PRC Economy and Industry: News and Discussions

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Mahendra
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Mahendra » 14 Feb 2009 19:28

Deleted disrecpectful post towards the gentle regime in Beijing
Last edited by Mahendra on 14 Feb 2009 21:45, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 19:31

The government now give each senior peasant $100.00 -200.00 a year (again, not much, but the seniors have their land) after they reach the age of 60 and if they only have one or two kids.
The biggest problem facing farmers is that they don't have medical insurance and the medical expense can be huge. But the government is trying to solve that problem.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Mahendra » 14 Feb 2009 19:32

deleted OT
Last edited by Mahendra on 14 Feb 2009 21:44, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 19:37

http://www.vdare.com/sailer/india.htm

Read above yourself. It is not written by a Chinese, Japanese, Chinese-American, or Japanese American. It is written by neutral U.S. guys.

Ah! comerade,
:rotfl: :rotfl:
I has got all to do with the meaning of the word democracy, democracy is a beautiful house, it just doesnt show up in a google search in China
and India was spared WW2? are you sure Comerade? is that what your little red book tells you?
Freedom is a beautiful word, doesnt make money but we have it and we enjoy it, do you? got anything to say about the 30 million poor souls who perished in the cultural revolution? was it chinese democracy? are you allowed an opinion?
There is nothing wrong with Indian people and we will do well without Chinese democracy, we will catch up with you, sooner rather than later[/quote]

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 19:42

I feel it is not Chinese that are brain-washed. Chinese know Outside world a lot. It is those who are outside China who are brain-washed. It is like if they have a "democratic" government like UK or US, they have everything. Wake up, all those "democratic" African and Latin-American countries...

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 19:46

>There is nothing wrong with Indian people and we will do well without Chinese democracy, >we will catch up with you, sooner rather than later[/quote]
Well, you don't have to wait until your GDP per captia fall to 1/3- 1/4 of China's to catch up, do you?

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 19:50

vaman wrote:Simple question, under chinese democracy are you allowed an opinion or not?
if so what do you have to say about this?
1989: Massacre in Tiananmen Square

None of you are answering this question, you probably dont even know about it



If you know Chinese, please go to Chinese websites to see by yourself. It is not that openly talked, but people do talk about it. You can only get trouble if you are a famous and powerful people.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby krishnan » 14 Feb 2009 19:51

zengerl wrote:I feel it is not Chinese that are brain-washed. Chinese know Outside world a lot. It is those who are outside China who are brain-washed. It is like if they have a "democratic" government like UK or US, they have everything. Wake up, all those "democratic" African and Latin-American countries...


:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 19:51

PS: I myself don't agree with or endorse the following. But for your convenience, that is what some US guys say.

http://www.vdare.com/sailer/india.htm

Steve Sailer Archive Email a Friend...
Printer Friendly Version...


May 23, 2004

Interesting India, Competitive China
By Steve Sailer

India has just had a remarkable election. An Italian lady led India's left-of-center Congress Party to an upset triumph over the Hindu nationalist BJP, which, in a curious echo of the GOP’s failure to adopt the Sailer Strategy, had apparently been neglecting its base. [See Steve Sailer's blog: Scroll down.] This has reminded Americans of two things:

India, with its billion people and awakening economy, is awfully important.


We don't know much about it.
With the help of my many South Asian readers, I've been trying to brush up on India for the last five years, so let me share a few perspectives that you might not hear elsewhere.

It's helpful to compare India to the other giga-country, China, which is India's opposite in so many ways. China isn't as simple as it looks, but it's far less convoluted than India.

China's ancient history is superbly documented and fairly simple, in its repetitive dynastic cycles of consolidation, decline, and chaos. But don't bother trying to learn India's history. It would be insanely complicated … if anyone had bothered to write it down while it was happening.

The Chinese have seen themselves as one nation, with one rightful ruler, going all the way back to the first emperor 2200 years ago. But no Indian ever thought of India as a “nation” until Gandhi visited South Africa at the end of the nineteenth century and found himself classified as an Indian.

Before then, India seemed to Indians not like a country or even a subcontinent, but like a world. The opening pages of Kipling's Kim spectacularly depict India's kaleidoscopic variety.

Ethnically, around 94 percent of the population of China is plain Han Chinese. Racially, China's a little more complex, with northern and southern Chinese being somewhat different. L.L. Cavalli-Sforza, Stanford's great population geneticist, has hypothesized that the north was settled by early modern humans coming out-of-Africa who took the northern route around the great mountains of central Asia. The ancestors of southern Chinese took the southern route along the Indian Ocean, and the two groups met up around what's now Shanghai.

In any case, the two Chinese populations remained fairly similar in looks. Moreover, the civilization invented by the northerners proved highly attractive to the southerners, who often peacefully assimilated.

India and its satellite countries share a long border with China. But the Himalayas are second only to the Sahara as a forbidding land barrier. Thus the sharpest racial divide on earth is found along the southern edge of the Himalayas. Mongoloid Tibetan Buddhists, such as the famous Sherpas of the Everest region, are found at high altitudes. Caucasoid Indo-European Hindus are found directly below them, in the warm lowlands where the East Asians won't venture for fear of malaria, for which they lack resistance.

Indian immigrant businessmen successfully petitioned the Reagan Administration back in 1982 to be lumped in with East Asians so they could get minority business development loans. But in fact India is more or less Caucasian. Genetically, Cavalli-Sforza found that Indians are about three times closer to West Europeans than to East Asians.

Still, making racial or ethnic generalizations about South Asia can be a mug's game. It is the most anthropologically complex region on earth. Arguably, its democratic stability rests in part on its infinite divisions. Indians couldn't arrange to hold a civil war because they couldn't coalesce into just two sides.

There appear to have been three major waves populating India.

Several tens of thousands of years ago, an early out-of-Africa wave left behind a substratum of modern hunter-gatherer tribes, and many of the 160 million Untouchables, at the bottom of the Hindu pyramid. They come in a variety of looks, from Caucasian to Negrito to Australoid. Thus they are hard to generalize about.


The second wave seems to have consisted of early Middle Eastern farmers. They now speak Dravidian languages and are most concentrated in the South. These typically small and dark Caucasians were largely ignored by the rest of the world—until the last two decades when word of their upper castes' impressive skills at math, science, and technology caught the attention of the business world. The center of India's burgeoning software industry is Bangalore in the southern highlands.


The last and most famous of the three waves were the Indo-European-speaking Aryan invaders—tall, light-skinned Caucasians from somewhere to the northwest. They introduced Hinduism and its accompanying system of social stratification: four major castes (plus the poor Untouchables), along with countless occupation-based inbreeding subcastes, all further divided by region.
The Aryan conquests are still clearly visible in skin color, in two dimensions: geographically and socially. Northerners and the upper castes tend to be fairer. And despite the impressive economic growth among some of the darker southerners, the northerners remain the social ideal. Bollywood movie stars are about as fair and tall as Greeks. Indian marriage ads are very choosy about how dark a prospective mate can be.

Although nominally outlawed a half century ago, the continuing oppression of the Untouchables in rural India may be the most brutal case of racial discrimination in today's world, outside the Sudan. The Indian government runs a massive affirmative action program for Untouchables and is accordingly roundly criticized by Thomas Sowell in his new book Affirmative Action Around the World. The program was originally supposed to be limited to 20 years duration and only to the lowest castes. But it has since become—surprise!—permanent and open to many higher up the social scale.

On the other hand, it's not clear what else could be done to deal with diversity so severe.

The average IQ of India and China is crucial to the future of the world. But the question is far from settled. Richard Lynn and Tatu Vanhanen's IQ and the Wealth of Nations found three IQ studies of China, which averaged out to 100 on a scale where the U.S. average is 98. As I've tried to emphasize, single-country averages from that important book should be taken with a grain of salt, but regional averages are more reliable. The more advanced and better-documented countries bordering China feature even higher average IQs. So the future looks bright for China.

In contrast, Lynn and Vanhanen found four studies of Indian IQ that average out to only 81.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that the variance in IQ is greater in India than in China. There may be more geniuses in India than in China but the average level of competence seems lower.

However, putting together a nationally-representative sample is harder in India than anywhere else on Earth. The caste system, by discouraging intermarriage, has in effect subdivided the Indian people into an incredible number of micro-races. In India, according to Cavalli-Sforza, "The total number of endogamous communities today is around 43,000…"

So I would keep an open mind on just what the IQ of India is. And, of course, better nutrition, health care, education, and more outbreeding could all work to raise it.

China focuses on giving the masses a solid basic education that prepares them for manufacturing jobs. The Chinese are building superb infrastructure to support their manufacturing economy. Indeed, the Chinese are building factories so fast, that more than a few observers have joked and/or warned that the Chinese intend in the future to manufacture everything in the world. They won't ever quite get there, but the trend is remarkable … and alarming.

This could have dire consequences for America's current political and military hegemony. But the cult of free trade, combined with the fact that nobody in the American media cares about factory work, means that the long-term Chinese challenge is seldom discussed. You might think that if America had to shed manufacturing jobs, we would prefer they go to Mexico to keep down the illegal immigration rate rather than to China, America's strategic competitor. But no one seems to care enough to discuss this either.

India, outside of cyberspace, remains chaotic and impoverished. India focuses more on giving outstanding university educations to the meritocratic elite.

The top Indian colleges are by now probably the most selective in the world. And because they teach in English, their graduates are more of a competitive threat to American journalists and their spouses and friends than are the Chinese, who are merely hammering blue collar Americans. And who cares about them?

Accordingly, over the last year, the press has devoted far more coverage to outsourcing white collar jobs to India than the loss of blue collar jobs to China—or, of course, the insourcing of jobs in America to immigrants, legal and illegal.

Apparently, reporters instinctively sense that Indians in Bombay could do their jobs of rewriting press releases into news articles.

At the elite end of the journalism racket, I have more than a few Indian readers who could step in and write this column for me (Peter, please forget I said that!). But fewer Chinese readers could do the same. The language barrier is a big factor. But Indians also seem more interested in the human biodiversity topics that I specialize in. Further, Indians tend to be of a more speculative and discursive turn of mind than the hard-headed, practical-minded Chinese.

Indian development has been held back until recently by their overly metaphysical focus. Fortunately for them, recent demands in the business world for extremely abstruse and abstract reasoning power have finally played into the Brahmins' traditional strength.

Still, in the long run, homogenous China looks more formidable a competitor for American than diverse India. One of my Indian correspondents wrote me:

"China has an enormous advantage over India: relative homogeneity. In China there is no significant difference in racial appearance between the rich and the poor. They come from the same people. In India, you can see a colour line dividing classes every inch of the way. Sure these lines aren't cut and dry like black and white, and there are overlaps, but the trends are easy to follow for anyone willing to observe. The fact that the Chinese don't have 4000 year old caste hatreds gives them an enormous advantage over India."

As late as 1960, the U.S. looked like China— it was nearly 90 percent white. But now whites are down to some 75 percent—because, since the 1965 Immigration Act, public policy has been bent on making us interesting, like India.

How odd.

[Steve Sailer [email him] is founder of the Human Biodiversity Institute and movie critic for The American Conservative. His website http://www.iSteve.blogspot.com features his daily blog.]
Last edited by zengerl on 14 Feb 2009 20:10, edited 2 times in total.

zengerl
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 20:00

>>Ah! comerade,

By the way, "comerade" means gay in China now. The gay people adopted that name approximately 10 years ago to fight for their rights. I like my gay friends, but I am not one of them.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Mahendra » 14 Feb 2009 20:19

deleted OT
Last edited by Mahendra on 14 Feb 2009 21:43, edited 1 time in total.

zengerl
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 20:30

Well, we have to admit it that one might get into trouble by talking about this if one is of influence. Yeah, China is still not totally free in speech. But, that has nothing to do with economic.
Again, freedom in speech is not absolute. Like in U.S., you are probably getting trouble by talking about race.

vaman wrote:So Comerade Mao now officially becomes Gay Mao

Well I dont know Chinese, neither do my politbureau members, why dont you give us your opinion NOW. I am asking for your opinion, not from any website. Does your 4 times greater GDP give you the same rights as a dark impoverished south Indian? Do you have an opinion at all.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 14 Feb 2009 20:32

vaman wrote:So Comerade Mao now officially becomes Gay Mao

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 20:37

Raghav K wrote:
vaman wrote:So Comerade Mao now officially becomes Gay Mao

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

Hi, he died more than thirty years ago.
And contrary to what you guys think, people in China can freely criticize him, a lot of people in China thinks and declare publicly he was a dictator and murderer; but more people worship him like God, because 1. he stood up with Chinese, against the most formidable power: US and former Soviet Union. 2. he liberated the peasants and give them lands; even after 60 years, every farmer in China still gets their own small piece of land (there is absolutely no landlord in farming countryside in China; it is partly due to the fact that you cannot sell your land, some leaders of China were talking about lifting that restriction recently, but they shut up on the nation-wide opposing of a lot of Chinese, including a lot of farmers themselves).

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 14 Feb 2009 20:46

zengerl wrote:PS: I myself don't agree with or endorse the following. But for your convenience, that is what some US guys say.
http://www.vdare.com/sailer/india.htm


Mrs zenboy, another BS post comparing China and India. I hope you know what "US guys" say about the chinese and China. Just wait till the economy gets worse and like Buffet mentioned "You only find out who is swimming naked when the tide goes out". The US will blame china for stealing their jobs and then the "tamasha" begins.

Mods, This thread is loosing its direction and becoming more of India vs China than the intention to bring out views on only "Chinese economy". Such posts should be deleted and Comrades sent to re-education camps.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 20:50

Think about it, if China is, like what you guys claim, a country with no freedom, you won't see all these posts from China. I really hope you guys know Chinese so that you can go to Chinese websites and find out by yourself (even better if you can go to China and talk to Chinese by yourselves).
Last edited by zengerl on 14 Feb 2009 20:56, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby zengerl » 14 Feb 2009 20:56

>Mrs zenboy, another BS post comparing China and India. I hope you know what "US guys" >say about the chinese and China. Just wait till the economy gets worse and like Buffet >mentioned "You only find out who is swimming naked when the tide goes out". The US will blame china for stealing their jobs and then the "tamasha" begins.

I personally think US people respect those who stand up for themselves; and unfortunately, some US racists prefer light-skinned East-asians rather than some other people (please find out by yourself since internet is so convenient now); east-asian culture, including those from Japan, has been wading into US culture and been part of US culture (referr to the comic books from Japan, and the stupid "Kung-fu" movie like Charlie's Angels, Matrix, Kill Bill, Kung-fu Panda...).

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 14 Feb 2009 21:05

zengerl wrote:Think about it, if China is, like what you guys claim, a country with no freedom, you won't see all these post from China. I really hope you guys know Chinese so that you can go to Chinese websites and find out by yourself (even better if you can go to China and talk to Chinese by yourselves).


We are not claiming anything out of thin air. We have gathered here to discuss the Chinese economy with perspectives from different people and around the world .In a democratic world, people have different views and POV's. If you still think you can brainwash BRfites by snooping in and showing us some crazy links, you are wasting your time.

On the surface , although China looks modern both India and China have similar problems. One thing which China can never ever beat India is in its diverse culture and spiritual knowledge.Believe me after this crisis ends, Spirituality will come to fore and time will tell.I am having to tell you this from my personal experience with a Mystical person.To give you one example

"India conquered and dominated China culturally for 20 centuries without ever having to send a single soldier across her border."

Hu Shih, former Ambassador of China to USA, in Bhavan Journal 15 May 1999

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby vsudhir » 14 Feb 2009 21:23

Sad that the thread has descended into a pi$$ing contest.

And lets be very clear that we can't outpi$$ china just like we can't outpace it either.

The reason why I have great and hope for India is simply that our aims are far more modest and hence, far more attainable. Unlike PRC, we aren't attempting to dominate the known world. I doubt we have either willingness, capacity or strategic appetite to stretch intentions that far. What we are attempting to do is to avoid getting dominated by other powers - an immensely worthy and attainable goal, IMHO.

In the meanwhile, admist all the chaos and confusion, we ought to focus on steadily if slowly pulling our people out of dire poverty. Mass-starvation is mercifully conquered. Malnutrition is the next great war, IMO.

The whites long back figured that getting indies and chinis to pi$$ and fight is a costless entertaining spectacle for them. desi jingoes, aided by chini drones repeatedly fall into the same trap. The game continues. Chalney do. :mrgreen:

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Mahendra » 14 Feb 2009 21:43

Well not knowing one's own capacity is a self defeating trait, there is nothing in this world that can prevent us from claiming our rightful place in the league of nations but for our own self defeating thoughts. The west may enjoy these pi$$ing contests but that doesnt take away the fact that China is an evil empire doing far more damage to India than the cousin marrying unwashed s)um of humanity across our western border has done
anyway sorry for the thread digression, will delete OT posts.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby vsudhir » 14 Feb 2009 23:09

No doubt, vaman.

I am totally convinced that prc represents a worse threat to India's security and interests going forward than any other nation state. And unless we are prepared to visit annihilatory destruction on PRC power for generations to come, we will not get the security and peace we look for, IMHO.

Time will tell where this is going.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby sanjaykumar » 14 Feb 2009 23:22

So the lighter skinned East Asian is blessed by American's preferences. Sounds like a superpower in the making to me. :)

Are these the same Americans who don't have enough money to shop at Walmart?

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Suraj » 15 Feb 2009 02:05

:!: Poster zengerl has been warned for trolling. Three warnings will result in an automatic ban.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raja Bose » 15 Feb 2009 05:40

Only answer to Liu, zenboy and other chinese postors here is this: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

Perhaps it is a trait of the Chinese society that you feel the need to show that almost everything is glorious and great in China and all Chinese are working hard harmoniously and you practice some different kind of 'democracy' as you term it. In that case please take your Face Saving Honor & Dignity presentations somewhere else coz Indians are born in a society which has freedom of thought and action; we dont have to think about the well-being of the 'party' everytime we have to take a pee. So you can show all the pretty pictures you want with selective (& benign) ugliness and describe how glorious everything is, but that is still a 'showcase' since reality is always a lot uglier and less selective. Perhaps over a few generations when your society is more open and where the mind is truly free, you will understand what the rest of the postors here are talking about and why they are saying what they are saying. Till then the only people to fall for such tales of progress will be Walmart executives and Pakistanis.

My last post on this topic as this thread seems to have degenerated into a flame war.
TIA.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 15 Feb 2009 09:20

BR Beware!!

Chinese hackers: No site is safe

"Xiao Chen" is his online name. Along with his two colleagues, he does not want to reveal his true identity. The three belong to what some Western experts say is a civilian cyber militia in China, launching attacks on government and private Web sites around the world. Video Watch hackers' clandestine Chinese operation »

If there is a profile of a cyber hacker, these three are straight from central casting -- young and thin, with skin pale from spending too many long nights in front of a computer.


But again off-camera, Xiao Chen says after the alleged Pentagon attack, his colleagues were paid by the Chinese government.


http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/03/07/chin ... index.html

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 12:21

PLS let get back down to the business.

Its topic is "chinese economy" here.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby ArmenT » 15 Feb 2009 13:54

As Mr. Liu suggested above, back to topic at hand:
China to stick with US bonds
China will continue to buy US Treasury bonds even though it knows the dollar will depreciate because such investments remain its “only option” in a perilous world, a senior Chinese banking regulator said on Wednesday.
....

Luo Ping, a director-general at the China Banking Regulatory Commission, said after a speech in New York that China would continue to buy Treasuries in spite of its misgivings about US finances.

Mr Luo, speaking at the Global Association of Risk Management’s 10th Annual Risk Management Convention, said: “Except for US Treasuries, what can you hold?” he asked. “Gold? You don’t hold Japanese government bonds or UK bonds. US Treasuries are the safe haven. For everyone, including China, it is the only option.”

Mr Luo, whose English tends toward the colloquial, added: “We hate you guys. Once you start issuing $1 trillion-$2 trillion [$1,000bn-$2,000bn] . . .we know the dollar is going to depreciate, so we hate you guys but there is nothing much we can do.

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 14:09

ArmenT wrote:As Mr. Liu suggested above, back to topic at hand:
China to stick with US bonds
China will continue to buy US Treasury bonds even though it knows the dollar will depreciate because such investments remain its “only option” in a perilous world, a senior Chinese banking regulator said on Wednesday.
....

Luo Ping, a director-general at the China Banking Regulatory Commission, said after a speech in New York that China would continue to buy Treasuries in spite of its misgivings about US finances.

Mr Luo, speaking at the Global Association of Risk Management’s 10th Annual Risk Management Convention, said: “Except for US Treasuries, what can you hold?” he asked. “Gold? You don’t hold Japanese government bonds or UK bonds. US Treasuries are the safe haven. For everyone, including China, it is the only option.”

Mr Luo, whose English tends toward the colloquial, added: “We hate you guys. Once you start issuing $1 trillion-$2 trillion [$1,000bn-$2,000bn] . . .we know the dollar is going to depreciate, so we hate you guys but there is nothing much we can do.


What Mr Luo said is truth!

What else can China buy?

mines, resource? .... not all the owners are ready to sell them china. even when china digs mine in hell-like $hit Africa desert western world has abandoned, china has to risk the title of "neo-colonist!'

Japan ,EU? the sale of EU and Japan stock market is too small to hold trillions of chinese forex reserve. Furthermore, EU and Japan now both are apples as rotten as USA.

Liu
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 14:37

Here are some photoes of ordinary rural china outside china industrialized belt....a ordinary village...no carpet :)

In such villages, you can hardly meet the youth,because usually most the youth leave for cities and work there and only the old and kids are left.

Image
Image
Image
Image

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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Suraj » 15 Feb 2009 14:43

Note of advice: we do not encourage posting big inline pics so that those who access the website using dialup or mobile connections don't face trouble accessing the forum threads. Please use links to pictures.

Liu
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 14:51

still pictures without carpets covered.

Here is a small town ,only several KMs aways from the village in the above post.
the small town is called Xinkai. the town can represent the development of most chinese countytowns outside Chinese coastal industrialized belt.



http://www.xici.net/u4342544/d50916842.htm

Avinash R
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Avinash R » 15 Feb 2009 19:00

Liu wrote:What Mr Luo said is truth!

What else can China buy?


How about Pakistan?
Buy pakistan's debts, Save Chinese satellite.

Liu
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 19:34

well ,the following picture shows the list of top 23 Chinese cities ordred by GDP.

1. As we see, Beijing's GDP grew most slowly of the 23 cities and its GDP growth in 2008 is only 9%.
Dalian grew fastest and its GDP grew 16.5 in 2008. BTW, Dailian is the biggest seaport in Manchuria.

2.Any of the 23 Chinese cities had a GDP of more than 300 billion RMB(45 billion USD) in 2008.

3.Shanghai has the most GDP among those 23 chinese cities.
Shanghai's GDP (2008) is 1369.815 billion RMB(about 200 billion USD) and its per nominal GDP (2008) should be also 10000+ USD.

4.Shanghai is not the richest cities of the 23 chinese cities, if measured by per nominal GDP.
For example,Guangzhou(3th),Shenzhen(4th),Dongguan(18th),Hangzhou(8th) and Ninbo(12th) may all have higher per nominal GDP ,because they have less population.

Attention: The unit of GDP data is " 100 million RMB"

No. City GDP(2008) Growth(2008)
[100 million RMB] [%]
1 Shanghai 13698.15 9.7
2 Beijing 10488.03 9.0
3 Guangzhou 8215.82 12.3
4 Shenzhen 7806.54 12.1
5 Suzhou 6701.21 13.0
6 Tianjin 6354.38 16.5
7 Chongqing 5096.66 14.3
8 Hangzhou 4781.16 11.0
9 Qingdao 4436.18 13.2
10 Wuxi 4419.50 12.4
11 Foshan 4333.30 15.2
12 Ninbo 3964.05 10.1
13 Wuhan 3960.08 15.1
14 Chengdu 3900.99 12.1
15 Shenyang 3860.50 16.3
16 Dalian 3858.20 16.5
17 Nanjing 3775.00 12.1
18 Dongguan 3702.53 14.0
19 Tangshan 3561.2 13.0
20 Yantai 3434.19 13.6
21 Jinan 3017.42 13.0
22 Zhengzhou 3004.00 12.2
23 CHangsha 3000.98 15.1




http://bbs.cjdby.net/viewthread.php?tid ... a=page%3D1
Image

Raghav K
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 15 Feb 2009 20:56

For Chinese, Peasant Revolt Is Rare Victory

So Xu, 79, and the others immediately heard the commotion when dozens of government cars and buses wound into Huaxi beginning at 4:30 a.m. on April 10, carrying an estimated 3,000 policemen and civilians assigned to destroy the tents. To alert people in this gritty farm town that police were pouring in, watchful residents set off fireworks by the hundreds.

For four years, they had been complaining that industrial pollution was poisoning the land, stunting the crops and fouling the water in their fertile valley surrounded by forested hills 120 miles south of Hangzhou. And now their protest -- blocking the entrance to an industrial park -- was being put down by force

The workers and peasants appear to have nowhere else to turn but the street. Their representatives in parliament do what the government says; independent organizations are banned in China's communist system; and party officials, focused on economic growth, have become partners of eager entrepreneurs rather than defenders of those abandoned by the boom

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 01531.html

Raghav K
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 15 Feb 2009 21:03

China's GDP data generates more heat than light

China's keenly awaited growth figures for the fourth quarter of 2008 were as clear as mud to most analysts, who were left struggling to work out what is really happening in the world's third-largest economy.

Experience has taught economists to take Chinese statistics with a pinch—if not a packet—of salt. The quality of the data may have improved in recent years, but it is conventional wisdom among China-watchers that the figures are prone to manipulation by a government intent on promoting stability and, hence, on minimising data volatility

His answer is that officials are juggling the data to set up a relatively firm statistical bounce in the second half of 2009. Other economists, by contrast, were puzzled that the fourth quarter was so strong given weakness in factory output and power generation. The latter fell 7.9% in December from a year earlier, marking the third straight monthly drop.

The problem is that economists have to make do with piecemeal data. China's quarterly GDP report is a supply-based figure. It includes only a real year-on-year growth rate and a nominal yuan level. Unlike in most developed economies, there are no real, expenditure-based figures.

"This means there are no quarter-on-quarter, seasonally adjusted, changes in key GDP inputs, in particular, exports, residential investment, and household consumption, with which to assess the result," Simpfendorfer said.


http://in.news.yahoo.com/241/20090123/1 ... -heat.html

Raghav K
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 15 Feb 2009 21:09

Liu wrote:still pictures without carpets covered.

Here is a small town ,only several KMs aways from the village in the above post.
the small town is called Xinkai. the town can represent the development of most chinese countytowns outside Chinese coastal industrialized belt.
http://www.xici.net/u4342544/d50916842.htm


First. Can you provide links that are not in Chinese. To re-educate you, Mandarin is not a universal language.

Second. Everyone knows the media in China is State Controlled. Post your "Carpet ads" from media that is independent and outside your nation.

Liu
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 21:11

Raghav K wrote:For Chinese, Peasant Revolt Is Rare Victory

So Xu, 79, and the others immediately heard the commotion when dozens of government cars and buses wound into Huaxi beginning at 4:30 a.m. on April 10, carrying an estimated 3,000 policemen and civilians assigned to destroy the tents. To alert people in this gritty farm town that police were pouring in, watchful residents set off fireworks by the hundreds.

For four years, they had been complaining that industrial pollution was poisoning the land, stunting the crops and fouling the water in their fertile valley surrounded by forested hills 120 miles south of Hangzhou. And now their protest -- blocking the entrance to an industrial park -- was being put down by force

The workers and peasants appear to have nowhere else to turn but the street. Their representatives in parliament do what the government says; independent organizations are banned in China's communist system; and party officials, focused on economic growth, have become partners of eager entrepreneurs rather than defenders of those abandoned by the boom

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 01531.html


well, Huaxi town seems a rather rich village from the picture, doesn't it?
the villiage is located in ZHejiang province. The province per GDP surpassed 7000 USD (per nominal GDP) or 20000 USD( PPP)in 2008.
Image
Image
Last edited by Liu on 15 Feb 2009 21:39, edited 1 time in total.

Raghav K
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Raghav K » 15 Feb 2009 21:14

Liu wrote:well, Huaxi town seems a rather rich village from the picture, doesn't it?
the villiage is located in ZHejiang province. The province per GDP surpassed 7000 USD (per nominal GDP) or 20000 USD( PPP)in 2008.


:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: So many Chinese Massages. Feels great.

Liu
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 21:17

Raghav K wrote:
Liu wrote:still pictures without carpets covered.

Here is a small town ,only several KMs aways from the village in the above post.
the small town is called Xinkai. the town can represent the development of most chinese countytowns outside Chinese coastal industrialized belt.
http://www.xici.net/u4342544/d50916842.htm


First. Can you provide links that are not in Chinese. To re-educate you, Mandarin is not a universal language.

Second. Everyone knows the media in China is State Controlled. Post your "Carpet ads" from media that is independent and outside your nation.


well, the link is a personal blog.

The writer of the blog visited the town and posted his travel pictures on his personal blog....the writer never expected that his pictures would be seen by indian people,so it can be confirmed that those pictures are not "carpet ads" ready to self-boast.
In china, its impossible for CHinese government to censor personal blogs and bbs,because thare are 300 million netizens in china.
Mandrin indeed is not universial language for time being,but I have confident it will be when chinese economy and trade is powerful enough,just as english did.
Last edited by Liu on 15 Feb 2009 21:26, edited 1 time in total.

Liu
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Re: PRC Economy News and Discussions-II

Postby Liu » 15 Feb 2009 21:25

Raghav K wrote:
Liu wrote:well, Huaxi town seems a rather rich village from the picture, doesn't it?
the villiage is located in ZHejiang province. The province per GDP surpassed 7000 USD (per nominal GDP) or 20000 USD( PPP)in 2008.


:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: So many Chinese Massages. Feels great.

Frankly,it is not good to trust CNN or CCTV's news blindly.

sometimes, analysising the pictures is a better way to obtain information than just blindly read the report written by others.


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