Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby negi » 11 Jan 2009 01:32

Competition.. HUH what's that ? :twisted:

dekho dekho..

India has three of world's worst airports

BANGALORE: For all you busy air travellers
, here's information that explains your frustration at Indian airports. Forbes' list of the most
delayed arrival airports in the world for 2008, in association with FlightStats, tracks historical and real-time flight information. Of the top five airports, three are in India — Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport, Mumbai, at No. 1, Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi, at No. 2 and Bengaluru International Airport (BIA), Bangalore, at No. 4.

The percentage of on-time arrivals at Mumbai airport was 49.95%, at New Delhi was 50.89% and in Bangalore, it was 60.16%. The Mohammed V International Airport, Casablanca, Morocco, occupied the No. 3 slot with an on-time arrival performance of 53.83%.

The report states that at Mumbai's airport, 58% of late arrivals in 2008 were delayed by 30 minutes or more, and at New Delhi's airport, more than 60% of flights
were at least 30 minutes late. The good news is that no Indian airport figures in the top 10 delayed departure list. Haneda airport in Tokyo tops the list of combined on-time arrival and departure.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 13 Jan 2009 09:38

Indian flights score low on safety

India faces the threat of being downgraded by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for consistently not adhering to the safety standards of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO). The result of the downgrade will mean that airlines like Jet Airways and Air India, which operate to and from the US, will face stringent security checks when planes land there.

"The Director General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) is lobbying hard with the FAA to buy six months' time to fall in line with the ICAO norms and prevent India from being downgraded from Category 1 to Category 2," said a source, adding that the FAA team was in Delhi last week as part of its international aviation safety assessment programme.

Category 2 nations are those that violate ICAO norms. As a Category 2 nation, India will join the ranks of Serbia, the Ukraine, Indonesia, Guyana and the like. Pakistan and China are in Category 1.

Capt A Ranganathan, an air safety consultant, {I am posting another article of his below} said, "It's not surprising that the FAA wants to downgrade India. For the last four years, we have not been conforming to ICAO standards and the DGCA has not been functioning as a regulator. For instance, Indian carriers have done three wrong runway landings in the past one-and-a-half years. This could have been prevented had the DGCA carried out proper safety audits."

DGCA Nazim Zaidi, who took over recently from Kanu Gohain, was unavailable for comment despite several attempts to contact him.

In 2006, the ICAO itself had conducted a safety audit of India and found several violations. "India got two out of ten for technical personnel qualification and training, while the global average was four. In safety oversight functions, it got four out of ten while the global average was six," said a source.

Ranganathan said, "Falling below the global average means that India has not been carrying out safety audits at the required time and with the required frequency."

A safety audit confirms if the airline conforms to rules on cockpit crew flying hours, the validity of licences, proficiency checks, updated flight manuals and documents, periodic maintenance and aircraft schedules.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 13 Jan 2009 09:45

Better safe than sorry - Capt. Ranganathan

I frequently post Capt. Ranganathan's excellent articles on flight safety in India here. This is one more in the series.

Rome was burning but Nero was fiddling. While several lives were lost in bomb blasts at various locations in India, the Home Minister was busy changing his safari suits! Finally, as a postscript to 26/11, the Prime Minister and the new Home minister say “Sorry”. Will this mitigate the hurt and anger that prevails against the inaction and neglect? Is it better to be safe or sorry?

The late U.S. President John Fitzgerald Kennedy said: “There are risks and costs to a program of action, but they are far less than the long-range risks and costs of comfortable inaction”. Wise words for our government?

In aviation, accidents may be a product of human error, either due to an active or latent failure. Active failures are those due to pilot error while a latent failure is that which lies dormant due to a systemic failure but which rears its head at a later stage. This has been explained in detail by the British psychologist James Reason who introduced the concept of the “Swiss Cheese” model in safety. The hypothesis is based on four layers of cheese representing various actions. When the holes in the layers line up, the stage is set for an accident.

In a recent aviation accident data published by the Flight Safety Foundation, the accident data from 1995 to 2007 shows a total of 1332 reported accidents. Runway Excursions are events when aircrafts overrun at the runway end or veer off the side of runway. Runway Confusions happen because of the use of incorrect or “wrong runway” for landing or take off. There have been 379 (29.1/year – 28.5 per cent) cases of Runway Excursions and four (.3/year – 0.3 per cent) incidents of runway confusions reported. The data may not contain several more as many countries do not report all the cases to ICAO or safety organisations.

Serious warnings

After May 2007, we have had more than nine runway overruns and four cases of runway confusions in India. The numbers point to an alarming 30 per cent of overruns and a more alarming single year (four wrong runway landings) equivalent of a 12-year average (four) in runway confusion in worldwide statistics. These are serious warning pointers that have appeared and we continue to ignore them. Three holes are aligned and we wait for the fourth to synchronise! Two events in the recent past are perfect examples. A private airline’s flight landing on the wrong runway which was closed at Kolkata and the stressed Air Traffic Controller at Chennai telling an Air Force pilot to shut up. Will these come under the active or latent category?

Image
View from the cockpit: While runway 19R in Kolkata was cleared for landing, the pilot landed the aircraft on 19L;

On December 1, 2008, the private airline’s flight was cleared to land on Runway 19R (Right runway) at Kolkata, as maintenance work was taking place on the Left runway (19L). Men and material were on the closed runway. Yet, the American pilot landed on the closed runway and it was providence that it did not become a major disaster. The error of the pilot would place it in the category of “active failure”. On June 9, 2008, another of the same private airline’s flight with an American captain landed on Runway 10 at Delhi instead of Runway 09. Here again, runway 10 was closed and providence saved a disaster. On June 12 2007, another flight from the same private airline landed on Runway 09 when they were cleared to land on runway 10. Another “active” failure.

What is of concern is the “latent failure” of the system. The same airline has committed identical errors on three different occasions. On two recent occasions the runway confusion was by experienced American pilots. Can this be brushed off as a minor error or should serious concern be raised? The DGCA seems to have brushed this aside as just a minor aberration. It appears that they have not learnt from the SQ 006 accident on October 31, 2000. The Boeing 747-400 aircraft attempted to take off from the wrong runway in Taipei during a typhoon, destroying the aircraft and killing 83 of the 179 occupants. The airline and the authorities in Singapore have ensured the prevention of a recurrence by stringent training and adhering to safety standards. Indonesia, a country which matches or exceeds the corruption levels in India, shut down Adam Air after a series of accidents.

The three incidents in India have thrown up serious deficiencies: 1) Training and safety standards of the airline; 2) The failure of the monitoring and safety audit of the airline by the DGCA, and 3) The screening and quality of expatriate pilots employed by airlines in India.

India is a land of Information Technology and we boast of very high quality in technological advancement. In this context, it is appropriate to highlight what Bill Gates once said: “The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency”.

Latest in technology


The Boeing 737-800 aircrafts involved in the three runway confusion incidents in India over the last year have a very high level of technology. The instrument presentation is among the best and most modern. These have been evolved after the manufacturers have incorporated the most advanced “Glass cockpit” concept. The information presented on the PFD/ND ( Primary Flight Display and Navigation Display) is comprehensive and reduces the workload immensely. The ND incorporates the latest VSD (Vertical Situation Display) which very few aircrafts in India have. This feature facilitates the pilot to identify the exact runway, the vertical profile of the aircraft and the point on the runway where the aircraft is likely to touchdown. The aircraft, ideally, should be flown to the full extent of automation during a normal flight. The manufacturers recommend it to make flying safe. With all these features, if they made identical errors three times, they seem to conform to Bill Gates’ second rule.

The DGCA has failed to identify and monitor a potential disaster situation. If an airline with all the modern features in its aircrafts is involved in potentially dangerous situations repeatedly, warning bells should have sounded. The airline’s heads of training and safety departments have failed miserably and yet the DGCA safety audit (is there any?) has neither come down on the airline nor have they tightened the screening process on the quality of expatriate pilots who come into the country. Those pilots may be highly experienced but are they conversant with the use of the modern glass cockpit? Safety and lives of passengers seems to be secondary to the DGCA and people who control them. Are we going to wait for another apology as a postscript?

In the incident involving the ATC, it is passed off lightly as an error in manners due to fatigue and stress. The reason is a severe shortage of qualified manpower in the ATC. In October 2006, during the International Civil Aviation Organisation safety audit, they had pointed out this shortage and the DGCA had given a compliance note to the effect that this will be addressed immediately. Nothing worthwhile has been done. What is more serious is the attitude of the ministry and the DGCA towards fatigue. This can prove to be a killer when fatigued and stressed flight crew are involved.

In June 2008, an Air India flight 612 on the Dubai-Delhi-Jaipur-Mumbai sector, overshot Mumbai because the crew overslept. The accident report is yet to be released by the DGCA and the airline has been on the denial mode from the time this came to light. The crew did not respond to radio contacts for more than 45 minutes and they overshot Mumbai by more than 80 kilometres towards the sea. It was pure luck and providence for the passengers and the crew on board that nothing untoward happened. This was a classic case of fatigue overcoming the crew.

Danger of fatigue


In July 2007, the DGCA issued the regulations for flight and duty time limits for pilots. It was based on scientific studies done internationally and welcomed by all except the airline owners. The ministry did some arm twisting and got this regulation cancelled, reviving an outdated 1992 circular. The matter is still in court. What many are unaware of is that the extra long haul flights that Air India does between Delhi or Mumbai and New York is not covered by this circular. The DGCA has issued dispensations to Air India to circumvent this. The high profile lawyers appearing for the airline owners and the ministry submitted in the court that the old 1992 circular has worked without any serious accident all these years and a change is not required. Maybe, the court will be interested in knowing that the Federal Aviation Administration, based on the recommendations of the National Transportation Safety Board of the U.S., has recommended almost 48 hours of rest for American pilots operating similar flights. Contrast this with Air India pilots, who have been permitted to operate with a minimum rest of around 14-18 hours by the Indian DGCA!

Several accident studies have indicated that one of the reasons is a delayed response to a vital action. This can be due to fatigue, a lack of understanding of the system or due to a phenomenon called “micro sleep”. Two to 10 second micro sleep events have known to occur for all human beings and it can occur when one is wide awake! For pilots, when this occurs during the flare and landing roll phase of the flight in adverse weather, it can make the difference between a safe landing and a fatal crash.

Three major accidents in recent times have identified delayed actions by the crew as one of the causal factors. The August 2005 Air France A340 overrun at Toronto while landing in heavy rain. The aircraft was destroyed by the post-accident fire. All 309 on board had a miraculous escape. One of the causes is a 12.8-second delay in selecting the reverse thrust. In December 2006, a Southwest airlines flight overshot the Chicago Midway airport runway while landing in snow. The runway length was limited and the conditions were marginal. The investigation revealed a 12-second delay in selecting the thrust reverser as one of the causes. In July 2007, a TAM airlines A320 overshot the Sao Paulo runway in Brazil, while landing in rain, on a runway with suspected friction characteristics. Here again, a 11-second delay is identified as one of the causes.

Image
Those Critical seconds: The time factor in recent runway overuruns.

How do the international community address these accidents? In the case of the Toronto and Chicago accidents, the recommendation to augment operational procedures as well as regulatory oversight have already been put in place. As far as India is concerned, nothing has been done to learn from those reports and recommendations. The investigation report of the TAM accident was released recently. They have identified, besides the causes, that several of the agencies involved need to face criminal prosecution. Among them are the Civil Aviation authority head, the Airport authority head, the manufacturer of the aircraft and the airline, including the training department.
Need for action

Yet, we amble along in the misguided security that we have not had a major fatal accident during the last several years. What we need in India is proactive action and not reactive knee-jerk. And we need a strong judicial system where citizens can seek timely justice. The people who control the destiny of aviation in India, the Ministry of Civil Aviation and the departments it controls — The Directorate General of Civil Aviation and the Airports Authority of India — ought to sit up and take notice. Or else, when a major aviation disaster strikes, the government will just say “Sorry” as a postscript.

The author is an Airline Instructor Pilot on Boeing 737 with a flying experience of 20,000 hrs. He is also a Consultant for Wet Runway Operations Training and Accident Prevention.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Philip » 13 Jan 2009 13:39

Why the huge investment in air travel (needed) must also be made for rail travel,which is far more important as millions more travel by rail.If high speed (even a modest 25% increase in speed will go a long way) links are established between major cities in the country,then air travel will be reduced to manageable levels.For journeys of 300km-500km,superfast trains can do the job more effectively.When travelling in Europe,one prefers to use rail more than air tansport.When laeving B'lore,it takes an hour to get to the airport,another hour (minimum) to check in and wait and then another hour say to Madras,plus the same time to get into the city.A total of four hours at least.With superfats rtains,the time can be cut down to three hours easily.Here is how the Spanish are enjoying the train revolution.I've enjoyed Spanish trains-great service,but haven't travelled on the new Barcelona-Madrid trains as yet.,hopefully later this year.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/ja ... ain-trains

Spain's high-speed trains win over fed-up flyers
Giles Tremlett in Madrid
The Guardian, Tuesday 13 January 2009

Spain's sleek new high-speed trains have stolen hundreds of thousands of passengers from airlines over the last year, slashing carbon emissions and marking a radical change in the way Spaniards travel.

Passenger numbers on fuel-guzzling domestic flights fell 20% in the year to November as commuters and tourists swapped cramped airline seats for the space and convenience of the train, according to figures released yesterday.

High-speed rail travel - boosted by the opening of a line that slashed the journey time from Madrid to Barcelona to 2 hours 35 minutes in February - grew 28% over the same period. About 400,000 travellers shunned airports and opted for the 220mph AVE trains.

Last year's drop in air travel, which was also helped by new high-speed lines from Madrid to Valladolid, Segovia and Malaga, marks the beginning of what experts say is a revolution in Spanish travel habits.

In a country where big cities are often more than 500km (300 miles) apart, air travel has ruled supreme for more than 10 years. A year ago aircraft carried 72% of the 4.8 million long-distance passengers who travelled by air or rail. The figure is now down to 60%.

"The numbers will be equal within two years," said Josep Valls, a professor at the ESADE business school in Barcelona.

Two routes, from Barcelona to Malaga and Seville, opened last week. Lines are also being built to link Madrid with Valencia, Alicante, the Basque country and Galicia. The government has promised to lay 10,000km of high-speed track by 2020 to ensure that 90% of Spaniards live within 30 miles of a station. The prime minister, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, boasts it will be Europe's most extensive high-speed network.

The high-speed train network is also helping Spain control carbon emissions.Straight tracks and few stops mean AVE trains use 19% less energy than conventional trains. Alberto García, of the Spanish Railways Foundation, has calculated that a passenger on the Madrid-Barcelona line accounts for one-sixth of the carbon emissions of an aeroplane passenger.

High-speed rail tickets are often cheaper. The lowest one-way price on the 410-mile Barcelona-Madrid route this month is €44 (£40). Rail operator Renfe says 99% of trains on the route arrive on time.

That sort of efficiency was sorely missed at Madrid's Barajas airport at the weekend. Tens of thousands of passengers suffered delays of up to 30 hours because of snow, a work-to-rule by Iberia pilots and a lack of air traffic controllers.

Zapatero, who has put infrastructure projects at the heart of an anti-recession surge in public spending, plans to invest €108bn (£96bn) in the high-speed rail network until 2020.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 24 Jan 2009 05:06

Radars blanked out with 23 planes in air

Radars blanked out with 23 planes in air


Mamta Todi
First Published : 24 Jan 2009 12:36:00 AM IST
Last Updated : 24 Jan 2009 01:11:47 AM IST

CHENNAI: Wednesday morning was a nightmare for traffic controllers at the Chennai airport when the radar screens suddenly went blank with eight flights readying for landing and six waiting for departure clearance. But that was not the worst moment for the staff of the Air Traffic Control (ATC), who, on January 16, were staring at a blank screen when 23 planes were on air within 60 nautical miles and nine were to take off. Such radar failure is a routine affair in Chennai and ATC personnel talk of near mid-air collusions and how they have adapted themselves to rapidly switch over to ‘procedural control method’ in which they guide pilots instinctively, making quick mental calculations. Radar — ‘Radio Detection and Range’ — is an equipment that identifies the range, altitude, direction and speed of air-borne planes. ATC personnel look at screens showing the flight path of all aircraft in their range and guide pilots accordingly. In Chennai, Westing House makes radar, which come with a 10 year expiry period. It was installed in 1995. When the primary radar, also called the Approach Control Radar, failed at about 10 am, the peak time for domestic flights on January 16, a controller on duty told the technical team, “radar scope is flickering, intervention required.” But it was set right only after an hour and a half. On January 21, it failed thrice. “Though the radar stopped giving signals for only ten minutes on all occasions, it put us through the same ordeal where we have to resort to procedural control methods whereby controllers have to put flights on stand-by mode and keep checking their levels in the sky and accordingly guide them with mental calculations,” said an AAI source. One day in December, both the approach radar and area control radar failed when three flights were on a criss-cross path.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Purush » 24 Jan 2009 10:54

^^ WTF! This seems to be the perfect recipe for disaster. :evil:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 24 Jan 2009 17:21

It has become a regular feature at Chennai. I get a feeling that Chennai is not getting proper attention from Praful Patel.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 24 Jan 2009 18:29

the ATC and radars are universally run by AAI in India, even in pvt airports.

they better act fast and be on the ball because chennai is a key airport.

kolkata airport has a flaw that the taxiway doesnt link to the runway at the
extreme end. so suppose you hold at the on-ramp for someone to land. when
he lands and passes your on-ramp you need to turn left and go 1km on main
runway before turning 180' for takeoff.

there is actually a taxiway to extreme end but it looks semi-complete and not
paved properly...no idea whats the politics behind that.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby harbans » 26 Jan 2009 19:01

I also flew Air India a few times, it was not a bad experience really. IMO the worst airline is South African Airways. Pathetic service. The stewardesses actually put on a scowl. :mrgreen:

I posted the above a few months back (Sept)..a recent article why this is so?

OHANNESBURG. Regular passengers of South African Airways have reacted with relief to news that some flight crew have been arrested for allegedly smuggling 50kg of drugs into the United Kingdom. Passengers have complained for years about SAA hostesses being cold, distant, fidgety, and openly hostile, but say now they understand "it was just the tik talking".

British police who made the arrests have conceded that the haul might have gone undiscovered if a male attendant had brought it into the country.

"In our experience it's usually the ladies who get busted because they put the stuff in suspicious containers like hat-boxes," said a police spokesman.

"It's a bit of a giveaway when you see a big hat-box being carried by an emaciated 4-foot tall woman. I mean her neck would just snap like a twig if she wore any kind of hat heavier than a yarmulke."

He said that male flight attendants usually evaded detection because they generally preferred to put drugs in condoms and "stick them up their bottoms".

"Some of them are really good at it, and even seem to enjoy it," he said. "We've seen guys waltzing through here with 80kg of crack up their bottoms, singing tunes from 'Hello Dolly' and beaming from ear to ear."

Meanwhile SAA passengers say the arrests have lifted their spirits.

Worsie Roux has been flying with the carrier for years, and says he thought the airhostesses' surly and unhelpful attitude was a reflection on him.

"I thought maybe I was smelly or something," he said. "I would always apologise before I asked them for something, because they always give you such kak looks when you interrupt them having a conversation.

"But now I know they were just totally cooked on drugs. I fell a lot better."

Businessman Midas Mdala said he thought the female cabin crew treated him "like poo" because he black.

"It was weird because most of them were black too," he said.

"They were rude, abrasive, neglectful, and basically gave you the impression that you were filth."

However he said that now the piece of the puzzle had come together.

"They were just practicing being mafia wives," he said.

He said he still had the greatest respect for the carrier's male attendants, who continued to deliver high quality service, although he sometimes wished they would be "less thorough and professional".

"Sometimes it's hard to go to sleep on the Joburg-Heathrow trip because they insist on tucking you in and reading you a story, and then shaking you every ten minutes to make sure you haven't been a victim of cot death.

"It's very sweet, but perhaps they could just be slightly more neglectful from time to time."


http://www.hayibo.com/articles/view/959

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby krishnan » 26 Jan 2009 20:24

harbans wrote:
He said that male flight attendants usually evaded detection because they generally preferred to put drugs in condoms and "stick them up their bottoms".

:rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 27 Jan 2009 00:45

harbans wrote:I also flew Air India a few times, it was not a bad experience really. IMO the worst airline is South African Airways. Pathetic service. The stewardesses actually put on a scowl. :mrgreen:

I posted the above a few months back (Sept)..a recent article why this is so?

OHANNESBURG. they put the stuff in suspicious containers like hat-boxes," said a police spokesman.



He said that male flight attendants usually evaded detection because they generally preferred to put drugs in condoms and "stick them up their bottoms".

"Some of them are really good at it, and even seem to enjoy it," he said. "We've seen guys waltzing through here with 80kg of crack up their bottoms, singing tunes from 'Hello Dolly' and beaming from ear to ear."



harbans ji,

80 Kgs!!!!!?????

Man, that would take some singing! :) and waltzing! :rotfl:



And pray, what the **** were the british police doing?

If, as per the police spokesman, they had actually seen the crew going past the gates ,singing?

With all that crack neatly ensconed.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Anurag » 27 Jan 2009 06:28

LOL :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby krishnan » 27 Jan 2009 11:18

80 kg;s, oh man thats some record :shock: . These guys must be gays? :P

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Dileep » 27 Jan 2009 12:54

Now, now krishnan, that is arcial profiling!!* You should not associate the capabity to shove large about of stuff up someones bottom to their $exual preferences, should you? :twisted:

*Hereby claiming copyright for the term.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 27 Jan 2009 13:03

actually our customs catches people routinely who have swallowed
about a kilo of capsules with sealed drugs inside. must be special
capsules to survive the acidic env and pass out intact.

customs usually just provides them stale food to pass stool and
collect the drugs.

I somehow doubt one could stuff more than a kilo of stuff up the
mush. the lining is delicate and ruptures easily, plus any undue pressure on the prostate is very bad. all in all, a truly bad idea.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Dileep » 27 Jan 2009 13:09

How much of the actual bio waste could be stored there before one would run to the loo? So, all those stories of kilos of dope there are nonsense. Maybe a few hundred grams tops I guess.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby krishnan » 27 Jan 2009 13:13

Bio waste , only if you eat something

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 27 Jan 2009 13:17

krishnan wrote:80 kg;s, oh man thats some record :shock: . These guys must be gays? :P




krishnan ji,

Even if the guys were olympic standard gays, 80 Kgs is just not possible!

Such a load would double a normal person's body weight and truly the bottom would fall out of any such enterprise. :D

Must have been a typo :)

Now if it were some DDM media channel anchors like bur*** and turdes** its surely possible!

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 27 Jan 2009 13:20

Dileep wrote:How much of the actual bio waste could be stored there before one would run to the loo? So, all those stories of kilos of dope there are nonsense. Maybe a few hundred grams tops I guess.



Dileep ji

Maybe these guys start out with a low residue meal like the NASA astronauts. :D

Afterall they are also embarking on a "flight"!

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Nayak » 27 Jan 2009 16:54

Cops are trained to watch people walking funny. Also air-hostesses finger passengers who don't eat during long duration flights. Common tactic is for ayeshas to swallow condom filled drugs. Pregnant women are favored on the middle-east runs as they tend to pass up security very fast.

There was an incident where a Nigerian was caught with nearly 2 KG of pure cocaine in his stomach. Some digestive acid burst a couple of condoms and dude went into extreme shock and kicked the bucket.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby krishnan » 29 Jan 2009 11:39

http://in.news.yahoo.com/48/20090129/12 ... cos-t.html

State-run oil marketing companies have threatened to stop aviation fuel supply to Kingfisher Airlines from next Wednesday if the airline does not clear its outstanding of Rs 158 crore.

Sources said the oil industry had already started supplying aviation turbine fuel (ATF) to Kingfisher and Jet Airways on 'cash and carry basis' from January 27 as they had not paid their dues for October 22 to October 31 even though the 90-day credit was over.

Jet immediately responded and paid off Rs 97.87 crore today, the sources said. But there was no response from Kingfisher which owes Rs 73.08 crore to Hindustan Petroleum for the 10-day supplies and Rs 85 crore to Bharat Petroleum for old instalment.

Vijay Mallya's Kingfisher is the most troubled airline in India with the carrier chalking cumulative loss of Rs 2,500 crore in the first half of fiscal 200-09, largely due to sharp hike ATF prices.

The three major airlines, including National Aviation Company of India Ltd, owe Rs 3,735 crore to the OMCs as on January 27 for ATF supply but not all is immediately payable as the government extended the 60-day credit by another 30 days in October as reprieve to airlines on condition that they do not fire their employees.

On October 22, it was decided that the airlines could pay their cumulative outstanding of Rs 1,506 crore in six monthly instalments by March 31 and that the OMCs would revise ATF prices every fortnight instead of every month to pass on the benefit of falling ATF prices in the international market.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 01 Feb 2009 11:36


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 01 Feb 2009 14:27

seems the 62ft high Shiva statue in delhi has reduced the useable
length of the huge new runway for landings to less than the current main runway.

proposal is to extend runway on other side even more or shift the statue/

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby VinodTK » 02 Feb 2009 00:48


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Raja Bose » 06 Feb 2009 07:11

CISF men thrash airport manager
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cities/CISF_men_thrash_airport_manager/articleshow/4084241.cms

Zabardasti policing applied at the airport :(( Wonder what the truth is....high handedness of new official or excessive force on part of CISF. Usually CISF personnel at airports that I have seen are amongst the smartest turned out, well-trained and most polite of any airport security in the world and till now also pretty efficient.

"Barriers aren’t supposed to be violated and so some CISF personnel rushed towards him and held his hand for questioning", said Sanjay Prakash, senior commandant, CISF


See...they were holding his hand sympathetically for giving moral support onlee during questioning :mrgreen:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Singha » 06 Feb 2009 08:44

Another 2000cr of scarce govt funds (our money) is going to be wasted
with a capital infusion into Air India in March per TOI.

It is ridiculous that nobody even chooses to comment on such bailouts
buts goes all ballistic on issues like pubs where renuka choudhury is
urging youngsters to go enmasse to pubs to break the blocade :roll:

the loot and rape of public funds continues quietly.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby SaiK » 07 Feb 2009 06:14


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 08 Feb 2009 01:52

Lufthansa shuts 4 city offices

Lufthansa shuts 4 city offices
New Delhi, PTI:


German air carrier Lufthansa, on Saturday, sacked 17 employees and announced closure of its offices in four cities as part of restructuring of its sales network in India.

The offices were closed in Chennai, Bangalore, Calcutta and Hyderabad, a spokesman announced here. “Due to the re-structuring of four offices, 17 associates of Lufthansa sales organisation were offered a special severance package,” he said. Lufhansa Director (South Asia) Axel Hilgers said “We have offered a responsible solution for all affected associates including vacant positions in our India headquarter in Delhi.”

Lufthansa, which operates a total of 22 flights a week from these four metros, said it would continue to serve these cities through its direct sales team and travel agencies to take care of reservations, ticketing and travel inquiries.

“This reorganisation reflects the current economic environment in which Lufthansa India needs to realise cost efficient measures and at the same time improve the services to customers,” the spokesperson said.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby JaiS » 11 Feb 2009 05:16

Some excerpts from:

New details emerge in Mumbai runway incident

New details are emerging in the case of a near collision at Mumbai Airport on Monday. One of the Indian Air Force helicopters, part of the President's convoy, broke the formation and landed out of turn on the runway, just 300 metres from an Air India plane preparing to take off.

NDTV has transcripts of the conversation between pilots and the Air Traffic Control, which detail what happened in Runway 27. The transcripts show the following set of dialogue between Mumbai ATC and Pratap 1 helicopter.

Pratap 1 to Mumbai ATC at 9.10 am: Permission required for take off, VIP on board.

Mumbai ATC: Take off cleared. Proceed towards Trombay Hill and hold.

Pratap 1: Positive.

Pratap 1: Three miles. Permission for clearance to finals.

Mumbai ATC: Positive.

At 9.17 am: Air India plane slowly moved on runway.

Pilot S S Kohli to Mumbai ATC: Air India (followed by call sign) flight requests permission for take off.

Mumbai ATC: Proceed to Runway 27.

9:17 am - 9:19 am: Air India aircraft proceeds towards Runway 27.

With Pratap 1 three miles away, ATC notices Pratap 2 helicopter breaking formation and nearing landing. Pratap 1 is heard twice directing Pratap 2 helicopter not to break the formation. But by then, it is already just 1000 feet from the Air India aircraft.

Meanwhile, Air India plane moved on runway and Pratap 2 overtook Pratap1 and landed. The ATC tells the Air India plane to halt and vacate the runway. Pilot Kohli applies emergency brakes and swerves to the right to move out of way. The aircraft tyres are damaged in the incident.

At 9.19 am, Air India plane swerved to the right and smoke started emerging from the tyres. ATC told Air India aircraft to reject take off and immediately vacate runway.

A minute after Pratap 2 landed without permission, Pratap 1 made a landing.

At 9.20 am, Air India plane turned right and Pratap 2 and Pratap 1 landed after that.


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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 11 Feb 2009 13:20

Some thing does'nt add up here.. IMHO.


Pratap 1 to Mumbai ATC at 9.10 am: Permission required for take off, VIP on board.

So can we assume that Pratap 1 had the VIP on board and is asking permission to fly out of the air port?

Mumbai ATC: Take off cleared. Proceed towards Trombay Hill and hold.
Pratap 1: Positive.
Pratap 1: Three miles. Permission for clearance to finals.
Mumbai ATC: Positive.

Can this communication be taken as an indication to proceed to Trombay Hill, wait for further instructions. And then to proceed to the final destination of Pratap 1?

With Pratap 1 three miles away, ATC notices Pratap 2 helicopter breaking formation and nearing landing. Pratap 1 is heard twice directing Pratap 2 helicopter not to break the formation. But by then, it is already just 1000 feet from the Air India aircraft.

Was Pratap 2 still up in the air when Pratap 1 took off? Why was Pratap 2 trying to land, when it was part of a formation which had already began its journey?

Meanwhile, Air India plane moved on runway and Pratap 2 overtook Pratap1 and landed.

This looks like Pratap 1 and Pratap 2 were now trying to land. But a few messages above, Pratap 1 was requesting permission to take off?

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby sum » 11 Feb 2009 15:23

Raja Bose wrote:CISF men thrash airport manager
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cities/CISF_men_thrash_airport_manager/articleshow/4084241.cms

Zabardasti policing applied at the airport :(( Wonder what the truth is....high handedness of new official or excessive force on part of CISF. Usually CISF personnel at airports that I have seen are amongst the smartest turned out, well-trained and most polite of any airport security in the world and till now also pretty efficient.

See...they were holding his hand sympathetically for giving moral support onlee during questioning :mrgreen:

The CISF turn the victims here
Briton gets away with beating cops
DH News Service,Thiruvananthapuram:
Home minister Kodiyeri Balakrishnan is in the dock after a British national, who assaulted security personnel at the international airport here, was let off lightly allegedly at the instance of the ministers actor-son Binesh Kodiyeri.

Though the minister has denied his son was involved in any way with the incident, the CISF has officially complained to the DGP against the manner in which such a serious offence was dealt with by the state police.
The incident happened at the airport here in the wee hours of Saturday when Egypt-born British national Mohammed Al Jalal, 30, and Madathil Reghu, 49, who operates a chain of bar hotels in the UAE, arrived by an Emirates flight. Sources said both were drunk and were harassing women inside the flight. Trouble started at the emigration counter where they jumped the queue and picked up a quarrel with the fellow passengers. The duo paid scant regard even for the CISF personnel and beat up an inspector, Subratho Chatterjee, who intervened. The CISF handed them over to the police. However, the Valiathura police charged only a petty case against the two and let them off at the instance of the minister’s son Binish and his friends who arrived at the scene. The CISF has said that the police even fudged the first information report by not including the crucial points of the incident submitted by them. CISF in-charge Subratho Chatterjee said while he had complained that he was beaten up by the duo, the FIR said the two had created only unruly scenes. The Central Intelligence bureau officials have submitted a report to the home ministry along with the video grabs of the incident. The Congress and BJP have hit out at the minister and the police handling of the issue. “Where else in the world can a foreign national beat up the airport security personnel and get away on petty charges without being deported,” said BJP vice-president K Surendran.

A Briton thrashes our cops and walks away? :-?
These netas and their cronies should be mercilessly thrashed before being handed over to the police or whoever...

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 11 Feb 2009 16:02

sum wrote:Home minister Kodiyeri Balakrishnan is in the dock after a British national, who assaulted security personnel at the international airport here, was let off lightly allegedly at the instance of the ministers actor-son Binesh Kodiyeri.

Not at all connected with Civil Aviation, but this fellow Bineesh Kodiyeri - his name comes up in any major scandal in Kerala. First was in a sex-scandal involving underaged girls, and then it was in a money scam running into crores of rupees, plus other assorted charges for fighting and rioting etc. And his shameless father goes and defends him.

Sources said both were drunk and were harassing women inside the flight. Trouble started at the emigration counter where they jumped the queue and picked up a quarrel with the fellow passengers. The duo paid scant regard even for the CISF personnel and beat up an inspector, Subratho Chatterjee, who intervened. The CISF handed them over to the police.


CISF-ukaarum yaathra kaarum chernnu nannayi perumaari: Mathrubhumi
The local language paper "Mathrubhumi" did report the incident yesterday. The CISF and the fellow passengers gave them a sound thrashing (perumaral: Mallu word meaning treatment ;)).It seems even the harassed women passengers slippered them.

Any ways this incident does show the Air Port security in a very bad light, and CISF should try at the highest levels to force Kerala Police into action. A goonda from one district in Kerala, cannot just move around like this :(.

The routine stuff.. And enquiry ordered by even a bigger goonda (the minister)..

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby sum » 11 Feb 2009 18:07

The CISF and the fellow passengers gave them a sound thrashing (perumaral: Mallu word meaning treatment ;))

The travelers did a very good thing. One of the few occasions i support "mob justice"

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 11 Feb 2009 22:15

sum wrote:The travelers did a very good thing. One of the few occasions i support "mob justice"

Local medias report that the Egyptian-turned-Briton has surrendered before the jurisdictional police. The CISF has pushed this matter at the highest level and the local police had conducted some raids etc., during the course of yesterday night and today.

The Chief Minister has also ordered a detailed enquiry regarding the involvement of a minister's son in this whole show (Aside: he better do that because this minister's son's name crops up practically in every scandal in Kerala ;)).

My sincere hope is that CISF notes down the face of these ruffians and "deal" ;) with them when they try moving around India's airports.

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 11 Feb 2009 22:51

Sachin wrote:Some thing does'nt add up here.. IMHO.


Pratap 1 to Mumbai ATC at 9.10 am: Permission required for take off, VIP on board.

So can we assume that Pratap 1 had the VIP on board and is asking permission to fly out of the air port?

Mumbai ATC: Take off cleared. Proceed towards Trombay Hill and hold.
Pratap 1: Positive.
Pratap 1: Three miles. Permission for clearance to finals.
Mumbai ATC: Positive.

Can this communication be taken as an indication to proceed to Trombay Hill, wait for further instructions. And then to proceed to the final destination of Pratap 1?

With Pratap 1 three miles away, ATC notices Pratap 2 helicopter breaking formation and nearing landing. Pratap 1 is heard twice directing Pratap 2 helicopter not to break the formation. But by then, it is already just 1000 feet from the Air India aircraft.

Was Pratap 2 still up in the air when Pratap 1 took off? Why was Pratap 2 trying to land, when it was part of a formation which had already began its journey?

Meanwhile, Air India plane moved on runway and Pratap 2 overtook Pratap1 and landed.

This looks like Pratap 1 and Pratap 2 were now trying to land. But a few messages above, Pratap 1 was requesting permission to take off?




Sachin ji,

" Some thing does'nt add up here.. IMHO. "

Here is the math and how it adds up. :)

The confusion occurred because the Air Force and the Indian Airlines guys were on different frequencies. :(

Each was unable to monitor the transmissions of the other!

Effectively each did not know that the other was there and operating from the same runway!

Air Force choppers were operating on approach frequency and were being controlled by the approach guys at Bombay airport, Approach freq 127.9 MHz.

The Indian Airlines guys were on tower frequency and were being controlled by the tower guys at Bombay airport, Tower freq 118.1 MHz.

Maybe ATC has the explanation, because the tower and the approach guys seem to be katti and not talking to each other :)

bibi burqua's channel talking s**t as usual :D :D :D


Facility information: VABB
Name Frequency Callsign
Mumbai Center 132,7 VABF_CTR
Mumbai Approach 127,9 VABB_APP
Mumbai Departure 119,3 VABB_DEP
Mumbai Tower 118,1 VABB_TWR
Mumbai Ground 121,9 VABB_GND
Mumbai Clearance Delivery 121,85 VABB_DEL

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 12 Feb 2009 00:44

chetak wrote:The confusion occurred because the Air Force and the Indian Airlines guys were on different frequencies.

I can understand that part. And thanks for providing the frequencies etc :). Is it open source information?

The confusion mainly was on two points...
Step 1:
Pratap 1 to Mumbai ATC at 9.10 am: Permission required for take off, VIP on board.

So this is on the "Approach Frequency" but Pratap 1 is planning to take off. And yes since AI is not on the same frequency this communication is missed by them.

Step 2:
But then the same news channel report mentions this...
Meanwhile, Air India plane moved on runway and Pratap 2 overtook Pratap1 and landed.

This gives an impression that Pratap 1 was about to land, instead of that Pratap 2 landed - all the while IA plane was on the process of moving into the run-way for take off.

From the classic wireless intercept I could not understand whether Pratap 1 and Pratap 2 were trying to land or take off. The following part adds more to the confusion.
With Pratap 1 three miles away, ATC notices Pratap 2 helicopter breaking formation and nearing landing. Pratap 1 is heard twice directing Pratap 2 helicopter not to break the formation. But by then, it is already just 1000 feet from the Air India aircraft.

Now what is this part? Pratap 2 is breaking formation and attempting to land? And Pratap 1 is asking him not to land. Again it becomes a question of take off or landing :).

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby Sachin » 12 Feb 2009 01:22

BTW, The Hindu seems to have a much better report (without any sensationalising or hollering)...
The Hindu : Front Page : Sources say copters did not get clearance ...

As per this report.. the Helicopters were to be landing at the Air Port. Guess, we have to now rely on good news paper reports rather than these umpteen TV channels. :roll:

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby chetak » 12 Feb 2009 01:26

Sachin wrote:
chetak wrote:The confusion occurred because the Air Force and the Air India guys were on different frequencies.

I can understand that part. And thanks for providing the frequencies etc :). Is it open source information?

The confusion mainly was on two points...
Step 1:
Pratap 1 to Mumbai ATC at 9.10 am: Permission required for take off, VIP on board.

So this is on the "Approach Frequency" but Pratap 1 is planning to take off. And yes since AI is not on the same frequency this communication is missed by them.

Step 2:
But then the same news channel report mentions this...
Meanwhile, Air India plane moved on runway and Pratap 2 overtook Pratap1 and landed.

This gives an impression that Pratap 1 was about to land, instead of that Pratap 2 landed - all the while IA plane was on the process of moving into the run-way for take off.

From the classic wireless intercept I could not understand whether Pratap 1 and Pratap 2 were trying to land or take off. The following part adds more to the confusion.
With Pratap 1 three miles away, ATC notices Pratap 2 helicopter breaking formation and nearing landing. Pratap 1 is heard twice directing Pratap 2 helicopter not to break the formation. But by then, it is already just 1000 feet from the Air India aircraft.

Now what is this part? Pratap 2 is breaking formation and attempting to land? And Pratap 1 is asking him not to land. Again it becomes a question of take off or landing :).



Sachin ji,

All frequencies posted are commercial in nature since VABB is an international commercial airport. :)

When a VIP movement is in progress, no other traffic, repeat no other traffic is permitted. In this instance it was the Head of State.
So tower clearing the Air India guys is a major mistake.

From press reports

Pratap 2, the second chopper, with the senior and ranking pilot, was carrying the VIP.

Pratap 1, the first chopper, was carrying the security detail who ordinarily would / should have landed first to secure the area.

In asking Pratap 2 not to land first, the pilot of Pratap 1, I am sure, was only conveying the protocol and instructions of the anxious security chief.

This exchange between Pratap 1 & 2 was independent of the ATC and though monitored by the ATC, it concerned only the Air Force. They already had landing clearance from ATC, as a formation of three choppers carrying the President. For security reasons the ATC also would not have known which chopper was carrying the VIP.

Pratap 2 must have possibly had over riding reasons to land first, disregarding requests from Pratap 1, which he was unwilling to transmit over an open frequency. :|

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Re: Civil Aviation Development & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 13 Feb 2009 02:45



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