Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

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A_Gupta
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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby A_Gupta » 29 Mar 2015 20:09

While not related to India directly:
http://news.sudanvisiondaily.com/articl ... npaid=2415
The essential conservation task before the world is to protect key habitats and wildlife populations long enough for generational attitudes to change in China and its neighbors.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby A_Gupta » 04 Apr 2015 18:10

http://www.nyoooz.com/bhopal/79809/indi ... bal-report

BHOPAL: Population of Indian Skimmer (Rynchops albicollis) across Chambal River in Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan which is its prime breeding habitat has declined to a dangerous level. This rare species of migratory bird will vanish in next couple of years if immediate steps are not taken, say experts.In a recent survey conducted by T K Roy of Wetlands International South Asia (WISA) and officers of wildlife department of Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh, researchers could find only 325 Indian skimmers compared to 550 recorded in 1994 by state forest officer R K Sharma.

Indian Skimmer, IUCN red-listed endangered bird species is only type found in India that breeds and lives in the sanctuary. In winter, it migrates to northern, western and eastern parts of the country and a few migrate to Pakistan, Nepal, Myanmar and Bangladesh. From 550 at one time, the population of species is now on the decline, experts said.

"Immediate attention is required to conserve this species from extinction," Roy said. Chambal river used to be prime breeding habitat. Officially, only 2 birds were spotted at Dibru-Saikhowa National Park (Assam) in 2013, about 100 on Satkoshia (Odisha) in 2014; 26 on Sone river (MP) in 2013, 115 on Ganges (Narora,UP) in 2014 and 135 in 2015 .

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby svenkat » 16 Apr 2015 19:26

http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/seshachalam-forest-encounter-tribals/article7106092.ece?ref=relatedNews

n April 7, 20 woodcutters, mostly tribals from Tiruvannamalai and Dharmapuri districts of Tamil Nadu, were shot dead by a special task force in the Seshachalam forests of Chittoor district in Andhra Pradesh. The incident was another in a series of similar ones, symptomatic of the increasing conflict over resources, stoked by crony capitalism and the rising violence of state and non-state actors. The law is often mute, helpless to prevent the bloodletting.

Rights activists call such incidents, officially declared as ‘encounter’ killings, premeditated murder. Highly expendable, this impoverished cannon fodder seems available in plenty from forests and the fringe villages around them.

Two questions get lost in the cacophony of allegations and counter allegations: Why do forest-dwellers risk their lives? And why are forests open freely to the forest mafia?


Rich mafia, poor tribals

Forests have always been an open resource for livelihood and cultural interaction for their tribal inhabitants. When these vast areas were officially notified as ‘forests’, the traditional rights of the original inhabitants to access the forest for food, medicinal plants, fodder, fuel, water, cultural and spiritual activities were mostly not recognised. The result: everything that they traditionally did in the forests became criminal acts overnight.

Revenue maximisation was the stated goal of the government and the once open forests were now locked in the tight grip of forest officials, whose job was to fell commercially valuable timber and transport it out. However, since it was only the tribal people who knew the forest and had the skills to extract its resources, they were used as labour. Forest settlements were established within forests, initially for ‘coupe felling’ or indiscriminate clearing of forest land, later replaced by selective felling, where forest officials marked old, diseased or other trees for felling.

However, with their main source of livelihood and life taken away, the forest dwellers became vulnerable to the forest mafia, mostly powerful, armed and violent gangs from the hinterland whose eye was on the protected timber and wildlife. Working through agents such as local shopkeepers or money-lenders, the mafia preyed on the tribals’ poverty and bonded them into illegal work in the forests. Forest department officials were no match for these gangs, often succumbing to their pressure or just turning a blind eye.


Now exploited by both forest officials and the mafia, the forest-dwellers were involved in both legal and illegal activities. But there was always the fear that the tribals would expose the illegal goings-on. There was also the need to show that some degree of forest protection was underway. This led to forest dwellers being routinely arrested for forest offences. The number of cases was notched up to show efficient forest protection. The forest mafia remained well protected. The odd honest forest officer faced the brunt of mafia anger if he dared to act; it was safer not to. The forest bureaucracy was itself divided within.

In 1980, the Forest Conservation Act was enacted, privileging conservation over revenue maximisation. Afforestation moved to the fore. Non-forestry activities were permitted only after clearance by the Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) and the Supreme Court (due to the Godavarman Case continuing since the mid-1990s) and on the payment of Rs.5.8 lakh and Rs.9.2 lakh per hectare as Net Present Value.

As forests became hotly contested assets for ‘development’ projects and its twin other, ‘conservation’ efforts, the forest-dwellers were pushed further down the hierarchy despite laws that granted them recognition of their rights. Even the MoEF conceded that a ‘historical injustice’ had been committed on the forest-dwellers in an affidavit filed in the Supreme Court in 2004 in the Godavarman case.

While becoming increasingly closed to their original inhabitants, forests opened up instead to powerful economic interests, both legal and illegal. Illegal mining cases filed between 2010 and 2014 were a whopping 330,512, most of them forest-related. The price of Red Sanders internationally is 10 times more than the Rs. 20 lakh per tonne it is here. The Seemandhra government anticipates a few thousand crores in revenue from its export, which explains all the special operations carried out against Red Sander smugglers.

The legitimate destruction of forests for the country’s ‘development’ runs parallel with the illegal looting of forests. The forest-dwellers get no share in either but are used, abused, and evicted from their land without proper compensation or rehabilitation. The 10 crore people living on forest land and the 27.5 crore forest-dependent people have been pushed to extreme poverty. Millions have migrated to far-flung places in desperate search of work.

Outside the forests, their rights over revenue land remain largely unrecorded. Those that are recorded fail to be protected by laws that can restore alienated land to the Scheduled Tribes. Without laws in Tamil Nadu that recognise and protect their livelihood or lands, it is no wonder that tribal people were driven to desperately risk their lives for money in the Seshachalam forests.


Looking for solutions

The ill-conceived drive ordered by the MoEF in 2002 resulted in the large-scale and violent eviction of tribals. The resultant nationwide struggle forced the government to enact the Forest Rights Act of 2006. A new paradigm of forest governance began, from governance of a colonised land and people to democratic governance with the law conceding the rights of forest-dwellers. Gram Sabhas were to determine tribal rights and protect, conserve, and manage the forests.

Even sceptics now accept the Forest Rights Act as the only way forward for both forests and the forest people. The Dongria Khondh used it to protect their revered Niyamgiri Hills in Odisha from being hollowed out for mining. The Gonds of Gadchiroli in Maharashtra are now the affluent owners of forest produces rather than mere wage earners.

But a powerful lobby within the forest department continues to resist it. The Act has been challenged by a number of retired forest officials. For instance, in Andhra Pradesh, it was the J.V. Sharma and Ors. vs. Union of India and Ors. case, while in Tamil Nadu, it was the V. Sambasivam vs. Union of India and Ors. case. However, the courts have not stayed the Act, and the cases are now in the Supreme Court.

Official reports too blame resistance from the Forest Department for the poor implementation of the law. The Ministry of Tribal Affairs told the Andhra Pradesh government in November 2013 that the titles issued to ‘forest protection committees’ controlled by the Forest Department contravenes the law, since they should be granted only to Gram Sabhas; but as of mid-2010, some 9.48 lakh acres were still titled to 1,669 Forest Protection Committees.

As of January this year, 29,92,853 hectares of forests have been recognised as belonging to forest-dwelling communities and 15,57,424 titles have been issued across the country. But this is still only 3.8 per cent of the total forest land. And still only about 9 per cent of what is officially recorded as forest land used by forest communities. Forest-dwellers continue to live in hope that the government will abide by its own law.

In Tamil Nadu, not a single title has been issued to tribals till date, although 3,723 titles are ready. Instead, the inhabitants of 2,968 sq. km of forest in four tiger reserves in the State are threatened with eviction, and 7,935 sq. km of forest land have been drawn up as elephant reserves. The utter desperation of the tribal people that makes them venture into forests for illegal work is a result of such moves.

Recognition and legal protection of their rights can alone ensure that forest dwellers get a fair deal. When forests become open, inclusive and come under the watchful eyes of the forest-dwellers themselves, forest protection and conservation become possible.

The Seshachalam killing comes from the delusion of gun-toting commandos that they are protecting forests. Rather than convert forests into conflict zones, conservation is best achieved by those who know the forest.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby RamaY » 16 Apr 2015 21:25

^ Pure 72ct BS farticle and waste of BRF bandwidth.

That farticle proves a well known truth one more time. That left/marxist nonsense is only useful to destroy native culture and system and adds zero value in solving any problem.

By the way, how is the forest conservation going on in christianized tribal areas?

More tribals are killed by Naxals, NGOs than Police.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby svenkat » 17 Apr 2015 06:59

No one in BRF has any illusions about the leftist marxists/Xtian propogaandu.I have no illusions about the chindu reporting.

Yet,in this case,the fact remains 20 people have been brutually murdered by picking them out of a bus.Not one middleman has been arrested.We need a hindu left of cente/centrist reporting based on facts.Such a view will not demonise anyone but report all sides of the issue,the constraints,the context,the subtext.The present reporting is monopolised by anti-state,anti-hindu NGOs.OTOH,no BRFite will deny the central role of state in implementing forest policy but the state has to follow its proclaimed policy.

There can be no 'wild west' policy on forests left to the whims of the cartels.The forest resources are property of the state,not the property of cartels who will pay a cut to govt.The govt should pay a fair rate to contractors.Unfortunately,in states like TN,Andhra because of populist pandering/domination by powerful 'people',the distinction between private/public interests has blurred.A Hindu worldview would demand that the state assert its right to be fair to all concerned.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Sachin » 17 Apr 2015 10:02

In the mean while at the Karnataka-Kerala border..
Night travel ban in Bandipur: Decision within two months
Bengaluru: Karnataka Chief Minister Siddaramaiah had termed it impartial (sic) {impractical} to lift the night travel ban in Bandipur.
The Malayalam version of the same report is in more detail. Kerala officials tried to paint a picture that animals in the forest gets mowed down during the day time. Karnataka Forest officials had data points to counter it. Karnataka state is not very keen on lifting the ban. And, Karnataka government have widened and relaid the road through Kutta & Gonikoppal which allows 24 hours travel into Kerala. Kerala now says that, this road takes two hours extra to complete the journey :roll:.

Karnataka based environmentalists are the hindrance for lifting the ban (Mathrubhumi: Malayalam)

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Prasad » 17 Apr 2015 10:31

TOI had a graphic which showed just how much vehicle caused deaths have reduced due to the night driving ban. We need to ensure we dont destroy what little we have.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby svenkat » 17 Apr 2015 10:59

This post should go to psy-ops thread.
The chindu article I posted portays India as a demon state and for no reason brings in a 'mysterious' MoEF directive in 2002 without saying anything more.(that alone would have guaranteed the article made to Chindus op-eds).I was in two minds whether I should post such a polemic.Yet it did seem to me that atleast in the case we are following,the people killed were hill dwellers(called in local parlance as 'malayalee'-mountain people from malai-mountain) and it is tragic these people were mowed down while going to work in AP.

The Chindu seems to get these 'manufactured outrages at the Indian state' at will.One would have expected that Chindus sub editors would have checked atleast some of the claims made in the piece which portray wickedness as inherent to Indians.OTOH,some of these issues are universal-the difference between hills and plains people,the difference between mainstream and fringe people,development and conservation,etc.In a way the chindus 'hitpiece' is an escapist view.It doesnt have to do the hard job of pointing its finger at the middleman netwotk in 'its backyard'-ie Chitoor,Vellore,Tirupathi,Madras.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Kashi » 17 Apr 2015 17:13

Prasad wrote:TOI had a graphic which showed just how much vehicle caused deaths have reduced due to the night driving ban. We need to ensure we dont destroy what little we have.


I was unfortunate to witness a few myself in Bandipur, including a Deer and a civet. This was way back in 2007.

There are two state roads that cut through Bandipur (towards Ooty and towards Kerala) and both are death traps for the animals- most of whom are nocturnal or have turned nocturnal due to human disturbance.

When Nagarhole road has long since been shut for night traffic, why should Bandipur road be reopened?

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby RamaY » 17 Apr 2015 17:29

svenkat wrote:This post should go to psy-ops thread.
The chindu article I posted portays India as a demon state and for no reason brings in a 'mysterious' MoEF directive in 2002 without saying anything more.(that alone would have guaranteed the article made to Chindus op-eds).I was in two minds whether I should post such a polemic.Yet it did seem to me that atleast in the case we are following,the people killed were hill dwellers(called in local parlance as 'malayalee'-mountain people from malai-mountain) and it is tragic these people were mowed down while going to work in AP.

The Chindu seems to get these 'manufactured outrages at the Indian state' at will.One would have expected that Chindus sub editors would have checked atleast some of the claims made in the piece which portray wickedness as inherent to Indians.OTOH,some of these issues are universal-the difference between hills and plains people,the difference between mainstream and fringe people,development and conservation,etc.In a way the chindus 'hitpiece' is an escapist view.It doesnt have to do the hard job of pointing its finger at the middleman netwotk in 'its backyard'-ie Chitoor,Vellore,Tirupathi,Madras.


Few facts:
1/ Malayalam came into existence because it was spoke by people living in Malaya-parvata region. Not the other way around.

2/ The coolies arent "mowed down". They were encountered. We should wait till end of this case as good citizens. These coolies were involved in illegal activities (red sander cutting/smuggling) and we (the society) gave the police necessary powers to do what is needed to stop illegal activities.

3/ Chindu is well known to twist a given issue to create non-existing social rift within India. Whoever fall for that nonsense are no better than intellectual slaves.This is a pure law-and-order issue. No need to bring poverty, inter-state politics, human values, morals etc into it. That way we cant solve any problem and Hinduism offers ritualistic-karma theory for such tamasik-minds.

4/ We, Indians, gave the necessary powers to our democratically elected governments to do what is needed for betterment of overall society. This is our constitution. We didn't give similar authority to NGOs, Secularists, Media etc; as constipationalists argue. As good citizens we not only have a right to question our governments to fix the issues but also the responsibility to give proper feedback. The Rs.Sarvajna (sarvajna सर्वज्ञ —10^51) question is do we, the civil society, want to define our legal system based on poverty; like poor people can do illegal activities for smuggling (not for survival)?

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby member_26011 » 18 Apr 2015 15:35

javadekar, minister for environment, spoke earlier this week in meetings at Harvard, MIT and UMASS Boston, and laid out an amazing vision for governance, emphasizing implementation/enforcement. He said that drones were now being actively used and successfully in wildlife management. He also discussed that india will hold the line as PM Modi has laid out coming to Paris for the next big climate jirga. Probably for another thread.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby chandrasekhar.m » 04 May 2015 10:40

The Swami who took on the mining mafia

A long and dusty road along the Ganga leads to the Matri Sadan ashram in Jagjitpur village, some distance away from Haridwar city. Two policemen lounge outside the gates — perhaps the only indicator of the ashram's 'activist' tag.

For over 18 years, its sadhus have battled illegal mining on the Ganga riverbed. In the process, they have faced barbs, attacks, and have even lost lives.

As the sun casts its last shadows on the Ganga, Swami Shivanand, the ashram's 70-year-old founder, walks into the verandah. He recently ended a 20-day fast, observed to protest the state government's alleged inaction on the issue even though the National Green Tribunal, taking cognizance of the ashram's complaint, had recently ordered a curb on all illegal mining in the area.

The swami is a frail man and occasionally his voice fades to a whisper. His disciples say his diet during the last three weeks was just plain water taken with a pinch of salt and lemon."People ask me why I can't occupy myself with bhajan-bhakti like other sadhus? Why am I so keen to stop mining activities? I ask them 'how can I sit by and simply watch the river being killed because of the greed of a few people?'" he says.

The swami's fight began in 1998 during Kumbh Mela when he spotted the riverbed being dug up and trucks stealthily crossing the river at night carrying quarried material. After he protested, there was a brief clampdown by district authorities. But by then he had become a marked man. "There were multiple attacks on members of our ashram throughout 1999," says Brahmachari Dayanand, the swami's chief disciple.

Anil Gautam of People's Science Institute, an NGO, says that the sadhus have over the years ruffled many feathers. "The fact that they have continually been the target of attacks shows that a number of people who are exploiting the Ganga want them out of the way," he says.

In 2000, Swami Shivanand became the target of a series of attacks, say his disciples. "He was implicated in a false case and thrown in jail in September 2000," alleges Dr Vijay Verma, a local pediatrician. "While there, he refused to eat anything, but he was force-fed nimbu paani. Soon after, he started throwing up blood. We had his blood samples analysed and found that he was administered arsenic poison, most likely mixed with the nimbu paani."

In 2011, another of the swami's disciples, Nigamananda, passed away after fasting for almost 115 days against the mining mafia. The ashram's sadhus allege that he was administered organophosphate poison. The stakes involved in this fight are high — the illegal mining business in the region is booming.

The ashram inmates though say they remain hopeful things will change. "Earlier, people were not willing to talk about the issue but in the last two decades since we began our fight, at least the matter has got recognition," says the swami. "The Supreme Court and the Union environment ministry have also taken note of the problem. I am sure that the results will come. Our job is to keep doing our karma."


Why is Economic Times website being Paki :twisted: and not allowing me to copy the entire article in one go? If you try to copy entire article, it only copies a snippet and appends a "Read more at <URL>" at the end. Forced to copy para by para :(

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 06 May 2015 21:49

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 126688.cms

‘Amreli lion numbers up, may need another reserve’
Himanshu Kaushik,TNN | May 2, 2015, 01.33 AM IST

Sources in the forest department said the lion population has grown considerably in Amreli district, including Liliya, Kakraj, Khambha, Mitiyala and Savarkundla talukas.

AHMEDABAD: The state may soon need a second sanctuary for Asiatic lions on the banks of river Shetrunji if the forest department's initial estimate of the big cat's population outside Gir sanctuary turns out to be true. (In fact, the forest department wants a second sanctuary for the growing population of lions.) The main lion census in Gir and surrounding areas that is to take place between May 2 and May 5 may confirm the forest department's initial estimates.

Sources in the forest department said the lion population has grown considerably in Amreli district, including Liliya, Kakraj, Khambha, Mitiyala and Savarkundla talukas.

In Amreli district and areas adjoining Savarkundla and Bhavnagar— all of which are located outside Gir sanctuary — officials estimate that the lion population has increased by around 80% in comparison to 2010. In 2010, areas around Savarkundla and Bhavnagar had reported 53 Asiatic lions while there were 21 lions in the coastal areas.

Sources said that, according to reports, the population of the big cats has grown in Lathi, Liliya, Kakraj, Savarkundla, Bhavnagar and even in coastal areas. In the 2010 census, there were 297 lions in Gir sanctuary and nearby areas while another 114 big cats were found outside the sanctuary area, officials said.

They further said that the increase in lion population will be more in areas outside Gir sanctuary while the numbers are likely to be constant mainly in Junagadh and Gir Sanctuary. Gir sanctuary and nearby areas have a capacity of not more than 280 lions and, for this reason, the big cats were moving out of the sanctuary because of their growing numbers, said officials.

According to a 'kill and scat' analysis, the lion population in Gujarat is now spread over an area of 20,000 sq km; in 2010, they were spread over an area of only 10,000 sq km.

The officials said that the state government had proposed a separate lion conservation reserve in Bhavnagar district of Gujarat. After the 2015 census, efforts to declare the area a reserve will gain momentum.

At present, lions are distributed in Gir National Park and Pania sanctuary and at least 15 different satellite locations which lions have made their permanent home.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 07 May 2015 03:13

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 168514.cms

Asiatic lion's total goes up, may touch 500
Himanshu Kaushik,TNN | May 6, 2015, 01.56 AM IST

AHMEDABAD: The first round of Asiatic lion census that ended on Tuesday, has raised expectations that the population of big cats in the state may now be around 500, an increase of 15-22% in the last five years. Those involved in the census said that the number of sightings of the lions was very encouraging, with indications that their population outside the Gir sanctuary had risen substantially.

Forest department officials said that what was particularly encouraging was the number of cubs in the age group of 0-3. They were sighted in good numbers and this was a sign of healthy conservation. The officials said that in the sanctuary area, including the core area of Gir National Park, the count has been constant.

"This was because the sanctuary was saturated and had more lions than its carrying capacity. According to a study, the carrying capacity of sanctuary and the national park was around 250 lions and cubs but around 290 lions were estimated to be there in Junagadh and Sasan Gir Sanctuary," said an official.

Sources involved in the census said that the big cats were sighted more in the area of Amreli, Bhavnagar and even coastal areas. For this reason, their population in these areas is expected to be higher, the sources said.

The officials said that the 2010 census had shown that the number of lions outside the sanctuary in the coastal areas, Amreli and Bhavnagar was only 114 but this time their number is expected to rise considerably and may even cross 150. Sources in the government said that some new areas too may be added to those where the lions are currently known to exist.

Sources said the count had revealed that there are nearly six satellite pockets which the big cats had made their home. These include Sasan Gir; Mitiyala; Kankraj and Liliya; coastal belt of Savarkundla and Rajula; Gir; and the sixth was Bhavnagar and the area on the banks of Shetrunji River.

However, sources said that the last census had shown that the adult male-female ratio was 97 males against 162 females. This year too there would be improvement in the ratio and the count of adult males and females was likely to be around 280 lions to 290 lionesses.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 10 May 2015 19:19

http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/asiatic- ... sus-762007

Asiatic Lion Count in Gir Goes Up To 523, Shows Census
All India | Reported by Rohit Bhan, Edited by Abhinav Bhatt | Updated: May 10, 2015 19:51 IST

NEW DELHI: The number of Asiatic lions in Gujarat's Gir sanctuary has gone up to 523, an increase of 27 per cent since 2010, when the last census showed the count at 411. :D

According to the 14th Asiatic Lion Census 2015, conducted by wildlife experts last week, there are 109 adult lions and 201 adult lionesses along with 213 sub adults and cubs.

Importantly, there has been a significant increase in lions in adjoining districts outside the protected zones particularly in Amreli district.

Forest officials attribute the increase to various factors including improved breeding base.

"Factors like rescue, habitat improvement, water management, man animal conflict mitigation, creating awareness have contributed to increased numbers," said Sandeep Kumar, DCF, Wildlife, Gir sanctuary.

The census was conducted with state-of-the-art equipment including Global Positioning System, camera traps and digital cameras.

Enumerators carried out what they call a total block counting method, which is based on direct sighting. Indirect evidence, such as pugmarks, weren't considered.

The Gir covers an area of 22,000 square kilometres - almost double the area covered in 2010, when the lion population was pegged at 411. Each of the 2,200 enumerators handled around 1000 kilometres each.

The count covered eight districts of the Saurashtra region, apart from the 1,400 square kilometres area of Gir sanctuary. Besides, 625 points for sighting lions were identified through a nine-month research.

While the 27 per cent increase in the number of Asiatic lions has elated not just the forest department but the state government as well, the biggest challenge lies ahead now - to manage the increased number of lions particularly in non-protected areas.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 224953.cms

Number of Asiatic lions in Gir goes up, reaches 523: Census
PTI | May 10, 2015, 09.25 PM IST

READ MORE Lion Census|Gir-Somnath District|Gir Sanctuary|Gir Forest|GIR
Number of Asiatic lions in Gir goes up, reaches 523: Census

GIR, Gujarat: The number of Asiatic lions in Gir sanctuary and its surrounding areas has gone up to 523, an increase of 27 per cent since 2010, according to the latest census report.

"The census of lions has revealed that their figure has gone up from 411 to 523 this year," Gujarat chief minister Anandiben Patel said at a press conference here.

The 2010 census had revealed the figure of Asiatic lions to be 411, she said, adding that their population has increased by 27 per cent.

As per this year's census, there are 109 male lions, 201 female lions and 213 sub-adults as well as cubs whereas in the 2010 census, the figure of male lions stood at 97, female lions were 162 and cubs were 152.

Notably, the lions' habitat area has increased to 22,000 square kilometres, which has almost doubled in five years, Gir Sanctuary superintendent Sandeep Kumar said.

As per the census, 268 lions were sighted in Junagadh, 44 lions were counted in the Gir-Somnath district, while in Amreli, 174 lions were sighted and in Bhavnagar, 37 lions were found.

"Conservation of lions is a glorious success story. More than 2 lakh lions were found in Africa, whose population has now decreased to less than 30,000. However, in Gir, the number of lions has shown an increase after every census," Kumar said.

The latest census exercise was carried out between May 1 and May 5.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby RamaY » 21 May 2015 08:32

Today's Eenadu news paper has two news items about deer hunting in Hyd.

In one case police caught two communal hunters with a gun and a dead deer.

In second case a vehicle got into accident where two dead & two severely injured peaceful community people. They found two modern hunting rifles and 30kg meat in the vehicle.

I wonder where all these guys are getting the gun licenses and why police are giving hunting gun licenses.

Looks like this is happening for a while.... And/or catching up. I saw a pic of hunter with a deer on Twitter.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Muns » 07 Jun 2015 23:10

We saved the Asiatic lions in Gir, but is it enough?

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-new ... 55955.aspx

I really support moving lions out of the Gir area to a new reserve. I'm not sure either about what may happen if tigers and lions are in the same sanctuary however? I am hoping that the current stall at Kuno wildlife sanctuary can be worked out and these lions can be moved out of man-lion conflict areas.

India: Asiatic lions cramped in Gir as numbers go up and translocation held up ;

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/india-asiatic- ... ld-1504794

Thanks to Pranay for regularly posting on this thread.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 10 Jun 2015 07:16

Muns - I too am in complete agreement on the concept of moving a "viable trial population" away from the larger Gir environment and moving them to Kuno - taking the expert opinion of Kuno as the most viable alternative location for the move at face value.

Unfortunately - these decisions take political overtones in India - where what's best for the lion's future in this case is secondary.

Another case in point was the myopic view by the judiciary about the airlifting of Ranthambhor tigers to the Sariska Sanctuary. Another being the shelving of the plan to re-introduce the Cheetah in India - issues that have been spoken to before.

To give credit where credit is due - Hat's off to the Maldharis and the local population in and around Gir, the Gujarat Government and the Indian Government & all concerned individuals in the comeback of the Asiatic Lion from the verge of extiction.

The initial remnants of the Asiatic Lions at the turn of the century were in the Gir forests. Now with the stellar recovery under way in the lion numbers - they have voted with their feet and have re-colonized surrounding areas. The Gir National Park/Sanctuary had reached saturation point a long time ago. More power to them...

Now the concern about the "cohabitation" of Lions and Tigers in Kuno is mentioned. Well, they will just have to adjust to each other's presence - just as the leopard adjusts to the presence of either the Tiger or the Lion - in it's territory.

They will size each other up when that occasion occurs - and will either walk away from a fight or they will fight to their deaths - Unfortunate , but that's simply the law of nature. (same thing happens when lions or tigers trespass on the territories of others of their kind now).

What is essential to the survival of the Lion in Kuno - as has been amply demonstrated by the Maldharis in and around Gir - is the pride and active participation of the local population in and around Kuno in safeguarding the lions, when and in what shape they do eventually move there.

At the present rate of natural dispersal of the Asiatic Lions from their nucleus of the Gir National Park - it will not be very long before they reach Kuno Palpur or other tiger inhabited areas on their own four feet.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 13 Jun 2015 02:12

Dhole - The Indian Wild Dog

Rare film footage and insight...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSUQ7jQIyX8

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 26 Jun 2015 20:10

http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/lioness- ... ued-775631

Lioness Strays Into Shiva Temple, Attacks 2; Rescued
All India | Press Trust of India | Updated: June 26, 2015 18:30 IST

VADODARA: An Asiatic lioness, which strayed into a Shiva temple in rain-ravaged Amreli district and attacked two women devotees, was rescued and released into the jungle after a 15-hour-long operation by forest officials.

The incident took place yesterday in Ingrola village when the local women reached the temple to offer prayers and spotted the lioness inside, MR Gurjar, Deputy Conservator of forest, Amreli division told PTI.

As soon as the two women entered the temple, the lioness attacked them, leaving the duo injured following which they were admitted to a nearby hospital, the official said.

Mr Gurjar said the lioness might have taken shelter inside the temple due to inundation and rising water levels in the Shetrunji river nearby, owing to heavy and incessant rains resulting in a flood-like situation there.

Many prides of lions are usually seen lazing on the banks of the river, said Mr Gurjar.

According to him, the animal was rescued after a 15-hour-long operation by a team of forest officials in the wake of torrential rains lashing the area making it difficult to mobilise men and material for such an operation.

Roads leading to the temple were completely submerged after the district received 22 inches of rainfall, he said.

However, around 1.30 am today, forest officials overpowered the lioness and tranquilised it, ending the operation, Mr Gurjar said.

The caged lioness was later released into the jungle. In another incident, a lioness was found dead today after it allegedly got stuck in muck at an agricultural field in Bhavadi village of Amreli.

The carcass was recovered from the muddy spot and sent to a veterinary hospital at Dhari town early this morning for post-mortem, said Mr Gurjar, adding that the animal might have been caught in flash floods which cut off this worst-hit district from rest of Gujarat for days.

Anshuman Sharma, another Deputy Conservator of Forests, said, "There are at least 50 lions who have made 25 villages on the banks of Shetrunji their permanent homes. The river was in spate since Tuesday night and has been flowing above the danger mark. It inundated all these villages yesterday. After the water recedes, the forest teams will be in a position to assess the damage in the sanctuary area of Gir forest, which is home to 511 Asiatic lions."

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 26 Jun 2015 21:16

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 833777.cms

Four lions found dead in flood waters in Gujarat
Vijaysinh Parmar,TNN | Jun 26, 2015, 09.01 PM IST

RAJKOT: Four Asiatic lions were found dead on Friday in Amreli and Bhavnagar districts of Saurashtra region, the last abode of Asiatic lions.

"We have found two lions' carcasses-one male-one female from water nea Garajiya village near Palitana and we believe that they may have swept in flood water from Amreli area'' G S Singh, Deputy Conservator of Forests, Bhavnagar, told TOI.

In Amreli two lions were found dead on Friday afternoon. "We have found two lions' carcasses near Krakach village of Liliya taluka of Amreli district on Friday. One five-year-old lion and three-months-old lion cub were found dead. Our teams are in search of lions and their groups in entire Krakach area and if any wild animal in trouble we will rescue them'' M R Gujjar, Deputy Conservator of Forests, Amreli, said.

Earlier on Thursday, an eight-year-old lioness was found dead in Bavadi village of Liliya taluka of Amreli district. According to sources, there are about 50 lions in Liliya-Krakach area of Amreli district where wild cats settled since last few years. However, the lions' habitat has faced worst-flood in decades as Shetrunji River flowing on danger mark.

Though flood water started receding in villages around Liliya and Krakach but wildlife lovers are concerned of lions' safety as its habitat is still inaccessible on the banks of Shetrunji River.

"We have witnessed hundreds of blue-bulls being swept in Shetrunji flood when we stuck up near Bhesvadi village. We also spotted four lions who were swept in flood water and we pray that they may have survived in downstream. It was catastrophic as we saw our pride being swept in floods'' Arun Patel, a resident of Bhesvadi village, some 5 km away from Liliya. Patel along with 20 other villagers stuck up between flood waters on Wednesday and they were rescued by villagers. Arun Patel is Vice-Chairman of Amreli District Co-operative Bank Ltd.

Forest department trackers are also roaming in villages of Liliya to find out lions' location and their status aftermath of flood.

"We have formed 15 teams in Bhavnagar, each consists of three members and they are scanning entire area where lions may have found. The teams are in search of any lions and other wildlife who need to be rescued immediately or if we found them dead, we immediately process for their final rites so that its decomposed body do not harm other animals" said a senior forest official.

Total five lions died in flood water as Amreli faced worst flood in decades.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Vayutuvan » 26 Jun 2015 22:46

Pranay wrote:Muns - I too am in complete agreement on the concept of moving a "viable trial population" away from the larger Gir environment and moving them to Kuno - taking the expert opinion of Kuno as the most viable alternative location for the move at face value. ...


Thanks for a lucid post. I am putting in the good posts thread.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 28 Jun 2015 05:01

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 847993.cms

2 more big cats found dead in Gujarat, toll now 8
TNN | Jun 28, 2015, 02.05 AM IST

RAJKOT: Two more lionesses were found dead in Gujarat's Bhavnagar and Amreli on Saturday, taking the big cats' death toll from the flash floods in the region to eight. :(

Forest officials found the carcass of a three-year-old lioness on the banks of river Shetrunji near Pingli in Bhavnagar.

A four-year-old lioness, swept away by flood waters, was found dead near Bavada in Amreli.

Earlier, carcasses of five Asiatic lions were found from Amreli and Bhavnagar on Friday.

Officials fear more lions may have died and have deployed 30 teams in areas where they were frequently sighted in the region.

Forest department trackers were camping in Liliya as well to search for the missing lions.

About 50 lions lived near the banks of Shetrunji River in Liliya-Krakach region, which was ravaged by flash floods on Wednesday.

"Our biggest concern is status of the lions that may have survived the flood but may be in need of immediate rescue," said an official.

Officials fear human-lion conflict as the big cats may look for safer areas near villages. "As flooding is high in Shetrunji near Liliya-Krakach, the lions might come into conflict with humans in search of prey and safe place," an official said.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 29 Jun 2015 18:48

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 859259.cms

27 missing lions located near Liliya, Krakach
TNN | Jun 29, 2015, 09.00 AM IST

RAJKOT: The forest department and wildlife conservationists took as sigh of relief as over 27 lions, that had gone missing after flash floods in Shetrunji river, were located in villages around Liliya and Krakach village. There were about 50 lions living near the banks of Shetrunji River in Liliya-Krakach area before floods last week.

"Our trackers have located around 27 lions and they are safe. The teams are searching for other three missing lions," M R Gujjar, deputy conservator of forests, Amreli, told TOI. The devastating floods had swept large number of domestic cattle, herbivorous wild animals like blue bulls, chittal, blackbucks and other pray base of lions.

"Since, the water level in Shetrunji river near Liliya-Krakach was high the lions might have migrated to nearby villages, increasing the chances of conflict with humans," Gujjara added.

Meanwhile, two more lions' carcasses were found in Amreli and Bhavnagar on Sunday taking the death toll of Asiatic lions to 10.

A three-year-old lioness' carcass was found near Ghoba village of Savarkundla, while that of a four-year-old lion was found in Mayadhar village in Palitana taluka of Bhavnagar on Sunday.

Teams of forest department are scanning banks of Shetrunji River in Bhavnagar and Amreli district for lions.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 01 Jul 2015 04:33

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 887662.cms

35 leopards roam Sanjay Gandhi National Park & its periphery, find tech-backed study
Vinamrata Borwankar,TNN | Jul 1, 2015, 12.45 AM IST

The study, conducted between December 2014 and April 2015 by a student of the Wildlife Institute of India in collaboration with the national park, pegged the area’s leopard density at 21.6 per 100 sq km.

MUMBAI: Thirty-five leopards call the Sanjay Gandhi National Park and areas around it home, found the most thorough census attempt so far backed by modern technology.

The study, conducted between December 2014 and April 2015 by a student of the Wildlife Institute of India in collaboration with the national park, pegged the area's leopard density at 21.6 per 100 sq km.

"With such a large human population living so close to the national park in Mumbai, finding so many big cats in SGNP and the surrounding areas is a great surprise. The leopard density is also very good compared to many other places," said SGNP director Vikas Gupta.

Nikit Surve's study for a master's project took into account around 140 sq km of SGNP, Aarey Milk Colony and the Nagla Block for over 44 days. "The area was divided into 2X2 sq km grids and there was a camera in each of them between 5pm and 7am. We identified the trails with the help of locals," said Surve, a resident of Mira Road who has worked with the park authorities before. The park was divided into three blocks, with each containing 9, 10 and 12 cameras.

The researchers actually sighted (through the camera traps) and identified 31 leopards. Of them, the sex of five could not be determined. "We might have missed capturing a few of the leopards. The software used for the study has taken into account standard errors and the sightings and put the total number of leopards at 35," said Surve.

An earlier study by Mumbaikars for SGNP initiative had estimated 21 leopards but cannot be compared to the current census due to the difference in scale and methodology.

The study also looked at the density of prey in the national park to determine what the leopards were feeding on. The maximum prey density among deer was that of chital, followed by sambar. Among monkeys, it was the common langur and the bonnet macaque. "Diet analysis was conducted using undigested material from leopard scats which were collected along the trails. Individual prey species were identified on the basis of undigested material. A total of 13 prey species were found, of which dogs alone constituted 24.5% of the total biomass in the diet," said Surve. It also studied the density of dogs in Aarey Milk Colony, Kashimira and Yeoor and found it was maximum at Aarey at 20.2 dogs per sq km.

Park authorities said the study will help in a number of ways. "We can chalk out ways to mitigate man-animal conflict through public outreach, study the ecology of the leopards and also look to strengthen the grasslands in SGNP," said park director Gupta.

Environmentalists said the study could act as a starting point to better monitor leopards in future. "This can be done every five years and we can get much better findings. Comparisons will be possible as the study used scientific methods and has shown the way," said Vidya Athreya, a wildlife biologist who was a supervisor of the project.

Other animals photo-captured during the study included rusty-spotted cat, jungle cat, mouse deer, black-naped hare, small Indian civet or palm civet.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 02 Jul 2015 18:52

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 890572.cms

RAJKOT: The forest officials have recovered carcasses of 1,255 wild animals including four lions and 1,225 blue bulls and 14 chittals from three talukas of Bhanvnagar district. These animals had swept away in river Shetrunji during flash floods last week.

Following a massive search and rescue operation, the Bhavnagar forest department on Tuesday issued a statement giving the details of the wild animal that died in the floods.

"Our 30 teams searched for wild animals dead or alive in mud filled water and muck for one week. We found bodies of total 1255 wild animals including four Asiatic lions which had swept away in flood waters and reached down-stream of Shetrunji River in Bhavnagar area," G S Singh, deputy conservator of forests, Bhavnagar, told TOI.

Singh said that the bodies were found from Palitana, Gariyadhar and Talaja talukas of Bhavnagar.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby shravanp » 02 Jul 2015 20:36

Pranay wrote:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/environment/flora-fauna/35-leopards-roam-Sanjay-Gandhi-National-Park-its-periphery-find-tech-backed-study/articleshow/47887662.cms



I spent my childhood in Borivali East in an area that is on the border of SGNP and have been fortunate to witness a leopard sighting in rainy season. That was 20 years ago.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 06 Jul 2015 19:32

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 937123.cms

RAJKOT: A dozen lions have died due to flash floods in Amreli district in June last week. The latest carcass of the wild cat was found in Loki village of Liliya taluka in Amreli on Thursday.

Forest department officials said that the carcass was found in muck near Loki village.

"It was a four-year-old male lion that was swept away during floods," said a forest official, adding that the carcass was disposed off.

Most of the lions that were swept away in floods were found from banks of Shetrunji River in Amreli and Bhavnagar districts.

Teams of the forest department have been scanning banks of Shetrunji River in Bhavnagar and Amreli in search of lions dead or alive.

Besides lions, over 1,200 wild animals including blue bulls, cheetals and black buck died in the flood waters.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 16 Jul 2015 20:36

http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/lion-hea ... est-782209


AMRELI, GUJARAT: Almost a month after devastating floods in Amreli, Gujarat left 10 Asiatic lions and hundreds of wild animals dead, forest officials are still taking stock of the big cat population.

Teams of specialised trackers from the wildlife department in Amreli district are trekking through the forest areas to track down the majestic Asiatic lions.

This year's census, before the floods, had counted over 170 in Amreli district alone.

Forest officials maintain that the majority of the lions have been accounted for and the hunt is on in Amreli for two that are still missing. But they admit that some lions are weak and shaken. The situation is gradually returning to normal though, they say.

"There are a few lions who we are still trying to trace but rest are safe. Earlier they were a little weak but we provided them baits and now they getting back to normal," said deputy conservator of Amreli forest MK Gurjar.

However, a few forest officers say that some lions continue to show behavioural changes.

"They still seem to be scared. It's the post-flood effect. They seem to be moving away from humans and water bodies suggesting they still under trauma," forest officer Bharat Rathod told NDTV.

As the searches continue, a section of environmentalists have yet again raised the need for relocation of lions to prevent a repeat of the disaster.

However on the ground, villagers living in close proximity to the big cats refuse to buy the argument. The headman of Tibdi village, Jairambhai has in fact been assisting the forest officials in the search.

"They keep wild animals away from destroying our crops. We have a special feeling for the lion. It's our pride," says Jairambhai.

But with a reduced supply of prey for the lions following the flood, the majestic creatures are far from being in the clear.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Rahul M » 16 Jul 2015 21:29

this is exactly why we need to spread around the population and let conservation of an Indian species take priority over short-sighted political/economic/tourism gains.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby pankajs » 17 Jul 2015 06:51

Kanchan Gupta ‏@KanchanGupta 8h8 hours ago

Say 'Cheese'! “@DeshGujarat: 4 Asiatic lionesses give birth to 11 cubs in Gir National Park http://deshgujarat.com/2015/07/16/4-asi ... onal-park/ … ”

4 Asiatic lionesses give birth to 11 cubs in Gir National Park

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 21 Jul 2015 01:45

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG-oncZfPOo

This is a new documentary (in Hindi) aired by Discovery Channel on July 6 - (India's Wandering Lions) - Excellent documentary with rare nighttime footage of the Asiatic Lions. Also showcases the stellar role played by the forest staff and also the local population - which has made the Lion conservation story in Gujarat/India an amazing success.

This documentary could be an excellent medium to sensitize the population around Kuno Palpur - prior to the eventual move of a trial population there - hopefully.

http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/prav ... 49342.html

Film-maker Praveen Singh of Discovery Channel has captured the incredible tolerance of the people to the big cats in a documentary India's Wandering Lions. The filmmaker took three years to capture on his camera, and on his notepad, this unique bond between humans and beasts. The programme will be aired on July 6 at 9 pm. When asked as to why he chose to document the Gir lion sanctuary, he told Mail Today: "We wanted to bring to audiences this incredible story of lions and people living together and incredibly, the lions seem to be thriving in this landscape - a mix of forest, scrub patches, fields and farms." He added, "The central theme of the programme shows how people and lions are living in close proximity with each other. For locals, lions are part of their lives and they are happy to have them around." Praveen's engagement with the lions and the people who co-exist with them gives a different spinoff than what many environmentalists argue. He said, "To most people if they see a wild animal living amongst people, they view it as conflict.
However, the lions seem to be doing fine and the people also accept the animals in their midst. The people are proud to have lions in their state and most know that the big cats are not going to attack unless provoked. Many farmers we spoke to said they don't mind the lions in their fields or mango orchards as that ensures deer and other herbivores cannot damage the crops." As regards conservation efforts, he said, "As per the latest census, there are 500 Asiatic lions in Gujarat, with quite a large number far from the Gir forests. The Asiatic lion population has shown a consistent increase over many years and the credit for this must go to the forest department, conservationists, biologists and locals who are tolerant to the presence of lions." He is not the only one. There are thousands who swear by the lion in the Saurashtra region, where the king has by now acquired a territory of 20,000 mind-boggling square km.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby disha » 24 Jul 2015 23:14

Rahul M wrote:this is exactly why we need to spread around the population and let conservation of an Indian species take priority over short-sighted political/economic/tourism gains.


It is a very emotional issue., and within Gujarat - Lions do have space to move and grow. In fact with 100+ lions in Amreli itself., the lions have migrated from Gir into Amreli (moving north).

Instead of spending money into relocating into MP., there is an alternative to create corridors for lions all the way to kutch and into the wild-ass sanctuary. This itself has the capacity to hold 1000+ lions in a decade or so. And this is an organic growth.

Further this experiment can be replicated to create Elephant and Tiger corridors throughout India.

So what is the alternative., select 50+ and put them in MP by force and see if they survive in their new environment or not or let the lions themselves migrate and establish themselves into newer areas?

The second alternative is more attractive. Since it allows lions to adapt and progress leading to much more healthy populations. In fact once the lions come into the little rann of kutch., they may evolve into a distinct sub-species like the namibian desert lions.

And with this forest corridors, not just lions but everything under it (since lions are at peak of pyramid) is saved.

Basically the second line of thought to establish viable corridors is doing more of the same as described here:

... the lions seem to be doing fine and the people also accept the animals in their midst. The people are proud to have lions in their state and most know that the big cats are not going to attack unless provoked. Many farmers we spoke to said they don't mind the lions in their fields or mango orchards as that ensures deer and other herbivores cannot damage the crops." As regards conservation efforts, he said, "As per the latest census, there are 500 Asiatic lions in Gujarat, with quite a large number far from the Gir forests. The Asiatic lion population has shown a consistent increase over many years and the credit for this must go to the forest department, conservationists, biologists and locals who are tolerant to the presence of lions." He is not the only one. There are thousands who swear by the lion in the Saurashtra region, where the king has by now acquired a territory of 20,000 mind-boggling square km.


The above has worked and hence can be taken at a higher level.
Last edited by disha on 24 Jul 2015 23:20, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Rahul M » 24 Jul 2015 23:20

why cant we have both ?

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby disha » 24 Jul 2015 23:40

Rahul M wrote:why cant we have both ?


Cost and unseen variables on displacing a wild population into a new areas - since the humans have chosen for them and not self-adapted by lions. This has never been tried before while the alternative is already at work!

Further it is an extremely emotive issue., if you are taking extreme pride in your care taking and somebody takes it away forcibly - it may have negative repercussions. Put it this way., even if it is rational to take one of your kid away and give it to somebody to increase your kids' chances of survival - will you agree? Will your spouse agree?

Also., the corridor project is underway implicitly., since the original set of lions in Gir were 177 (1968/per wiki) and the latest in Amreli district itself is 174 - which is some 100 km up north! This allows the forest department to plan and educate local populations and adapt appropriately.

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 25 Jul 2015 05:25

Disha - There are no two opinions on the fact, as has been amply demonstrated - the lions have responded beautifully to the pride and protection provided them by the Maldharis and the local population in Saurashtra - by the increase in their population and by the successful colonization of surrounding countryside.

I wish them all the very best as they march ahead and colonize more and more areas. (As previous conquerors have been noted to mention - wish some day their spread is such that the term - Delhi is not far - is mentioned.)

I'd like here to cite the example of the reintroduction of the Wolf to Yellowstone NP. As is also a fact, the wolf was almost completely wiped out from the contiguous US (except for a population in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan). The reintroduced wolves were brought in from Canada and now they have a thriving population there and in the larger Yellowstone area. If natural dispersal was chosen as the only means of the wolf reintroduction - it would never have happened.

While the natural dispersal is indeed welcome and should be actively facilitated by creating corridors, proactively sensitizing human populations that will be exposed to lions in their midst, etc. - the option of taking say a dozen or so lions (solo males kicked out of their prides and looking for new territories of their own, small female groups, etc.) - and introducing them to Kuno Palpur should be exercised, i believe. An essential element to success should be the proactive sensitizing of the local populations in Kuno to the introduction and making them stakeholders in the lion's future, etc. etc.

The Kuno ecosystem is similar to the Gir/Greater Gir environment - the prey base is the same. It's not as if the lions are being moved to Kashmir or the tropical rain-forest.

The sticking point here is is that politics has come to play and local pride in the lions is being manipulated and unnecessarily whipped up to say that a neighboring state - Madhya Pradesh cannot have them (It's not that they are being sent to Pakistan). What will happen when the lions have re-colonized the whole of Gujarat?? Build fences and walls along it borders to keep the lions in??

It will be the greatest dis-service to the lions and to the population of Saurashtra who have been active stakeholders in their revival - if what happened to the lions in the Ngorongoro Crater were to ever happen here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ngorongor ... ation_Area

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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 31 Jul 2015 21:32

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 293536.cms

Seven Wild ass found dead in flood-hit villages of Gujarat
Vijaysinh Parmar,TNN | Jul 31, 2015, 01.06 PM IST

RAJKOT: In a worrisome news for wildlife conservationists, at least seven wild ass were found dead in flood-hit villages of Surendrangar near Little Rann of Kutch and forest department officials fears that casualty of precious wildlife may be more.

Heavy downpour four days ago in North Gujarat, Kutch and Surendranagar has flooded the Little Rann of and its surrounding areas-the habitat of wild ass populations-and the these areas are totally marooned.

"We have found seven Wild Ass dead in flood-hit villages near Wild Ass Sanctuary. These Wild ass were found dead in Zinzuvada and Akhrana village of Surendranagar district'' S M Saiyeed, Sanctuary Superintendent, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Dhrangdhra, told TOI.

"We have formed four teams to trace Wild Ass and other wild animals which might have stuck up in mud and floods in and outside of the sanctuary. These teams are tracing area of Dhrangdhra, Bajana, Halvad and Adesar'' S M Saiyeed added.

Wild Ass Sanctuary encompasses an area of 4953.70 square km. of the Little Rann of Kutch and the districts of Surendranagar, Rajkot, Patan, Banaskantha, Surendranagar and Kutch.

Easily spotted in big groups in the vast span of desert throughout the year, this population of wild ass is the only gene pool of Indian Wild Ass in the entire world and one of the six geographical varieties or sub-species surviving on the earth.

Besides Wild Ass, major wild animals in Little Rann includes Blubull, Hare, Wolf, Indian Fox, Hyena, wild board and desert fox among others.

According the latest census of Wild Ass, there are over 4451 Wild Ass in and around Sanctuary. The Wild Ass has expanded its territory and now they are found Sanand, Viramgam and Nalsarovar as their permanent residence.

vasu raya
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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby vasu raya » 01 Aug 2015 07:16

Lots of elephants are killed on rail tracks, they are known to communicate by seismic method, approaching trains already make enough ground disturbance that a slow moving train will be safely cleared, its the track switching equipment before operating one should listen to tusker traffic which can be done by installing hydrophones in the nearby ground and communicate back to control rooms.

Neshant
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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Neshant » 01 Aug 2015 08:08

Sad.

The "tame" elephants seem indifferent to the plight of their own kind (i.e. the wild elephants being captured).

Its almost like the tame elephants converted to another religion once they got captured from the wild.


Pranay
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Re: Nature & Wildlife Conservation in India

Postby Pranay » 13 Aug 2015 20:18

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 430800.cms

Rajasthan may change stripes over Gujarat lions
Himanshu Kaushik,TNN | Aug 11, 2015, 05.21 AM IST

AHMEDABAD: BJP-ruled Rajasthan government is likely to come to Gujarat's rescue over the issue of lion translocation from Gir to Kuno Palpur in Madhya Pradesh. The neighbouring state that had offered no opinion on the issue so far is planning to oppose the translocation citing conflict threat between lions and tigers.

A fresh petition filed by Rajkot-based NGO Wildlife Conservation Trust challenging translocation has joined Rajasthan government and the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) as respondents in the petition. Rajasthan was not a party in the earlier case where the court had ordered translocation.

Currently, tigers T-38 and T-71 have made Kuno their home. Both the tigers strayed to Kuno from Ranthambore. In the past three years, two more tigers have moved to Kuno through the green corridor from Ranthambore in Rajasthan to Madhavpur National Park in MP.

In this backdrop, Rajasthan is likely to oppose lion translocation to avoid a tiger-lion conflict. A senior forest official in Rajasthan said there is no detailed study on co-existence of the two big cats. There is only one research paper by a historian that says lions and tigers co-existed in Shivpuri district before they were hunted down over 100 years ago.

"Rajasthan will insist upon a study by expert wildlife scientists from International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to ascertain if two species of big cats can co-exist before any translocation takes place. There is a possibility that either tiger or lion may die during a conflict," the senior officials said. :shock: {Do lions and leopards co-exist? Do tigers and leopards co-exist? Not to mention smaller cats such as Caracal, Jungle Cat, etc - In Africa, does the Lion/Leopard/Cheetah/Caracal/Serval etc. co-exist?? - Are these people really this ignorant???}

S H Chaudhary, principal chief conservator of forest, Rajasthan told TOI, "Our tigers have been moving through natural corridor to Madhya Pradesh. Lions and tigers are top predators and one cannot preempt their behavior — whether they will co-exist or erupt into a major wildlife conflict. We are not aware of MPs' plans whether they wish to restrict the movement of lions by keeping them in caged environment or open. Let us get their project and then we will decide."
:shock: {What is this man saying??? An amazing display of ignorance by a "principal chief conservator of forest" can he add any more verbiage to his title??}

Ample example of Ignorance, politics and the blind leading the blind here... :shock:

Check out the website of the "NGO" mentioned above - Rajkot based Wildlife Conservation Trust - http://www.asiaticlion.org/ and a sponsor's Ad jumps at you (a resort on the outskirts of GNP) The NGO is run by a gent named Kishore Kotecha - they have participated in the initiative to cover the open wells that caused multiple lion deaths - but what is this all about???


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