Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

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Jamal K. Malik
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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Jamal K. Malik » 02 Jul 2009 00:29



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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 05 Jul 2009 22:53

Jamal K. Malik wrote:26 new species of frogs and insects discovered in India
http://www.ddinews.gov.in/Social/26+new+species+of+frogs+and+insects+discovered+in+India.htm

which means more habitat destruction. :(

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby KrishG » 06 Jul 2009 15:48

Rahul M wrote:
Jamal K. Malik wrote:26 new species of frogs and insects discovered in India
http://www.ddinews.gov.in/Social/26+new+species+of+frogs+and+insects+discovered+in+India.htm

which means more habitat destruction. :(


The north-east and the Western Ghats are a haven for biologists in search of new species. So much of the place is unexplored! It's a shame that most have already been converted to coffee, tea estates or mines.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby shaardula » 06 Jul 2009 17:05

that is true. they keep finding new species all the time. amongst others prof. ramachandra at iisc are very active about sahyadris. thankfully kudremukha is now closed for good, mainly due to efforts by people like ullas karanth. where else is mining going in WG? they actually wanted to move people out of it. that lead to all sorts of people including naxals getting in. they have managed to contain the fallout and they have managed resettlement from neighbhouring bhadra reserve much better. jairam ramesh was here recently and he was happy with the new MC Halli resettlement.

ameen ahmad's catalogue of india's forests
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ameenahmed/

dinesh valke has an awesome catalogue of flora
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dinesh_valke/

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 06 Jul 2009 19:04

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Indi ... 742282.cms

An amazing lack of vision in Tiger conservation.... Before you know it, they may even suggest rounding up all the tigers in the wild to be placed in zoos...

How about an efficient anti-poaching approach? Enlist the people from the surrounding villages...

The conservation efforts in the Chitawan National Park in Nepal can be a template.

NTCA has written to chief wildlife wardens of 11 national parks to keep the tigers and a prey base in an enclosed area. The "house arrest" of tigers in a virtual aquarium is seen to be needed to protect dwindling tiger populations highly vulnerable to poaching and man-animal conflict. NTCA member secretary Dr Rajesh Gopal revealed — for the first time on record — that the Panna tigers were most probably poached.

Dr Gopal told TOI that Panna lost most of its tiger population to poaching. "The last tiger there was spotted in December and even he has disappeared now. Poaching seems to be the major cause for this," he said. The aim of the new plan is to protect breeding tigers from being poached.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 06 Jul 2009 19:52

http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news ... ne/485182/

Good-bye Indian wildlife.... :(

I wonder what would be the "Mission Statement" for the Wildlife Boards in States and if there is any National Oversight mechanism... regarding their agendas and functioning?

Some of the proposals if implemented will most certainly pass a death sentence on the wildlife...

Does anyone really care???? :(

A decision to send the proposal was taken at the state Wildlife Board meeting here on Saturday under the chairmanship of Chief Minister Narendra Modi.

Among the main items cleared at the Board meeting were a proposal for diversion of 89.74 hectares of land in the Wild Ass Sanctuary for the power transmission line of Adani Power Limited, and another 241.59 hectares for the state-owned Power Grid Corporation’s transmission lines in the same sanctuary.

The Board also cleared a proposal for the diversion of 7.29 hectares in the Girnar Sanctuary for Usha Breco Limited (UBL) for power ropeway construction, and another 0.450 hectares each for Vodafone Gujarat Ltd and Reliance Communication Gujarat Ltd for laying fibre-optic lines in the famous Narayan Sarovar Bird Sanctuary.

It also cleared the proposal of the State Road Development Corporation, seeking the diversion of 4.40 hectares of land in the Velavadar Blackbuck Sanctuary for laying a six-lane Sarkhej-Vataman-Bhavnagar Road, and BSNL’s proposal for 0.315 hectares diversion

in Balaram Ambaji Sanctuary for laying fibre-optic lines.

Pradeep Khanna, Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife), told Newsline after the meeting: “All these proposals seeking clearance under the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 will now be sent to the National Wildlife Board which, in turn, will forward it to the Supreme Court-appointed Central Empowered Committee for consideration. The apex court will take a final decision on the proposals.”

Khanna said the Board meeting also approved other proposals, including a 265 km-long “garland road” to be laid around the Gir Sanctuary, the setting up of Leo-genetic lab for Gir lions and other wild animals at Junagadh, besides creating a communication network for surveillance, management and protection of animals in the Gir Sanctuary.


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 07 Jul 2009 21:29

http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_ei ... nd_1271231

Absolutely amazing and shameful....The disingenuous rationalizations arrived at to justify narrow goals...and it's doomed to succeed. :(

Gandhinagar: It took the state wildlife advisory board and the Gujarat Forest department just 90 minutes to convince chief minister Narendra Modi, and recommend to the Centre a proposal to grant hundreds of hectares of forest land, until now protected as sanctuaries for wildlife.

Five private firms and three government companies will benefit from this move which further worsens the status of five of the state's sanctuaries which are already facing very heavy pressure from human activities inside and outside.

The proposals, cleared by the state on Saturday, will now be sent to the National Wildlife Board for final approval.

A highly placed source in the state government said, "The board has cleared proposals of the Power Grid Corporation, Adani Power, Reliance Communication, BSNL, GSRDC, Vodafone, Usha Breco and the IOC.

These include parcels of land as small as 0.315 hectares to a vast expanse of 52 sq km. Decades of conservation efforts by foresters and activists in the Wild Ass sanctuary, Girnar sanctuary, Narayan Sarovar, Velavadar and Balaram-Ambaji sanctuary will be wasted."

He added, "The forest department may justify this action claiming it's a very small piece of land, but the fact is that these industries and their activities will ruin the tranquillity and privacy of the places that are essential for Gir lions, the Wild Ass, migratory birds and others."

Principal secretary, forest & environment, SK Nanda, said, "The board has cleared all the proposals placed before it because they were in the state's larger interest. :eek: The use of sanctuary land by these private companies to lay fibre-optic lines, establish power transmission towers and lay a 1.3 km road in wild ass sanctuary, or a road line in Gir, will not harm the environment. Not a single tree will be cut for these activities.'' :eek:

But the government's decision has shocked many. "As it is, the government is giving away all available land at token rates to industries," said activist Mahesh Pandya, of NGO Paryavaran Mitra.

"So why give away forest land too? These developments will lead to heavy activity inside forest areas where there should be minimal human intervention.

The state has held back from declaring the sanctuaries as Eco-Sensitive Zones (ESZ) for the last seven years, despite supreme court orders. The apex court has ruled that the government cannot allow any activity within 10 sq km area of the ESZs."

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby KrishG » 08 Jul 2009 01:35

A highly placed source in the state government said, "The board has cleared proposals of the Power Grid Corporation, Adani Power, Reliance Communication, BSNL, GSRDC, Vodafone, Usha Breco and the IOC.


I bet all these people would have paid the 'babus' a handsome sum for getting the job done. This will increase the numerous problems that Gir is already facing!

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Jamal K. Malik » 08 Jul 2009 16:32

Tiger Conservation Foundation for Consevation of Tiger and Biodiversity
SIX STATES COVERING 16 TIGER RESERVES CONSTITUTED TCFS

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby KrishG » 09 Jul 2009 00:00

Extinct in India, Cheetah may be imported :D :D :D

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Earth/Cheetah-may-be-imported/articleshow/4751464.cms


Atleast a start. The government has to consider Cheetah reintroduction seriously. But I would suggest Iranian ones.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Neela » 09 Jul 2009 17:48


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Kakarat » 10 Jul 2009 19:49

Adopt a Plant Campaign 2009 - WWF

Hope many will support this campaigning

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 14 Jul 2009 03:48

http://www.outlookindia.com/full.asp?fo ... andipur+(F)&sid=1

Death Count

* A tiger and an elephant
* Seven langurs, two leopards
* Six mongoose, three sloth bear
* Nineteen spotted deer, eleven sambhar, ten shikras, nine Indian hare
* Eleven bonnet macaque, six red-vented bulbul, seven jungle owlet, eight egret, six drongo.
* Five spectacled cobras

(Source: WCF, Mysore)


A random survey by WCF of road kills between 2004 and 2008 counted 91 mammals, 74 birds and 56 reptiles.

Laying out speedbreakers and enforcing speed limits could perhaps minimise road kills, but it appears these simple measures too are hindered by red tape. The existing signage is inadequate and, since much of it isn't in the local languages, serves practically no purpose.

The situation in Bandipur is alarming, the higher-ups of the forest department in Bangalore don't really seem to care. It was surprising to hear what additional principal conservator (wildlife) B.K. Singh had to say: "Some conservators are unnecessarily making this an issue. I don't think vehicular traffic will disturb wildlife in Bandipur. You can't stop the movement of essential commodities. This is my view." Singh perhaps needs to elaborate on that.



Bandipur and the road of sorrow passing through it... and Mr. S.K. Nanda has other illusions with commercial development of sanctuaries and National Parks in Gujarat...

...and we have Mr. B.K. Singh in Bandipur to share notes with Mr. S.K. Nanda. :(

Pranay wrote:Principal secretary, forest & environment, SK Nanda, said, "The board has cleared all the proposals placed before it because they were in the state's larger interest. The use of sanctuary land by these private companies to lay fibre-optic lines, establish power transmission towers and lay a 1.3 km road in wild ass sanctuary, or a road line in Gir, will not harm the environment. Not a single tree will be cut for these activities.''

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 15 Jul 2009 02:01

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8150382.stm

...and one sad day will arrive when the roar of the tigers will vanish from the jungles of India. When our kids and grand kids will only be able to see striped pussycats in zoos and pictures.

One of India's main tiger parks - Panna National Park - has admitted it no longer has any tigers.

The park was part of efforts by the central state of Madhya Pradesh to save the famous Royal Bengal Tiger from extinction.

State Minister of Forests Rajendra Shukla said that the reserve, which three years ago had 24 tigers, no longer had any.

A special census was conducted in the park by a premier wildlife institute, after the forest authorities reported no sightings of the animals for a long time.

This is the second tiger reserve iin India, after Sariska in Rajasthan, where numbers have dwindled to zero.


Officials from the wildlife department say there is no "explicable" reason for the falling number of tigers. :shock:

But a report prepared by the central forest ministry says Panna cannot be compared with Sariska because "warning bells were sounded regularly for the last eight years".

The report says wildlife authorities failed to see the impending disaster despite repeated warnings, and lost most of Panna's big cats to poaching.

While this controversy rages, there have been reports that another national park in Madhya Pradesh, Sanjay National Park, which was included in the tiger project three years ago, also has no tigers left.

The park had a population of 15 tigers until the late 1990s.


This really makes me wonder - what is the "Mission Statement" for the various wildlife department managements??

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 24 Jul 2009 17:30

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8166904.stm

New lizard species found in Kolhapur, Maharashtra....

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 25 Jul 2009 04:32

Monkey Rehab Centre to be Created:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8168199.stm

Can we get any politicians in there?

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby KrishG » 06 Aug 2009 16:47

This is by far the most amazing (in a way also disheartening) thing I have ever seen !
I pray that these wonderful creatures return back the Indian grasslands !!!!!

Cheetah Hunt, 1939, India


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby BajKhedawal » 20 Aug 2009 07:00

KrishG wrote:This is by far the most amazing (in a way also disheartening) thing I have ever seen !
I pray that these wonderful creatures return back the Indian grasslands !!!!!

Cheetah Hunt, 1939, India


Good find Krish, a hardcopy of the same coffee table book (used) sells for USD 135.00

I have been to this reserve; it’s the Velavadar Black Buck Santuary in Bhavnagar, Gujarat. These black bucks are amazingly fast and graceful. The grassland too is beautiful but I must complement the local kathiawari people for their selfless courage and passion for protecting these complete ecosystem inspite of real worldly pressures. These are ethnically the same people as found around Gir forests, no wonder the Asiatic lions are doing so well too. It’s sad that Kathiawaris are not given the same amount of positive press as enjoyed by the Bishnoi’s just because it’s Modi’s Gujarat and saying anything positive about it is plain and simple sacrilege for them.

Low number of man-animal conflict and pride of heritage = Asiatic lions thrive
The department is busy making a presentation to show how effective conservation measures have been in the state. Officials said Gujarat had 12 lions in 1880 and since then the lion population has grown to 359.

In 1968, there were just 177 lions and 41 years later, the population has almost doubled. Officials said the presentation would also focus on the low number of man-animal conflicts and on the fact that people take pride in the presence of lions in their vicinity.


{edited to append the quote above, reason why the Kathiawaris should be applauded and emulated elsewhere for the poor tigers}
Last edited by BajKhedawal on 20 Aug 2009 21:44, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby JwalaMukhi » 20 Aug 2009 10:29

KrishG wrote:
merlin wrote:Reintroduction of cheetahs back into the Indian wild is a bad idea. The causes for its extinction are still around and unless the causes are addressed the re-introduced populations will meet the same fate.

We will have to address the issues which led to their extinction but that doesn't mean that doesn't mean that until then there shouldn't be any conservation efforts. Cloning is not a simple process and an artificially inseminated egg may not develop properly or the zygote might not have formed properly. It takes tens and hundreds of tries for a successful cloning. That would take anywhere from 3 years to a decade. We need to sort out all the issues we have regarding this and go ahead. If a population 20 lions can multiply into 350 and so on and thrive in our forests, we can do the same with Cheetahs with better law enforcement and rehabilitation.


Restoring a healthy population through cloning is tough. The generations of cloned animals in subsequent cycles have compromised immunity. Anyways, here is a book that deals with genetic implications of cloning for cheetah and other animals.

Tears of the cheetah: and other tales from the genetic frontier
By Stephen J. O'Brien
http://books.google.com/books?id=2Fx6Km ... q=&f=false

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 03 Sep 2009 03:58

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8233923.stm

A scientist in India says he has found three rare species of frogs that make nests in which to lay their eggs.
Dr SD Biju of Delhi University says the frogs make nests after laying eggs to protect them from heat and predators.
The discovery was made in the rainforests of the Western Ghats mountain range in the southern Indian states of Kerala and Karnataka.
It comes after 20 years of intensive research carried out in Wayanad in Kerala and Coorg in Karnataka.
'Extremely rare'
The tiny frogs, which measure up to 12cm (about five inches) in length, roll leaves from top to bottom to make a cocoon and produce a sticky substance to close the ends to secure the eggs.
"These are extremely rare frogs, the only ones of their kind found in Asia," Dr Biju told the BBC.
He said the frogs differed from leaf-nesting frogs found in America and Africa as they make their nests after the females have laid the eggs.
The American and African species build the nest in the process of laying eggs, and both male and female frogs build it together.
Dr Biju says the species are seriously threatened by coffee and other plantations due to which they are losing their habitat in the forest.
"Eight years ago when I visited the area it was easy to spot them breeding during the night. But there has been a dramatic change and it's now extremely rare to spot them," he says.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby joshvajohn » 06 Sep 2009 08:48

My comments: Because there is no strong opposition to any thing in TN, DMK started selling TN for making money for their families....MK is selling everything




SC panel raps TN industrial deforestation plans


G Babu Jayakumar
First Published : 01 Sep 2009 02:10:00 AM IST
Last Updated : 01 Sep 2009 06:32:55 AM IST

CHENNAI: A demand to fell 11,088 trees in Kanjamalai forest in Salem district and another 2,22,397 trees in Kvuthimalai forest in Tiruvannamalai district for iron ore mining under a joint sector project by Tamil Nadu Industrial Development Corporation Ltd (TIDCO), a state government-owned undertaking, has come in for severe criticism from a Supreme Court-appointed Central Empowered Committee (CEC).

“The CEC is of the view that the ecological cost of felling of more than two lakh naturally grown trees and the use of 325 hectares of undisturbed reserved forest for iron ore mining and pelletisation project far outweighs the financial benefits that may accrue by reduced cost of raw material,” the committee’s report said.

In the project under taken by Tamilnadu Iron Ore Mining Corporation Ltd (TIMCO), a joint venture with a Jindal group company, TIDCO has only one per cent stake, which, too, will be disinvested after three years.

In view of that, the CEC took a strident line, saying: “The entire ownership and benefit of the project will finally vest with the applicant company promoted by the investment companies of Jindal Group without any stake or benefit to either M/s TIDCO or to the State government, though all the permissions and approvals are being sought/obtained by stating that it is a joint venture project of the State.”

For the approval sought under the Forest (Conservation) Act, the CEC report said: “The applicant company at present has no locus standi either for seeking approval under the FC Act or for seeking permission of his Hon’ble Court for felling of naturally grown trees therein.” “It would not be in public interest to grant the approval under the FC for the non-forest use of 638 hectares of reserved forest area for the project,” the report said.

http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/stor ... 20district

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby RoyG » 10 Sep 2009 05:55

When is the bengal tiger projected to become extinct in India?

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby merlin » 10 Sep 2009 17:42

It won't, at least in the short to medium term (10 years). But it would have reached a dead end with all surviving populations being inside wildlife sanctuaries/national parks/tiger reserves and each population being an island population with no links to other protected areas (in bred population with less genetic diversity).

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 14 Sep 2009 18:40

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/248 ... -here.html

With Iran refusing to give cheetah to India for translocation, Union Minister of State for Environment and Forest Jairam Ramesh said today that efforts would be made to get this animal either from Kenya, South Africa or Namibia.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Jarita » 02 Nov 2009 10:22

How GMO foods destroy bio diversity

http://en.greenplanet.net/food/gmo/234- ... rsity.html


Today Mr. Schmeiser has no doubt about the damage that GMOs cause to agriculture, foods' health and the agricultural methods: "Once you introduce GMOs - he said - you no longer have coexistence and biodiversity, which is a great concern for the environment too. It all becomes GMOs and you no longer have a choice, there's no use complaining about seeds blowing in the wind". Another important issue Percy Schmeiser highlighted during our conversation is the control that multinationals have over farmers and foods supplies through GMOs. According to him, "GMOs were never meant for bigger yields, as these companies have always stated to defend their position: indeed GMOs use a lot more chemicals and also oblige farmers to buy the seeds from the corporations every year, so that they have to depend on the companies' supplies and spend more money with them", Mr. Schmeiser complained.
The health issue too was claimed by Percy Schmeiser as a very relevant one to be considered against GMOs: "A lot of studies have been done about the bio-resistance and the new bacteria that are in the GMO food, and that make it a lot more unhealthy to eat. Also, the fact that they use a lot more chemical, and more powerful ones, make GMO foods even more dangerous to human health".

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Airavat » 23 Nov 2009 16:41

A new tiger reserve in Kota - South-East Rajasthan

Rajasthan is all set to get its third tiger reserve, and India its 39th, National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) has given its in-principle approval to the project at Darrah National Park, which is about 50 km from Kota. The surplus tigers of Ranthambore will be translocated to Darrah after the area is declared a tiger reserve; it will help form a large corridor connecting Sariska, Kota, Bundi and Ranthambore to Madhya Pradesh.

The Darrah National Park consists of three wildlife sanctuaries of Darrah, Chambal and Jaswant Sagar, and is spread over a total area of 250 km. The park is the only one to have a perennial source of water from the Chambal Basin with the river running 4 to 5 metres deep in certain stretches:

Image

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby shravan » 04 Dec 2009 11:16

Gujarat forest cover blooms larger by 16 sq km

Ahmedabad: More achievements for Gujarat in the 'green' region - the latest report of the forest survey of India revealing that the state's green cover has gone up fractionally by 16sq km.

However, though the extension of the total forest area has seen an upward movement by 0.08% and the state has thereby gained 86sq km in open forest area, 70sq km of moderately dense forest has been lost.

This brings the state's total forest cover to 9.66% of the state's total geographical area, much lower than the ideal requirement of a third of the total land. The report quotes state forest officials citing tree cutting by villagers as the reason for loss of forest cover in districts of Narmada, Surat, Valsad and Navsari. The report is on the basis of the satellite data derived in a survey conducted in 2007.

Though the increase might be diminutive, foresters are happy about the development, though not satisfied. "We have been striving hard for some time to increase the state's forest cover. Though we are happy that there has been some improvement, it is by no means satisfying and we have a lot more to do before we can settle down," principal chief conservator of forest, Pradip Khanna said.

Most of the increase in the green cover has been attributed to mangrove plantation in districts of Ahmedabad, Bharuch, Jamnagar and Kutch. The forest cover had decreased by 99 sq km comprising 0.66% of the total state forest cover as per forest survey of India's findings of 2005.

Forest cover has been one of the main concerns of the state forest department and a good deal of their efforts are geared towards increasing the green cover. Over the past few years, aggressive mangrove plantation has been the main activity of forest departments like Gujarat Ecology Commission and intensive studies on mangroves by GEER Foundation.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby KrishG » 30 Dec 2009 21:44

Raju in, dancing bears do their last act :) :) :)

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/Raju-in--dancing-bears-do-their-last-act/556938

When 4-year-old Raju, led by 40-year-old Raja Saab, walked into Bannerghata rescue centre in Karnataka on Friday morning, it brought down the curtain on a 300-year-old practice.

Raju is an endangered sloth bear made to perform as a dancing bear, and his ‘owner’ Raja surrendered him — post-public notice in a local paper for ‘peaceful surrender’ — making him what could be India’s last ‘dancing bear’.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby shaardula » 16 Jan 2010 14:41


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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby shaardula » 23 Jan 2010 20:16

Survey of 2010

Tiger experts positive about census result
http://www.hindu.com/2010/01/22/stories ... 390500.htm


As the Forest Department gears up for the much-anticipated tiger census that begins on Friday, wildlife scientists say they are optimistic for a “stable, if not positive trend” to emerge in the State.

While the dwindling tiger population, thanks to rampant poaching in north India remains a matter of concern “we do not expect a big change in the tiger population in Karnataka, for that matter, not even in Tamil Nadu or Kerala,” said Qamar Qureshi, a conservation biologist with the Wildlife Institute of India, which is conducting the survey along with the State Forest Department and the National Tiger Conservation Authority. The nationwide survey last took place in 2006, estimating 1,141 tigers in the country, with Karnataka recording 290 and emerging second to Madhaya Pradesh in tiger population. Four protected areas will be the focus of the weeklong census in the State this year — Nagarahole National Park, Bandipur National Park, BR Hills Wildlife Sanctuary and Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary.

Concurring with Mr. Qureshi’s view, Ullas Karanth leading tiger expert and director of Wildlife Conservation Society (India) said the State is likely to pip Madhya Pradesh to claim first place this time. “Bandipur and Nagarahole could well see an increase in the tiger population, while the numbers can be expected to remain fairly stable in Bhadra and BR Hills”

It will be between six months to a year before the results emerge from the three-phase census, said Mr. Qureshi. “On Friday, the Forest Department begins recording evidence of tiger presence (pugmarks, scats, scent marks, rake marks on tree trunks), prey density, habitat quality and human disturbance, along fixed-line transects. The second and third phases comprise satellite mapping to assess forest connectivity, and camera trapping.” Forest guest houses will be out of bounds for visitors until January 27, said B.K. Singh, PCCF (Wildlife).

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Airavat » 01 Feb 2010 15:25

All 13 tiger-range countries have pledged to double the number of tigers in the wild by 2022, the next Year of the Tiger. "We shall reach up to the highest levels of our governments for support at the Year of the Tiger Heads of State Summit in Russia. Let us join together boldly to save the wild tiger," WWF reported Thailand's Minister of Environment and Natural Resources, Suwit Khunkitti, said in Hua Hin, at the First Asia Ministerial Conference on Tiger Conservation.

The heads of states summit to discuss tiger conservation will be held in Vladivostok in September. An international donor conference is also planned later this year to support tiger range countries to raise additional resources to save wild tigers from extinction.

National Geographic

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby shaardula » 01 Feb 2010 21:07

Bhitarkanika National Park may get world heritage site status
Kendrapara (Orissa), Feb 1 (PTI)

Already declared a Ramsar wetland site, the Bhitarkanika National Park with its rich bio-diversity and unique eco-system has now been shortlisted as a World Heritage site.


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/500 ... y-get.html

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby merlin » 02 Feb 2010 16:40

Airavat wrote:All 13 tiger-range countries have pledged to double the number of tigers in the wild by 2022, the next Year of the Tiger.


Pipe dream, pipe dream, pipe dream. Did I say pipe dream?

In India, actual tiger numbers are close to 1000 if not below. Doubling that in 12 years time requires a [i][b]massive[b][i] political will. Massive. Not going to happen.

1. Prey base is dwindling - lots of small scale poaching
2. Steady loss of forest cover
3. Ill advised infrastructure schemes through our best reserves
4. Pathetic state of patrolling in our reserves, non-tier 1 and non-tier 2 area patrolling is close to non-existent
5. Poaching mafia still at large, unabated demand from China
6. No political will in resettling forest villages or towns
7. No political will in stopping non-forest activities in forested areas
8. No political will

Pipe dream, pipe dream, pipe dream. Did I say pipe dream?

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby RoyG » 02 Feb 2010 20:22

merlin wrote:
Airavat wrote:All 13 tiger-range countries have pledged to double the number of tigers in the wild by 2022, the next Year of the Tiger.


Pipe dream, pipe dream, pipe dream. Did I say pipe dream?

In India, actual tiger numbers are close to 1000 if not below. Doubling that in 12 years time requires a [i][b]massive[b][i] political will. Massive. Not going to happen.

1. Prey base is dwindling - lots of small scale poaching
2. Steady loss of forest cover
3. Ill advised infrastructure schemes through our best reserves
4. Pathetic state of patrolling in our reserves, non-tier 1 and non-tier 2 area patrolling is close to non-existent
5. Poaching mafia still at large, unabated demand from China
6. No political will in resettling forest villages or towns
7. No political will in stopping non-forest activities in forested areas
8. No political will

Pipe dream, pipe dream, pipe dream. Did I say pipe dream?


Could the free market approach possibly save the tiger? It's about time we try something new. All these conservation groups and gov intervention end up being the disease instead of the cure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CO47DZw0ls

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 05 Feb 2010 03:35

RoyG wrote:
Could the free market approach possibly save the tiger? It's about time we try something new. All these conservation groups and gov intervention end up being the disease instead of the cure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CO47DZw0ls


This approach would be a total disaster.... and here are some of the reasons,

1) All the animal species mentioned in the youtube segment (chickens :roll: ) are herbivores.
2) The larger question to be asked is, do we just want tigers to be saved or wild tigers to be saved?? I would say, the wild ones.
3) The PERC solution to the issue, as shown in the youtube video clip is so intellectually disingenuous in the case of the wild tigers. (their solution - sounds very Republican - Privatize everything, let the market forces rule without check - the outcome - look at the current dismal state of affairs of the US economy and it's ramifications around the world).

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby RoyG » 06 Feb 2010 23:55

Pranay wrote:
RoyG wrote:
Could the free market approach possibly save the tiger? It's about time we try something new. All these conservation groups and gov intervention end up being the disease instead of the cure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CO47DZw0ls


This approach would be a total disaster.... and here are some of the reasons,

1) All the animal species mentioned in the youtube segment (chickens :roll: ) are herbivores.
2) The larger question to be asked is, do we just want tigers to be saved or wild tigers to be saved?? I would say, the wild ones.
3) The PERC solution to the issue, as shown in the youtube video clip is so intellectually disingenuous in the case of the wild tigers. (their solution - sounds very Republican - Privatize everything, let the market forces rule without check - the outcome - look at the current dismal state of affairs of the US economy and it's ramifications around the world).


About 1100 wild tigers left and their numbers continue to drop despite more gov involvement and $$ being thrown at the problem. Do you really expect wild tiger populations to stabilize and even increase with the current course of action? What does being herbivorous have to do with anything? Do the Chinese who sell their bones care if the tiger was breed in a cage or in nature?

"their solution - sounds very Republican - Privatize everything, let the market forces rule without check - the outcome - look at the current dismal state of affairs of the US economy and it's ramifications around the world"

Market forces didn't cause the dismal state of affairs of the US economy. It is gov intervention and policies of the FED which is causing the collapse of the US economy. Forcing OPEC to carry out oil transactions in dollars, bailing out failing private sector companies, massive stimulus aimed at creating even more inefficient and uncompetitive public sector jobs also causing record high inflation and devaluation of the dollar, and keeping interests rates extremely low are the primary reasons.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby Pranay » 07 Feb 2010 03:37

RoyG - The "secret" to success at anything in life is not throwing money at the problem. Wildlife conservation needs a clarity of vision and dedication of purpose. Please refer to some of my posts earlier on this page itself for you to understand the lack of vision, poor training and the very poor quality of the human resource in charge of India's wildlife management.

Mind you, i'm not talking about the lowly, poorly paid forest guards, but people in "charge".

Do read up about the success that was achieved in the Chitawan National Park in Nepal when dedicated staff was assigned to protect its' denziens, where the "mission Statement" was clearly defined. The forest guards in Chitawan had the power to shoot on sight any poachers within the park boundaries. The surrounding community and their understanding of the local environment was leveraged to save the wildlife.

Look at what has happened to Sariska re: it's tigers, and Panna National Park and Sanjay National Park and god knows how many more.

Has any one in the management of these parks been punished for "dereliction of duty"?

What happens to poachers in India when caught?

Look at the training aspect, a sampler from the Gir National Park below. If this can be taken as a microcosm, then the sad state of the Indian wildlife is only to be expected.

http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news ... dy/568181/

Ahmedabad Lion census is set to begin shortly at the Gir National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary, and the state Forest Department may also take up GIS mapping this time. But in an irony of sorts, a recent training conducted by the Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) has shown that only 16 per cent of the total staff manning the sanctuary actually knows the exact application of The Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. About 490 Gir staff had attended the first-ever WTI training in Gujarat
.

According to the WTI, nearly 25 per cent of the total staff undergoing training failed to identify wildlife crime; out of 490 staffers, 324 did not know what a protected area is, and only 16 per cent of the total staff knew what their powers are.
.

So, the issue at hand is having a national Clarity of Vision regarding it's natural resources. Establishing a clear "Mission Statement", providing adequate training and resources to the caretakers of wildlife, positively involving the human population in and around these wildlife sanctuaries in wildlife conservation. Firing Conservation staff where dereliction of duty is evident and giving shoot on sight orders against poachers and following through with it.

Otherwise, all that the human race will have in a decade or so will be total extinction of the wild tigers and the ecosystem in which they thrive. Only to be replaced with striped pussycats scurrying around breeding mills - like there are puppy mills - here in the states. A Very Sad Day it surely will be ...

...and a little bit about the present economic crisis, it was a lack government oversight (SEC) that caused the residential real estate bubble to become so large and then explode in everyones face.

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Re: Nature Conservation in India News & Discussion

Postby RoyG » 07 Feb 2010 20:48

Pranay, has a farmed animal ever gone extinct? If tigers are allowed to be legally owned and farmed, doesn’t the primary incentive of poachers disappear? They thrive on low stock and high demand which ends up pushing up the price per animal. Moreover, how does farming animals = extinction of that animal in the wild? Large licensed breeding/farming centers and even licensed "backyard breeding" would alleviate much of the pressure being placed upon wild populations of tigers especially from our "friends" to the North (Ex. Licensed American Alligator Farms). Ecosystem destruction can also be mitigated by private participation through the declaration of a trust and joint ownership agreement between the government and interested party. The party should be allowed to keep the revenue generated from ecotourism thereby creating more incentive to keep the ecosystem intact. Ownership of the land would also give the owners the right to shoot to kill/maim trespassers. Animal ownership and large scale breeding would even allow for those interested in controlled hunting on privately owned land.

As for the “current” economic crisis, the FED is mainly responsible. By keeping interest rates artificially low for many years prior to the crisis, the FED created easy credit conditions which led directly to the housing bubble. This fact coupled with the massive stimulus package and additional gov interference in the market is prolonging the recession and is going to make it a whole lot worse. Obama should have let the banks fail and concentrated on reforming the FED and creating sound money. Better to eat the broccoli now than later my friend!


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