Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

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Lalmohan
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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Lalmohan » 30 Nov 2011 13:38

good documentary on nat geo about how dyclofenac in cattle medicine started killing off vultures across india - and the impact that has had on the ecosystem as a whole, plus the huge increase in rabid feral dogs who live off the cattle carcasses (instead of the vultures)

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 30 Nov 2011 14:45

The Bombay Natural History Society, of which I am a proud member, has done exemplary service in breeding vultures at its breeding centers. They have been successful in breeding vultures in captivity. The Government of India too did well to ban dyclofenac promptly.

The impact of the drug can be gauged from the fact that the vulture population in India came down from over 10 million to under a 100,000 within 10 years!

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 30 Nov 2011 20:01

Vasu wrote:The Bombay Natural History Society, of which I am a proud member, has done exemplary service in breeding vultures at its breeding centers. They have been successful in breeding vultures in captivity. The Government of India too did well to ban dyclofenac promptly.

The impact of the drug can be gauged from the fact that the vulture population in India came down from over 10 million to under a 100,000 within 10 years!


Good to know that you are a member of BNHS - reminds me of meeting the famous Ornithologist Salim Ali there in 1975 - 1976 when i had visited BNHS to look at their collection of birds. Brings back memories...

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 30 Nov 2011 21:10

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-15963842

A scorned snake charmer...

An angry snakecharmer in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh has let loose dozens of snakes in a government office, sparking chaos and panic.

Hakkul, of Lara village in Basti district, dumped the snakes, including a number of cobras, at the land revenue office in Harraiya town on Tuesday.

Many of the frightened villagers and officials ran out of the office, while others climbed on top of tables.

No-one was bitten or injured but the snakes are yet to be caught.

Mr Hakkul is usually called in whenever a snake is spotted in the area and he has saved many lives over the years, local journalist Mazhar Azad told the BBC.

Mr Hakkul has petitioned various government offices over the years demanding a plot of land where he can "conserve" his snakes.

Mr Azad said Mr Hakkul had even petitioned the president.


Some of the snakes are still in the building
Mr Hakkul says his request has been cleared by senior authorities, but the local officials keep delaying it.

On Tuesday, Mr Hakkul went to the Tehsil [revenue] office with a group of supporters and emptied out his bags containing poisonous snakes.

"Snakes were climbing up the tables and chairs. The office was full, there were nearly 100 officials and clerks and many more visitors," Mr Azad said.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 01 Dec 2011 01:14

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 936754.cms

Greater Flamingos, which fly thousands of miles from Siberia to breed in the warm marshes of the Khadir region in Kutch, are landing into a death trap. In the past 10 days, at least 400 of these graceful birds have been electrocuted by high tension cables near their breeding grounds.

D K Sharma, chief conservator of forests, admitted to at least 130 deaths, but locals and ornithologists have been recording much higher numbers. The flamingoes have landed in record numbers this year, with one estimate putting their strength at five lakh, the highest ever.

Experts said the deaths were taking place at night, when the birds disturbed by passing vehicles would fly straight into the wires. The 220-400 kilowatt cables can kill a human being instantly.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Lalmohan » 01 Dec 2011 03:16

in some places they put large balls on the wires to scare the birds off, don't suppose it works at night...

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 01 Dec 2011 03:24

fluorescent balls would. simply painting the wires with glow paint at certain intervals would work.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 01 Dec 2011 18:10

Pranay wrote:
Vasu wrote:The Bombay Natural History Society, of which I am a proud member, has done exemplary service in breeding vultures at its breeding centers. They have been successful in breeding vultures in captivity. The Government of India too did well to ban dyclofenac promptly.

The impact of the drug can be gauged from the fact that the vulture population in India came down from over 10 million to under a 100,000 within 10 years!


Good to know that you are a member of BNHS - reminds me of meeting the famous Ornithologist Salim Ali there in 1975 - 1976 when i had visited BNHS to look at their collection of birds. Brings back memories...


Oh. Thats nice to hear. What can I say, Dr. Ali was one of India's best. The Hornbill House in Mumbai is at the Dr. Salim Ali Chowk, as that square is now named, right across the Lion Gate. In fact, I have his stamp (thanks to another passion of mine :)) I became a member only earlier this year but the kind of work they are doing is what attracted me to the organization.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 01 Dec 2011 19:16

Vasu - Keep up the good work at BNHS... As they say, Birds of a feather,... :)

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 14 Dec 2011 19:55

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 105492.cms

Four orphaned Asiatic black bear cubs raised at a rehabilitation centre near Kaziranga National Park in Assam have been shifted to Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary in Lower Dibang Valley district of Arunachal Pradesh on Tuesday for rehabilitation in the wild.

Two of the rescued cubs - three males and a female - were found in jhum cultivated areas in north Tripura.

The third was found in Medo under Namsai sub-division in Arunachal Pradesh, and the fourth form Sonai in Assam's Sonitpur district, official sources said here on Wednesday.

Twenty-six such cubs were rehabilitated by various organisations in North-East India so far. The rehabilitation process began in 2006.

The cubs would be taken for daily walks in the forest to gradually acclimatize them to the wild beginning this week, officials said.

The cubs would be accompanied by caretakers who are based at the release site in Roing.

Once the cubs are able to fend for themselves, they would be radio-collared and monitored remotely to confirm survival in the wild, sources said.


Wish that they would videotape the whole release event... for the record.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 15 Dec 2011 03:00

http://flonnet.com/stories/20111230282606600.htm

An up-close view of wild elephants from a house in the Sigur forest in Udhagamandalam.



The footloose tusker ignores the admonition shouted from the frontage of a tiny house, situated in Sigur forest on the periphery of the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve in Udhagamandalam, Tamil Nadu. Instead, he lifts his trunk, thrusting forward his immense tusks, and trumpets as a sign of warning. For anyone not used to the behaviour of elephants in the wild, Rivaldo's threatening posture could be frightening. The tusker advances menacingly but stops abruptly and becomes calm when he is within arm's length of the house. The quick transformation provides an interesting input not only to ethology but also to the study of human-animal relationship.

“Don't worry. He is just a crazy elephant [said very affectionately]. Not a killer or a rogue,” says Mark Davidar, the owner of the house in the wilderness, as we watch the scene from the verandah of his house. The house is called “Cheetal Walk” after the cheetal [spotted deer] that came to its courtyard soon after the owners moved into the place in 1967. It was only in the 1980s that elephants began to frequent the area surrounding the house and got accustomed to the presence of humans there. Since the area around the house is not fenced, wildlife moves around freely in the vicinity, offering an up-close view of their activities. The house's proximity to wildlife had warmed the hearts of the renowned ornithologist Salim Ali and the great field biologist George B. Schaller.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 24 Dec 2011 00:16

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZzASSxA6P0

Preparations for Gir Lions in Palpur Kuno.


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 26 Dec 2011 17:32

Buxa roars back, count finds 20 tigers in park

A report by the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) has concluded that the North Bengal reserve - which has never had a steady tiger population and hasn't reported a sighting for over a decade - is home to 20 tigers, four of which are female.


That is very unusual normally there 3-4 female tigers for every male.


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby nithish » 08 Jan 2012 07:53

India's first anti-poaching tiger force begins work

India's first forest ranger unit charged specifically with preventing tiger poaching has gone into action.

The 54-member force will patrol tiger reserves in national parks straddling the borders of Karnataka, Tamil Nado and Kerala states in the south.

The Special Tiger Protection Force has received training in jungle survival and weapons use.

Tiger numbers have shrunk alarmingly in recent decades. A census last year counted about 1,700 tigers in the wild.

A century ago there were estimated to be 100,000 tigers in India.

Numbers up
"The force is operational," Karnataka conservation official BK Singh told the BBC. "They will deal with poachers and hunters."

The Special Tiger Protection Force was formed by the forest and environment ministry on the recommendation of the National Tiger Conservation Authority and Karnataka authorities.

With their special training course completed, the unit has moved into Bandipur and Nagarahole national parks, south of Bangalore.

The forested region has the highest number of tigers in India, according to a census released in March 2011 by the forest and environment ministry.

Karnataka state, which has six tiger reserves, has about 300 tigers, followed by Madhya Pradesh in the north with 257.

The census indicated that tiger numbers had increased to 1,706 from 1,411 at the last count in 2007.

Officials say conservation efforts by the government and wildlife organisations have helped tiger and elephant populations increase.

But poaching remains a threat, with some 25 tigers killed in Karnataka alone since 2006.

A second tiger force will be set up in the eastern state of Orissa.

Senior National Tiger Conservation Authority official Rajesh Gopal said 13 tiger reserves in seven states across the country had been identified for special measures to protect the big cats.

Tiger expert Ullas Karanth said the new force would go a long way toward saving tigers from poachers.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby merlin » 09 Jan 2012 17:08

Pranay wrote:http://flonnet.com/stories/20111230282606600.htm

An up-close view of wild elephants from a house in the Sigur forest in Udhagamandalam.



The footloose tusker ignores the admonition shouted from the frontage of a tiny house, situated in Sigur forest on the periphery of the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve in Udhagamandalam, Tamil Nadu. Instead, he lifts his trunk, thrusting forward his immense tusks, and trumpets as a sign of warning. For anyone not used to the behaviour of elephants in the wild, Rivaldo's threatening posture could be frightening. The tusker advances menacingly but stops abruptly and becomes calm when he is within arm's length of the house. The quick transformation provides an interesting input not only to ethology but also to the study of human-animal relationship.

“Don't worry. He is just a crazy elephant [said very affectionately]. Not a killer or a rogue,” says Mark Davidar, the owner of the house in the wilderness, as we watch the scene from the verandah of his house. The house is called “Cheetal Walk” after the cheetal [spotted deer] that came to its courtyard soon after the owners moved into the place in 1967. It was only in the 1980s that elephants began to frequent the area surrounding the house and got accustomed to the presence of humans there. Since the area around the house is not fenced, wildlife moves around freely in the vicinity, offering an up-close view of their activities. The house's proximity to wildlife had warmed the hearts of the renowned ornithologist Salim Ali and the great field biologist George B. Schaller.


Cannot read that article now but last month I saw a board on the route to Cheetal Walk stating that its was not legal to go on that road. Wonder how public roads can be labelled thus.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 09 Jan 2012 21:06

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pn-Gas0D ... 1.0.1l11l0


India - Land of the Tiger : Kanha National Park, Ranthanbhore, etc. (National Geographic Documentary)

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 09 Jan 2012 21:36

Pranay wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pn-Gas0DNwI&oref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fresults%3Fsearch_query%3Dland%2Bof%2Bthe%2Btiger%2Bpart%2B1%26oq%3Dland%2Bof%2Bthe%2Btiger%26aq%3D1%26aqi%3Dg10%26aql%3D%26gs_sm%3Dc%26gs_upl%3D89l3247l0l6729l17l14l0l2l2l2l692l2558l0.7.2.1.0.1l11l0


India - Land of the Tiger : Kanha National Park, Ranthanbhore, etc. (National Geographic Documentary)


When I click the Link I get the message, the uploader has not made it legal to view in your country. :oops:

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 09 Jan 2012 22:30

Aditya_V wrote:
Pranay wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pn-Gas0DNwI&oref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fresults%3Fsearch_query%3Dland%2Bof%2Bthe%2Btiger%2Bpart%2B1%26oq%3Dland%2Bof%2Bthe%2Btiger%26aq%3D1%26aqi%3Dg10%26aql%3D%26gs_sm%3Dc%26gs_upl%3D89l3247l0l6729l17l14l0l2l2l2l692l2558l0.7.2.1.0.1l11l0


India - Land of the Tiger : Kanha National Park, Ranthanbhore, etc. (National Geographic Documentary)


When I click the Link I get the message, the uploader has not made it legal to view in your country. :oops:


I cannot help you with that issue :( ... But whenever you do get the chance... some rare and very beautiful shots.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 09 Jan 2012 23:40

http://www.ndtv.com/album/listing/news/ ... es/slide/1

Leopard/Man encounter in Guwahati ...

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 09 Jan 2012 23:48

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcnKvBup8rM&feature=fvsr

Lost Land of the Tiger (The Tiger in Bhutan)

Aditya_V - I hope you are able to view this one :)

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 10 Jan 2012 18:23

Pranay wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcnKvBup8rM&feature=fvsr

Lost Land of the Tiger (The Tiger in Bhutan)

Aditya_V - I hope you are able to view this one :)


Nope- looks like Indians cannot view Indian wildlife.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 10 Jan 2012 21:04

Last edited by Pranay on 10 Jan 2012 21:59, edited 1 time in total.


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 11 Jan 2012 13:49



Alphonse Roy Documentary is good, even the documentary where he captures a Tiger Kill ( his first wild tiger Kill on Camera) with a British guy who shoot for Big Cat diary is very good.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Vasu » 11 Jan 2012 14:58

Aditya_V wrote:
Pranay wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcnKvBup8rM&feature=fvsr

Lost Land of the Tiger (The Tiger in Bhutan)

Aditya_V - I hope you are able to view this one :)


Nope- looks like Indians cannot view Indian wildlife.


ha ha ha. Literally and figuratively!

Meanwhile, enthusiasts can be a part of the Vulture Census that will take place in the Panna Tiger Reserve!

Vulture Census in Panna Tiger Reserve from Jan 21

There is good news for vulture enthusiasts and bird watchers as the Panna Tiger Reserve will be initiating a three-day “vulture estimation” exercise in the reserve from 21st January onwards.
Out of the nine vulture species found in the country—Oriental White-backed Vulture, Long billed Vulture, Egyptian Vulture, Indian Griffon Vulture, Himalayan Griffon, Cinereous Vulture, Slender billed Vulture, Red Headed Vulture and Bearded Vulture or Lammergeier—the first six are found in the Panna Tiger Reserve, including the endangered White-backed Vulture and Long billed Vulture.

The vulture estimation exercise will be conducted on the 21st, 22nd and 23rd of January and having learnt a lesson from the rather ineffective counting of last year, the reserve officials plan to make it a more inclusive event this time around.

“While last year, we could only cover 40% of the area, we plan to cover the entire reserve this year with the help of technical experts and other wildlife enthusiasts,” says R.S. Murthy, Field Director, Panna Tiger Reserve.

Enthusiasts who wish to be a part of this exercise can find out the details by visiting the reserve's official website (www.pannatigerreserve.in, download the Vulture Estimation PDF from the home page) and apply via email or post in the prescribed format before 15th January, 2012.

Those invited will be provided with food and accommodation by the reserve throughout the three-day exercise. The invitees however will have to bear the travel expenses to and fro from Panna.



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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 19 Jan 2012 04:47

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 546510.cms

Poachers are extremely active in Uttarakhand. Last week, nine kilos of tiger bones, 18 tiger claws, three canines, and tiger's whiskers were seized from the Kotabagh area near Ramnagar.

The seizure took place on Jan 11 following a joint operation by the special operations group (Kumaon Forest Range) and the NGO, Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI).

"An informer tipped us off. We laid a trap and seized the goods. One person has been arrested. Two kilos of leopard bones were also seized from him later," Paramjit Singh, chief conservator of forests (Kum-aon range), who headed the operation, told TOI over phone.

Earlier on Jan 9, seven steel jaw traps used for trapping leopards and other wild animals were also seized from a village in Dauli range near Haldwani.

According to WPSI, Uttarakhand has emerged as a hotbed of wildlife crime activity. In 2011, the hill state alone accounted for more than 30% of all tiger and leopard deaths recorded from across the country.

Belinda Wright of WPSI says, "Apart from being among the top five states in India for the maximum number of reported wild-life crime, in 2011 by far the most leopard and tiger deaths were reported from the state of Uttarakhand. A sustained effort is required to curb wildlife crime in the state."

"It is also puzzling how tiger deaths have more than doubled in the past three years, while tiger poaching and seizure cases have now decreased by 50% from 2008," she says.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Airavat » 22 Jan 2012 07:40

licence to kill

In 2006, Punjab allowed hunting of wild boar in Mukerian, Dasuya, Garhshankar, Balachaur, Ludhiana, Dhar, Pathankot and Dera Baba Nanak, Ropar, Anandpur Sahib and Kharar, Ajnala, Tarn Taran and Patti. In 2009, it was decided to give permission for hunting at night and killing of female boars was also allowed. Then early last year, the state government approved the proposal of the Principal Chief Conservator of Punjab for payment of compensation of Rs 4,000 per acre to farmers for crop damaged by wild animals.

In Haryana, which had allowed killing of nilgai (blue bull) in 1996, a few people have come forward to take the permit, which is issued by the DFO or directly by the wildlife warden. Sources say till date about 39 permits have been issued for hunting down 210 nilgais, but only 11 animals have been killed.

Sources in the Haryana wildlife department say the number of animals has ironically increased after the notification was issued, as earlier people thought it was free and easy to kill nilgais, but framing of rules made them fearful. Besides, there are religious reasons too. “People consider nilgai a cow, and cannot even think of killing it,” they add.

Nilgai we all understand is an antelope, but with the name and the similarities of it's face to a domestic cow, it gets protection by default. Wild boar multiplies very fast and the only predators that can threaten it: full grown tigers or a pack of wild dogs, are now found only in wildlife sanctuaries.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 29 Jan 2012 22:04

Guys any travelling to forests in Western TN southern Karnataka, be a bit careful, apparently this is the season when many male elephants are in Musth.

2 elephants dead in Satyamangalam forests, 1 due to 2 males fighting, one because a KSRTC bused rammed a 30 year old female elephant. :evil:

17-yr-old elephant found dead

Forest dept mulls to put up warning signs on Mysore highway

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 05 Feb 2012 04:37

Cheetahs on the way to Kuno Palpur... :D

http://asiatic-lion.blogspot.com/2012/0 ... india.html

Now the Environment and Forests Ministry is set to clear the import of cheetahs for the first site at Kuno Palpur wildlife sanctuary in Madhya Predesh. The Kuno Palpur is thought to be able to support up to 32 cheetahs. It is also the site that the government has chosen for the translocation of Asiatic lions from Gujurat. With the reintroduction of cheetahs and lions and the current populations of leopards and tigers the 345 square kilometre wildlife park will be home to all 4 of India's big cats.

Asiatic cheetahs used to roam widely now down to under 100 cats.

Cheetahs used to roam widely over much of Asia though now the Asiatic cheetah is critically endangered and less than 100 survive in the deserts of Iran. The cheetah was so common place that it is named from the Sanskrit words "chitra kayah", meaning speckled or spotted (chitra) and body (kayah).

The cheetahs to be released into Madhya Predesh will come from Namibia as it is thought to be too high risk to take individuals from the Iranian Asiatic population.

While the plans to re-introduce the cheetah are supported by many conservationists in India including the major wildlife organisations there are still some who are deeply concerned about the plans.

Arguments about re-introduction of cheetahs still ongoing.

Issues include whether there are enough prey for the cats and whether it is right to import an African cheetah into the Indian grasslands. There are also issues with the risks to inbreeding with the original Asiatic cheetah if the African cats succeed in breeding and expand their range in the region. Questions have also been raised as to whether the current wildlife laws in India are sufficient to protect the big cats in human-wildlife conflicts.

Supporters of the plan, including international cheetah experts, dismiss the fears and say that the wildlife parks picked out for the re-introduction plans can support viable populations of cheetah and their presence will help to conserve the threatened grassland habitats.

The government also believe that apart from the conservation and ecological benefits of the introductions there will also be a boost to the local economy through tourism. This boost should outweigh any losses that could occur to livestock.

With the forestry ministry about to clear the import of the cheetahs it's only going to be a few short months before the cheetah is once more roaming and hunting on the dry grasslands of India.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 06 Feb 2012 12:54

I really feel before importing African cheetahs we should preserve what wildlife we have.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 09 Feb 2012 12:03

I didnt there are panthers in SHAR? these cats are truly adaptive.

Panther found dead on SHAR premises

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Murugan » 09 Feb 2012 19:55

Gujarat is a Cause for Mangrove Cover Increase

The Forest Survey of India (FSI) has singled out Gujarat's efforts as a factor for the 23.34 sq km increase in India's mangrove cover between 2009 and 2011.


http://www.indianexpress.com/news/gujar ... er/909917/


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 11 Feb 2012 22:37

The Last Maneater (Killer Tigers of the Indian Sunderbans)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHfSTt1t ... re=related

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 15 Feb 2012 11:55




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