Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

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nachiket
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nachiket » 18 Apr 2018 23:27

There was a similar incident in 2016 as well on another SW 737 where the fan blade failed and broke away and debris impacted the fuselage. Fortunately the passenger compartment wasn't penetrated that time. That was said to be an undetected fatigue crack. This also appears to be a similar case. Clearly, maintenance procedures do not seem to be adequate to find cracks like this and the engine casing is not strong enough to keep a failure contained.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 19 Apr 2018 19:05

there are lot of videos of blade failure testing on ground testbed. its a std test for all engines. the engine casing and front cowl is supposed to contain the damage but clearly either at high alt and fwd speed the dynamics and temp of -56C may play some role or else materials are being shaved off and corners cut for fuel economy.


secondly in all these tests they seem to use a small explosive charge at the blade root which is where it usually comes off. but they need to break it off near the middle and tip and see what happens....in southwest it broke both in root and middle to create two projectiles.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 19 Apr 2018 21:17

The damaged part was most likely to have been by Safran Aircraft Engines. CFM International is a joint venture between GE Aviation [US] and Safran Aircraft Engines [France].


‘Uncontained’ CFM56-7 Failures: Southwest B737-700s 27 August 2016 & 17 April 2018

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has issued a press release, in advance of a preliminary report, on a occurrence to Boeing 737-700 N766SW operating Southwest Airlines Flight 3472, from New Orleans, Louisiana to Orlando, Florida on 27 August 2016.

A second, seemingly very similar event occurred to N772SW operating Flight 1380 from New York-La Guardia, NY to Dallas-Love Field, Texas on 17 April 2018. In that case debris penetrated a cabin window aft of the wing and one passenger is confirmed to have died (early reports suggest they had been partly sucked through the window). This was Southwest’s first passenger fatality ever and the first Part 121 fatality since February 2009.

The First Accident Flight 27 August 2016
One fan blade of the left hand CFM56-7B engine separated from the fan disc during the cruise. The root of that blade remained in the fan disc hub but the blade was not recovered.

The Second Accident Flight 17 April 2018
The aircraft departed at 09:43 and by 10:04 was passing 32,500ft when the no 1 engine failed. Debris impacted the side of the fuselage shattering a passenger window resulting in a loss of cabin pressure. The crew initiated an emergency descent, shut the engine down and diverted to Philadelphia, PA, landing at 10:19. It is reported that:

Consequently the entire left engine inlet separated from the engine, with debris damaged the fuselage, wing and empennage. A 5 x 16 inch hole was made in the fuselage just above the left wing and the cabin depressurised (though no engine debris penetrated the cabin).

The aircraft diverted to Pensacola, Florida and made a safe landing, 18 minutes later. None of the 99 passengers and 5 crew onboard were injured

The NTSB call this an uncontained failure, though it is not clear if the fan blade exited radially (the true definition of uncontained) or axially (i.e. forward). Either way, the out of balance forces resulted in an unexpected failure of the inlet structure.

Investigation Findings
The CFM56 fan blades are manufactured of titanium alloy and are coated with a copper-nickel-indium alloy at the root contact face.

Initial findings from the NTSB Materials Laboratory metallurgical examination include:

The fracture surface of the missing blade showed curving crack arrest lines consistent with fatigue crack growth. The fatigue crack region was 1.14-inches long and 0.217-inch deep, and
The center of the fatigue origin area was about 2.1 inches aft of the forward face of the blade root. No surface or material anomalies were noted during an examination of the fatigue crack origin using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

The NTSB subsequently confirmed that the woman, seated in seat 14A, had died. Seven others were treated for minor injuries. There were 5 crew and 143 passengers on board.

Engine nacelle damage was very similar to the earlier incident with a released fan blade and loss of the nacelle intake. Additionally the outer fan cowl door separated and the inner door was badly damaged and open. Leading edge damage was also evident on the left wing.

The engine “had 40,000 cycles on it, a quarter of those since it was overhauled” said Southwest CEO Gary Kelley.

The CFM56 family has achieved more than 350 million engine hours and powers around 6,700 aircraft worldwide.

UPDATE 18 April 2018: Video of on scene NTSB press conference 17 April 2018 by NTSB chairman Roger Sumwalt.

The CVR and FDR have been returned to Washington and the CVR has already been downloaded.
Cowling debris has been located at Bernville, Pennsylvania, about 60-70 miles west of Philadelphia.
The crew elected to land with the flaps at 5 degrees (rather than 30 or 40) at a higher approach speed due to concerns of potential controllability issues.

The NTSB have started that blade 13 (of 24) failed “at the hub” and there was evidence of fatigue.
The NTSB say Southwest plan an accelerated ultrasonic inspection programme.
Sumwalt praised the crew. The Captain is reported to be a former US Navy aviator.

UPDATE 19 April 2018: The NTSB say blade broke in two places: “near where the blade meets the engine hub” and halfway along its length. An “internal crack likely caused the break near the hub, which then caused the mid-blade facture”. The NTSB say the FDR showed that as left hand engine ran down, vibration increased significantly and the cabin altitude alert sounded shortly afterwards indicating the cabin pressure had exceeded a pressure equal to 13,500-14,000ft altitude. The aircraft also made a rapid uncommanded roll to 41.3º left bank. The NTSB released pictures of the nacelle debris.






The damaged engine and the aircraft

Image


The Ex navy fast jet pilot Tammie Jo Shults captained Flight 1380 to a Philadelphia airport in Tuesday's emergency

Image


The damaged engine a CFM56-7B

Image


The cutaway drawing of a similar engine

Image




The lady pax who unfortunately died

Image
Jennifer Riordan (R) with husband Michael and their two children
Last edited by chetak on 19 Apr 2018 21:39, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 19 Apr 2018 21:28

jaan nikal gaya engine ka....way more damage than the tests prescribe.

and one blade did this...what if 3 had come off.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 19 Apr 2018 22:05

Singha wrote:jaan nikal gaya engine ka....way more damage than the tests prescribe.

and one blade did this...what if 3 had come off.


In both cases, the damage is eerily similar. Is there some issue that is causing such specific damage that has not been caught or not accounted for during engine tests, maybe some parameter being missed, perhaps??

Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 suffered an uncontained failure of its left engine on Tuesday.

In August 2016, Southwest Airlines Flight 3472 also suffered an uncontained failure of its left engine.

Both engines are CFM56 turbofans and failed when one of its fan blades snapped off mid-flight.


The Southwest Airlines engine that failed last month allowed debris to puncture the Boeing 737-700's engine casing and fuselage, according to federal ... hole was found in the left fuselage just above the wing of Flight 3472, (Southwest Airlines Flight 3472)



Image

This Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016, (Southwest Airlines Flight 3472), photo shows an engine through a window of a Southwest Airlines flight. The flight from New Orleans bound for Orlando, Fla., diverted to Pensacola, Fla., after the pilot detected something had gone wrong with an engine, according to a Southwest statement.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 20 Apr 2018 08:26

in 2010 a qantas flight suffered this devastating damage due to a rotor failure on A380

Image

the australian govt found the rc to be some oil pipes not made to spec
https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/in ... 0-089.aspx

I am supposed to fly next friday *dhoti shiver*

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 20 Apr 2018 08:29

china eastern airlines, outbound from australia

Image

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 20 Apr 2018 08:31

so the front cowl of the engine needs to be way stronger to contain these singularities .... planes are being made to work hard with short breaks , people are always trying to shave weight and make things thinner ..... not a great combo

were such events common in the 80s and 90s ... i dont recall these kind of incidents ....

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Kashi » 20 Apr 2018 10:15

Singha wrote:always trying to shave weight


Southwest could do that by toning down their livery.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JayS » 20 Apr 2018 18:59

Looking at the pictures above (B737), though the events started by FBO, the fan containment case itself is not the culprit, its the Nacelle which fails to contain the damage. This is typically Aircraft OEM's component rather than the Engine OEM.

Interestingly FAA was working on issuing AD to enforce extra checks for fan blade root crack last year for all aircrafts with >15000cycles. Even before the AD became official one FBO happened with SW Airline, which had done only 10000cycles until then. Clearly the problem has been known and was not fully understood. FAA and CFM will have to do better. Also Boeing, I suppose.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Zynda » 20 Apr 2018 23:05

^^AFAIK, current nacelle (including cowling I think) & Thrust reverser systems are supplied by separate OEM and are not from Aircraft OEM. Current commercial aviation nacelle systems are dominated by UTC Aerospace (Formerly Goodrich Aerospace Systems) & Safran Nacelles (formerly known as Aircelle). Again, AFAIK, FBO condition needs to be shown compliant...don't know the details about how many simultaneous blade out events are allowed and under what conditions etc.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nachiket » 21 Apr 2018 00:26

Singha wrote:so the front cowl of the engine needs to be way stronger to contain these singularities .... planes are being made to work hard with short breaks , people are always trying to shave weight and make things thinner ..... not a great combo

were such events common in the 80s and 90s ... i dont recall these kind of incidents ....

The wiki page about uncontained engine failures seems to support your hypothesis that these are more common now.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbine_e ... _incidents

The United 232 crash in 89 is very famous. But there seem to be too many such incidents since 2010 onward. Of course that may be simply because of a large increase in commercial aircraft traffic since then.

This one in particular is scary: American Airlines Flight 383 (2016)

The right engine suffered a sudden rupture of the stage 2 disk operating at takeoff power. The disk separated into two pieces, the smaller of which pierced the wing's fuel tank and then flew 2,935 feet (895 m), falling through the roof of a United Parcel Service (UPS) facility and coming to rest on the building's floor. No UPS employees were injured.

The right hand side of the fuselage suffered considerable fire damage, and the right wing collapsed about midway along its length. American subsequently declared the hull a loss.


The only reason the passengers survived was because it happened during takeoff and the pilots could abort it successfully. If this happened in flight the aircraft would have probably banked uncontrollably to the right and nose-dived to the ground with no hope of recovery.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JayS » 21 Apr 2018 10:20

Zynda wrote:^^AFAIK, current nacelle (including cowling I think) & Thrust reverser systems are supplied by separate OEM and are not from Aircraft OEM. Current commercial aviation nacelle systems are dominated by UTC Aerospace (Formerly Goodrich Aerospace Systems) & Safran Nacelles (formerly known as Aircelle). Again, AFAIK, FBO condition needs to be shown compliant...don't know the details about how many simultaneous blade out events are allowed and under what conditions etc.

Of coarse its made by some supplier and even designed perhaps. When I say OEM, its the org which is considered OEM from regulatory perspective and responsible for the part for Certification.

We make engine parts, we own the design completely, but we are not OEM. HAL makes Su30 from raw materials but not cobsidered OEM for Su30. And so on....

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Mort Walker » 23 Apr 2018 08:24

Air India window come off on Boeing 787. Make sure to watch the video, the lady passenger is understandably very shaken up.

Air India plane hits turbulence, three injured; window panel falls off

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JayS » 23 Apr 2018 10:22

The inner window panels are like dummy panels, i.e. they are not the one which take the structural load. IIRC the Boeing aircrafts have 3 layered windows and the innermost, the one which fell down in this case is like a dust cover really to safeguard main windows from inside (and also removable from inside for maintenance purpose I think). But the fear in passengers is quite understandable. Especially with oxygen masks getting deployed and all.

But surprisingly some passengers were without seating belt in such severe turbulence. Someone hit their head to luggage compartment as per the article.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 23 Apr 2018 18:22

turboprop powered a.c even the smaller ones seem to have a decent engine safety record ... perhaps engines are more old school and not trying so hard to be next gen kitties

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JayS » 23 Apr 2018 19:13

Singha wrote:turboprop powered a.c even the smaller ones seem to have a decent engine safety record ... perhaps engines are more old school and not trying so hard to be next gen kitties


Do you have any data to compare..? like failures per flight hour or per passenger km or any such matrix..?

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 23 Apr 2018 20:14

Long-delayed Mitsubishi jet ready for first air show

But competitors Embraer and Bombardier are catching up


MASAMICHI HOSHI and KOSUKE TSUNODA,

April 23, 2018

TOKYO -- Japan's first commercial jet airliner in half a century will make its maiden public flight this summer at a British air show as manufacturer Mitsubishi Aircraft rallies from numerous setbacks that have let competitors close in for a dogfight in the regional airliner field.

"I want to show the aircraft soaring across the sky so that more people recognize the Mitsubishi Regional Jet," President Hisakazu Mizutani told Nikkei Wednesday.

The MRJ will make its first exhibition flight in July at the Farnborough International Airshow in England. Mitsubishi Aircraft, a unit of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, hopes to dispel worries about delays that have plagued the aircraft's development by demonstrating its flying abilities. The company displayed only the plane's body at the Paris Air Show last year.

Development of the MRJ began in April 2008, with the first deliveries initially slated for the second half of 2013. The delivery date has now been delayed five times, most recently in January last year to relocate the electronics bay and related wiring. The company received its first order cancellation this January.

"We will just be able to meet last year's goal of delivering the first aircraft by mid-2020," said Mizutani. "The design work is nearly complete."

But just as Mitsubishi Aircraft appears poised to get back on track from its series of setbacks, rival regional jet makers have suddenly cozied up to major airplane manufacturers like America's Boeing and Europe's Airbus.

Bloomberg reported on April 10 that Brazil's defense minister said the country's regional jet maker Embraer and Boeing probably will reach a deal. Airbus also said in October that it will partner with Bombardier by taking a stake in the Canadian planemaker's subsidiary for its C Series of smaller airliners.

Mitsubishi Aircraft, however, has remained calm while its rivals team up with the airplane industry's two biggest names.

"Airbus and Boeing are targeting small aircraft with 100 seats or more," said Mizutani. "At 70 to 90 seats, the MRJ is for a different set of customers."

Yet Mitsubishi Aircraft still risks being left behind, having tapped Boeing to provide after-sales support service for the MRJ. The company's relations with Boeing could change if the U.S. planemaker deepens its connection with Embraer.

Mitsubishi Aircraft is also letting its chance to catch up to Embraer and Bombardier slip through its fingers. Initially, the MRJ's appeal was to be its high-fuel efficiency from cutting-edge Pratt & Whitney engines, but Embraer will release a new plane with the same engines as soon as 2021.

The MRJ's setbacks are also weighing on parent company Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

"We will become a world leader in the energy-environment and the aerospace fields," then-President Hideaki Omiya, who currently serves as chairman, said in April 2008.

Profits from those segments were to be diverted to the MRJ project, but the delays have prompted the company to sell off some assets and shrink fixed costs.

This all comes amid a slowdown in the company's mainstay thermal power generation business. Demand has flagged globally for such equipment as concern for the environment grows. Orders for large gas turbines in the nine months through December fell 70% on the year to just four units.

The space and aviation segment is also struggling as component demand for Boeing's next-generation 777X airliner has yet to lift off while 777 deliveries fell 40% in fiscal 2017 to 57 planes.

"Once mass production begins, we will have to think about raising capital at the appropriate time," said Mizutani, given Mitsubishi Aircraft's excessive liabilities.

Nikkei staff writer Eiki Hayashi contributed to this report.


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Supratik » 23 Apr 2018 21:04

Pune and Jewar airports get clearance.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/in ... 882859.cms

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 24 Apr 2018 13:17

JayS wrote:
Singha wrote:turboprop powered a.c even the smaller ones seem to have a decent engine safety record ... perhaps engines are more old school and not trying so hard to be next gen kitties


Do you have any data to compare..? like failures per flight hour or per passenger km or any such matrix..?


there is some data here but not broken down into engine incident buckets. overall turboprops being smaller, being in small shops and having to fly through adverse weather have a higher overall incident rate while reduced fatality in landing incidents.
https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all ... turboprops

it seems US complexes incl nasa are pursuing advanced turboprops because the limits of bypass in turbofans are being reached so next the prop-fans might offer gains. materials and stuff r&d is on same lines as turbofans
http://proceedings.asmedigitalcollectio ... gt-201.pdf

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 25 Apr 2018 08:29

Having done a few atr72 flights to chennai from blr under the cloud level it feels solid enough and the low takeoff and landing speed is pleasing
Thing which scares most is fast shaky bouncy landings with rolls of wings followed by hard braking that rattles all to the bone
The planes are designed for it but diapers must be issued to all ....

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Prasad » 25 Apr 2018 13:42

Runway expansion is our biggest bottleneck. Thanks to land acquisition problems at all major airports. Unless we build newer airports, we'll get to the limits very quickly at the pace our traffic is increasing. Mumbai, delhi chennai pune goa all are victims of not thinking ahead and thereafter not doing anything in the past 10-15 years when this was foreseen.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby hanumadu » 25 Apr 2018 13:53

Is Delhi a problem too? Because Delhi as 4000 acres and the present airport can be expanded to 100 million pax/year.

Mumbai only had 2K acres to begin with some of which is occupied by slums. Even if the slum land was available, Mumbai would have needed the Navi Mumbai airport.

Added Later: Delhi airport has 3 runways. A fourth will be built. Also, terminal 1 is being expanded now. Terminal 2 will be demolished and Terminal 4 will be built in its place which will enable the airport to handle 100 mil passengers.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 25 Apr 2018 14:36

Dilli needs a underground people mover railway and baggage trainbeyween the two sides else its a real pain to arrive on lcc and take to t3

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vips » 25 Apr 2018 18:25

hanumadu wrote:Is Delhi a problem too? Because Delhi as 4000 acres and the present airport can be expanded to 100 million pax/year.

Mumbai only had 2K acres to begin with some of which is occupied by slums. Even if the slum land was available, Mumbai would have needed the Navi Mumbai airport.

Added Later: Delhi airport has 3 runways. A fourth will be built. Also, terminal 1 is being expanded now. Terminal 2 will be demolished and Terminal 4 will be built in its place which will enable the airport to handle 100 mil passengers.


The actual functional area of the Mumbai airport is less then 1,000 acres, Just like its local trains which handles 8 million daily passengers, the airport in Mumbai holds an unbeatable world record of handling 48 Million passengers a year operating in that constrained space.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 26 Apr 2018 16:43

Across the creek...

Cidco plans to go ‘full blast’ to meet Navi Mumbai airport’s 2019 deadline

Already working to a tight deadline, Cidco is facing an uphill task of relocating project affected persons (PAPs) and clearing the land by flattening Ulwe hill and diverting Ulwe river by December-end. This will give the concessionaire at least one year for development of the airport.

The government wants one runway (3.7km-long) of the airport ready by December 2019 for the maiden flight. As of now 40% of shifting of villagers has been done and 36% of the hill has been levelled; both the works are closely linked. A Rs 2,033-crore work order for the hill operation and diversion of river was issued on April 24, 2017, but not much work could be done as several months were lost—first to monsoon and then to protests by villagers in October. Now, Cidco officials plan to go full throttle with the work to meet the deadline.

Though river diversion work is also on, the waterbody may not change course before the next monsoon. “This monsoon, Ulwe river will continue to flow from south to north via the lowland of the hill. But next rains, it will be diverted to the west, along the southern part of the hill and have a new course of 3km into Moha creek,” he said.

On the rehabilitation front, the Cidco’s rental scheme, which provides for rent to families for 18 months—during which they are are supposed to build or get new houses, too has met with little success. It was started in July, 2016, but only 40% families have opted for it.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nachiket » 26 Apr 2018 22:38

Vasu wrote:
Already working to a tight deadline, Cidco is facing an uphill task of relocating project affected persons (PAPs) and clearing the land by flattening Ulwe hill and diverting Ulwe river by December-end. This will give the concessionaire at least one year for development of the airport.

The government wants one runway (3.7km-long) of the airport ready by December 2019 for the maiden flight. As of now 40% of shifting of villagers has been done and 36% of the hill has been levelled; both the works are closely linked. A Rs 2,033-crore work order for the hill operation and diversion of river was issued on April 24, 2017, but not much work could be done as several months were lost—first to monsoon and then to protests by villagers in October. Now, Cidco officials plan to go full throttle with the work to meet the deadline.

Though river diversion work is also on, the waterbody may not change course before the next monsoon. “This monsoon, Ulwe river will continue to flow from south to north via the lowland of the hill. But next rains, it will be diverted to the west, along the southern part of the hill and have a new course of 3km into Moha creek,” he said.

On the rehabilitation front, the Cidco’s rental scheme, which provides for rent to families for 18 months—during which they are are supposed to build or get new houses, too has met with little success. It was started in July, 2016, but only 40% families have opted for it.

So let me get this straight. Last year they lost time because of the monsoons and villager's protests. This year, the monsoon is now a couple of months away and the villagers have still not shifted. So what exactly does Cidco mean when they say they want to go "full throttle"?

AT this rate the 1 runway operational by Dec 2019 is a pipe dream. Or they may get the runway operational but flight operations will have to be carried out from a mud hut by the side of the runway, with passengers waiting for their flights on open ground.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vips » 27 Apr 2018 02:32

Devendra Fadnavis wants to show visible progress on airport project in Navi Mumbai before the State elections which are due in October/November 2019. He has set up a control room in Mantralaya with some staffers monitoring this (amongst other) projects deemed as crucial for Mumbai.

The compensation and rehabilitation package being given to the affected villages is the most lucrative (Money to move, rent for new house, jobs for family members and most importantly a share in the developed land once the airport comes up) and the villagers are holding out for more egged on by some political parties.

Fadnavis has really worked to get the work going on the airport, coastal road, various metro routes and has readily reached out to the union ministers to get the environmental and other clearances holding all the infra projects in Mumbai.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby jaysimha » 28 Apr 2018 14:19

https://www.cgiedinburgh.gov.in/pdf/EOI%20%2006.4.18%20(3).pdf

EOI Document for Seaplane / Helicopter/ Small passenger aircraft
services in A & N Islands

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby jaysimha » 30 Apr 2018 14:50

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/pmreleases.aspx?mincode=26
PIB link of Ministry of Civil Aviation

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 30 Apr 2018 15:14

Singha wrote:turboprop powered a.c even the smaller ones seem to have a decent engine safety record ... perhaps engines are more old school and not trying so hard to be next gen kitties


A lot of turbo props are free turbines and as such do not run the same demanding regimes that a conventional turbofan/jet does in terms of frequent rpm variations.

Most run at some controlled fixed rpm and power delivery is varied via the prop pitch.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Supratik » 03 May 2018 19:48

Pakyong airport to be operational by June. 100th functional airport.

https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-ne ... 3sMPN.html

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JayS » 04 May 2018 12:24

Results of investigation of recent 737-300 and CFM-56 engine accident are given in news below. Its confirmed that it was fan blade fatigue failure (no surprises there)

NTSB finds fatigue cracking on Southwest CFM56-7B failed blade
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... fa-448321/

Investigators released pictures of the engine, the Boeing 737-700 involved in the incident and the failed blade, which they say shows metal fatigue near the leading edge of the blade's convex side.
The fatigue area is about 5.7cm (2.2in) long and 1.2cm deep, running "through the thickness" of the fan dovetail, says the NTSB in a 3 May investigation update.

"The number 13 fan blade had separated at the root; the dovetail remained installed in the fan disk," the update says. "Examination of the number 13 fan blade dovetail exhibited features consistent with metal fatigue initiating at the convex side near the leading edge."

"Fatigue fracture features emanated from multiple origins at the convex side," it adds.

In addition to the fan blade failure, the engine inlet and cowling separated and struck the wing and fuselage, causing rapid depressurisation, the NTSB says.
Engine pieces significantly damaged the leading edge of the left wing, fuselage and horizontal stabilizer. The incident killed one passenger – the first passenger fatality on a US airline since 2009.

The failed engine's fan blades had been overhauled 10,712 cycles prior to the incident, in November 2012, the NTSB says, citing maintenance records. At that time, maintainers inspected the blades visually and using "fluorescent penetrant", says the NTSB.
The engine's blades had logged 32,000 cycles since new, and inspections conducted after the incident revealed no cracks on other blades, the NTSB says.


The design method failed to predict the fatigue crack growth to failure, correct inspection interval and proper inspection methodology. I am sure the design methods today are already much more advanced. This blade must be designed in late 80s-early 90s.


Vips
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vips » 15 May 2018 19:04

Iceland’s low-cost carrier WOW air offers flights to Europe, North America with fares starting Rs 13,499.

WOW air, Iceland’s low fare transatlantic airline, announced the launch of its flight operations in India from December 7, 2018, with ‘airfares that will enable everyone to fly.’ The airline today announced that it will have five direct flights a week between New Delhi and Keflavik airport in Iceland that will connect to multiple destinations in North America and Europe.

“To be offered in 4 exciting fare options: WOW basic, WOW plus, WOW comfy & WOW premium, the airline will introduce never-before seen fares to their transatlantic destinations for Indian travellers. A one-way ticket to Iceland, US, Canada and London in economy category called WOW basic will start from INR 13,499/- (including taxes) while the business class fares termed as WOW premium will be priced from INR 46,599/- onwards (including taxes),” the airline company said.

Singha
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 19 May 2018 13:21

another mid air engine failure in russia on a 737. reason unknown. a/c landed safely on 1 engine.

arshyam
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby arshyam » 19 May 2018 15:03

There was another incident in Cuba - a 737 crashed with 100 people on board. On mobile, can someone else find out what model it was?

Austin
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Austin » 19 May 2018 15:51

arshyam wrote:There was another incident in Cuba - a 737 crashed with 100 people on board. On mobile, can someone else find out what model it was?


I read it was 737-200 model , it hit some electric while coming back expecience both engine issue

Austin
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Austin » 19 May 2018 15:52

Superjet. 10 years in the sky! , Unseen Photos

https://fotografersha.livejournal.com/991125.html


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