Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

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Supratik
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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Supratik » 15 Apr 2018 16:42

Both the men and women relay teams are about 10 sec short of world std. In sprint that is like diff between Mum and Del. Unless you have men who run 400 m sub-50 and women close to 50 you will not get there. Right now we don't have such athletes.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby VenkataS » 15 Apr 2018 18:27

26 Gold, 20 Silver, 20 Bronze
Not a bad performance by India.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby VenkataS » 15 Apr 2018 18:32

BTW - Why aren't we hosting Asian games anymore. The last time we hosted AGs was in 1982. They have already been allocated until 2026. That is a long time without hosting games that should be within our reach.
In the meantime between 1982 and 2026, South Korea and China would have been hosts three times and Japan twice. What are our priorities here?

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Supratik » 15 Apr 2018 19:07

We should host the AG.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suraj » 15 Apr 2018 21:41

I see no VFM in hosting games . We hosted CWG 2010. It was an expensive effort . The money would have been better spent on actual sports development . These games already demonstrated we don’t need home field advantage to do extremely well.

If building sports culture is so important, then focus on the national games . Make that something where at least some sports are at world standard (eg shooting) with potential WR performances .

Overall our performance here was way more than expectations but still left a trace of regret . Those 26 golds could have been up to 29 had we not finished with 3 silvers in three finals on the last day, all of which we had a real chance of winning .

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Supratik » 15 Apr 2018 22:01

True but organizing games fires up our sports babus to do something about sports in India. It is like poking the bull from his slumber. They will put in more effort than they normally do. While we try to create a sports ecosystem in India, which is more important, holding the AG will bring out extra effort. So not a bad idea.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suraj » 15 Apr 2018 22:19

Organizing an international multisport games involves very little long term focused investment into the overall sports ecosystem. A lot of money does get spend, but on trying to boost immediate medal tally and therefore focuses on short term gains. The analogy is to a quarterly result performance focus rather than long term company gain. Delhi 2010 didn't yield gains at Glasgow 2014. But having someone like Rathore in charge did at GC2018.

Looking at things in terms of just performance, just these CWG results are outstanding. We're not the host. We're not even in the middle of sports season. And we finished #3 by a long distance. In the 2000s, we finished 4th multiple times, in a neck and neck race with Canada. This time we were about 10 golds ahead, and within 10 golds of Eng's non-para total.

What I'm trying to say is, we're doing fine as it is. There's a noticeable improvement in attitudes of the contingent, and we are feared as major competitors in every sport we won in at GC2018. Even in sports where we didn't come close to medaling, we beat several national records. Sajan Prakash in swimming, Muhd Anas in 400m, Jinson Johnson in 1500m.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Ankit Desai » 16 Apr 2018 04:23

Commonwealth games are over. Asian games and Tokyo 2020 qualifications are next.

Shooting Olympic Quota process.

Next Shooting qualification starts from August 31st ISSF World Championship 2018 in Changwon, KOR.

-Ankit

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby SBajwa » 16 Apr 2018 06:16

Thanks Ankit!

Sports is a huge industry and is itself an economy booster (just like tourism and other). People want to entertain by something else beyond Bollywood. Here in USA NFL (american football) tickets (for many teams) have been sold out for next 10+ years. Ice hockey tickets are $50.00 per person. A cup of french fries is $5 in a game., a bottle of beer is $7. People are paying it! and funny thing is that these sportsmen/women are not part of any Olympics, American or CM games. They want to earn money by being professional and Olympics, Asian, etc is just for fun. Michael phelps makes more money via endorsements than his Olympics etc wins. 2-3 indian village guys were selected right from Indian villages to play in Baseball as they won a competition all over india of throwing fastest ball.

People need to be convinced that Sports is Good!! Because of the Islamic influence we have neglected our women and sports! This must be overcome!

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby VenkataS » 16 Apr 2018 07:27

Suraj - Organizing CWG, AG, OGs or World Championships will boost the local economy of the city/state that it is held in. We do need international level sports infrastructure in every major city in the country. Big sporting events will boost public interest in sports and encourage further investment in sports infrastructure, academies, Olympic Gold Quests etc. Another advantage of hosting these events is that we can push for/lobby for making our strongest sports as core sports (and we should definitely boost the medal count of these sports when we host them)

I think we should aim to have one big event every 4 years (our economy should be big enough to support this level of activity in the near future); AG, CWG, OGs, and World Championships (in our core sports). This way we will have something to aim for every 4 years. In addition we should have a long term 20 year sports plan as well.

Since 2026 CWG bid is still in contention we should plan for the following (and World championships in our major sports every few years in between)
2026 CWG
2030 AG
2032/2036 OG (By 2032 our economy will be most likely in $10-15 trillion range)

We should have these in different cities as well not just in Delhi.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suraj » 16 Apr 2018 09:08

VenkataS wrote:Suraj - Organizing CWG, AG, OGs or World Championships will boost the local economy of the city/state that it is held in.

Like the spectacular boost that Athens, Sochi, Rio etc got ? :-) Big multi-sport events are boondoggles.

Sorry, I disagree with you completely. I'm not even interested in seeing us participate in CWG2022, much less host the one after it...

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Kashi » 16 Apr 2018 09:42

Suraj wrote:
VenkataS wrote:Suraj - Organizing CWG, AG, OGs or World Championships will boost the local economy of the city/state that it is held in.

Like the spectacular boost that Athens, Sochi, Rio etc got ? :-) Big multi-sport events are boondoggles.

Sorry, I disagree with you completely. I'm not even interested in seeing us participate in CWG2022, much less host the one after it...


1982 Asian games were very good for Delhi in terms of new infrastructure. CWG2010 could have had far reaching impact, but for Kalmadi and Sheela Dikshit. Still a lot of the existing sporting infrastructure in Delhi- JLN stadium, IG and JLN sports complexes, RK Khanna Stadium, Tal Katora, National Stadium etc. received a major overhaul. Dhyan Chand Stadium ended up hosting the Hockey world cup in the same year as well.

In the Indian context where we are looking to upgrade and improve our cities, AGs, CWGs can help and also upgrade the sporting infra in the host cities.

Of course if they end up too many new facilities that are not used, they would indeed be boondoggles.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Vasu » 16 Apr 2018 11:57

Here's a interesting read relevant to this discussion.

Why (almost) no one wants to host the Olympics anymore

Pyeongchang, South Korea, built a brand new Olympic stadium to host the Winter Games this year. The 35,000-seat stadium cost $109 million to build. And it will be used just four times before it’s demolished.

The cost of the stadium will come out to an astonishing $10 million per hour of use.

The spectacular impracticality of Pyeongchang’s Olympic stadium isn’t an outlier among Olympics venues — it’s actually rather typical. And it’s a powerful symbol of why fewer and fewer cities around the world want to host the Olympics.

Rising costs, horror stories of unexpected debt, and the increasing burden of “white elephants” — facilities that are expensive but useless after the games — have made cities more and more wary of hosting the Olympics in recent years.

The drop-off is striking. The 2004 Games garnered bids from 12 cities around the world. For the 2020 Games, the pool shrank to five bidders. Then the 2022 Winter Olympics and 2024 Summer Olympics managed to get only two bidders each.

In fact, for the 2024 Games, the International Olympic Committee decided to do something unprecedented: Instead of choosing between the only two bidders, Paris and Los Angeles, it decided to award Paris the 2024 Summer Olympics and give Los Angeles the 2028 Summer Olympics. Experts say the IOC decided to give them out at the same time for a simple reason — it was afraid no city would want to host the tournament by the time the 2028 bidding started.

Since 1960, no Olympic Games have come in under budget. In fact, nearly half of them end up costing more than twice as much as expected.

Additionally, cities tend to find that most of the stadiums, fields, courts, and other facilities that they built for the games are simply useless after the Olympics are over. Their enormous size makes them difficult for athletes to use and for fans to fill up.

And when cities attempt to retrofit Olympics facilities to make them useful for other sports, it can become very expensive very quickly. According to Matheson, London’s attempt to convert its Olympic stadium for a local soccer team after it hosted the games in 2012 ended up costing as much as the stadium itself.

Andrew Zimbalist, a sports economist at Smith College, has pointed out that there’s little evidence that cities see a substantial tourism bump beyond the games themselves. Barcelona saw a lasting tourism legacy after hosting in 1992, but most analysts say its experience was exceptional because the Spanish city was a “hidden gem” with vast cultural offerings that weren’t as well-known around the world prior to the games. The reality is that most cities can’t simply become great tourism hubs just by virtue of hosting the Olympics.

Back in 2000, the Summer Olympics in Sydney cost just around $5 billion. The cost of Olympic Games can vary based on a lot of variables, but the broad trend is clear: It’s becoming a lot more expensive.

Allen Sanderson, a sports economist at the University of Chicago, says a lot of the modern uptick in costs can be traced to something that has nothing to do with building stadiums or even sports at all: It’s tied to fear of terrorism.

After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the cost of security at the Olympics skyrocketed. The first Summer Olympics held after the attacks were the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece. Those games cost more than $15 billion, and a big part of that was because the city spent tons of money trying to protect the games from a potential terrorist attack.

Sanderson says that post-9/11 security “adds between $2 and 5 billion to the price tag to start with.”

For decades, cities’ Olympic bids have been about more than just building sports facilities. Cities also tend to use their bids as an opportunity to invest in and upgrade infrastructure for transit in the city (roads, public transportation) and tourism (hotels, parks). And China and Russia both used the Olympics to invest massively in their cities. They did it to improve the cities themselves and to impress the world — but also because they could.

Analysts say that Beijing and Sochi’s runaway spending has had a lasting effect. It created a new benchmark for how grand and expensive hosting can be and ramped up the pressure on other cities to come up with flashier and costlier proposals in order to get the IOC’s attention in their bid. Those big proposals have made many cities think their bids have to be more expensive than ever to have a chance of winning.

Scholars of the Olympics say the IOC knows it has some serious thinking to do about how to make hosting the Olympics more sustainable. One idea is to have the Olympics rotate among a handful of host cities that have proven they can handle hosting without spending too much money and that will be able to reuse their Olympics facilities every 16 to 20 years. Another idea is to change the bidding process to actually create incentives for cities to come up with more modest and sustainable budgets rather than flashy ones.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suraj » 16 Apr 2018 12:31

Kashi wrote:1982 Asian games were very good for Delhi in terms of new infrastructure. CWG2010 could have had far reaching impact, but for Kalmadi and Sheela Dikshit. Still a lot of the existing sporting infrastructure in Delhi- JLN stadium, IG and JLN sports complexes, RK Khanna Stadium, Tal Katora, National Stadium etc. received a major overhaul. Dhyan Chand Stadium ended up hosting the Hockey world cup in the same year as well.

In the Indian context where we are looking to upgrade and improve our cities, AGs, CWGs can help and also upgrade the sporting infra in the host cities.

Of course if they end up too many new facilities that are not used, they would indeed be boondoggles.

A long of generic considerations are being wrapped up into the role of a sporting event. Effectively, the argument is that a large sporting event serves to develop a city's infrastructure, right ? Consequently, it follows that almost all of the monetary spending goes into stuff other than sports. The $4 billion supposed cost of CWG2010 largely deals with urban infrastructure development. How much of that total sum went into *sports* ?

I doubt Dhyan Chand stadium cost even $100 million. It didn't prevent us from failing to win a medal in either mens or women's events in hockey this time. Which of the sports in which we won 26 golds benefits from what we spend money on during a major multi sport conference ? Badminton ? Nope - Gopichand Academy is built with money he received from investors. TT ? No idea where they train. Wrestling ? Mostly small town Haryana. Weightlifting ? NIS Patiala and elsewhere. Shooting ?

My point is, infrastructure in a city at best services to enable its case to hold another event, which in turn again gives it the ability to do so. It doesn't necessarily have a lot to do with the sporting ecosystem. It helps that city be a venue of major competitions. It need not be a multisport event. The Kalinga Stadium in Bhubaneswar is a major world hockey venue.

Large sporting events, in themselves, are wasteful spending for a country trying to focus the sporting investment directly into athletes themselves. The argument for them ends up conflating various related and unrelated concerns, like general urban development, to the point that the athletes themselves are not the consideration anymore.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby arshyam » 16 Apr 2018 14:36

Singha wrote:three legged cheetah race
Was that intentional saar? :rotfl:

Sorry, couldn't resist :)

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby arshyam » 16 Apr 2018 15:30

SBajwa wrote:Thanks Ankit!

Sports is a huge industry and is itself an economy booster (just like tourism and other). People want to entertain by something else beyond Bollywood. Here in USA NFL (american football) tickets (for many teams) have been sold out for next 10+ years. Ice hockey tickets are $50.00 per person. A cup of french fries is $5 in a game., a bottle of beer is $7. People are paying it! and funny thing is that these sportsmen/women are not part of any Olympics, American or CM games. They want to earn money by being professional and Olympics, Asian, etc is just for fun. Michael phelps makes more money via endorsements than his Olympics etc wins. 2-3 indian village guys were selected right from Indian villages to play in Baseball as they won a competition all over india of throwing fastest ball.

People need to be convinced that Sports is Good!! Because of the Islamic influence we have neglected our women and sports! This must be overcome!

Saar, I am sure you have heard of IPL? Being in amreeka and all, it is perhaps hard to see a world exists outside :).

IPL changed the way India was regarded in the cricketing world - it is now the #1 sporting tournament in the global cricket fraternity, and by a very long distance. There are other T20 tournaments worldwide, but nothing comes close to IPL for the visibility and the money it offers. NFL can go take a hike, for all I care.

To counter the usual argument that India has to look beyond cricket, IPL was followed by other tournaments soon after: ISL (football, or soccer, if you prefer), HIL (hockey), PBL (Badminton), PKL (Kabaddi), etc. The last one especially became wildly popular, with almost 86.4 million people tuning into the first season's final match. PKL's viewership for the entire 1st season was 435 million, per the article, and has only grown since.

Thanks to these leagues and better coverage on TV, there is a growing awareness of such sports, which is reflected in better performance at global events. Sure, we are not there yet, but certainly are going in the right direction. Cricket itself is still growing, believe it or not. A bunch of state cricket associations now host their own T20 "premier league" events, building on top of the IPL team based in the state. I am sure the other sports will soon follow.

In summary, yes, people in desh do know that sports is good for the economy. I am sure you know all of the above, but this repeated focus on what khanate does with "milk and honey" (to borrow Singha saar's phrase) becomes jarring after a point.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby SBajwa » 17 Apr 2018 02:24

Arshyam sir!

OK!! My posts were not meant to be offensive. Just some information that I wanted to share!

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby SBajwa » 18 Apr 2018 00:06

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/sport/ ... 75282.html

Rohit Mahajan

Tribune News Service

Gold Coast, April 16
Neeraj Chopra, a junior commissioned officer in the Army, is only 20 but is already the greatest javelin-thrower in the history of Indian athletics. After becoming only the third Indian man ever to win an athletics gold in CWG (after Milkha Singh and Vikas Gowda), Chopra has raised hopes that he could become a medallist in a global event such as the World Championships or the Olympics. The Tribune spoke with Chopra after his feat. Excerpts:

How do you look back at your gold-winning performance?

I’d like to thank people from my state Haryana, and from all over the country. I had blessings from all over India. People wanted me to do well. This is the reason I was able to win gold for India. I want to thank them all.

Uwe Hown is the new India coach for javelin throw. You’d been training in Germany before you joined him in March. What have you been learning from him?

I’ve been improving steadily. For three months, I’d been in Germany, to train there. Working with Werner Daniels in Germany was also very helpful, and I’ve been training and learning from Uwe Hown also. I worked with the coach in Patiala too. I’ve learnt a lot from these coaches in the last six months.

After throwing, you often stumble and nearly fall down, which rarely used to happen with Indian throwers.

It happens automatically, I don’t do it deliberately. When one makes a greater effort, one runs very fast, then it happens.

Hown has spoken about technique, about the need to work on your technique.

Yes, there are things that need to be ironed out. Small faults in the technique, which I’ve been working on with my coach.

What are the things you’re focussing on?

There are small things like timing and point of release of the javelin that we’ve been working on, along with other minor things.

You came close to your personal best, were you targeting it?

Yes, I was trying for a new personal best, but failed by only 1cm. This is only the start of the season, and I’m going to work on my technique so that I could improve further.

You’ve been quite popular here, as you walked around the stadium, people were cheering madly for you even though you beat an Australian to gold.

Yes, but back home also there have been events in which there were lots of people. In Bhubaneswar (Asian Championships in 2017, where he won gold with 85.23m) also there were huge crowds in the stadium, and I had a big boost from them. Here also there was good support and it helped me a lot.

Physically, you’re not a huge or very bulky man, unlike Hown, who’s a giant.

Jan Zelezny, who is the current world record holder, also was not heavy and I’m also not very big and heavy. I weigh 86-87kg, and am a little under 6ft tall. His technique was very strong.

Your home state Haryana excels in sport. What’s the reason?

Yes, Haryana’s players get jobs, and that’s the reason sportspersons from Haryana are doing so well. But I would say that everywhere sportspersons should be supported because they reach a high level after a lot hard work.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby SBajwa » 18 Apr 2018 00:09

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/sport/ ... 75363.html

India should boycott 2022 CWG, says NRAI chief Raninder Singh

National Rifle Association of India (NRAI) president Raninder Singh on Tuesday said the country must boycott the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham if shooting sport is not reinstated.

Raninder said he will soon write to the Sports Ministry and Indian Olympic Association (IOA) in this regard.

Speaking at a function to felicitate the Indian shooters here, the NRAI chief said, “Within a day or two, I am going to write to the Union Sports Minister Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore, the Indian Olympic Association (IOA) and will urge them to boycott the 2022 CWG if shooting is not re-included in the games.

The Indian shooting squad bagged as many as 16 medals, seven of them gold, in the discipline at the just concluded Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast.

“We will strongly appeal to the Sports Ministry and Indian Olympic Association to withdraw Indian team from the 2022 edition of the CWG,” he added.

The CGF has decided to exclude shooting from the 2022 Games, citing logistical issues.

In a letter to the 2022 Games organisers earlier this year, CGF CEO David Grevemberg had said, “Shooting will not feature at the 2022 CWG and the CGF has awarded the Games supporting these plans.”

Grevemberg though made it clear that the sport was not being scrapped, insisting that it remained in the optional category, which a host city can pick in a particular CWG.

Rathore had written to the CGF, urging their intervention so that the discipline remains a part of the 2022 edition of the quadrennial Games.

The NRAI chief, though, still preferred to be hopeful of shooting being re-included in the Games.

In January this year, the CGF had backed the local organising committee’s decision to not include shooting at the Birmingham Games.

Raninder also said that the NRAI was in constant touch with the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF), the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) as well as with the Birmingham Games organising committee to work out ways in which the sport can still be included.

Shooting, though an optional sport at the CWG, has been played in every edition since Kingston 1966, except once in Edinburgh in 1970.

After a great show in Australia, top shooters will skip the (rifle/pistol) World Cup in Fort Benning, USA, from May 7-15 to focus on the Asian Games and World Championships in Changwon, Korea.

It is the first qualifying event for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games with plenty of quota places on offer.

India will also not participate in the ISSF World Cup for shotgun in Tucson, USA. — PTI

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suraj » 18 Apr 2018 00:34

Good to see that senior babus are also in favor of skipping CWG 2022. I hope we do so.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby disha » 18 Apr 2018 01:41

Suraj wrote:Good to see that senior babus are also in favor of skipping CWG 2022. I hope we do so.


We should send only lawn bowl team. All the participants must be >62 years.

And we should host our own commonwealth games in parallel. Call it Ganrajya games and split the commonwealth club. It is about time.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Vips » 18 Apr 2018 08:52

UGRA:Why Gold Coast is India's best CWG ever

Want to know what was special about Gold Coast? It was India's best Commonwealth Games, and there are a few good reasons why.

Of India's 66 medals, there are as many as 26 golds. More than their silvers, more than their bronzes. It is not a proportion that Indians are used to in the multi-discipline games that matter. Nor is India's third-place finish on the CWG medals table the first time they have ever finished that high outside the 2010 Delhi Games. Let's not get ahead of ourselves and dream of world domination, though, as the Asian Games up in August will be a far tougher event.

But if we number crunch, then these 26 golds fit in at No.3 in India's overall CWG count: there's the heady 39 from Delhi 2010 and 30 from Manchester 2002. So, was Gold Coast India's third-best CWG ever?

Actually, it was arguably its best. Take a closer look into Manchester's 30 and Delhi's 39. Manchester's 30 came from five sports: boxing, hockey, shooting, weightlifting and wrestling. Delhi's golds had a wider spread of nine: archery, athletics, badminton, boxing, shooting, table tennis, tennis, weightlifting and wrestling. Gold Coast 2018 covered seven: athletics, badminton, boxing, shooting, table tennis, weightlifting, wrestling.

Look closer at the 30 golds from Manchester. There were 14 from shooting and 11 in weightlifting, in a manner that medals are no longer awarded in international competition. Weightlifting has trimmed the number of medals it handed out in Manchester: nine in every weight category - snatch/ clean & jerk/ overall.

Shooting doesn't hold the pairs events any more. Of India's 14 shooting golds in Manchester, they won eight in the pairs and six in individual. Of the 11 weightlifting golds in the same game, India won four overall medals, and seven in the other smaller categories - either for snatch or clean & jerk. Every gold medallist from Manchester earned their medals fair and square and deserved every accolade and reward that followed. Had Gold Coast followed Manchester's medal distribution pattern, India's tally would have easily zoomed beyond 2002's 30 golds.

Yet, how does the Gold Coast count go beyond Delhi? Simple. Because India's performances came without home advantage or the inclusion of sports that suited them. Like archery, tennis and Greco-roman wrestling in Delhi 2010, Gold Coast 2018 picked beach volleyball, diving and mountain biking.

The Gold Coast Games has served notice that our athletes are pushing, striving and moving forward. The 20 silvers tell us how close they came. Personal bests in tough track and field events are signs of what abilities lie among them.

In the names and faces of shooters Manu Bhaker and Anish Bhanwala, table tennis players Manika Batra and G Sathiyan, athletes Neeraj Chopra and Hima Das, weightlifter Mirabai Chanu, wrestler Bajrang Punia and boxer Gaurav Solanki, lie the heart and soul of India's athletic aspiration for the Games cycle of the upcoming Asian Games in Jakarta and the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

India's best ever Commonwealth Games has the power to become the launch pad to what they must be dreaming are the larger achievements ahead of them.

At a time like this, on a day like today, for Indian sport, it should be seat belts on, everyone.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Supratik » 18 Apr 2018 18:13

We should boycott CWG 2022 if shooting is not in play. They have already cut down on sports we are good at.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suresh S » 18 Apr 2018 19:04

no offense to you Bajwa boss. But I am with Arshyam on this one. Even though i am in the so called land of milk and honey (not by choice if I may add). India will do fine in sports too in the future. I do not want to sound like a conspiracy theorist but it is my belief, part of the reason westerners or in the past soviets dominated was not entirely due to sporting prowess but cheating. If you guys remember in 1972 East Germany was second in the Olympics very close to Soviet union in medals tally but as was proven later on it was mostly doping.

Every sporting organisation is under the thumb of these westerners and is corrupt to the core.Few examples , to ban Russian team for para olympics on fake doping charges. Serena Williams and Olympic multi gold medal winner recently Simon Biles both took banned substances including steroids and other drugs multiple times over the years for "medical reasons". No Ban. Because if they ban these ladies, US knows the consequences domestically. This is what is known and recorded,Now you can guess what does not appear in any official records and not recorded for obvious reasons.

From what I have seen of western behaviour in every organisation sporting or otherwise I absolutely doubt the impartiality of any western judges or any judge under their influence for whatever reason in any sporting event.This is as fake as east german victories in 1972.Of course I can not prove everthing like Fancy Bears but you can make your own judgement.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby jaysimha » 19 Apr 2018 14:37

for all the politicos and babus we have "download Image of higher resolution"
http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease.aspx?relid=178765
but not for these.
hardly you can see faces..

Press Information Bureau
Government of India
Ministry of Defence
18-April-2018 18:29 IST
Contribution of Army Sportspersons in 21st Commonwealth Games 2018

Army athletes were part of the Indian contingent which has brought laurels for the nation, during the recently concluded Commonwealth Games. Army personnel got a haul of three Gold, three Silver and four Bronze Medals although they were expected to do better. Army will continue to monitor the performance of all athletes and will prepare them for the forthcoming Olympics, expecting better performance from them all.

The achievers: Subedar Jitu Rai (SM) - Gold Medal (Shooting),
Havildar Om Prakash Mitharval - Two Bronze Medals (Shooting),
Subedar Satish Kumar - Silver Medal (Boxing),
Naib Subedar Amit Kumar - Silver Medal (Boxing),
Naib Subedar Mohd Hassumuddin - Bronze Medal (Boxing),
Naib Subedar Manish Kaushik - Silver Medal (Boxing),
Havildar Gaurav Solanki - Gold Medal (Boxing),
Naib Subedar Neeraj Chopra - Gold Medal (Javelin) and
Naib Subedar Deepak Lather - Bronze Medal (Weightlifting), have done the nation proud.

The Chief of Army Staff acknowledged their performance and felicitated the medal winners on 18 Apr 2018. He further encouraged and motivated the athletes to continue their sustained and focused efforts as they train and prepare for the forthcoming International events, before they launch themselves into the Olympics arena.

Col Aman Anand

PRO (Army)


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Manish_P
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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Manish_P » 20 Apr 2018 14:48

Suresh S wrote:I do not want to sound like a conspiracy theorist but it is my belief, part of the reason westerners or in the past soviets dominated was not entirely due to sporting prowess but cheating.


+ 1. Their cheating/doping systems are very advanced and one step ahead of the detection agencies, many of whom anyway belong to or are dominated by the same group of nations.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby SBajwa » 20 Apr 2018 18:56

For athletics I would select people from Himalayas who live above 15,000 feet. They have an advantage over others and we have the highest mountains in world. Actually in all physically demanding sports training centers should be build above 15000 feet. for example places like these

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikkim,_Himachal_Pradesh

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Build an astroturf ground, football ground, track, etc.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Karthik S » 20 Apr 2018 20:08



At 4:40, Rahul, who won gold in CWG, says no help from the government, and no sponsors also. His father has been helping him, but he says it's very tight. I wonder, we have richest sporting body on one hand, and total neglect of other sports on the other.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Singha » 21 Apr 2018 09:54

Ooty kodaikanal are good reachable places for high alt training also. But the genetic adaptations of the african highland herders took 100s of years of living there to develop there are no short cuts
Goras go there to train but come away without the permanent adaptations

Some benefits could be there by living permanently all year and training esp ppl from those high alt regions not lowlanders

The kind of core ede engine and fuel sippy afterburner of kipchoge are really born not made on a training mill . Mental fortitude to win and fight is also inborn and out 100 such warriors emerge the rudishas and kipchoges

One needs tremendous depth of talent in training pool to shape and polish such uncut gems

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Singha » 21 Apr 2018 09:59

But even lowlanders like van niekerk of safa have shown pne need not be kala to be world champion

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby arshyam » 21 Apr 2018 11:06

SBajwa wrote:Arshyam sir!

OK!! My posts were not meant to be offensive. Just some information that I wanted to share!

No worries, Bajwa-ji.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby arshyam » 21 Apr 2018 11:06

From the world of chess...

Praggnanandhaa bags his second GM norm - ToI

CHENNAI: Almost five months after he bagged his maiden Grandmaster norm, R Praggnanandhaa - on Tuesday - pocketed his second as he reigned supreme at the Herkalion Fischer Memorial GM Norm tournament in Greece.

The 12-year-old city lad, who needed to win his final round-robin clash against Markidis konstantinos to clinch the norm, did so without much fuss. He had won his maiden GM norm at the World junior championships in Tarvisio (Italy) last November.

Praggu did admit that coming close to getting his second GM norm on a few occasions in recent times was playing on his mind. "The thought did cross my mind but it was important for me to concentrate on the game in front and look to do well. I am just happy to have won the match and the competition. This GM norm gives me a lot of self-belief," Praggu told TOI on Tuesday.

Praggu won the competition with 7.5 points from 9 outings. Greece GM Nikolaidis Loannis and Anand Nadar from India finished second and third respectively. Praggu has so far fulfilled 3 out of the 4 criteria needed to become a GM.

"I have an ELO rating of 2520 at the moment and have two GMs. All I need is to get one more (GM) in order to be called a Grandmaster. My next target will be to get my third GM," he said.

Did he try anything different in terms of his preparations in the last few months? "No, I did not. The trick was to not tinker much in terms of my preparations and look to seize the key moments. I thought I did well in this tournament," Praggu said.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby arshyam » 21 Apr 2018 11:10

In the words of the Grandmaster himself:

Anand lauds Praggu's show - Prasad RS, TNN

CHENNAI: R Praggnanandhaa hasn't put a foot wrong in the last fortnight. The 12-year-old, who recently pocketed the Herkalion Fischer Memorial GM Norm tournament in Greece - and in the process bagged his second Grandmaster norm - has been lauded by his idol and multiple-time World champion Viswanathan Anand.

Anand was effusive in his praise of the youngster and felt Praggu will gain a lot of confidence out of his performance in Greece. "A very convincing win with 7.5 points," said Anand, before going on to add, "It's a big step towards getting the GM title. He will also play in the Leon chess event which will be a huge opportunity for him in an elite event." Praggu led the show at Greece in an event that had three GMs being part of it. The tournament was a 10-player field and featured in a round robin tournament.

Praggu had caught the attention of many when he won his maiden GM norm at the World junior championships in Italy last November. However, he failed to bag his subsequent norm despite coming agonizingly close on numerous occasions. The criteria to become a GM requires a player to have an ELO rating of over 2500 and achieve 3 GM norms from three different competitions. With Praggu meeting three of the 4 criteria, he is in touching distance of becoming the next Grandmaster from India.

Praggu too acknowledges that his next target is to become the GM. "It is important for me to come up with consistent performances to become the GM," Praggu said.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Singha » 22 Apr 2018 12:20

in all other sports where we invested in world class training, we have become competitive at AG/OG levels

why then does our football ranking languish in the 120+ range ?

are there genetic markers for football ability ? we see world class players from widely separate teams as chile, nigeria and japan so its not like the east african running meme...

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Supratik » 22 Apr 2018 19:20

We have looked at football seriously only since 2014-2015 when the ISL started getting organized. You have to give it some time. But it is one of the most competitive sports if you consider the number of countries playing the sport. Nothing will happen quickly. First we have to find out where we stand in Asia which will happen in AG or AFC Asia cup.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby M_Joshi » 23 Apr 2018 01:47

Singha wrote:in all other sports where we invested in world class training, we have become competitive at AG/OG levels

why then does our football ranking languish in the 120+ range ?

are there genetic markers for football ability ? we see world class players from widely separate teams as chile, nigeria and japan so its not like the east african running meme...


India's FIFA rank is currently at #97 which is the highest in the last 25 years of data. We've risen from #171 in 2014 to #97 in 2018 which I think is remarkable growth.
http://www.fifa.com/fifa-world-ranking/ ... index.html

As Supartik pointed out the ISL is coming big among the players & the fans as well. Reliance which is a promoter of ISL has Reliance Foundation Youth Sports & is doing good work at the grassroots to promote football, far better than AIFF did or is doing. http://www.rfyouthsports.com/football
We can see better players coming up from these foundations & taking the team to below #70 or below #50 in the next decade or so.

Suraj
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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Suraj » 23 Apr 2018 02:22

Football is also a team sport . It requires 11+ good players with different skills, not like a few shooters or wrestlers all doing the same discipline .

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby Lalmohan » 23 Apr 2018 18:21

Singha wrote:Ooty kodaikanal are good reachable places for high alt training also. But the genetic adaptations of the african highland herders took 100s of years of living there to develop there are no short cuts
Goras go there to train but come away without the permanent adaptations

Some benefits could be there by living permanently all year and training esp ppl from those high alt regions not lowlanders

The kind of core ede engine and fuel sippy afterburner of kipchoge are really born not made on a training mill . Mental fortitude to win and fight is also inborn and out 100 such warriors emerge the rudishas and kipchoges

One needs tremendous depth of talent in training pool to shape and polish such uncut gems


Mo Farah had been 3 months in Ethiopia training for the London marathon (yesterday). He finished 3rd, which is pretty remarkable given it really is not his event and there are some really strong guys in the top 10 (all East African highlanders). Mo is Somali I believe, not sure he has the highlander gene, but he certainly has the physique for long range

the women's race was a shocker, the top two seeds flopped badly despite setting the pace for most of the race, one of them even pulled out of the race. both were east African, allowed more of the Europeans to finish in high rankings

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby SBajwa » 24 Apr 2018 17:36

http://www.rediff.com/sports/report/spo ... 180424.htm

Rivzi's silver opens India's account at ISSF World Cup

World record holder Shahzar Rizvi on Tuesday claimed India's first medal at the ongoing ISSF World Cup in Changwon, winning the 10m air pistol silver, while the Commonwealth Games' medal-winning duo of Jitu Rai and Om Prakash Mitharwal could not even qualify for the final.

Rizvi won the silver in the 10m air pistol event on day three of the year's second World Cup (Rifle/Pistol/Shotgun stage). He missed the gold by 0.2 points to Russia's Artem Chernousov. Samuil Donkov of Bulgaria won the bronze.


"Happy Bday to legend & inspiration to every sport person @sachin_rt (Sachin Tendulkar) sir. And what a day I myself have won Silver Medal in #ISSFWC changwon (KOR)," Rizvi tweeted.

In the 24-shot final, Rizvi was 0.2 adrift of the Russian before the final shot. Both delivered scores of 10.0 to ensure that the order remained intact.

Artem finished with a score of 240.0 and Rizvi shot 239.8. Bulgarian Samuil Donkov was eliminated in bronze medal position after the 22nd shot on a score of 217.1.

The men's 10m air pistol saw many a big names fall by the wayside in the 87-strong qualification field.

Rizvi shot a score of 582 out of 600 to make it to the eight-man final in the sixth place. However, CWG gold-medallist Rai and bronze-medallist Mitharwal finished 38th and 11th with scores of 575 and 581 respectively.

At the CWG, Mitharwal's two bronze medals had come in 10m air pistol and 50m pistol events, while Rai had won the 10m air pistol gold.

Olympic champion Xuan Vinh Hoang of Vietnam also shot 575 to bow out in 37th place.

In the men's Trap, India's Manavjit Singh Sandhu shot 117 out of 125 in qualification to be the best Indian finisher in 24th spot, while Kynan Chenai shot 115 to end in 36th place.

Zoravar Singh Sandhu was further back in 41st on a score of 114.

With Rizvi's silver, India got onto the board at the Changwon International Shooting Centre with eight more finals left to play over the next five competition days.

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Re: Indian Sports and Entertainment Industry

Postby jaysimha » 25 Apr 2018 12:02

Ministry of Defence
Achievement: Air Warrior SGT Shahzar Rizvi
Posted On: 24 APR 2018 8:36PM by PIB Delhi

Sgt Shahzar Rizvi of IAF Shooting team won a Silver medal for the country today at ISSF World Cup being held at South Korea. He won the medal in
10 Mtr Air Pistol individual event. The Air Warrior missed the Gold merely by 0.2 points. Gold medalist of the event ArtemChernousov of Russia scored 240.0 points whereas Rizvi scored 239.8 point in the final round. It is prudent to mention that three Air Warriors are representing country in the said championship.

Earlier, Sgt Rizvi made his maiden ISSF World Cup appearance representing India and won the Gold medal in the 10M Air Pistol event at Guadalajara in Mexico on 03 Mar 18. Sgt Rizvi shot a world record score of 242.3 points in the final to beat Christian Reitz of Germany, 239.7 points, to win the top honour. The Air Warrior has been representing Air Force at National Shooting championships and won accolades from one and all.

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