Indian Telecom Folder

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Shivani
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Postby Shivani » 14 Jan 2009 20:43



This is quite distressing. From what I have read in media, Nortel was and is considered the 'gold standard' in the enterprise IT segment, ahead of rivals like Cisco. Truly, no one is safe. The comments to this news are quite telling. The good side:

theglobeandmail wrote:While still North America's largest telecom equipment maker, Nortel's shares were worth a total of just $192-million yesterday, and the company has 26,000 staff after a bruising series of layoffs over the past eight years. Nortel stock that soared to $1,231 at the peak of the tech bubble – reflecting a recent consolidation in shares – closed yesterday at 38.5 cents on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

theglobeandmail wrote:In addition to selling the Ethernet unit, divisions that could go on the auction block include the carrier networks unit, which sells gear to phone companies, and the enterprise division that sells telecom equipment to businesses. Potential buyers for these units are all foreign: Nokia Siemens Networks, Telefon AB LM Ericsson, Cisco Systems Inc. and China's Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.


This is a terrific opportunity for Indian companies to acquire IP. Even BSNL/ DoT should consider a bid for Nortel assets. Directly or via proxies. We are a complete non-player in the IT and networking hardware department. And we have (and will continue to have) one of the biggest market for these products.

With some crafty policywork on government side and effective management Nortel assets would pay off and then some! :)

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Tanaji » 14 Jan 2009 21:01

Its official, they just filed for Chapter 11.

Such a pity, an excellent company.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Nitesh » 14 Jan 2009 21:42

Nortel was a good company but some of it's divisons were not doing good especially in Service provider sector. They just won C.G. SWAN case. I am worried how the implementation will go ahead.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby bart » 14 Jan 2009 21:46

Nortel enterprise products are total crap and so is their support. Some divisions like PBX, Call center infrastructure, voice switches, optical products etc are good.

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Postby bart » 14 Jan 2009 21:50

Shivani wrote:This is quite distressing. From what I have read in media, Nortel was and is considered the 'gold standard' in the enterprise IT segment, ahead of rivals like Cisco. Truly, no one is safe.


You have got to be kidding me. I work full time on enterprise communications infrastructure and I know from years of personal experience and many sleepless nights and wasted weekends troubleshooting stupid issues that that is definitely not the case. I would rate the quality of Dlink or Linksys cheap SOHO stuff higher than Nortel, I wouldn't buy any of their crap even if they were paying me for taking it. We were a premium gold support customer for Nortel and bought tens of millions of dollars worth of their junk (so we were a major customer), and to date I have yet to see a single resolution from Nortel customer support for anything other than a simple hardware replacement.

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Re: Re:

Postby Nitesh » 14 Jan 2009 21:54

bart wrote:
Shivani wrote:This is quite distressing. From what I have read in media, Nortel was and is considered the 'gold standard' in the enterprise IT segment, ahead of rivals like Cisco. Truly, no one is safe.


You have got to be kidding me. I work full time on enterprise communications infrastructure and I know from years of personal experience and many sleepless nights and wasted weekends troubleshooting stupid issues that that is definitely not the case. I would rather by Dlink or Linksys cheap stuff than buy any Nortel crap. We were a premium gold support customer for Nortel and bought tens of millions of dollars worth of their junk (so we were a major customer), and to date I have yet to see a single resolution from Nortel customer support for anything other than a simple hardware replacement.

Oh come on bart please this is too harsh on Nortel. Nortel has good products. Can you please sepcify some specific incident please.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Tanaji » 14 Jan 2009 21:58

Enterprise =/= routers and switches alone where Cisco dominates. There is other stuff as well. Nortel doesnt compete in enterprise routers, but has excellent PBX and associated products.

Of course, on carrier side, its Passport series of data switches were class leading.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby svinayak » 14 Jan 2009 22:01

Tanaji wrote:Its official, they just filed for Chapter 11.

Such a pity, an excellent company.

The VP I know who was in Nortel till 2007 was telling me that the end was near.

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Re: Re:

Postby bart » 14 Jan 2009 22:37

Nitesh wrote:
bart wrote:
Shivani wrote:This is quite distressing. From what I have read in media, Nortel was and is considered the 'gold standard' in the enterprise IT segment, ahead of rivals like Cisco. Truly, no one is safe.


You have got to be kidding me. I work full time on enterprise communications infrastructure and I know from years of personal experience and many sleepless nights and wasted weekends troubleshooting stupid issues that that is definitely not the case. I would rather by Dlink or Linksys cheap stuff than buy any Nortel crap. We were a premium gold support customer for Nortel and bought tens of millions of dollars worth of their junk (so we were a major customer), and to date I have yet to see a single resolution from Nortel customer support for anything other than a simple hardware replacement.

Oh come on bart please this is too harsh on Nortel. Nortel has good products. Can you please sepcify some specific incident please.


As I said earlier, some enterprise products like PBX etc are pretty decent.

Take switches - one area where on paper they have 'competing' products with Cisco. In other areas like routers, etc they don't even have a product range competing with even 20% of Cisco/Juniper. Nortel passports are amongst the worst switches I have used - for example we could not get a simple feature like IP access lists (without which a Layer-3 switch is barely useful) to work reliably. We checked with Nortel support and after 2 months of going back and forth they admitted that they had no idea how to fix it.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Shivani » 14 Jan 2009 22:51

bart wrote:Nortel enterprise products are total crap and so is their support.


I would not know otherwise!

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Re: Re:

Postby Nitesh » 15 Jan 2009 10:23

As I said earlier, some enterprise products like PBX etc are pretty decent.

Take switches - one area where on paper they have 'competing' products with Cisco. In other areas like routers, etc they don't even have a product range competing with even 20% of Cisco/Juniper. Nortel passports are amongst the worst switches I have used - for example we could not get a simple feature like IP access lists (without which a Layer-3 switch is barely useful) to work reliably. We checked with Nortel support and after 2 months of going back and forth they admitted that they had no idea how to fix it.


Nortel passports are Multi Service Switches which are used mainly by contact center industry for voice compression. And I had seen very less complaints with that. They were not having good portfolio in routing space it is known. They have taken over Tasman and now they have a decent portfolio. Although not as good as Cisco or juniper. But look in to the 4134 model. The service issue was a major one and the APAC head for logistic got fired for that. The things are smooth now.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby vipu » 15 Jan 2009 20:39

http://www.hindu.com/2009/01/14/stories/2009011453960400.htm

Airtel lifetime offer at Rs. 99

BANGALORE: Bharti Airtel on Monday introduced lifetime prepaid scheme for Rs. 99. Under the scheme, a subscriber can stay connected by paying just Rs. 99 and recharging with a minimum of Rs. 200 every 180 days to continue enjoying lifetime validity benefits.

With effect from January 12, Lifetime Prepaid 99 is available to all existing as well as new Airtel mobile users, the company press release said.

Any Idea if this is a precursor to charging higher Number Portablility fees?. :shock: . looks like a scam here and MRTPC/Consumer court should look at the usual 'conditions apply'. Some one needs to remind Mittal-saab that the consumer is always right.. :lol:

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 19 Jan 2009 03:01

Batelco to buy 49% in S-Tel.

Simply amazing 450-500 Million $ valuation for a company which is just holding lisences to six of the least attractive telecom circles.This is crazy and all these Airtel wannabe companies are going to make big losses some years down the line.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 21 Jan 2009 01:13

Reliance makes third entry into mobile telephony.

When Mukesh Ambani, the head of Reliance Industries, was making a high-decibel entry into mobile telephony based on the CDMA platform six years ago, he gave several interviews recounting how his father, the redoubtable Dhirubhai, provided the guiding principle for the business. In a customary heart-to-heart evening chat with his elder son, Dhirubhai said mobile telephony would take off only if a short how-are-you call cost less than a postcard, whose price was 15 paise.

That charted the course for Reliance Infocomm’s Monsoon Hungama. Opening on July 2, 2003, it offered a mobile phone for Rs 501, including Rs 100 worth of free talk time, and redefined the pricing and tariff structure in the business. Until then, if you wanted a mobile phone, the handset alone cost about Rs 2,000 and more, the connection was extra.

Now, Dhirubhai’s younger son, Anil Ambani, is going a step ahead. Having received the group’s telecom business in the June 2005 settlement with his brother and consolidated it as Reliance Communications, Ambani has taken the company’s focus back to GSM and launched a new pre-paid service that can be bought for just Rs 25 and will be valid for three months, one-eighth of the cheapest offer by anyone else. The connection will come with five to 10 minutes of free talk time (depending on the circle) every day, which works out to 450 to 900 free minutes in the three-month period.

Ambani’s rivals say this is purely a ploy to get additional spectrum at a low cost before the other new licence holders get in. Spectrum, the radio frequency on which mobile signals travel, is a scarce resource on which the new telecom wars are being fought. A new licence holder, as RCom is, begins with 4.4 MHz and gets another 1.8 MHz in Delhi and Mumbai once its subscriber base in these cities touches 500,000.

Low key, low cost
Reliance won eight circles when the government gave out the first GSM licences in 1995. However, they are on the fringe and have so far netted only 10 million subscribers. The group’s big entry in the business took place on the CDMA platform in December 2002. In keeping with the company’s penchant for grandeur, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, the Prime Minister at that time, took the first call from then communications minister Pramod Mahajan. The inauguration was covered live by most news channels.

Anil Ambani, who skipped that glittering event, has done it quietly this time — just a regular press conference in Mumbai. There were no ministers, no teasers, no hoardings, no multi-crore pre-launch advertising blitz, and no brand ambassador (cricketer Virender Sehwag’s mother had become a household name the last time).

But the usual Reliance methods of scale and speed are very much in attendance. The company has done a national rollout of the new licence in just 12 months. The others who got licences at the same time are nowhere close to it. RCom has already invested over Rs 10,000 crore and its target is to reach 95 per cent of the population in three to four months. That is close to the penetration of its CDMA service, which has more than 50 million subscribers. By the end of this month, RCom’s GSM will be in 11,000 cities and 300,000 villages.

The low-key launch has given ammunition to the spectrum theory. Its propounders say the company has saved on marketing and advertising expenses so that it reaches the half a million mark in subscribers in Delhi and Mumbai at the lowest possible cost and get more spectrum.

“There is nothing to respond to as they are not following a sustainable pricing policy and their average revenue per user is negative. They are making a loss per subscriber and virtually giving away SIMs (subscriber identity module cards) free to subscribers. Their aim is to reach 500,000 subscribers in a circle so that they can get the additional 1.8 MHz of spectrum nearly free of cost. They are not making any advertising blitz to keep the numbers in check,” says a senior executive of a leading telecom company.

According to RCom, however, this is a usual entry strategy for someone coming into a crowded market. “Our target is to reach the 100 million mark in mobile subscribers in the shortest possible time,” says S P Shukla, president of RCom’s wireless business. Since the CDMA service already has 50 million and the older GSM service 10 million, the target gets whittled down to 40 million.

Still, what about the cost?

Entry cost
Retailers can pick up the SIM card for Rs 10 and sell it for Rs 25. The company will give them Rs 40 after a month if the subscriber is still on the network. Thus, even if the retailer gives the SIM free, he still makes money.

If a subscriber makes calls for 10 minutes or less a day, RCom will get no revenue for the first 90 days from him since it is giving 10 minutes free every day. On the other hand, it will have to pay termination charges to other networks on the calls made to non-RCom phones at the government-mandated rate of 30 paise a minute. Assuming that about two-thirds of the free outgoing calls are to other networks — after all, Reliance’s GSM subscriber base is only a fraction of the total mobile user base of more than 300 million — the company will pay Rs 60 per subscriber per month to other networks for the free calls which anyway will not bring in any revenue.

Still, rivals say the expenses are a small price. “The math works out beautifully for them. Even if RCom has to spend Rs 180 per subscriber for three months as termination charges, that comes to only Rs 9 crore for 500,000 consumers. Once it reaches that number, it gets 1.8 MHz of additional spectrum under government policy. Everyone knows that the spectrum value is many times more,” says an RCom rival. He adds that apart from the subscriber base, the usage has also been made a criterion for allocation of additional spectrum. That RCom can achieve thanks to the free minutes which it has spread over the three-month period.

Says analyst Mahesh Uppal: “The strategy is akin to free sampling and acquiring subscriber numbers by being a loss leader so that you can claim more spectrum. The fear is that its consequences should not be passed on to others by creating a shortage of the scarce resource.”

The last time, Reliance’s cheap service garnered a large number of subscribers but later it had to write off a large sum as non-performing assets to clean up its balance sheet.

The reasons why Reliance is doing it again are two. First, over 80 per cent of the new additions in the mobile space are for GSM, since consumers like the flexibility of choosing their handset (CDMA phones are tied to the network). Secondly, international roaming, especially in Europe, is difficult on CDMA, and Reliance cannot afford to loose the customers who travel as they would typically be high-usage ones.

“We will leverage on our late mover advantage. Our aim is to get part of the 250 million GSM consumers who are frustrated with their existing networks to come and try a new, better service at the lowest cost, forcing the incumbents to defend their position,” says Shukla. He says the plan is also to get a part of the 8-9 million new subscribers that come on board the GSM ship every month, a market that was so far largely out of Reliance’s reach.

Macquarie Research projects that RCom should be able to capture at least 6 per cent of the net add market by the third quarter of 2009-10.

Experts say the pricing would affect the incumbents, which will have little choice but to take on this new RCom in GSM’s clothing. Already, Bharti’s Airtel, the country’s largest mobile phone brand, has cut its lifetime connection fee to Rs 99. Vodafone is planning to bring its down to the same level across the country. Idea Cellular is already offering it at Rs 40 in some circles and the average across the country has already fallen to Rs 149. All of them point out that they are not offering free minutes — a loss-making proposition.

Macquarie warns of a disruptive impact on the incumbents’ average revenue per user, or ARPU, as well as their minutes of usage since many pre-paid subscribers would shift significant talk time usage to RCom for the next 90 days. Macquarie says Bharti’s Airtel will suffer a 17 per cent drop in ARPU in the next quarter, and forecasts a sharper decline for Idea Cellular, which is also launching in new circles.

RCom executives say that while the goal is to get a large subscriber base, they do not think the company would be ARPU-negative and that the business model is not unsustainable. They point out that the company would make some money from calls that terminate on its network (at the same rate that it will pay other networks). Secondly, they expect all their consumers to buy recharge coupons and use their phones beyond the 10 calls that are free. Thirdly, the incentives given by other competitors to retailers for a new connection are as high as Rs 150-200 while RCom’s trade margins are far lower.

“The trends have shown that 85 per cent of calls from a phone are made to just five numbers, so once they know a new number they will also call back and we expect termination charges on incoming to neutralise what we spend on outgoing calls to other networks,” says a senior executive of RCom. He adds that the company has been able to pass on the lower trade margins and the zero cost on advertising to consumers as low entry packs.

“One of our competitors, which recently started service, spends Rs 30 crore on advertising, but got only 70,000 subscribers in a month. We have refrained from doing so,” says Shukla.

But is RCom overstretching itself by targeting 100 million mobile subscribers? Most analysts agree that the mobile market would hit the 600 million mark by 2012, nearly twice the current size, which has been reached with just seven players. With six new players joining the fray and incumbents controlling at least 70 per cent of the net additions, it might be difficult to get more than 30 million customers each and that would only materialise three years down the line.

Many expect RCom to loose its CDMA subscribers to its own GSM service, so there might not be any big real addition in its mobile subscriber base. “If RCom continues with this fabulous offer, its CDMA subscribers will feel cheated and shift. With number portability (which allows users to migrate from one service provider to another while retaining the number) coming in, it will be easier to do so. So these numbers are too ambitious,” says a senior executive of a competing mobile company.

Industry experts say the company itself might offer free or cheap GSM handsets to its CDMA customers to goad them to switch, so that it has to manage just one network. But RCom executives say they are technology-neutral and there is a market for both the products. Those who want data functions would prefer CDMA, while those looking for predominantly voice usage and handset flexibility would prefer GSM.

Shukla and his team are not only concentrating on new customers but also targeting the existing pre-paid, low-end customers of rivals. RCom has leveraged its existing network to keep fixed costs down. For instance, a similar launch by a new player would need twice the investment, as the network and the towers would have to be set up from scratch. The company can also leverage its existing distribution network of over 5,000 distributers, 2,000 exclusive stores and more than a million outlets. It’s a muscle that will be difficult to match for new players except for the Tata Group, which, too, already has a CDMA network and is making a foray into GSM.

Above all, RCom is counting on two factors. One, it does not expect any of the new GSM licence winners to roll out in the next 12 months. The second is the financial meltdown. “We clearly have time to consolidate our GSM foray in the next one year as we don’t see new players coming in. So we will be competing with the same players that we used to. The only change is that we have a pan-India GSM product,” says a Reliance ADAG executive. Not only that, by the time the other newcomers get in, RCom will also have more spectrum.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby ajay_ijn » 21 Jan 2009 20:23

Vipul wrote:Batelco to buy 49% in S-Tel.

Simply amazing 450-500 Million $ valuation for a company which is just holding lisences to six of the least attractive telecom circles.This is crazy and all these Airtel wannabe companies are going to make big losses some years down the line.

why would they vipul?, telecom is showing no signs of slowdown despite the global crisis. there is still large rural market to be addressed, new services to be explored like mobile banking. There is still 3G, broaband, Wimax, IPTV etc
India adds 10.81 mn wireless subscribers in December
According to the regulator, a total of 10.81 million wireless subscribers were added in December as compared to 10.35 million a month before, registering a growth of 4.44 per cent.

However, in the wireline segment, the subscriber base decreased to 37.9 million in December from 38.05 million in the previous month.

The country registered 2.84 per cent growth last month, taking the total number of telephone connections to 384.79 million from 374.13 million in November 2008, said the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) statement.

"With this growth, the overall tele-density has reached 33.23 per cent at the end of December 2008 as against 32.34 per cent in November," the TRAI said.

The total wireless subscribers base (GSM, CDMA and WLL(F)) stood at 346.89 million in December.

The total broadband subscribers base reached 5.45 million in December as against 5.28 million a month before, a growth of 3.21 per cent.



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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 21 Jan 2009 22:57

ajay_ijn wrote:
Vipul wrote:Batelco to buy 49% in S-Tel.

Simply amazing 450-500 Million $ valuation for a company which is just holding lisences to six of the least attractive telecom circles.This is crazy and all these Airtel wannabe companies are going to make big losses some years down the line.

why would they vipul?, telecom is showing no signs of slowdown despite the global crisis. there is still large rural market to be addressed, new services to be explored like mobile banking. There is still 3G, broaband, Wimax, IPTV etc


Cause for each of the new services you have mentioned further investment of hundreds of crores will be required. Even then they will be competing against established players who have already done this investment (and depreciated those assets for a good part) and making profits.
Even in the bread and butter 2G services that the players are counting on (total 750 Million connections) nearly half (355 Million as of date) has already been reached.Note that by the time these players roll out the service in another 6 months a further 60 Million would have been further appropriated.
More importantly new connections would have already reached the limit in Metro and Urban areas by then.What will be left out is semi-urban and rural areas where the ARPU(average revenue per user) is 40% lower.So banking on growth in a shrinking market (relative to the number of players already operational or will be) in a low earning market does not look so good.
To give you an idea of the operating expenses for a a telco aiming to roll out services on an all india basis the rental on towers alone is 1600 crores p.a.(Swan's deal with RCOM)

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Singha » 23 Jan 2009 22:42

well once upon a time synoptics(west coast switch co) merged with wellfleet(east coast routing co) to form Bay Networks. it was not a good cultural and management fit but they were kinda peers of cabletron, 3com and cisco at the point - mid 1990s.

then cisco pulled a little ahead but they were still managing ok vs 3com and cabletron(who had a notoriously tough work culture)

then 3com merged with us robotics and kinda left the big picture.

cisco pulled further ahead - somehow managing to buy lots of cos and using lucrative stock to retain key employees until the "startup demo to VC" gear was made shippable to enterprise clients atleast.

at this point Nortel stepped in and bought Bay. huge cultural and org misfit.
Bay had a good router then and were developing better ones, plus new BRAS platform (I wuz there).

they did stuff like killing the new bras and bought aptis for that...overall they
ran bay into the ground in short order and most of the people left and joined
other cos like csco, sycamore, ciena, jnpr, startups...

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby amdavadi » 24 Jan 2009 06:16

Singha, you are right on the money.

US robotics wasnt interested in running 3com, once they decided to spin off palm.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby ramana » 24 Jan 2009 08:26

i think Rajeev Srinivasan the jingo writer was at Bay(?)

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 31 Jan 2009 00:45

Cell phone makers propose free handsets to 50 m poor families.

Mobile handset makers have sought Rs 5,000 crore from the Universal Services Obligation fund to give free cellular phone and a connection to families under the below poverty line.

In a representation to the telecom regulator, the Indian Cellular Association (ICA) said that the subsidy should be given to 50 million BPL families which will help in removing the digital divide. ICA is the industry association representing handset makers including Nokia and Sony Ericsson.

At present, support from the USO fund is being given only to telecom operators. ICA suggested that support should be given directly to consumers to make it more effective in achieving the objective of reaching communication services to the rural areas.

“Invest in the 50 million BPL families by providing free of cost mobile handsets and connections with 100 free calls per month. The mobile handset provided can be a basic phone with an AM radio, which can be useful for listening to relevant local language content. These radio stations should be made interactive and calls to these radio stations should be made free of cost. This investment of approximately Rs 4,000–5,000 crore has the potential of transforming the life of many families and individuals in this category,” said Mr Pankaj Mohindroo, President, ICA.

ICA suggested that along with a free calling package bundled with handset, skills mapping of these families should be done at the time of providing the connection. “These families have unutilised skills and competencies which can be used, provided these are mapped out and then aggregated in a particular geographical area, say 20 sq. kms. These skills can be made available based on requests received through voice calls and SMS. The IT backbone along with local language call centres need to be created,” said Mr Mohindroo.

The industry body has estimated that free calls will enable these families to save around Rs 15-20 a month, which they would have spent on transportation as access to information in local languages on their mobile phone will cut down on their need to travel. “As saving starts accruing to these families, after the initial period of two years they would be willing to start paying for the mobile services at the rate of at least Rs 25 per month,” ICA said.

Mr Mohindroo said that content providers should also be provided funds out of USO to develop relevant applications in collaboration with rural institutions. To deal with handset repairs and educating the BPL population about mobile usage, ICA suggested that theUSO fund should be utilised to set up service stations in rural areas. “Repairs i.e. after sales service is a key factor in the success of mobile handsets penetration and acceptance: Service centres are virtually absent in the rural areas. The USO fund should be utilised in setting up anchor service stations after a proper study,” ICA said in its letter to TRAI.

In addition to the USO subsidy, handset manufacturers have sought abolition of value added tax of 4 per cent which would enable them to bring down the cost of handset to under Rs 1,500.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 11 Feb 2009 00:33

GSM operators add record 9.3 mn subscribers in Jan.

Looks like 11 to 11.5 Million new connections for this month which will be a record. :)
Bharti seems to have settled on a run rate of 2.7 million new customers each month.Idea reached the 2 million figure for the first time.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 14 Feb 2009 00:08

India's Reliance Comm adds 5 mln users in Jan. :eek: :shock: 8)

Reliance Communications Ltd (RLCM.BO), India's no 2 mobile telecoms firm, on Friday said it added a record 5 million new subscribers in January, boosted by the launch of services on the GSM platform.

Reliance, which has most of its users using rival CDMA technology, launched nationwide GSM-based services in January. By end-December, Reliance had 61.35 million of India's 346.89 million mobile phone users, according to data from the telecoms regulator

India's top telecoms firm Bharti Airtel (BRTI.BO) added 2.73 million users in January, while No 3 Vodafone Essar, controlled by Vodafone Plc (VOD.L) added 2.4 million users

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Shivani » 16 Feb 2009 00:21



Is this true net increase? Or just new connections without any correction for lost business?

They will lose users from their own CDMA business, perhaps with some lag.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby vipins » 16 Feb 2009 00:46

Shivani wrote:


Is this true net increase? Or just new connections without any correction for lost business?

They will lose users from their own CDMA business, perhaps with some lag.


Reliance GSM offering sim cards for around 50rs with daily 5-10 Rs. talk time adding up daily
if someone can spend the last days amount.Many people specially students going for these sims.But most
for them already have other connections so these are only temporary ,i guess.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 16 Feb 2009 22:36

Thats true most of the new connections would be of from other competitors who are using the additional SIM card for free talk with other RCOM subscribers.

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India Mobile Firms Added 15.41 Million Users in Jan

Postby goutham » 20 Feb 2009 21:45

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123513073080432363.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

NEW DELHI -- Indian telecom service providers added 15.41 million wireless users in January -- compared with 10.81 million in December 2008 :shock: -- with Bharti Airtel Ltd in the lead, the country's telecommunications regulator said Friday.

The total number of wireless users in the world's fastest-growing telecom market was 362.30 million at the end of January, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India said.

Bharti Airtel, the country's top mobile company by users, added 2.73 million users in January, taking its base to 88.38 million subscribers.

Reliance Communications Ltd., the second-largest, added 4.95 million users. It had 61.34 million subscribers at the end of December.

The company launched its mobile service using the global system for mobile communications or GSM technology in December.

Privately owned Vodafone Essar Ltd. -- majority owned by the U.K.'s Vodafone PLC -- added 2.4 million users, taking its total number of subscribers to 63.34 million.

State-run Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd. had a user base of 47.58 million, after adding 1.3 million subscribers in December.

The country's fixed line user base, however, fell to 37.75 million in January from 37.90 million in December, TRAI said.

The country's overall teledensity, or the number of phone users for every 100 individuals, was 34.50% at the end of January compared with 33.23% at the end of December.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Rahul Mehta » 20 Feb 2009 22:21

Any one has info on number portability? i.e. if I change the company, number can still remain same?

Is TRAI opposing number portability? If yes, any reason why?

.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Prasad » 21 Feb 2009 00:43

Afaik,
TRai has been pushing for number portability among other things but the networks are reticent.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Singha » 21 Feb 2009 01:15

they claim it will cost them extra to run the mapping databases etc. we bhikhari onree saar.

GoI needs to pass a small act making it mandatory.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 21 Feb 2009 05:17

GOI had plans for Number portability(mobiles only not landlines) by June 2009 and rest of the contry by December.
The process for selecting agency to overlook the rollout was initiated.This was in october of last year but there is no info after that.GOI and DOT is more focussed on starting the process of auctioning the 3G spectrum right now.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby wasu » 21 Feb 2009 06:37

Official trai press release...Nice Milestone, 400M Telecom subs end of Jan.

http://www.trai.gov.in/WriteReadData/tr ... 09no16.pdf

New Delhi, 20th February 2009:- Total 15.26 million telephone connections (Wireline and Wireless) have been added during January 2009 as compared to 10.66 million connections added in December 2008. The total number of telephone connections reaches 400.05 million at the end of January 2009 as compared to 384.79 million in December 2008. With this growth, the overall tele-density has reached 34.50% at the end of January 2009 as against 33.23% in December 2008.

The total wireless subscribers (GSM, CDMA & WLL(F)) base stood at 362.30 million at the end of January 2009. A total of 15.41 million wireless subscribers have been added during the month of January 2009 as against 10.81 million wireless subscribers added during the month of December 2008.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Rahul Mehta » 21 Feb 2009 08:46

tsriram: Afaik, TRai has been pushing for number portability among other things but the networks are reticent.

Singha : they claim it will cost them extra to run the mapping databases etc. we bhikhari onree saar. GoI needs to pass a small act making it mandatory.

Vipul: GOI had plans for Number portability(mobiles only not landlines) by June 2009 and rest of the contry by December.The process for selecting agency to overlook the rollout was initiated.This was in october of last year but there is no info after that. GOI and DOT is more focussed on starting the process of auctioning the 3G spectrum right now.


TSriram,

The networks would always oppose portability as portability will make them loose their grip over captive clients. eg my mobile bill would reduce by almost half if I switch from Vodafone to Reliance. And more than half if some newcomer comes who is more aggressive than Reliance. So if TRAI is accommodating resistance of networks, that is clearly un-becoming of TRAI. It is often called as 'regulatory capture' where in regulator sides with companies in looting customers.

Singha,

One level of indirection is no big deal in terms of software or hardware cost. If companies or TRAI are citing implementation issues in portability, they are liars.

Vipul,

The auction process of 3G does not hamper number portability in anyway. If GoI, DoT or TRAI are making 3G auction as excuse, it is just another lie.

===

We need to get at the bottom of this issue. It seems that TRAI is deliberately going slow portability and something may be cooking.

.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Avinash R » 22 Feb 2009 22:00


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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 22 Feb 2009 22:04

Mobile Number Portability coming to India by August this year.

Indian Union Minister for IT and Communication A Raja has said in a statement that the government aims to bring mobile number portability in the market by August this year.

Mobile number portability has been massively delayed and is much awaited.

This feature would allow mobile users to switch their mobile service providers without changing their old numbers.

Raja said in a statement: “The mobile number portability enabling customers to retain their old number while shifting from one operator to another would be launched in major cities by August this year.”

It is likely to be launched in the major cities in the country by August. It would be further expanded to other markets at a later stage.

We are big supporters of this move by the government. A lot of mobile users are stuck with their providers just because they cannot afford to change their numbers. This would be a huge relief for them.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Nitesh » 23 Feb 2009 13:55

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/4158371.cms?frm=mailtofriend

Bankrupt Nortel selling a business to Radware
20 Feb 2009, 0749 hrs IST, REUTERS


NEW YORK: Nortel Networks Corp, the Canadian phone equipment giant that filed for bankruptcy protection last month, on Thursday said it agreed to
sell parts of its application delivery portfolio to Radware Ltd, pending the results of a court-supervised auction.

North America's largest telephone equipment maker said it filed the agreement with the U.S. bankruptcy court in Wilmington, Delaware. Nortel said it also asked the court to establish bidding procedures to allow others to submit higher or better offers, as required under U.S. bankruptcy law. It said it filed a similar motion with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.

Both courts must approve any sale, it said. The purchase agreement calls for Radware to assume ownership, product development and outstanding warranties, but Nortel said it would continue to promote the products. Nortel added the application switch product line in October 2000 when it acquired Alteon WebSystems Inc, Radware said in a separate statement.

Once a stock market darling during the 1990s technology bubble, Nortel filed for bankruptcy protection in the United States on Jan. 14, after its liquidity deteriorated in the wake of a sharp slowdown in many major markets including the United States, as well as competition from lower-cost rivals. Analysts have expected Nortel to shed some assets, likely at low prices in light of the recession and tight credit conditions. A copy of the Radware agreement was not immediately available. The case is Nortel Networks Inc, U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware, No. 09-10138.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby SRoy » 24 Feb 2009 23:36

Rahul Mehta wrote:
tsriram: Afaik, TRai has been pushing for number portability among other things but the networks are reticent.

Singha : they claim it will cost them extra to run the mapping databases etc. we bhikhari onree saar. GoI needs to pass a small act making it mandatory.

Vipul: GOI had plans for Number portability(mobiles only not landlines) by June 2009 and rest of the contry by December.The process for selecting agency to overlook the rollout was initiated.This was in october of last year but there is no info after that. GOI and DOT is more focussed on starting the process of auctioning the 3G spectrum right now.


TSriram,

The networks would always oppose portability as portability will make them loose their grip over captive clients. eg my mobile bill would reduce by almost half if I switch from Vodafone to Reliance. And more than half if some newcomer comes who is more aggressive than Reliance. So if TRAI is accommodating resistance of networks, that is clearly un-becoming of TRAI. It is often called as 'regulatory capture' where in regulator sides with companies in looting customers.

Singha,

One level of indirection is no big deal in terms of software or hardware cost. If companies or TRAI are citing implementation issues in portability, they are liars.

Vipul,

The auction process of 3G does not hamper number portability in anyway. If GoI, DoT or TRAI are making 3G auction as excuse, it is just another lie.

===

We need to get at the bottom of this issue. It seems that TRAI is deliberately going slow portability and something may be cooking.

.


Nope. Nothing fishy going on. We participated in the RFP process for some part of the MNP infrastructure in Nov 2008.

The reluctance is from the operators.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 26 Feb 2009 19:29

Mobile number portability licences to be granted in March.

The list of companies that will be granted licences for mobile number portability (MNP) - a technology that enables cellphone users to
retain their phone numbers when changing operators - will be announced next month, the government said on Thursday.

"The successful bidders for grant of mobile number portability service licences will be announced by March 5," Communications and Information Technology Minister A. Raja said in Rajya Sabha.

The letter of intent will also be issued the same day, Raja said, adding that the implementation of MNP has not been delayed.

The government had issued guidelines for award of MNP service licences Jan 1 this year.

As per the guidelines, MNP is to be implemented in all metro and category 'A' service areas within six months of the award of the licence, and in rest of the service areas within one year.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby manish » 26 Feb 2009 19:36

SRoy wrote:
Nope. Nothing fishy going on. We participated in the RFP process for some part of the MNP infrastructure in Nov 2008.

The reluctance is from the operators.


Yes, this is what I believe as well. AFAIK, absence of NP is one of the key things that is keeping the already stratospheric Customer Churn Rate from shooting through to the ionosphere. :)

When the Average Abdul has the freedom to chuck his existing operator providing a poor service and choose a competitor providing better service/lower tariffs without having to give up a number he has been using for many years, you are unshackling one of the last chains keeping him with his current operator. Of course there will be opex and capex issues involved as well, but this IMHO is the major reason why the operators don't want LNP.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 26 Feb 2009 20:36

Due to the MNP, telecom companies with superior quality and least network congestion would increase market share, it will be the average consumer who will be gaining the most as other players would be forced to cut their tariffs to remain competitive.What will happen ultimately is more customers would end up with subscribing to services of more then one mobile operator.We will soon see penetration rates of an average of 130% in the metro cities and A circle zone's.

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Re: Indian Telecom Folder

Postby Vipul » 05 Mar 2009 05:54



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