Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 23 Apr 2009 06:54

Coimbatore Airport Expansion

. .the airport runway earlier was 7,500 ft and the same had been extended to 9,520 ft. With works on for fixing threshold and approach lights, very shortly the runway would become operational. . .The final objective was to extend the runway to 11,000 ft.

Works are already under way for expanding the terminal building with a capacity for 300 passengers in order to accommodate 700 passengers at a cost of Rs. 78 crore by increasing the area from 6,000 sq.m. to 14,700 sq.m.

It would also have two aerobridges with visual docking guidance system, four escalators and elevators and modern passenger baggage handling systems.

The approach road from Sitra Junction to the airport would be widened and the AAI was waiting for the local body to hand over the road.

The apron extension work would also be over in a few months thus creating two more parking bays in addition to the already existing five bays for aircraft and one isolation bay for aircraft with security perceptions

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Dileep » 28 Apr 2009 16:02

Open sky? Trust A-I to make it an open fly
If it weren't so absurd it would be funny. Passengers on the domestic Kolkata-Delhi-Kolkata sector of Air-India's international flights are asked to declare that they possess valid customs clearance documents for the zip fasteners on their pants. Such documents are also required for watches and mobile phones made overseas, and even for carrying more than Rs 5,000.
......

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Bade » 01 May 2009 02:14

Jet airways sacks 60 cabin crew
The dismissed crew members were part of the group of 850, who were laid off in October last year, only to be taken back the very next day by airline chairman Naresh Goyal.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Nayak » 01 May 2009 12:55

TOI

Kingfisher plane has close shave in Mumbai
1 May 2009, 0750 hrs IST, TNN
Print Email Discuss Share Save Comment Text:
MUMBAI: It was a close shave for the Kingfisher flight to Baroda when its tow-bar tractor (a vehicle attached to the aircraft to push it to the
taxiway) hit its nose-wheel gear on Thursday afternoon. All the 46 passengers on board had to be deplaned immediately and the aircraft had to be towed for a thorough check. The IT 3193 flight from Mumbai to Vadodra was stranded between the parking bay and taxiway, delaying other flights lined behind it.

The incident occurred at 4.40pm when the flight was preparing to leave for its destination and all passengers had been asked to take their seats for take-off. An aircraft is usually pushed by a tractor, linked to the aircraft by a long tow-bar, before the engine is started. On Thursday, the pin holding the ends of the tow sheared off, resulting in the tractor hitting the nose-wheel gear.


The equipment I see lying in the airport look totally worn out. Most of them appear rusted and near to the breaking point.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Rohit_K » 04 May 2009 05:35

Delhi's new T1D Terminal. After T3 opens in April 2010, this will become a LCC terminal.

Image

Image

T3 on May1
Image


more pics can be found here

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby VickersB » 04 May 2009 22:51

Anyone got info on what's with these rumors that there are massive delays getting out of the airport (IGI Delhi) due to swine flu checking? someone mentioned it took them nearly an hr and half to get to the baggage carousel from the immigration desk. Is that true? :((

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 05 May 2009 10:38

Kingfisher Airlines continues to default on payment of dues

Quote

New Delhi/Mumbai: India’s top ranked carrier by passengers flown in the March quarter, Kingfisher Airlines Ltd, continues to default on payments.
In the latest instance, Indian Oil Corp. Ltd (IOC) has encashed bank guarantees of around Rs65 crore provided by the airline, after a cheque for some Rs50 crore issued to the oil firm by the airline bounced last week, people familiar with the development said. It wasn’t immediately clear if the guarantee had been encashed in full or in part.

In November, state-run Airports Authority of India (AAI) which runs most of the country’s airports, had threatened to encash bank guarantees of Rs100 crore after Kingfisher fell behind on a payment of at least Rs256 crore.

After cheques given to the authority bounced last fortnight, the carrier transferred some Rs77 crore electronically to AAI. After this payment, said an AAI board member who did not want to be named, Kingfisher’s dues for now are within the bank guarantee furnished by the carrier.
Dues to three state-run oil companies totalling to at least Rs1,000 crore, however, still remain to be paid, forcing IOC’s hand.
“The bank guarantee has been encashed,” said a person familiar with the development, declining to be identified. A second person aware of the process confirmed the move.
IOC encashed the bank guarantee after Kingfisher had sought a second 10-day extension of the deadline to pay state-run IOC after missing a 10 April deadline to settle the tab for jet fuel supplied by the refiner. A first deadline of 31 March, too, was missed by the firm, as reported by Mint last month.
In October, the Union government allowed the country’s three largest carriers—National Aviation Co. of India Ltd (Nacil)-run Air India, Jet Airways (India) Ltd and Kingfisher—a period of six months to pay dues amounting to Rs2,962 crore to oil marketing firms.
Oil companies say the airlines have not met that commitment.
“When one particular (oil) company asks for payment, they (Kingfisher) shift the business to the other,” said the second person quoted above. He was referring to the fact that the airline had moved most of its fuel purchases to Hindustan Petroleum Corp. Ltd (HPCL) where the airline can still buy jet fuel on credit.
The same person said the overall overdue payments of the carrier amount to about Rs129 crore for IOC, Rs488 crore for HPCL and Rs326 crore to Bharat Petroleum Corp. Ltd (BPCL).
Both IOC and BPCL have discontinued fuel sales to the airline on credit and insist on cash-and-carry purchases.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby sum » 05 May 2009 22:26

In the latest instance, Indian Oil Corp. Ltd (IOC) has encashed bank guarantees of around Rs65 crore provided by the airline, after a cheque for some Rs50 crore issued to the oil firm by the airline bounced last week, people familiar with the development said. It wasn’t immediately clear if the guarantee had been encashed in full or in part.

Heard from a chaiwalla that Mallya-ji owes money to nearly 50-60% of his suppliers.

His own chopper pilot (ex-col of the IA) has not been paid for months. Seems even the poor watchmen of UB city in Bengaluru have not been paid due to severe cash crunch and KF cheques are very notorious for their "bouncy" factor with all suppliers.

Panwaalas say that his obsession with a bleeding Kingfisher airlines is causing other companies of his group to bleed as well (to help fund the KF fiasco)

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 06 May 2009 00:01

sum wrote:
In the latest instance, Indian Oil Corp. Ltd (IOC) has encashed bank guarantees of around Rs65 crore provided by the airline, after a cheque for some Rs50 crore issued to the oil firm by the airline bounced last week, people familiar with the development said. It wasn’t immediately clear if the guarantee had been encashed in full or in part.

Heard from a chaiwalla that Mallya-ji owes money to nearly 50-60% of his suppliers.

His own chopper pilot (ex-col of the IA) has not been paid for months. Seems even the poor watchmen of UB city in Bengaluru have not been paid due to severe cash crunch and KF cheques are very notorious for their "bouncy" factor with all suppliers.

Panwaalas say that his obsession with a bleeding Kingfisher airlines is causing other companies of his group to bleed as well (to help fund the KF fiasco)


sum ji,

The wise shareholders in the other group companies have long since ganged up and blocked off access to funds from their kitty to fund KingFisher Airlines. Many many moons ago.

He owes two major private Indian banks plenty. If he tanks, probably one of them will also tank with him.

Mallya-ji is literally flying solo with bad management as baggage.

Hear that he sold a big block of his personal shares in a group company recently to continue support for the airline.

The staff have all been paid regularly. No employee can crib about pending payments.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 06 May 2009 04:37

India's first seaplane operations to take off in Oct.

For the first time in India's aviation history, seaplane operations are likely to begin in Andaman and Nicobar islands in October this year, with state-owned Pawan Hans Helicopters Limited (PHHL) planning to launch its services.

"We plan to launch seaplane operations by October 15," PHHL CMD R K Tyagi said at a seminar on helicopter operations here, adding that the operations would be launched jointly by the public sector chopper firm and the island administration to operate sorties for tourists and inter-island movements.

The PHHL, which currently operates helicopter services in the group of islands, also plans similar services in Goa and Lakshadweep after the Andaman operations settle down.

The public sector chopper firm plans to wet-lease one seaplane, likely from a Mauritius-based company, for one year. The cost of the project, which is to be shared 50:50 with the island administration, would be about Rs six to eight crore.

"There is a good scope of operating three to four seaplanes in the region, but we will wait for the launch operations to take shape first," the PHHL chief said, adding that the seaplanes would either be eight or 16 seaters.

In another initiative, Tyagi said PHHL was in talks with the North Eastern Council (NEC) to start flights with fixed wing aircraft in the region. "We have made a presentation to the NEC urging them to give us the opportunity to have a four-five year contract."

Replying to questions, the PHHL chief said the bids for the seaplane would be finalised in such a way that would help in launching flights by mid-October.

Observing that there was a massive scope for seaplane operations to grow in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Tyagi said the islands attract over one million tourists each year.

To questions on PHHL's chopper operations in the islands, he said the Union Home Ministry subsidised helicopter operations in the islands in 90:10 ratio.

This enables a local inhabitant to pay only ten per cent of the price for inter-island transportation while a tourist pays 25 per cent of the cost.

Regarding the proposed heliport in Delhi's Rohini area, Tyagi said 25 acres of land has already been allocated and work was going on in full-swing to make the heliport operational before the 2010 Commonwealth Games.

For a heliport in Mumbai, he said the Maharashtra government has given options of sites at Nariman Point, Bandra-Kurla and Navi Mumbai areas.


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 May 2009 11:50

maybe he can climb down to a less lavish lifestyle to help KF ? two huge yachts, dozens of luxury properties,
hundred luxury cars, choppers, jets, tons of gold and jewels, a wine cellar of huge size no doubt.

I wonder if his is a acquired taste or his famous father and grandfather were also like that. first gen self-made
tycoons are generally very frugal and disciplined.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Hitesh » 08 May 2009 11:51

How can Kingfisher afford to pay for those new aircrafts when it can't even pay its staff, fuel, or surcharges? :?:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Suraj » 08 May 2009 12:10

Here's a picture of IGI showing the scale of the new under-construction T3, which dwarfs the existing T2:
New Delhi Indira Gandhi International Airport satellite view

Based on the scale given, the extreme ends are over 1.6km/1 mile apart. The two arms are individually each over 1km long. The main hall in the middle is around 300m*450m . Nothing like it anywhere else in India for sheer scale, and considering what GMR has already achieved in Hyderabad, IGI T3 will be a showpiece.

This will be the first of three similar shaped phases. Phase two will, as I recall, entail the demolition of T2 and its replacement with a copy of the current T3 shaped building.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Nihat » 08 May 2009 13:06

This will be the first of three similar shaped phases. Phase two will, as I recall, entail the demolition of T2 and its replacement with a copy of the current T3 shaped building.


How did you get hold of this info sir , if it is available in the master plan - could you please provide me the link to the same as I was unable to do so.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Suraj » 08 May 2009 13:38

Nihat wrote:How did you get hold of this info sir , if it is available in the master plan - could you please provide me the link to the same as I was unable to do so.

See this thread on SSC, which links to the original master plan press release material from GMR:
IGI airport thread on SSC

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 May 2009 13:44

would many aerobridge gates and departure holding areas would that permit ? 80 ? 120?

finally - masha-allah something to compare with the immense scale of kuala lumpur or bangkok when its
completed.

time was when certain british/us rags gleefully pointed out "india's decrepit infra" and said our airports were
worse than pakistans main one's (it was - for a while :eek: :(( )

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Suraj » 08 May 2009 14:00

T3 will have 76 aerobridges, up from the current 12 or so in T2. It will have an area of over 500,000sqm, larger than Kuala Lumpur and closer to Bangkok Suvarnabhumi Airport in size. Add T4 and T5 by 2025 and the aggregate area will rank among the highest.

New Delhi Airport will be quite a sight next year, with the new terminal, the underground airport express station in addition to another 100kms of Delhi Metro elsewhere as part of Phase 2, the new interchange at the airport exit connecting to the NH-8/Delhi Gurgaon Expressway. Plenty of shock and awe for those coming from Mumbai, Bangalore and elsewhere...

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 08 May 2009 14:17

Singha wrote:maybe he can climb down to a less lavish lifestyle to help KF ? two huge yachts, dozens of luxury properties,
hundred luxury cars, choppers, jets, tons of gold and jewels, a wine cellar of huge size no doubt.

I wonder if his is a acquired taste or his famous father and grandfather were also like that. first gen self-made
tycoons are generally very frugal and disciplined.



Have a heart saar.

The guy is an extremely hardworking go getter.

His personal and other ventures business expenses don't come out of the KF kitty.

On his own, the guy is a billionaire. He works round the clock and across many time zones. He can continue a business conversation exactly where he left off more than a month later with no prompting
or reference to a diary. His routine is backbreaking. Any normal human being in his position would be working out of the ICU.

If his staff at KF had a tenth of his ability, the company would be swinging. Every lame and non performing management joker at KF ( and there are many of them) travels only first class and eats only gourmet meals.
Their management motto seems to be "Change - 'cause that's all you'll have left when we are done."

As Mallaya openly says, its my money and I will enjoy it any damn way I please. No commies in that family.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 May 2009 14:28

Every lame and non performing management joker at KF

are there still fatkat MBA expats at desi airlines brought in for their supeior massa 'operational experience' ?

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 May 2009 14:31

Plenty of shock and awe for those coming from Mumbai, Bangalore and elsewhere...

:(( guess our phoren trips can be to dilli in winter.

btw what happened to the GVK peacock throne airport in mumbai ? maya or reality?
will it have comparable shakinah scale as IGI ?

we definitely need such edifices at ALL the gates of Gondor to intimidate the wayfarer.
and nice clean taxis like BLR, not the CNG powered mousetrap Omnis at IGI with
ill dressed and behaved drivers.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Tanaji » 08 May 2009 14:34

Also what happened to the Mumbai expansion? They did up the existing terminals to look nice, layout has improved, but what about the new terminal? Land acquisition issues as usual?

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 08 May 2009 15:23

Singha wrote:Every lame and non performing management joker at KF

are there still fatkat MBA expats at desi airlines brought in for their supeior massa 'operational experience' ?



Endangered species.

Very few left.

Remnants are being relentlessly hunted down.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vipul » 08 May 2009 20:48

MIAL is tearing down the old terminal.The management was on course to complete it within 45 days but Air Parasite discovered it has has one of its cables going through it, and has asked for 3 months to build up an alternative one.So that work is now at a standstill.
The first set of Slum dwellers( largely Bangladeshi )are going to be rehabilitated in modern apartments in Santacruz (per sq ft rates right now in that area is Rs 15,000 to 20,000 only!!!!)towards the end of the year which will free up 80 acres of land which will be utilized for building aprons.Rest of the illegal settlers will be similarly provide alternative accomadation at Santacruz and only then will MIAL be able to build up the X type terminal by 2012.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Vick » 09 May 2009 09:37

Suraj wrote:New Delhi Airport will be quite a sight next year, with the new terminal, the underground airport express station in addition to another 100kms of Delhi Metro elsewhere as part of Phase 2, the new interchange at the airport exit connecting to the NH-8/Delhi Gurgaon Expressway. Plenty of shock and awe for those coming from Mumbai, Bangalore and elsewhere...

Don't forget the massive new train station on the cards as well. If only other cities in the country had the kind of autonomy and self governance Delhi enjoys, instead of being held hostage to intrastate factional political pissing contests...

Getting back to civil aviation, the next item up on the agenda should be to build up a massive aircraft leasing company, preferably privately owned, that can throw its weight around by dangling 50+ aircraft orders to the major builders and help out the nascent Indian aerospace scene.

This leasing company can also be used as a secondary strategic airlift capability for NEO, humanitarian and other operations when needed.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 09 May 2009 11:33

yeah but for the avg Joe (who cant afford to live in south dilli/gurgaon/noida posh sectors) , dilli is still a pretty
tough and unsafe place to live in on climatic and social fronts. its easier for the avg joe to find affordable housing and safety in places like blr/chennai/kolkata imo.

WSJ

India Sends the Foreign Pilots Back Home

By NIRAJ SHETH

NEW DELHI -- India's airlines, in a slump, are sending the following message to the cockpit: Foreign pilots, go home.

It's an abrupt turnaround from the past several years, when Western pilots looked to growing markets like India as saviors for their profession. While carriers in the U.S. and Europe struggled with the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, India was opening its skies to new domestic carriers -- and hiring hundreds of foreign pilots to fill the new planes with experienced fliers.

But in the past several months, India's airline industry has contracted as the economic crisis has hit. Now, the industry is trying to cut costs.

Part of the solution: Firing expensive, though often more experienced, foreign pilots. India's government has effectively endorsed the purge. In March, it ordered airlines to get rid of all foreign pilots by July 2010.

The purge is the latest in a string of similar moves around the world, as governments try to reduce the number of foreign workers to free up jobs for native-born citizens. In Malaysia, the government has frozen recruitment of workers from overseas in some sectors and asked employers to lay off foreigners instead of locals. Australia has said it intends to cut its intake of skilled migrants by 14% amid rising unemployment. Last month, the Irish government said it was imposing rules to make it tougher for foreigners to get and renew work permits.

Such moves are making life harder for employers that have relied on overseas workers to keep costs low or make up for shortages of skilled labor. The restrictions are also creating new hardships for the workers themselves. Many made enormous sacrifices to travel abroad in search of better employment and new opportunities.

For pilots, India's decision has raised a troubling question: If even growth markets like India won't hire pilots, who will?

Last year, in the twilight of his 45-year flying career, Svein Brendefur arrived in New Delhi with a single goal. "There was one thing I wanted very much that I wasn't able to do," the 64-year-old Norwegian says. "That was to fly the latest-generation planes."

After a career that included stints as a fighter pilot during the Cold War and at a big Scandinavian airline, he made captain for Indian carrier SpiceJet Ltd. and started flying the new Boeing jets.

Then, six days before Christmas, Mr. Brendefur was told his job at the Gurgaon-based airline would end at the end of the year. He has applied to other airlines in the Middle East and Asia, hoping to stay in the region. But, he says, he might be running out of time. "Every day, I'm coming closer and closer to 65, when no one will hire me anymore," he says. "To relocate from one corner of the world to another is not something you do for fun."

More than 800 foreign pilots like Mr. Brendefur heeded the call to come to India, according to the Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, a Sydney-based market-research company. At their peak, they made up almost 20% of India's pilot corps.

"There were lots of discussions around the breakfast table with families: Should I look east and take a job there?" says Jim McAuslan, general secretary for the British Airline Pilots' Association. "Even up to a few months ago, people were making that decision" as layoffs and salary cuts continued at many Western carriers.

Recently, though, the Indian aviation industry has hit hard times. The industry is expected to lose more than $1.5 billion in the year ended March 31, analysts estimate. Pleas for a government bailout have gone unanswered, and carriers say they have been forced to cut staff and sell planes to stay afloat.

In an election year, cutting Indians from the payroll has proved too politically sensitive. When Mumbai-based Jet Airways Ltd. said in October that it would lay off 1,900 flight attendants and pilots, the Indian government stepped in, pressuring the company to backpedal; it kept the workers. Firing foreign pilots, in contrast, doesn't set political alarm bells ringing, airlines and industry observers say.

"It makes overall economic sense to replace the expats," says Jack Ekl, chief pilot and executive vice president of flight operations for SpiceJet.

The airline still has 42 expatriate pilots, or roughly half of its captains, on the books, but expects to replace them by the government's deadline, he says.

While some carriers are having trouble finding enough Indian pilots with the required flight hours to promote to captain, almost all airlines say they will be expat-free by July 2010.

Bangalore-based Kingfisher Airlines Ltd. said it is "in compliance with the program" to phase out foreign pilots. A company spokesman declined to comment on how many expat pilots Kingfisher has.

Some observers say the protectionist measures India is taking in its aviation sector could prompt other countries to do the same to Indian workers.

"It could be a very short-sighted approach that the Indian government is taking," says Mr. McAuslan.
—Patrick Barta contributed to this article.

Write to Niraj Sheth at niraj.sheth@wsj.com

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Bade » 09 May 2009 19:03

What if the western governments came up with an ad-hoc rule that all non-citizen IT workers need to be replaced by locals only. :twisted:

What about the Indian origin expat CEOs enjoying life in India. Will it apply to them too. :mrgreen: That would be fun.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby svinayak » 10 May 2009 05:10

Bade wrote:What if the western governments came up with an ad-hoc rule that all non-citizen IT workers need to be replaced by locals only. :twisted:

What about the Indian origin expat CEOs enjoying life in India. Will it apply to them too. :mrgreen: That would be fun.

They have cut down investment into India.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Bade » 10 May 2009 06:16

Well a better way to deal with it would be to make it competitive salary wise. No more premium salaries for expats. They will need to compete with locals with local salaries in this down market. If the gora pilots need a job bad enough, then they can live in India on Indian salaries.

That way we show that we are for open and free labor markets only :) and very capitalistic too. We surely have more Indian citizens working out of India than a few expat pilots working for Indian enterprises, hence need to be chanakian in the way we use the heavy stick when needed.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 10 May 2009 18:00

Chennai Airport's Runway extension runs into trouble yet again

The expansion and renovation plans of the main and secondary runways with appended link and taxiways that was to begin in the first week of April had been stalled owing to approval delays on the project by the airport authorities in Delhi after a representation was made by the airline operators on the non-viability of the project in the face of losses that they are already facing.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JaiS » 11 May 2009 09:08


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 11 May 2009 09:18

expats were earning more for same job . which is not the case for h1/gc workers else they'd also be shown the
door.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 12 May 2009 13:24

Bade wrote:Well a better way to deal with it would be to make it competitive salary wise. No more premium salaries for expats. They will need to compete with locals with local salaries in this down market. If the gora pilots need a job bad enough, then they can live in India on Indian salaries.

That way we show that we are for open and free labor markets only :) and very capitalistic too. We surely have more Indian citizens working out of India than a few expat pilots working for Indian enterprises, hence need to be chanakian in the way we use the heavy stick when needed.


Unfortunately at this time we cannot do without expat pilots.
The shortage is more acute in the smaller aircraft like the ATR series. The expats, even though fully qualified on Boeing or Airbus are still willing to fly the smaller aircraft.

Every Indian pilot seems to want to fly only a Boeing or Airbus.

Qualified Indian pilots are also moving abroad because the salaries are higher.

In the gulf countries, irrespective of experience, once you reach a particular salary range, the contract is not renewed any further.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby sampat » 12 May 2009 13:31

Indian passengers flying Air France allege racial bias

From my expereince of travelling in Euroland. Finnair have been the only decent airline with respect to staff friendliness on ground and in flight.
Their in-flight service for cattle class has been execellent. Only if they could manage reducing flight cancellation..

Asutrian, KLM and Lufthansa were the rudest with racist overtones. KF should fly worldwide. That will show these racist turds their real place.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 12 May 2009 13:41

sampat wrote:From my expereince of travelling in Euroland

My experience:-
1. Singapore Air Lines. The best, no issues at all.
2. Lufthansa and not KLM (Frankfurt and to US). No overtly racial hatred. But they are sticklers to baggage sizes etc. An old lady bringing a huge bag as check-in baggage got a ear-ful from the ground crew.
3. Air France (Bangalore to Amsterdam). Did not find them too rude. But in the return journey wasted lots of time because of some ticket related issues. Co. had paid all the dues, but the clerk could not confirm it from her system.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby vina » 12 May 2009 13:52

My rating starting with the worst downwards.

1) Air India-Parasite (come on , no one beats them, maybe some of their role models like say Aeroflot or Uzbek etc)
2) British Airways (absolutely racist pricks . Swore never to fly the ever again long ago)
3) Air France (racists and some serious 'tude . Not worth it)
4) KLM (who the hell wants to go to Schitepool anyways . thanks Alok_N (long demised))
5) Malaysian (that airline sucks , has serious 'tude, very Indian unfriendly in general, why t.F do people go there I find it difficult to understand)
6) Lufthansa (tolerable, and the less evil of the Euro trash airlines)

Other than those in the list , I have flown Singapore, Thai, Cathay (which are good) and all the other Massa airlines (service sucks, but okay and none of the Oierpean racist rubbish) .

Thumb rule, avoid the first two in the list like the plague.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sathish_A » 12 May 2009 14:10

Seems all goras were moved instantly, because they don't need VISA to enter Europe. We as a nation, still have leaking pot and buying passport is not a big deal. Hence have to suffer such humiliation for some time to come. :evil:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 13 May 2009 00:12


SSridhar
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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 13 May 2009 09:03

I have posted before about frequent interruptions in radar operations at Chennai airport, usually because the radar is old. It failed again yesterday, this time because of careless digging

It was a careless move made by the driver of an earthmover that disrupted radars and delayed several aircraft for close to 12 hours from 5.15pm on Monday. The radars were restored only around 5am on Tuesday.

The cables got damaged when an earthmover in the apron area snapped an underground optical fibre cable at two places. Blips went off air traffic controllers' screens and they were forced to switch to manual control procedures.

More than 200 flights suffered delays because the airport could handle just 16 flights per hour without radars.

"The first damage to a joint in the cable was rectified by midnight, while the second damage was repaired by early morning. It took a long time to locate the problem spots. Technicians had to brave snakes in the night to repair the fault," an official said.

The cables could be repaired only after borrowing a cable laying and slicing machine from BSNL. "AAI does not have such equipment because "we do not lay or re-lay cable often and such incidents are never supposed to happen," he added.

The Airports Authority of India (AAI) had provided a cable routing map to the contractors carrying out the works, but this was obviously not referred to.


If the contractor is made to pay a heavy penalty, he will learn, but because of the 'chalta hai' attitude of everyone nothing will happen.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Suppiah » 13 May 2009 18:19

I dont think the Air France issue was racial, it was one of PP. I doubt if they would have asked Indian origin passengers with EU/US/Singapore passport to sleep on the floor. The point is very simple - you need visa to enter the city and in some cases, even to be in transit (not sure if Paris is such a case). Airlines dont control visas, govt. does. So those having single entry visas or no EU visas etc., would have to get immigration clearance to leave airport. If they had proper EU visas, I am sure there would not have been issues because then it is a matter of $50 or whatever it is that costs to put them up in a cheap nearby hotel used for such purposes.

For instance Changi offers free day tours to transit passengers. This is of course only for those that do not need / have visas. If you are an indian in transit from, say, US, you can't use that facility. That is not racial profiling, it is, you may call it, national profiling. Or just visa rules.

The good thing about Europe, based on my visits is that they barely glance at your PP once there is some visa of European state. Once we were waved off even without officer touching the PP, just by showing the visa page! EU nationals of course, dont have to even open the page, just show the cover to be shunted off in a separate line where there is no checking.

Of course, this is also not a life or death matter, just a few hours. If they had plucked passengers out from sea and refused to bring them ashore because of wrong passport, that would have been different!

GOI would not let a Pakbarian in transit to enter the city simply because he got bumped off the flight. Had it been AI not a single parasite would have even been there to supply water.


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