A Nation on the March

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Gerard
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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Gerard » 19 Aug 2008 03:48

some old fashioned law and order
Hyderabad: 8 jailed for stopping train
the Metropolitan Magistrate for Railways (Secunderabad) sentenced eight people to six months imprisonment and a fine of Rs 1,000 each for stopping a passenger train.
They, along with a mob, had squatted in front of train engine at Aler railway station and raised slogans demanding halt of some other trains at Aler.
Meanwhile, the railway authorities requested people not to resort to 'Rail Roko' agitations as it causes inconvenience to the rail passengers.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Baljeet » 21 Aug 2008 01:50

Singha wrote:the chinese peasants lot does not look good. any comp at whims and mercy of local despots and
builders. very telling statistic that and about 95% of top 20,000 richest being CCP allies.
also the proportion of listed PSU cos.


Singhaji
You should have seen a documentary by CNN(not sure) when their reporters went to interior of china with hidden cameras, the plight of chinese farmers is miserable. Their lands are taken over for building industry, acquifers are so polluted with heavy metals, crops grown in that water are unfit for any consumption and people are forced to eat that produce. When one reporter asked the factory manager if he will eat locally grown produce he said, "All my food is shipped from beijing, I don't buy anything local". :x

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby vsudhir » 25 Aug 2008 22:54

x-post:

face value - Ram drive

The Ekkkonomist profiles TCS boss S Ramadorai.

Uplifting read onlee.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Vipul » 26 Aug 2008 19:24

India to have fourth of global workforce by 2020.

India is expected to account for a fourth of the world's total skilled workforce by 2020 and the central government is according top priority to higher education, allocating Rs.275,000 crore (Rs 2.75 trillion) to the sector, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said on Tuesday.

"Our government's effort has been to create the next wave of investment in higher education. And the 11th Five Year Plan which is now under implementation is basically a knowledge investment plan," the prime Minister said.
"We have significantly increased allocation to the education sector with a five fold increase to an unprecedented Rs.275,000 crore," he said while addressing faculty and students at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Guwahati.

The prime minister said the government was trying to extend quality elementary education to all taking major expansions in secondary and higher educations. The idea was to produce some 500 million trained workforce by 2020.

Approval had already been granted for eight new IITs, seven Indian Institutes of Management, 16 central universities, 14 world class universities, five Indian Institutes of Science, 10 new National Institutes of Technologie, 20 Information Technology Institutes, and 1,000 polytechnics, he added."India has the potential to create over 500 million trained people by the year 2020. That would be over a fourth of the global workforce. This big and unique opportunity for India will come from an education revolution that we must undertake as our most important national endeavor."

The prime minister also advocated the need for partnerships between ths state and the private sector to further boost higher education in the country."We need to work in close partnership with the corporate sector, non-governmental entities and community organisations. We need to facilitate creative partnerships between the public and private sectors in the field of education including higher education," he said.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby sanjaychoudhry » 30 Aug 2008 02:03

150,000 emergencies handled by Gujarat’s ‘108′ project

If you are in Gujarat and face an emergency, just dial the toll-free number `108′ and experts will rush to your help. At least 150,000 emergencies have been handled by a project being run by the state government and the Hyderabad-based Emergency Management and Research Institute (EMRI) in the past one year since its launch.”I want to make the 108 Emergency Response Service (ERS) one of the eight wonders of the world,” said Venkat Changavalli, CEO of EMRI.

Changavalli was speaking Friday at the first anniversary here of Gujarat EMRI completing successful operations in the state.

He said EMRI was now operational in Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat and Uttarakhand. “Recently, I was in Europe and people there were surprised by the scale and scope of our achievement,” he said.

In India there are two million emergencies every year. “Our mission is to save one million lives in a year,” said Changavalli.

Six more states that have signed MoUs with EMRI are Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Rajasthan, Goa, Assam and Karnataka. Operations would begin in all the six states by Nov 1, Changavalli said.

On August 29 last year, Gujarat EMRI was inaugurated by Chief Minister Narendra Modi and former president A.P.J. Kalam with just 14 ambulances and a year later there are over 300 ambulances.

The public private partnership (PPP) project between EMRI and the Gujarat government has become a model for other PPP projects. Today, within a span of just 12 months, it provides in all the 26 districts of the state, a world class emergency response service, said Gobind Lulla, Gujarat EMRI chief operating officer.

“Even as I am talking, three ambulances are being launched, taking the total to 303. It will be 320 by the end of next month,” Lulla said.

“95 percent of the emergency calls are attended in one ring. Within two to three minutes the ambulance is on its way,” he added.

On July 26 when the serial blasts occurred here, within an hour our team took 62 people to the trauma ward. Only one person died after admission.

Since its launch, 150,000 emergencies have been attended to. Currently, Gujarat EMRI is responding to 1,300 emergencies on a daily basis and saving 60 lives per day, Lulla said.

A common person thinks that 108 services means ambulance but it is more than just that. It has four aspects like medical, police, fire services and natural disasters all being attended to through the single toll-free number `108′, Lulla said.

EMRI has given special attention to pregnant women in rural areas. Of the 1,300 cases per day, 400 are related to pregnancies., and of these 366 deliveries are taking place in the EMRI ambulances, Lulla said.

“Health is most basic. If good health prevails it helps other areas of progress. For the government EMRI is one aspect. More important is increasing the number of trauma centres so that critical patients can be taken directly by 108 service within the ‘golden hour’ so that life can be saved,” said Health Minister Jaynarayan Vyas.

In seven-and-half minutes, one life should be saved is the target of EMRI.

The need for such a service arose because the country lacked a systematic Emergency Response Service (ERS), prevalent in the developed countries of the world. It is appalling that despite progressing in other areas of medicine, India still lacks basic emergency services, said Changavalli.

The project is the brainchild of B. Ramalinga Raju, founder and chairman of Satyam Computers and his brother B. Rama Raju. It was launched in Hyderabad on Aug 15, 2005.


www.thaindian.com/newsportal/uncategori ... 90236.html

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby sanjaykumar » 30 Aug 2008 07:34

Glad to hear it, India is where you may be 5 km from a hospital with first class standards and some of the most competent physicians in the world, and die before you are able to physically get there.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Singha » 30 Aug 2008 08:19

Karnataka is finally going to unify its emergency# into one in around 6 months under a private
contractor engaged by the State Govt.

in BLR alone there is supposed to be some # like 1066 but dont think its statewide.
there are also "issues" in dialing emergency from cellphones....mails float around periodically
on it.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Vasu » 02 Sep 2008 18:12

I was in Doon when EMRI and the State Government launched the service. Could see a spanking new fleet of the Force Motor Traveller Ambulances leave the Coronation Hospital and leave for places like Haridwar, Joshimath and other urban centers. Their performance has been good and response time has been short, at least in Dehradun which has a relatively easier access to hospitals than other districts.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Philip » 03 Sep 2008 11:57

A sad untimely death of an Indian entrepreneur who made it big in the UK,especially teaming up with "Dirty Des" with the mag "Asian Babes"!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituar ... arajh.html

Aroon Maharajh
Entrepreneur who started in the rag trade and personified the dot-com bubble before moving into celebrity management.

Last Updated: 9:44PM BST 01 Sep 2008

Aroon Maharajh, who has died aged 41, was an entrepreneur in the rag trade, the dot-com market and in the arena of celebrity management.

Aroon Kumar Maharajh was born on February 6 1967 at Twickenham, Middlesex. His father, a South African of Indian extraction, had a clothing factory at Acton and had met Aroon's Austrian mother in London, where she was working as an au pair.

Their elder son, Aroon, left Orleans Park School, Richmond-upon-Thames, at the age of 16 with only a single O-level to his name (in Art) and immediately set up his own business making linings for clothing. He then went into manufacturing menswear, eventually employing more than 100 people as one of Britain's largest suppliers of casual menswear to major retail outlets such as Burton's, C&A, River Island and Top Man.

By the late 1990s overseas competitors were eating into Maharajh's profits, and he decided that it was time to get out of the rag trade. He turned his attention instead to the dot-com phenomenon.

With Stewart Feendy, a former record company scout, he set up a website – musicunsigned.com – to showcase unsigned music acts and promote them on the internet. The business was run from the garden shed of Maharajh's home at Hampton, Middlesex, where he and Sweendy would listen to tapes and CDs offered by aspiring young bands and artists who wanted to attract the attention of the record labels.

For a fee of £160, selected acts were rewarded with three songs on the website, along with a photograph and biographical details, with an initial exposure of three months.

The company took no cut from any deal subsequently signed with a record company. In April 2000 Maharajh and musicunsigned.com were among the subjects of a Panorama documentary about dot-com fever, which was presented by Tom Mangold.

That October he floated the company on the AIM stock market for £15 million. After the dot-com bubble burst, Maharajh set up a celebrity management agency, which in 2006 became Full Portion Media.

His clients included the former boxer Chris Eubank, the professional bounder James Hewitt, the chef Jean-Christophe Novelli and sporting figures such as Richard Dunwoody, the former National Hunt champion jockey, and the chairman of Crystal Palace FC, Simon Jordan.

In 2004 Maharajh joined forces with Simon Robinson, chairman of Remnant Media, to buy for an estimated £15 million Fantasy Publications, the Express newspapers' proprietor Richard Desmond's "adult magazine portfolio", which included Asian Babes, Readers' Wives, Electric Blue and the gay lifestyle magazine Attitude.

Encouraged by his Austrian mother, Maharajh had loved skiing since the age of three. He also enjoyed shooting, fly fishing, parties and the occasional long lunch.

On August 19 he suffered a heart attack at his home, and died later that day at Kingston Hospital.

Aroon Maharajh married, in 1990, Teresa Quinlan, whom he met at a night club in the West End of London. She survives him with their three sons.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby vsudhir » 04 Sep 2008 06:01

Tide turns in shocked Singur, own supporters tell Mamata to stop

Earlier, two representatives of Kolkata’s IT industry, Ranjan Basu and Suma Mukherjee, went down to Singur to reason with Mamata but were reportedly sent packing. Basu and Mukherjee are part of a group of IT professionals who recently ran a signature campaign in Kolkata in support of the Nano project.

“People want Tata to stay. We want to know why the problem cannot be solved through talks,” said Mukherjee.

“We never though that Mamata will drive Tata away,” said Malik, who runs a tea stall in the village. “The Tatas should not be forced to leave. The majority of the agitators are outsiders. They should stop the nonsense immediately. We need Tata here.”


Is this DDM-itis or is it for real? I hope it is for real. I hope that pointless posturing by netas is called to account.

Sad, that this ios the best Bengal could do as an alternative to the CPIM...

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Katare » 04 Sep 2008 21:10

It's real one farmer commited suside :roll: last night because Tata is leaving and all 3 of his sons who were working at Nano factory are out of job now. Mamta is on the receiving end now....

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby bart » 04 Sep 2008 21:27

“We never though that Mamata will drive Tata away,” said Malik, who runs a tea stall in the village. “The Tatas should not be forced to leave. The majority of the agitators are outsiders. They should stop the nonsense immediately. We need Tata here.”


That sadly is the real truth about all 'agitations' and 'resistance of oppression' by left-wing nut cases.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Vasu » 05 Sep 2008 03:16

What I am really curious to find out is that if the Tata's decide to stay, will the people remember these shenanigans at the time of the elections and punish both these ape species?

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby ramana » 05 Sep 2008 21:02

X-Posted...
ksmahesh wrote:
Atish wrote:One thing I noticed while travelling in the South and even in Nepal, how even the popular Hindu pilgrimage spots and temples were so much more clean than the filth that we see in the North of India. One reason is I think a rather disingenuous sort of respect for life as in stray dogs. I stepped on the excrement of a stray dog very near the sanctum sanctorum of a major temple spot in Rajasthan. Try to eliminate stray dogs (leave alone cows) in Indian streets to reduce filth and rabies and all sorts of animal rights activists oppose it. General public considers any such administrator a barbarian. One lets stray animals create filth and then the other aspects and rules of maintaining a clean environment cannot work. One is not gonna feel bad about taking a piss on a public street if mounds of animal waste lies nearby and is tolerated, nay supported!


The bolded parts are far from reality. Let me give you a real and recent example. I live in a city called Hisar. Two years earlier an IPS (I only remember his last name - Jadhav) was posted (I guess it was general law and order).

Now stray cows is major problem in Haryana particularly so in Hisar (the reason is Hisar is on Rajgarh border - a district in Rajasthan. And Rajgarh has in past faced repeated draughts).

This officer called a meeting of shopkeepers in main market and asked for views. The unanimous view was to remove cows out of city. when cows were counted and costs calculated it turned out that for 6000 rupees one cow shall be taken care of (Gaushalas).

Next started a campaign for donation. Money collected and Gaushalas built and cows translocated.

As some people had expressed doubts about the possibility that these cows could be sold to slaughter houses all cows were branded with a symbol (of hisar municipality) and a number.

As I write I am glad to tell you that stray cows are history in Hisar. If we have more such officers then the problem cannot go on.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby SaraLax » 09 Sep 2008 15:14

A recent Industrial Economist article
( Not Sure if this article will be archived and hence posting in full below )
Pin-hole surgery for underground construction!

Imagine finding space on the surface for storing 125,000 cu m of LPG in a crowded port town like Visakhapatnam! An ingenious project to construct the storage facility in a cavern 200 m below ground was conceived and constructed in just two years! The LPG stored in the cavern is contained by a large water curtain! No concrete lining, no steel containers! This engineering marvel that became functional and loaded to full capacity, is yet another, one-of-its kind facility in South Asia, constructed by L&T.

Indian mythology talks of Lord Shiva having assumed a gigantic form as a Flame which stretched from the Heavens down to Patala to unfathomable depths below the ground. Similarly L&T's operations cover a wide gamut, from tall structures of even 275m ht. down to spectacular constructions below the ground. One such marvel is the project, the underground storage cavern for LPG at Vizag, Andhra Pradesh, executed by L&T recently.

A huge storage facility 200 m below ground!

This facility has been built to store 125,000 cu m of LPG in a rock cavern located 200m below ground level. Such an underground storage facility scores over large surface installations on many counts such as cost, security, safety, ease of operations, etc. It is the first of its kind in South Asia.
Image
The facility is owned by South Asia LPG Company Private Ltd (SALPG), a 50:50 joint venture between Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd. (HPCL) and Total Gas and Power India (TGPI), a subsidiary of the French oil major, TotalFinaElf. Geostock of France provided consultancy to the owner and L&T was the contractor for both the underground and above-ground works.

The construction project covered rock excavation work as well as erection of all the electrical and mechanical equipment required for successful operation of the facility located mainly above ground. This mined cavern will be one of the world's deepest LPG caverns. The underground facility consists of two individual caverns of size 160 x 20 x 19m height interconnected by cross galleries. What was remarkable is that these caverns were excavated through only two small size shafts from ground level–access Shaft and Operation Shaft of 6.5m and 4m diameters respectively.

LPG contained by water!

LPG is stored in the underground rock cavern without any concrete lining employing an ingenious principle of hydraulic containment. Subsurface water present in the rock fissures surrounding the cavern, supplemented by water flowing down as required from horizontal holes drilled from a Water Curtain Gallery located 15m above the cavern, ensures that evaporated LPG does not escape through any fissures in the rock.
Image
It is a common occurrence for underground works to face some surprises in spite of extensive investigations initially carried out with the best of efforts. In this project also many unforeseen situations arose and with the flexible attitudes of the owner and the wide-ranging skills of the contractor the various problems encountered were sorted out successfully and quickly. Right from construction of the Diaphragm Wall in the upper overburden portion, progressive excavation of the shafts along the depth and excavation of the cavern in 3 benches posed many challenges.

Automated, systematic working...

The work was completed with very good quality and without a single fatal accident in all the underground works. After commencement of regular work in the shafts in rock, the underground works were completed in about two years, a significant record for such underground works. The faster completion with good quality and safety was accomplished through highly automated and systematic working as well as by excellent people-management through motivation and morale-building. Though the entire work was carried out by drilling and extensive, but controlled, blasting, the safety record was excellent. All the heavy construction equipment deployed, including heavy crushers, had to be dismantled on the surface, lowered carefully down the shaft to the cavern and reassembled. They were also brought back to the surface in a similar manner.

Some of the significant achievements in this project were the high rate of excavation for the shafts, strict tolerance on deviation for the 90m long horizontal holes, use of liquid explosives for the first time in India for such a complicated work, etc. The construction work has also won prestigious construction safety awards from Indian and international agencies.
The whole operation of excavating a large cavern through only two small diameter shafts is rather akin to the pin-hole surgeries being performed today in modern medicine thorough a very small hole or incision!

This project is a true demonstration of project management and technical skills of the country's largest construction agency, Larsen & Toubro Ltd.


More newspaper/PIB info on this LPG Underground Cavern
Deora inaugurates LPG cavern in Vishakhapatnam
PIB Release

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Singha » 09 Sep 2008 15:18

wise men think such caving skills would be useful for ram-billi SSBN submarine pens.
need underwater entrance tunnel.

how nice they got to build this in Vizag and study its underground rock trends :mrgreen:

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Nayak » 12 Sep 2008 13:16

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Deve ... 471745.cms
Poverty in India declines by 27 %: UN
11 Sep 2008, 1453 hrs IST,AGENCIES

NEW DELHI: Riding on the better social indicators like health and primary education, India has achieved an over 27 per cent decline in poverty and is well on track to meet the target set for 2015, according to the UN.

Even as it painted a bleak outlook for the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) for the world, the United Nations in its annual report said India had made significant inroads into the health and primary education sectors.

"India needs strong institutions and good governance to achieve the various millennium development goals (MDGs) laid down by the United Nations (UN)", Lok Sabha Speaker Somnath Chatterjee said at a function to launch the MDG report 2008.

"To achieve MDGs, we need strong institutions and good governance. It is essential that the success and shortcomings of achieving the MDGs almost midway to the period should be reviewed to ascertain the progress made in realising these goals," Chatterjee said.

However, there were no significant improvement in the secondary education sector.

"There was a 27.5 per cent reduction in poverty in India. The target of 19 per cent reduction by 2015 is well likely to be achieved," Maxine Olson, UN representative in India, said.

India was, however, lagging as far as reduction in the rate of maternal and infant mortality were concerned.

Similar was the case with controlling the spread of HIV/AIDS as well as providing clean drinking water and sanitation facilities to its population, the report said.

The target appears unlikely to be met unless there is targeted intervention and improvement in the institutional delivery mechanism, P N Kulkarni, one of the researchers who compiled the report told reporters here.

The annual report, a yardstick for measuring the achievement of the MDGs, predicted that higher food prices may push 100 million people deeper into poverty.

According to the report, there has been a strong and sustained progress in reducing extreme poverty. But, improved estimates of poverty from the World Bank show that the number of poor in the developing world is larger than previously thought, at 1.4 billion people.

But the new estimates confirm that between 1990 and 2005, the number of people living in extreme poverty fell by over 400 million, and that the 1990 global poverty rate is likely to fall by the targeted 50 per cent by 2015.

While most of the decline occurred in East Asia, particularly China, other regions had much smaller decreases in the poverty rate and only modest falls in the number of poor. Sub-Saharan Africa and the former Soviet Republics actually saw the number of poor increase between 1990 and 2005.

Among the MDGs, gains noted in the report were that primary school enrolment has a 90 per cent increase and is in striking distance of the 2015 goal of 100 per cent in all but two out of 10 regions of the world.

Within primary schools, gender parity is at 95 per cent in six out of 10 regions. Experts said that India is not on track on achieving this target.

Deaths from measles have been cut in one third between 2000 and 2006, and the vaccination rate among developing world children has reached 80 per cent.

More than one and a half billion people have gained access to clean drinking water since 1990-- but due to stress on fresh water resources nearly three billion people now live in regions facing water scarcity.

With help from the private sector, mobile phone technology and access to essential medicines are spreading in the poorest countries.

The targets which are not on track to achieved, however, are complications relating to child birth and pregnancy which the Government have not been able to reduce.

About one quarter of developing world's children are undernourished and half of the developing world population still lack improved sanitation facilities. More than one-third of the growing urban population are living in slums.


If we manage to get our priorities right we will soon take our rightful place under the sun.

Lagey raho India.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby ramana » 12 Sep 2008 20:15

IIM honors humble chaiwala

Image

Sketch of Rambhai

IIM sips from chaiwala cup
- Case study on Rambhai’s business ingredients
BASANT RAWAT

Ahmedabad, Sept. 11: A humble chaiwala who inspired a website has been honoured with a case study at IIM-A on his business that has all the ingredients that go into a successful venture.

For the past 25 years, Ram Attar Kori has been selling student favourites such as tea, biscuits, egg bhujiya, buns, paan and cigarettes on the footpath outside the campus of the premier business school which has recognised him by “opening” a window through the border wall which allows easier access.

Today, Rambhai, 51, was in the classroom as an “observer”, listening to three management experts who presented a case study on his business model, which, as one of them said, was a humbling lesson on the untold success stories that abound on India’s dusty and bustling streets.

He keenly listened to the discussion on the case study presented by the three: Umesh Neelakantan of the DCMAT School of Media and Business, Kerala, Jaspreet Ahluwalia, assistant professor at the Centre for Management Training and Research, Mohali, and Sonal Katewa, assistant professor, Asia Pacific Institute of Management, Jaipur.

The trio are part of a batch of 38 business management teachers who are doing a faculty development programme at IIM.

“The reason why we chose Rambhai as our case study is that we noticed he had a huge clientele among the students. We learnt that he has been doing business at the same place for the last 25 years. As we have to do a case study as a part of our curriculum, we decided that instead of going to any corporate house, why not study this man who has blended various principles of management without undergoing any formal management training,” said Katewa.

Language was no barrier as Rambhai listened to the presentation on him and his business model.

“I was not supposed to say anything as I was there as a guest and observer,” said the man who had turned out for his big moment shorn of his patent stubble and smartly attired in a new olive green shirt and cream trousers.

Much like Pramod-da of Calcutta’s Presidency College and Arun-da of St Xavier’s, who has “retired”, Rambhai is a legend on campus. He has even inspired a website http://www.rambhai.com, which is a platform for free exchange of views, similar to the kiosk he runs where many ideas have been born.

The son of an agriculture labourer from Faizabad in Uttar Pradesh, Rambhai came to Ahmedabad at the age of four. After doing odd jobs, he started his teashop in the early eighties and has not looked back since.

And like any savvy entrepreneur, he isn’t willing to let out the numbers. “Let me say that I earn well enough to look after my needy relatives and educate my 20-year-old daughter, a student of fine arts at CN Vidyalaya,” he said, adding that the IIM experts had promised to help him expand his business. But students say his daily sale would be “at least” Rs 2,000.

Neelakantan said the rationale for doing a case study on the man was to show that “even an institute like IIM-A can learn a lesson from a street vendor”.

“Generally, street vendors are perceived to be tough and ill- mannered guys, but here is a man who is simple, loveable, light-hearted and yet has been successfully doing business outside an elite institute, stationing himself in one place for the last 25 years and maintaining a long-term customer relationship,” said Neelakantan.

Ahluwalia pointed out that even without formal management training, Rambhai was “practically executing all management principles”.

“Like every entrepreneur, he first saw an opportunity to start his own business outside the IIM-A campus, developed a strategy and maintained a system which ensured he got repeat customers,” said Ahluwalia.

Katewa said Rambhai mastered the concept of good customer relations: a popular management concept considered a cornerstone of success for any consumer product. “He has been observing customers. He realised the importance of location, right outside the IIM-A gate,” said Katewa.



I always said business sense was the innate paradigm which was suppressed during the Nehruvian elitist period. What was natural for Indians and an innate strength was put down.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Avinash R » 12 Sep 2008 20:45

ramana wrote:IIM honors humble chaiwala
And like any savvy entrepreneur, he isn’t willing to let out the numbers. “Let me say that I earn well enough to look after my needy relatives and educate my 20-year-old daughter, a student of fine arts at CN Vidyalaya,” he said, adding that the IIM experts had promised to help him expand his business. But students say his daily sale would be “at least” Rs 2,000.

sunday being a holiday, so taking 6 days a week, 24 days a month that means he earns a cool 48000 per month. hats off to such a hard working man.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby durvasa » 12 Sep 2008 22:20

Rambhai earned a few tens of thousands for me from tea and biscoots. Of course I owe him millions for managing to get out unscathed by keeping me alert till 2AM every night for months. Could not have survived Mote's courses without Rambhai.

Really nice to know that he is still there - happy and thriving.
.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Eshwar » 12 Sep 2008 23:04

Off topic, but related to the above. I got this message on Google Chrome when I tried to open the http://www.rambhai.com.
Warning: Visiting this site may harm your computer!
The website at http://www.rambhai.com contains elements from the site http://www.tehelka.com, which appears to host malware – software that can hurt your computer or otherwise operate without your consent. Just visiting a site that contains malware can infect your computer.
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Even a humble enterpreneur is not left alone :( On the brighter side even Google recognizes the worthies for what they are for the society, a malware.

Raghavendra
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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Raghavendra » 13 Sep 2008 14:26

Avinash R wrote:
ramana wrote:IIM honors humble chaiwala
And like any savvy entrepreneur, he isn’t willing to let out the numbers. “Let me say that I earn well enough to look after my needy relatives and educate my 20-year-old daughter, a student of fine arts at CN Vidyalaya,” he said, adding that the IIM experts had promised to help him expand his business. But students say his daily sale would be “at least” Rs 2,000.

sunday being a holiday, so taking 6 days a week, 24 days a month that means he earns a cool 48000 per month. hats off to such a hard working man.

That gives me an idea.
I will quit my studies and open a paan shop in front of my college to earn money and send it to Subramaniam who is after this poor yindoo.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Vasu » 13 Sep 2008 20:22

Avinash R wrote:
ramana wrote:IIM honors humble chaiwala
And like any savvy entrepreneur, he isn’t willing to let out the numbers. “Let me say that I earn well enough to look after my needy relatives and educate my 20-year-old daughter, a student of fine arts at CN Vidyalaya,” he said, adding that the IIM experts had promised to help him expand his business. But students say his daily sale would be “at least” Rs 2,000.

sunday being a holiday, so taking 6 days a week, 24 days a month that means he earns a cool 48000 per month. hats off to such a hard working man.


If I may add, never in the history of marketing has the idea of a captive market been so epitomized. Not to take it away any credit from Rambhai, but the hostel store guy at my institution of higher learning probably makes half of this in smokes alone, just to give you an idea of the amount of buying that the kids in the big institutes do.

bart
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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby bart » 14 Sep 2008 02:21

Avinash R wrote:
ramana wrote:IIM honors humble chaiwala
And like any savvy entrepreneur, he isn’t willing to let out the numbers. “Let me say that I earn well enough to look after my needy relatives and educate my 20-year-old daughter, a student of fine arts at CN Vidyalaya,” he said, adding that the IIM experts had promised to help him expand his business. But students say his daily sale would be “at least” Rs 2,000.

sunday being a holiday, so taking 6 days a week, 24 days a month that means he earns a cool 48000 per month. hats off to such a hard working man.


If he knows how to make 100% Margins perhaps he should be conducting the classes at IIM :mrgreen:

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Singha » 16 Sep 2008 13:29

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2b537008-834c-11dd-907e 000077b07658.html?nclick_check=1

Landmark launch of Indian Intel chip

By Joe Leahy in Mumbai

Published: September 15 2008 22:30 | Last updated: September 15 2008 22:30

Intel is to launch the first microprocessor for the mass market that it has developed almost exclusively at its design centre in Bangalore in a milestone for the research and development of computer hardware in India.

The US-based chipmaker’s Xeon Processor 7400 Series will feature six “cores” or processing units built into each chip, making it suitable for use in servers handling intensive enterprise applications. Previous chips had only four cores.

“It’s not just services and software that India is known for but this shows you also can do this kind of complex research and development and product design here in India,” said Praveen Vishakantaiah, president of Intel India.

India is known for its computer services outsourcing companies that develop and maintain software for third-party clients but its engineering prowess in designing and building information technology hardware is less well known.

Many leading multinational IT companies and some outsourcing groups have long had hardware design units in India, which assist their foreign headquarters or clients in the development of chips and other components.

In the past, few companies had developed complex products for the mass market from start to finish at their centres in India, but that is changing.

“There is a huge gamut of product design that is happening out of India,” said Vinnie Mehta, executive director of India’s Manufacturers Association of Information Technology.

Intel’s Xeon 7400 processor will be used in the high-end segment of the global server market. The server industry generated total sales in the second quarter ended June of $13.9bn, according to IDC research company.

The Xeon 7400, codenamed “Dunnington” during its development, is designed to handle heavy workloads typically associated with memory intensive business applications such as databases, enterprise resource planning programs and other software.

The servers in which it will be deployed would typically be used by IT-intensive companies such as stock markets, investment banks and other organisations.

The development of a chip capable of standing up to the requirements of businesses requires exhaustive testing.

Although not much bigger than a matchbox, the six-core processor contains 1.9bn transistors, each of which must be tested individually. Engineers at Intel’s Bangalore laboratories also had to test the chip to ensure it is compatible with almost all existing and forthcoming software.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Singha » 16 Sep 2008 13:31

why is it called Dunnington ? was the initial work done somewhere?

Yahudis get to keep their own names - the upcoming Nehalem 8core lineup in 2009
sounds like a yahudi center project.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby derkonig » 16 Sep 2008 15:00

^
ayyo,
we r SDRE onlee, how can we go against massa?

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Ameet » 20 Sep 2008 02:16

Got the chance to hear a CK Prahalad talk last night. Topic was on his new book "New Age of Innovation". One of the examples he gave of businesses following what he termed "next practice" was Jaipur Foot. For those that aren't familiar with the long established business, they make artificial limbs for the poor. A below the knee limb can cost $28 in India. Whereas in the US about $10k. Jaipur Foot also provides limbs free if you cannot afford it. They have not patented any of their designs or products. They are willing to teach anyone who want to know how it works. People from countries all over the world have come and used the tech in their own countries. Below are links to Jaipur Foot and an old, but great article from Time.

http://www.jaipurfoot.org/

Time article
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 07,00.html

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby SwamyG » 23 Sep 2008 21:33


svinayak
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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby svinayak » 23 Sep 2008 22:28

A partial chronology of ISRO

1963 - The first sounding rocket was launched Nov. 21 from TERLS.

1965 -Space Science & Technology Center (SSTC) was established in Thumba, Trivandrum.

1967 - Satellite Telecommunication Earth Station was erected at Ahmedabad.

1969 - Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) was created on August 15 in the Department of Atomic Energy. Since then, ISRO has managed India's space research and the uses of space for peaceful purposes.

1972 - The government established the Space Commission and the Department of Space (DOS) in June. DOS conducts the nation's space activities for ISRO at four space Centers across the country. DOS reports directly to the Prime Minister.

1972 - ISRO placed under DOS on June 1.

1975 - ISRO made a Government Org. on April 1.

1975 - Aryabhata, the first Indian space satellite, was launched for India on April 19.

1979 - Bhaskara-I, an experimental satellite for earth observations, launched on June 7.

1979 - The first experimental launch of an SLV-3 rocket on August 10 did not place its Rohini Technology Payload satellite in orbit.

1980 - India successfully launched its own Rohini-1 satellite on July 18 on a Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV) rocket from the Sriharikota Island launch site.

1983 - The Rohini-3 communications satellite, launched in August, had by the end of 1985 extended nationwide television coverage from 20 percent to 70 percent of the population. Today it is about 90 percent.

1984 - The first Indian cosmonaut, Squadron Leader Rakesh Sharma became the 138th man in space when he spent eight days aboard the USSR's space station Salyut 7.

1992 - The Indian-built INSAT-2 geostationary communications and meteorological satellite superseded an American-built INSAT-1.

1993 - The even larger Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) debuted in September, but failed to attain orbit. Its individual elements were successful. PSLV can lift a one-ton satellite to a Sun-synchronous polar orbit.

2001 -- The first launch of a still larger Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) rocket was successful on April 18.

2002- On 2nd September 1st MET Satellite was launched from Satish Dhawan Space Center at Srihorikota. It keeps continuous watch on weather through its high resolution Radiometer.

2003-The multipurpose, INSAT-3A was launched from France on 10th April. A communication satellite weighing 1800 Kg was launched aboard the GSLV-D2 from Sriharikota on 8th May.


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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Rahul M » 27 Sep 2008 01:43

www.jaagore.com

requesting all Indians in desh, whether BRFites or lurkers to visit the site.

nicely done, it's a great initiative.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby SwamyG » 02 Oct 2008 05:52

I like the focus Anubani showers on smoking. A welcome change, a minister with mission?

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby VikramS » 02 Oct 2008 08:50

Singha:

Nehalam is a river in Oregon. Most Intel projects are named after some river or place in Oregon/California.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nehalem_(microarchitecture)
Last edited by VikramS on 02 Oct 2008 09:10, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Nayak » 02 Oct 2008 08:55

Wall Street Journal Honors TCS As the Most Innovative

http://www.sda-asia.com/sda/news/psecom ... apore.html


The Wall Street Journal, a leading business publication, has selected Tata Consultancy Services’ mKrishi service as the winner of its 2008 Technology Innovation Award in the wireless technology category.

TCS' mobile based crop-advisory service, mKrishi, is a novel approach to helping rural farmers throughout India have better access to information through a cell phone application. It has been developed to provide personalized information and expert advice to rural farmers in their local language using sensor technology. It is also adaptable to illiterate farmers to make a query from a cell phone using voice-specific functions.

“We are truly honored to receive the prestigious Wall Street Journal Innovation Technology award for TCS’ mKrishi service,” said S. Ramadorai, CEO and Managing Director of Tata Consultancy Services.

The Wall Street Journal Innovation Award recognizes companies, individuals and organizations world-wide for technological breakthroughs in such areas as medicine, software, the Internet, wireless and consumer electronics.

Winners were chosen based on whether the technology represented a breakthrough from conventional methods, rather than just an incremental improvement, said Wall Street Journal.

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Sanjay M » 07 Oct 2008 05:43


svinayak
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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby svinayak » 07 Oct 2008 06:51

India’s tricky path to industrialisation

Published: October 6 2008 20:06 | Last updated: October 6 2008 20:06

It should have been a perfect marriage. Ratan Tata, the acceptable face of Indian capitalism, and the Communist party rulers of West Bengal, a late convert to the cause of industrialisation and a friend to India’s poor. Instead, the attempt to negotiate a tiny plot of land for India’s most imaginative industrial project, construction of the $2,200 per unit Nano mini-car factory, has ended in defeat. Why?

For all its claim to be socially responsible, Tata has taken a don’t-look, don’t-see approach. It outsourced the task of acquiring land to politicians who, according to one commentator, can be “bought and sold like vegetables”.

Peasants in 18th-century Britain were thrown off the land. Enclosure acts reduced the commons, pushing people from the countryside to become fodder for industrialisation. Similarly, China has managed the process of industrialisation reason­ably smoothly: by force and without the niceties of land rights.

For better or for worse, India became a democracy before it set off seriously on the road to industrialisation. Moreover, it is a democracy where minority causes, even that of 400 hold-out farmers in West Bengal, can hold the national good to ransom. That, in part, explains why roughly half of the Chinese population is now urban while, in India, just over 22 per cent lives – often in squalid conditions – in the cities.

Make no mistake. If India cannot industrialise, it will never be prosperous. Those who defend the status quo are condemning hundreds of millions of peasants to a life of back-breaking and unproductive toil, and the often violent discrimination of the caste system. Romanticising village life is something villagers cannot afford. The average Indian farmer lives a shorter and more brutish life than the most humble of nouveau-urban Chinese.

So what is to be done? First, clear rules need to be set – and transparently implemented – for purchasing agricultural land. Fair compensation must be paid and, when necessary, alternative work found. If farmers are merely dispossessed in the vague hope that they will drift to the cities, India will inevitably suffer violent peasant revolt.

Second, cities must be made more attractive. India should spend on infrastructure to make towns a bigger draw. If migrants know that urban living offers water, electricity, decent housing and the chance of better health and education for themselves and their children, cities will become places where people want to live. Few were thrown off the land when Japan and South Korea were industrialising. But they came to the cities anyway.

Third, the government must invest in rural health and education. Even if India truly wanted to industrialise, it lacks the human capital to do so. Many of the poorly educated, undernourished products of India’s rural idyll are simply not skilled or healthy enough to join the global workforce. Unless they can be made so, India will always lag behind. It will be a country with a tiny minority of computer engineers and call-centre operators and a vast majority of subsistence farmers. In other words, it will be poor, very poor.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2008

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby Rishirishi » 07 Oct 2008 21:27

Acharya wrote:
India’s tricky path to industrialisation

Published: October 6 2008 20:06 | Last updated: October 6 2008 20:06

It should have been a perfect marriage. Ratan Tata, the acceptable face of Indian capitalism, and the Communist party rulers of West Bengal, a late convert to the cause of industrialisation and a friend to India’s poor. Instead, the attempt to negotiate a tiny plot of land for India’s most imaginative industrial project, construction of the $2,200 per unit Nano mini-car factory, has ended in defeat. Why?

For all its claim to be socially responsible, Tata has taken a don’t-look, don’t-see approach. It outsourced the task of acquiring land to politicians who, according to one commentator, can be “bought and sold like vegetables”.

Peasants in 18th-century Britain were thrown off the land. Enclosure acts reduced the commons, pushing people from the countryside to become fodder for industrialisation. Similarly, China has managed the process of industrialisation reason­ably smoothly: by force and without the niceties of land rights.

For better or for worse, India became a democracy before it set off seriously on the road to industrialisation. Moreover, it is a democracy where minority causes, even that of 400 hold-out farmers in West Bengal, can hold the national good to ransom. That, in part, explains why roughly half of the Chinese population is now urban while, in India, just over 22 per cent lives – often in squalid conditions – in the cities.

Make no mistake. If India cannot industrialise, it will never be prosperous. Those who defend the status quo are condemning hundreds of millions of peasants to a life of back-breaking and unproductive toil, and the often violent discrimination of the caste system. Romanticising village life is something villagers cannot afford. The average Indian farmer lives a shorter and more brutish life than the most humble of nouveau-urban Chinese.

So what is to be done? First, clear rules need to be set – and transparently implemented – for purchasing agricultural land. Fair compensation must be paid and, when necessary, alternative work found. If farmers are merely dispossessed in the vague hope that they will drift to the cities, India will inevitably suffer violent peasant revolt.

Second, cities must be made more attractive. India should spend on infrastructure to make towns a bigger draw. If migrants know that urban living offers water, electricity, decent housing and the chance of better health and education for themselves and their children, cities will become places where people want to live. Few were thrown off the land when Japan and South Korea were industrialising. But they came to the cities anyway.

Third, the government must invest in rural health and education. Even if India truly wanted to industrialise, it lacks the human capital to do so. Many of the poorly educated, undernourished products of India’s rural idyll are simply not skilled or healthy enough to join the global workforce. Unless they can be made so, India will always lag behind. It will be a country with a tiny minority of computer engineers and call-centre operators and a vast majority of subsistence farmers. In other words, it will be poor, very poor.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2008


It is a gross oversimplification from FT.
They fail to mention how some state governmnets, have worked overtime to attract the TATA's. They fail to mention the improvement in litracy, and reduction of poverty. The are also silent about the real income growth. There is of course much room for improvement, but the overall situation is on the bright side.
Wonder why the are silent on the sound financial system?

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby vsudhir » 07 Oct 2008 23:01

http://www.narendramodi.in/

Finally, a neta has decided to go straight to the people even when elections aren't hovering round the corner.

The man's asking for ideas, volunteers and the like. And is distributing his POV and achievements, which the vested medis has an interest in burying, straight to the people.

Hope the trend catches on. And netas in power explain their POV, rationale for policy decisions (and policy options not chosen as well) in publicly accessible media vehicles.

For one, would love to know what the power mantri, raksha mantri, finance mantri, commerce mantri, telecom and health and I&B mantris are thinking abt the burning topics of the day in their ministries.

Of course, the pradhan mantri doing something like this would be at a different level altogether...

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby rachel » 09 Oct 2008 00:29

vsudhir wrote:http://www.narendramodi.in/

Finally, a neta has decided to go straight to the people even when elections aren't hovering round the corner.

The man's asking for ideas, volunteers and the like. And is distributing his POV and achievements, which the vested medis has an interest in burying, straight to the people.

Hope the trend catches on. And netas in power explain their POV, rationale for policy decisions (and policy options not chosen as well) in publicly accessible media vehicles.

For one, would love to know what the power mantri, raksha mantri, finance mantri, commerce mantri, telecom and health and I&B mantris are thinking abt the burning topics of the day in their ministries.

Of course, the pradhan mantri doing something like this would be at a different level altogether...


NARENDRA MODI zindabad! Please make this man PM of India! WIth a majority govt please... no coalition with any other party!

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Re: A Nation on the March

Postby shyam » 10 Oct 2008 09:35

I think NM should start mentioning India whenever he specifies Gujarat.
For example, he should say like, ".. for the development of Gujarat and there by helping India also develop". He could always claim that whenever a Gujarat enterprise purchases a component from other states of India, it helps India indirectly. So his intiatives to help Gujarat are in fact his share of efforts to develop India too.


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