Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

The Technology & Economic Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to Technological and Economic developments in India. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
nandakumar
BRFite
Posts: 917
Joined: 10 May 2010 13:37

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nandakumar » 26 Apr 2019 17:03

Is the revenue share percentage (AAI) a 'pass through' in the calculation of UDF? I know it should not be as it would allow bidders to quote recklessly (revenue share percentage) to win the contract. But I have known a few cases of container terminal concessions in ports where this has happened.

manish
BRFite
Posts: 839
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 16:13

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby manish » 26 Apr 2019 17:24

nandakumar wrote:Is the revenue share percentage (AAI) a 'pass through' in the calculation of UDF? I know it should not be as it would allow bidders to quote recklessly (revenue share percentage) to win the contract. But I have known a few cases of container terminal concessions in ports where this has happened.

DEL and BOM contracts came much after the harsh lessons were learnt by both sides in those early container terminal bids (Those interested should look up the Tuticorin case).

Since bidding was based on revenue share it was not made a pass through. It comes out of airport operating company's P&L.

AAI gets some Rs 3,000Cr + every year from DEL and BOM as revenue share. Cynics of course see this as hafta to them for staying away from running them :D

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 27 Apr 2019 17:25

watch video


Sideways landing in a 40-knot crosswinds at Bristol Airport

https://twitter.com/OrgPhysics/status/1121691759216558080

nandakumar
BRFite
Posts: 917
Joined: 10 May 2010 13:37

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nandakumar » 27 Apr 2019 17:31

manish wrote:
nandakumar wrote:Is the revenue share percentage (AAI) a 'pass through' in the calculation of UDF? I know it should not be as it would allow bidders to quote recklessly (revenue share percentage) to win the contract. But I have known a few cases of container terminal concessions in ports where this has happened.

DEL and BOM contracts came much after the harsh lessons were learnt by both sides in those early container terminal bids (Those interested should look up the Tuticorin case).

Since bidding was based on revenue share it was not made a pass through. It comes out of airport operating company's P&L.

AAI gets some Rs 3,000Cr + every year from DEL and BOM as revenue share. Cynics of course see this as hafta to them for staying away from running them :D

Thanks for the clarification. It is a relief to learn that lessons have been imbibed.

nithish
BRFite
Posts: 426
Joined: 02 Oct 2009 02:41

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nithish » 06 May 2019 03:15

surely this is criminal negligence?

Boeing Left Airlines, FAA in Dark on Alert Linked to 737 Crashes

Boeing Co. knew months before a deadly 737 Max crash that a cockpit alert wasn’t working the way the company had told buyers of the single-aisle jetliner.

But the planemaker didn’t share its findings with airlines or the Federal Aviation Administration until after a Lion Air plane went down off the coast of Indonesia in October, according to a Boeing statement Sunday. The accident occurred after erroneous readings by a single angle-of-attack sensor triggered software that pushed the jet’s nose down until pilots lost control.

Boeing’s latest disclosure raises new questions about the 737 Max’s development and testing -- and the company’s lack of transparency. The alert was supposed to flash when two angle-of-attack vanes sent conflicting data about the relation of the plane’s nose to the oncoming air stream. Boeing had told airlines and pilots that the so-called AOA disagree warning was standard across the Max fleet, as on a previous generation of 737 jets.

The software delivered to Boeing linked the signal with a second cockpit gauge -- available for a fee -- that displayed the readings from the two vanes. As a result, the AOA disagree light, which warned pilots of issues with the sensors, functioned only for customers that purchased the optional indicator.

---

The inactive alert was later deemed to be “low risk” by the FAA’s Corrective Action Review Board, the regulator said Sunday. “However, Boeing’s timely or earlier communication with the operators would have helped to reduce or eliminate possible confusion,” the FAA said.

Boeing engineers discovered the discrepancy “within several months” of the initial Max deliveries in May 2017, the company said as it provided additional details of an issue that first came to light last week

---
Boeing briefed the FAA’s Seattle aircraft certification office in November, and the information was forwarded to the agency’s Corrective Action Review Board for evaluation, an FAA representative said Sunday. The panel determined the issue to be “low risk,” and said Boeing would have to fix it as part of an overall package of enhancements to the Max in response to the Lion Air accident.

Before the Max returns to service, Boeing plans to issue a software update that will allow the AOA disagree light to operate as a standalone feature.

Boeing has separately been working to finalize a redesign of the software, known as MCAS, that was mistakenly triggered by the faulty sensor readings. The last major milestone is an FAA certification flight that the company expects to conduct shortly.

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23306
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Austin » 06 May 2019 19:51

The crew of the SSJ-100 that burned down in Sheremetyevo told the details of the disaster

According to flight attendant Tatyana Kasatkina, after takeoff, the plane hit a cloud, where there was a strong hail

"At this moment there was a clap, a flash such as electricity. Everything was very fast," she said

The stewardess noted that after a hard landing, people began to rise from their seats and move toward the exit, although the plane was still moving. According to her, the evacuation began immediately after the stop

The commander of the crew, Denis Evdokimov, told the TV channel that due to the lightning strike, the radio link had disappeared and the pilots had to switch the plane directly to emergency control mode

The crash with the Sukhoi Superjet 100 aircraft en route from Moscow to Murmansk occurred on Sunday evening. After 28 minutes of flight, the crew urgently returned to Sheremetyevo

The plane managed to land only at the second attempt due to adverse weather conditions. With a hard landing, he struck down the landing gear and the engines caught fire. Then the fire spread to the entire tail of the aircraft


https://ria.ru/20190506/1553299694.html

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23306
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Austin » 06 May 2019 19:54


chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 07 May 2019 02:49

Austin wrote:



the same aircraft in happier times


Image

Vips
BRFite
Posts: 1653
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vips » 07 May 2019 18:04

IndiGo prepares for another 'large' Airbus order.

The Indian airline, which adds an aircraft to its fleet every week, is in discussions to buy a longer-range version of the European planemaker’s
newest narrow-body jet, according to chief executive officer Ronojoy Dutta.

Existing orders will see IndiGo through the next two years, Dutta said in an interview with Bloomberg News editor-in-chief John Micklethwait. After that, the carrier is considering adding new planes including Airbus’s long-distance A321neo LR and the yet to-be-released A321 XLR, he said.

“When we order, we’ll order in bulk for sure,” Dutta said in New Delhi in his first interview since becoming CEO of the airline in January. “I can’t give you a tentative number, but it will be large. We need longer range.

mmasand
BRFite
Posts: 417
Joined: 19 May 2009 23:46

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby mmasand » 08 May 2019 00:12

Vips wrote:IndiGo prepares for another 'large' Airbus order.

The Indian airline, which adds an aircraft to its fleet every week, is in discussions to buy a longer-range version of the European planemaker’s
newest narrow-body jet, according to chief executive officer Ronojoy Dutta.

Existing orders will see IndiGo through the next two years, Dutta said in an interview with Bloomberg News editor-in-chief John Micklethwait. After that, the carrier is considering adding new planes including Airbus’s long-distance A321neo LR and the yet to-be-released A321 XLR, he said.

“When we order, we’ll order in bulk for sure,” Dutta said in New Delhi in his first interview since becoming CEO of the airline in January. “I can’t give you a tentative number, but it will be large. We need longer range.


If one were to compare their previous 'large' order with their current fleet, the discrepancy is evident. InterGlobe laid siege to the assembly lines, if any airline wanted a A320, they would have to wait it out for 4-5 years or optionally go to Indigo, which would then sell them a used A320 at a much higher rate.

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66406
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 10 May 2019 13:54

indigo has perfect their thin hard seat cushion and might be able to patent and export it worldwide.
sheer torture on longer flights. now with LR planes they can do delhi-paris, delhi-tokyo probably on narrowbody jets.

sigh...the old days of cushy international flights with better seats , legroom , booze, pick of PYT crop are long gone.

to cut costs they will develop a autonomous food trolley that will move slowly down the aisle and attached will hand out food and drink.

tandav
BRFite
Posts: 357
Joined: 26 Aug 2016 08:24

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby tandav » 10 May 2019 15:54

Singha wrote:indigo has perfect their thin hard seat cushion and might be able to patent and export it worldwide.
sheer torture on longer flights. now with LR planes they can do delhi-paris, delhi-tokyo probably on narrowbody jets.

sigh...the old days of cushy international flights with better seats , legroom , booze, pick of PYT crop are long gone.

to cut costs they will develop a autonomous food trolley that will move slowly down the aisle and attached will hand out food and drink.


But I find the thinner harder seats far more comfortable... what PYTs are you talking about most OIRO airlines were staffed with older no nonsense ladies quite like Air India. Autonomous food trolley sounds grand.... is someone working on this or should I get some folks to get cracking

tandav
BRFite
Posts: 357
Joined: 26 Aug 2016 08:24

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby tandav » 10 May 2019 15:56

mmasand wrote:


If one were to compare their previous 'large' order with their current fleet, the discrepancy is evident. InterGlobe laid siege to the assembly lines, if any airline wanted a A320, they would have to wait it out for 4-5 years or optionally go to Indigo, which would then sell them a used A320 at a much higher rate.


Leverage this to move the manufacturing supply chain to India??

mmasand
BRFite
Posts: 417
Joined: 19 May 2009 23:46

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby mmasand » 10 May 2019 16:00

tandav wrote:
mmasand wrote:
If one were to compare their previous 'large' order with their current fleet, the discrepancy is evident. InterGlobe laid siege to the assembly lines, if any airline wanted a A320, they would have to wait it out for 4-5 years or optionally go to Indigo, which would then sell them a used A320 at a much higher rate.


Leverage this to move the manufacturing supply chain to India??


Unlikely, we are plagued with land acquisition issues. There are small parts that do get manufactured for EADS in India, but we don't have an apprentice program/vocational education policy in place to support this.

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3513
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chola » 10 May 2019 16:11

Singha wrote:sigh...the old days of cushy international flights with better seats , legroom , booze, pick of PYT crop are long gone.


No PYTs in the Yoo Ess for ages because all the PYTs from the 1980s aged and were kept on by the unions -- blocking unaged PYTs from assuming those positions.

Airlines from the chini-type places are less strick about age- and gender-discrimination and so you will see more PYTs with the likes of Singapore, Cathay and Korean.

In fact, the Far East is unapologetic about it.

https://www.maxim.com/.amp/maxim-man/bikini-airline-vietnam-first-woman-billionaire-2016-3
THIS BIKINI AIRLINE HAS SPAWNED VIETNAM'S FIRST FEMALE BILLIONAIRE

Sometimes the simplest ideas are the most lucrative.

Meet Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao, a mega-successful Vietnamese entrepreneur who is set to become one of the world's richest people, thanks to her brilliant idea of staffing an airline with bikini-clad babes.
Image

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66406
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 11 May 2019 08:52

true to my bottom feeding prediction, Etihad has now showed up as a bidder for Jet airways.

the others are not known names, so etihad will win. hope they run it better than goyal did......convert it into a indigo type airline domestically but a etihad type airline on international routes (with thicker seat cushions than indigo).

due to jet demise, geared turbofan issues on PE engines our civil aviation growth was very weak in march. will need a quarter to get back to double digit range again.

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 11 May 2019 11:39

Singha wrote:true to my bottom feeding prediction, Etihad has now showed up as a bidder for Jet airways.

the others are not known names, so etihad will win. hope they run it better than goyal did......convert it into a indigo type airline domestically but a etihad type airline on international routes (with thicker seat cushions than indigo).

due to jet demise, geared turbofan issues on PE engines our civil aviation growth was very weak in march. will need a quarter to get back to double digit range again.


goyal is rumoured to have already transferred shares to them earlier in direct contravention of the Indian law.

so, the gelfies are invested in jet much more than they are revealing or letting on.

why do you think that certain pawarful peoples are very very quiet.

The sandy hammer is poised to fall on their heads and certain guests, "extradited" from the gelf and currently occupying choice govt accommodations in dilli are doing an excellent imitation of a talented and musically inclined canary in full cry as indicated by Modi himself with frequent public references to the music of michel mama.

Zynda
BRFite
Posts: 1640
Joined: 07 Jan 2006 00:37
Location: J4

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Zynda » 13 May 2019 23:27

A National Disappointment: What Went Wrong With the Sukhoi Superjet 100

On the night of May 5, a Sukhoi Superjet 100 operated by Russia’s national carrier Aeroflot took off from Moscow heading for Murmansk, only to return to the airport about 30 minutes later, where it made a hard emergency landing with full fuel tanks, which caused a fire that claimed the lives of 41 of the 78 people on board. The crew had first reported a radio malfunction, and then informed dispatchers of an emergency.

Harrowing videos of the plane speeding down the runway engulfed in flames evoked strong emotions on social media, not least criticism of the Superjet. After all, it was not the first tragedy involving the plane: during a show flight of the Superjet in Indonesia on May 9, 2012, the plane slammed into a mountain, killing 45 people.

The Superjet’s problems began almost as soon as the plane started being developed in the early 2000s. There was much excitement about the creation of what was supposed to be the perfect regional plane. The political climate in Russia was very different in the early 2000s: the country was opening up to the world, and the world reciprocated. High oil prices filled up state coffers, and the country’s new leader, Vladimir Putin, was keen to show off Russia’s participation in the international arena.

The Superjet fit the bill perfectly. It soon boasted among its partners the strongest players on the global aviation market: France’s Snecma and Thales, Italy’s Alenia Aeronautica, and the U.S.’s B/E Aerospace. Boeing acted as the project’s consultant.

Mikhail Pogosyan, head of the Sukhoi Design Bureau, boldly claimed that the Superjet would be able to compete with the titans of the market for regional planes, such as Canada’s Bombardier and Brazil’s Embraer. Russia’s state-controlled aircraft maker United Aircraft Corporation (UAC) planned to sell 300 aircraft to airlines around the world and start making a profit. Italy’s Alitalia was among the potential buyers, while Aeroflot was by default listed as Sukhoi’s number one client.

The official picture painted of the Superjet soaring toward the global market was certainly attractive, and ultimately, this idealized public image was the plane’s downfall. Behind the facade — as with all aviation innovations — was a less appealing story of malfunctions, missed deadlines, defective parts, and engine shortages.

The project required more and more resources, while UAC’s management and senior government officials preferred not to talk about the problems. The growing discrepancy between reality and the plane’s image angered the public, and the lack of credible information about the Superjet’s development provided plenty of fuel for speculation.

Then the Indonesia crash happened. The tragedy dealt a serious blow to the project: a number of invaluable specialists were killed, including the project’s senior test pilot and chief flight test engineer. Sales negotiations came to a halt, and Putin, the main source of administrative and financial resources, lost interest in the project.

When the jet’s main champion, Pogosyan, left UAC in 2015, the project also started losing its public luster. All of its problems — a lack of spare parts, service centers, end market, and financing — came to the forefront. Foreign partners reduced their participation in the project to the bare minimum.

Government incentives are the only reason Russian airlines purchase the Superjet. But even this support doesn’t make the plane that attractive: foreign analogues get twice as much flight time. Aeroflot has the largest Superjet fleet, with 50 planes.

“Who, if not us, will learn to fly it?” Aeroflot CEO Vitaly Savelyev told the TASS news agency.

“Yes, it entails certain expenses and headache. If Aeroflot were a private business, perhaps the shareholders wouldn’t want to do it. But we understand the situation and believe that the SSJ100 will fly,” he said.

Reactions to the latest disaster on May 5 showed that public mistrust of the Superjet has not disappeared. Of course, other aircrafts have had accidents as well. But the Sukhoi Superjet 100 has long stopped being just another aircraft, and has become a sociopolitical symbol of hope and disappointment. The project launched almost 20 years ago as a dream of conquering the world has turned into a thorn in everyone’s side. It seems that everyone, from government officials to airlines and passengers, is tired of the Superjet.

Valentina Matviyenko, head of the Federation Council, the upper chamber of Russia’s parliament, offered one of the frankest assessments of the plane in late 2018.

“We made this Sukhoi Superjet 100. And who needs it? It’s not suitable for regional transportation. Aeroflot says, ‘We bought them, they’re on the ground.’ Nobody abroad is buying it. In reality, the plane is more than 80 percent foreign, if not more. So, what have we accomplished?” she asked Transport Minister Yevgeny Ditrikh.

Perhaps it’s now time to ask another question: should the Superjet continue to exist (at least, in its current form)?

At first, it might seem that stopping production of the Sukhoi Superjet 100 is not an option: the project has cost so much effort and money (a hefty $2 billion, according to Pogosyan). But a plane should be evaluated not only in terms of the money already invested in it, but in terms of its business prospects. Once it’s understood that a project is not marketable, it should be shut down.

For instance, Airbus admits — however regrettably — that its double-decker A380 has no future: there is simply no demand for it. After delivering on the remaining contracts, the Europeans will close the program. Another example is Bombardier’s long and expensive CSeries jet project, which the company had no money to promote. The Canadians reluctantly sold it to Airbus, which turned it into the A220 jet, avoiding the project’s complete closure.

Another less radical solution is to merge the Superjet with another passenger plane: the MC-21, since they already belong to the same division of UAC. They could be developed in parallel, but that would entail greater expense. The Superjet could also be integrated into the MC-21 lineup as the shortest version of that plane and be renamed MC-21-100 (this possibility has already been discussed).

Whichever option the state chooses, it will have to stop its bad habit of bragging. Things have changed a lot since the Superjet was launched: Russia is increasingly politically isolated, there’s no longer excess money in the budget, and even major domestic airlines like Utair and S7 are unwilling to buy the plane.

But many government structures do need a regional jet — whatever name it carries — to replace their old aircraft. If a large number of the plane’s parts can be produced locally, the Superjet could very well be the workhorse of the security services, police, and emergency services. In the worst case scenario, the project can always be abandoned. The main thing is that there should be no more illusions or perfect pictures.

nachiket
Forum Moderator
Posts: 6808
Joined: 02 Dec 2008 10:49

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby nachiket » 13 May 2019 23:34

The Indonesia crash of the Superjet-100 was pilot error. It was a demo flight and the pilots were distracted while talking to potential customers in the cockpit and ignored EGPWS warnings in addition to being unaware of the terrain in the area. Highly unprofessional behavior. But there was nothing wrong with the aircraft itself.

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 14 May 2019 01:22

nachiket wrote:The Indonesia crash of the Superjet-100 was pilot error. It was a demo flight and the pilots were distracted while talking to potential customers in the cockpit and ignored EGPWS warnings in addition to being unaware of the terrain in the area. Highly unprofessional behavior. But there was nothing wrong with the aircraft itself.


why should idiot customers be allowed or even encouraged to enter the cockpit. but I know from experience that on demo flights a lot of foolish things get done, pushed, organized and orchestrated by the sales guys.

it, however, wiped out their senior flight test team as well as many very accomplished designers and vitally important engineers. It basically blew up the Superjet-100 project where important folks starting with putin lost interest and focus and people started to leave the project team when they realized that was no future for them there.

it isn't really that great an aircraft anyway. govt subsidies accounted for a great deal of the Superjet-100 sales and thereafter they spent a lot of time on the ground.

in the recent crash, the pilot is said to have indicated that they were hit by lightning but lightning protection is standard on all such aircraft and it surely wasn't the first Superjet-100 to be hit by lightning anyway. Operating in the kinds of weather and regions that they usually do, the Superjet-100 would have taken literally hundreds of lightning strikes, statistically speaking, some known and much more unknown.
Last edited by nachiket on 14 May 2019 02:17, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Editing to fix typo in my quoted post

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3513
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chola » 14 May 2019 14:43

Chini gora pilot recruitment website. Indians welcome too!

http://www.chinaaviation.hk/

The highest paid and most secure jobs in the world!

SICHUAN AIRLINES - A320 CAPTAINS

HOME OF THE PANDA BEAR - BRING YOUR FAMILY AND ENJOY A $10 USD PER FlGHT HOUR SENIORITY BONUS INCREASE EVERY YEAR!

$60,000 USD OR $40,000 USD SIGN-ON BONUS

Base Chengdu, China
Requires: 1000 hours PIC in type. 5,000 hours total time, age under 59 years old at start of assignment. Compensation (net amount received by pilot): Option A: 45 days annual leave; $25,100 USD per month plus $250 USD per hour over 85 hours. Option B: 103 days annual leave; $20,700 USD per month plus $215 USD per hour over 80 hours. Option C: 161 Days of annual leave; $16,600 US per month plus $180 USD per hour over 75 hours. Option D: 4 weeks ON, 4 weeks OFF $15,100 per month plus $160 USD per hour over 75 hours. Contract term: 3 years (renewable). Sichuan Airlnes wecomes candidates from Turkey and candidates from India with an FAA ATPL.

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 14 May 2019 22:54

Jet Airways CFO Amit Agarwal, CEO Vinay Dube resign within hours, both cite personal reasons

This is the second high profile exit in as many days at the grounded Jet Airways after Deputy CEO Amit Agarwal put in his papers on Monday.

ArjunPandit
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2422
Joined: 29 Mar 2017 06:37

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby ArjunPandit » 15 May 2019 00:34

^^etihad not upping the stake. They resigned after it was clear that even with etihad investment the airline wont be able to work.

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 15 May 2019 02:55

ArjunPandit wrote:^^etihad not upping the stake. They resigned after it was clear that even with etihad investment the airline wont be able to work.


there are already investigations in progress about the fraudulent diversion of around 6-700 million$ by the management.

Deans
BRFite
Posts: 838
Joined: 26 Aug 2004 19:13
Location: Moscow

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Deans » 15 May 2019 11:47

Singha wrote:indigo has perfect their thin hard seat cushion and might be able to patent and export it worldwide.
sheer torture on longer flights. now with LR planes they can do delhi-paris, delhi-tokyo probably on narrowbody jets.

sigh...the old days of cushy international flights with better seats , legroom , booze, pick of PYT crop are long gone.

to cut costs they will develop a autonomous food trolley that will move slowly down the aisle and attached will hand out food and drink.


Go Air was offered the thin (lighter) seats in 2011. I was in favour, because it would not make a perceptible difference over a 1.5 hour flight (avg. duration in India) and the saving in fuel would be significant. Proposal was nixed and Indigo was the first to sign up.

Indigo's aircraft orders have to be seen in the context of their leases, They go in for 6 years leases, so at any given year, a lot of aircraft are being returned. 6 years helps them avoid the heavy maintenance needed after 6 years. Their volumes have given them a purchase price estimated to be $ 1 million lower than Indian competition.That alone can enable them to offer fares which give them a wafer thin margin when everyone else, matching their fares, will lose money.

PYT's actually cost less than older flight attendants (who get unionised and have annual increments). Typically they join for a few years, till they marry a rich guy (better pay-off than collecting your provident fund at 60).
Last edited by Deans on 16 May 2019 09:44, edited 1 time in total.

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3513
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chola » 15 May 2019 14:13

chetak wrote:
ArjunPandit wrote:^^etihad not upping the stake. They resigned after it was clear that even with etihad investment the airline wont be able to work.


there are already investigations in progress about the fraudulent diversion of around 6-700 million$ by the management.


$700M? Well, that is a bit more than the average desi excess. Very ambitious.

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 15 May 2019 15:17

chola wrote:
chetak wrote:
there are already investigations in progress about the fraudulent diversion of around 6-700 million$ by the management.


$700M? Well, that is a bit more than the average desi excess. Very ambitious.



Serious Fraud Investigation Office May Probe Jet For 'Fund Diversion'


Serious Fraud Investigation Office May Probe Jet For 'Fund Diversion'

The fresh investigation follows recommendation given by MCA's Mumbai regional office after inspecting the airline's books.

May 09, 2019

Serious Fraud Investigation Office May Probe Jet For 'Fund Diversion'
The SFIO will now look into Jet's written-off investments in various subsidiary companies.


The Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) is likely to ask Serious Fraud Investigation Office (SFIO) to probe the alleged fund diversion and writing off of investments by Jet Airways.

The fresh investigation follows recommendation given by MCA's Mumbai regional office after inspecting the airline's books.

In Jet Airways' preliminary probe, Registrar of Companies RoC (Mumbai) told the MCA that it has found violation of Companies Act and unaccounted investments, official sources said, adding the natural way forward is an SFIO probe.

News agency IANS had reported on Wednesday that the RoC Mumbai had submitted a report and that appropriate action would be taken after its examination.

The concern of refunds to customers remains, as uncertainty over bidding process lingers. Sources tell BTVI, that 40% of total refunds are yet to be processed. We understand that the International Air Transport Association holds Rs 1000 Cr as adva...

The SFIO will now look into Jet's written-off investments in various subsidiary companies and try to source where they have landed. The SFIO will also start the process for seeking personal appearance of the company's then top management in an attempt to find out why the company suddenly posted loss in the fiscal year 2018 after a string of profits.

The company had received fund infusion in the form of Etihad's investments twice during the period. In his complaint, whistleblower Arvind Gupta had alleged that Jet Airways' promoters were trying to siphon Rs. 5,125 crore from the airline's books.

The RoC Mumbai has completed the books' inspection of Jet Airways as part of its preliminary investigation before turning to SFIO for a full-fledged investigation.

The RoC investigation was initiated last August after the company deferred its first-quarter FY19 results the same month. The RoC investigation followed a complaint by Arvind Gupta, who was also the chief complainant in the ICICI-Videocon case.

In the complaint, Mr Gupta also alleged that the audit committee was unable to prevent the fund diversion. Jet Airways and JetLite brands undertook transactions with companies owned by promoters in the guise of selling and distribution, Mr Gupta alleged.

The Income-Tax department in its February report had already found tax evasion of over Rs. 600 crore at Jet Airways.


"There were some transactions concerning a Dubai-based entity, which were found to be of suspicious nature," an Income Tax official said on the condition of anonymity.

"Commissions were paid to this Dubai-based company, which were excessive in nature," the official.


Deans
BRFite
Posts: 838
Joined: 26 Aug 2004 19:13
Location: Moscow

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Deans » 15 May 2019 19:48

chola wrote:
chetak wrote:
there are already investigations in progress about the fraudulent diversion of around 6-700 million$ by the management.


$700M? Well, that is a bit more than the average desi excess. Very ambitious.


Fund diversion is very difficult to prove. I doubt the SFIO will have an understanding of the subject. It does not explain losses in 2018 (that probably has to do more with rising cost of ATF). Diversion would typically happen when you negotiate an aircraft purchase (or lease) at a slightly higher rate - but within the benchmark of the industry and have a kickback coming paid to your personal account. It can be done when the promoter and the person signing the purchase / lease agreement are the same person.

ldev
BRFite
Posts: 1574
Joined: 06 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby ldev » 17 May 2019 05:08

This is terrible. The one airline in India doing well is now facing a clash of promoters!!

Clash between the INDIGO promoters

Hot on the heels of Jet Airways crisis, India's biggest airline IndiGo is also seeing some turbulence with its founders, Rahul Bhatia and Rakesh Gangwal, having serious differences over the airline's expansion strategies. Reports say both these industry stalwarts disagree on some clauses in the shareholders' agreement and the airline's management control. Analysts say these differences may be disastrous for the Indian aviation sector, which is already in trouble after the recent shutting down of Jet Airways.

The dispute between the promoters has reportedly escalated in the past few weeks, with Bhatia unsure about Gangwal's aggressive approach to expanding overseas. Bhatia also fears that Gangwal is trying to take greater control over the airline as he hired his own team, including some top-level executives, on key posts in the recent past. Both of them, however, are trying to sort out these differences, and have hired JSA Law and Khaitan & Co to settle issues, reported the Economic Times.

Rahul Bhatia has a family stake of 38.26 per cent in IndiGo, while Rakesh Gangwal, along with his family, owns 36.69 per cent in the low-cost carrier, which has a market capitalisation of Rs 61,833 crore. Founded in 2006, Interglobe Aviation, also known as IndiGo, was a joint venture between Bhatia and Gangwal. The company was listed in 2013, a time when both of them held a 99 per cent stake in the airline. Gangwal was driving force behind making IndiGo a global carrier, while Bhatia looked at the airline's affairs in India.

The issues cropped up in 2018 after Gangwal sought aggressive expansion to tap into India's aviation market while Bhatia called for a balanced and cautious approach. Gangwal in February 2018 had claimed to increase the airline's capacity to 250 from 155 (almost 52 per cent). The proposal didn't go down well with IndiGo management, including Aditya Ghosh who subsequently resigned from the airline as its whole-time director in April 2018. Questioning Gangwal's approach, the Bhatia camp had reportedly raised the issue of "overcapacity" and "yield". The crises deepened after Gosh's exit and the appointment of foreign executives on key management posts, including Gregory Taylor as its CEO. Most of these employees were hired by Gangwal from United Airlines. Interestingly, Gangwal himself is an aviation veteran and had worked with United Airlines and US Airways before he launched IndiGo.

Right now, both the parties are reportedly weighing in all the possible option with the help of their law agencies, which are monitoring the situation. Since the talks are at initial stages, no one has reportedly called for buying each other's stake and exiting from the airline. Though both believe that they can grab the space left by the apparent closure of Jet Airways, both have different strategies. While Bhatia believes wide-bodied aircraft could be helpful in achieving IndiGo's international dream, Gangwal says narrow-bodied aircraft like Boeing 737 for all its operations, and codeshare agreements with other global carriers to cater to long-haul passengers, could help it gain the global market share. With a market share of 47 per cent, IndiGo has a fleet of 225 aircraft right now. The airline runs 1,400 daily flights to 54 domestic and 17 international routes (March figures).

mmasand
BRFite
Posts: 417
Joined: 19 May 2009 23:46

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby mmasand » 25 May 2019 19:04

Naresh Goyal made to disembark from an EK507 flight at BOM, allegedly was on his way to LHR. Bureau of Immigration has detained him.

srin
BRFite
Posts: 1724
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:13

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby srin » 26 May 2019 12:03

I find it really interesting. If they'd already embarked, it means that they'd cleared immigration. So, between the time of clearing immigration and flight take off, lots of information got passed around I guess between BOM and Delhi and orders came to take them off.

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66406
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 26 May 2019 13:49

goyal has a posh penthouse in dubai marina and also property in london. he was planning a break journey in dubai and then on to london.

https://indianexpress.com/article/citie ... l-5748290/

BIAL expects to handle 65 mil pax in 2025 and 90 mil in 2030.

a rapid metro system to airport, linked with the ongoing metro is needed and the KR Puram to Hebbala metro needs to be done ASAP...its not even tendered. neither is any work ongoing on the KR Puram to Silk board ORR metro after IL&FS the winning bidder became insolvent. :((

typical stepmother treatment to east and south blr bjp heartlands.

Sachin
Webmaster BR
Posts: 7352
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Undisclosed

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 30 May 2019 17:06

mmasand wrote:Naresh Goyal made to disembark from an EK507 flight at BOM, allegedly was on his way to LHR. Bureau of Immigration has detained him.

srin wrote:I find it really interesting. If they'd already embarked, it means that they'd cleared immigration. So, between the time of clearing immigration and flight take off, lots of information got passed around I guess between BOM and Delhi and orders came to take them off.

What’s in a surname? Ask Naresh Goyal.
It took an alert immigration official to identify Naresh Goyal (whose passport was in the name of Naresh Goel, where as look out notice had his last name as Goyal), and then call back his plane from the taxi-way and de-board him. Similar could be the case of few other "rich & powerful" people who managed to leave the country. Have a different name in the passport, and use some other spellings in the court records etc.

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23306
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Austin » 09 Jun 2019 16:24

Full video of Russia’s Sukhoi Superjet 100 crash

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NhvqAWJ4TU

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19113
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 09 Jun 2019 22:55

Is this all or some bits of the pilots are also missing :mrgreen:

aren't we a dhimmi country.

twitter


This is @IndiGo6E getting carried away with its policy of appeasement!!
New uniforms!! For flight to jeddah!!


Image

mmasand
BRFite
Posts: 417
Joined: 19 May 2009 23:46

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby mmasand » 10 Jun 2019 12:09

chetak wrote:Is this all or some bits of the pilots are also missing :mrgreen:

aren't we a dhimmi country.

twitter


This is @IndiGo6E getting carried away with its policy of appeasement!!
New uniforms!! For flight to jeddah!!


Image


There is no appeasement, this is mandatory in Saudia. 6E avoids having their crew to layover in Jeddah.

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66406
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 10 Jun 2019 12:40

even passengers are not allowed to board flights to saudi from anywhere wearing revealing clothing like men wearing shorts.

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3513
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chola » 10 Jun 2019 13:21

Bah! We should do sari and choli no matter where we fly. A little bare midriff will not kill them.

Image

sanjaykumar
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3898
Joined: 16 Oct 2005 05:51

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby sanjaykumar » 11 Jun 2019 10:33

:eek: Who is this aryaputri?

Chinmay
BRFite
Posts: 185
Joined: 15 Aug 2016 07:25

Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Chinmay » 11 Jun 2019 12:33

sanjaykumar wrote::eek: Who is this aryaputri?


Google chacha tells me that it's an actress named Isha Talwar


Return to “Technology & Economic Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests