.gov.in/Home/NHPIndex.aspx

Bhuvan https://bhuvan.nrsc.gov.in/bhuvan_links.php
Mosdac https://www.mosdac.gov.in/
Vedas https://vedas.sac.gov.in/vedas/
Single Database for Ground Water http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease. ... lid=175307
https://www.isro.gov.in/earth-observati ... -resources
Image

A Nandy
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby A Nandy » 12 Jun 2019 15:29

+ 1 for new Water Discussion thread. Probably the biggest challenge for us now and in coming years.

jaysimha
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby jaysimha » 12 Jun 2019 18:33

--re-post ( MBD )--

Presentation By
Shri. A.S. Kiran Kumar
Chairman ISRO

on Foundation Day and Award Ceremony of UAS Bengaluru

October 09 2015

https://www.isro.gov.in/sites/default/f ... galuru.pdf


in my opinion

One Bharat Ratna is due for Isro after Dr.Kalam ( drdo) , Prof CNR Rao ( pure science)

A Nandy
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Re: Infrastructure News & Discussion

Postby A Nandy » 20 Jun 2019 01:06

Here is something that might prove useful to cities at the coast like Chennai: https://phys.org/news/2019-06-hot-effic ... ation.html

Engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50%

In conventional membrane distillation, hot, salty water is flowed across one side of a sheetlike membrane while cool, filtered water flows across the other. The temperature difference creates a difference in vapor pressure that drives water vapor from the heated side through the membrane toward the cooler, lower-pressure side. Scaling up the technology is difficult because the temperature difference across the membrane—and the resulting output of clean water—decreases as the size of the membrane increases. Rice's "nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation" (NESMD) technology addresses this by using light-absorbing nanoparticles to turn the membrane itself into a solar-driven heating element.


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