Renewable Sources of Energy

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Kersi D
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Kersi D » 10 May 2011 01:44

I am working in the field of energy (mostly thermal) for the past 20+++ years. My views on the energy supply scenario may be out of sync with some people on this forum. Let us discuss our future energy options.

My argument are based on the current technology and pricing.
India is a growing economy. Whether you call it fast / slow / moderate / Hindu growth, it is immaterial.
Our requirements for electrical power are going to increase, partly due to our increase in population, partly due to increase in our purchasing power and economic growth.

India has no option. We will have to use coal and nuclear power for the next 10 - 30 years. All the other sources like wind power, solar power etc will continue to be marginal sources of power.

Our installed electric power capacity is about 170,000 MW of which about 60%+ would use coal. Our installed capacity of nuclear power is barely 5,000 MW. I guess that our demand would increase by about 1,000++ MW every year. I do not think that solar and wind and geothermal and what-not can change this equation. They have too many limitations on locations, seasons, time of the day (or night) etc. And what about the investments ? On an average a solar / wind based power plant cost 100 - 300% MORE than a conventional coal based power plant. (Yes even a nuclear power plant would cost 100+% more or than a conventional coal based power plant.)

One source which is being used today and should be further encouraged is waste bio-mass eg. baggase. As an example if ALL our sugar mills use high pressure (100+ kg/cm2g) and high temperature (540 Deg C) boilers and turbines, they could produce considerable excess power to be sold to the local grid. I believe that this is quite prevalent in UP but not in Maharashtra. Considering that we have a huge agriculture "industry" and we produce a lot of agricultural "wastes", these material can be a useful source of energy. However I do not think that we are "wasting" these wastes, perhaps they can be used more productively. Gobar gas is another avenue which is not utilised properly.

This scenario can change if there is a sharp drop in the investment costs of say solar power panels.

This scenario can change if say India discovers a huge cache of oil/gas which can be used instead of coal

I look forward to a healthy debate

Regards
Kersi

k e r s i k d o t i w a l l a a t r e d i f f m a i l d o t com

PS We will later discuss about the environmental aspects of the various energy sources

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vasu » 10 May 2011 20:27

One of the fallouts of the tsunami in Japan was that the claim of the pro-nuclear energy lobby that nuclear energy is safe and under control was severely dented. As expected, Japan's going in for a massive rethink, and probably retooling of its energy policy. Possible lessons for the rest of the world.

Japan to scrap plan to boost nuke energy to 50 percent

Japan will scrap a plan to obtain half of its electricity from nuclear power and will instead promote renewable energy as a result of its ongoing nuclear crisis, the prime minister said on Tuesday.

Mr. Kan told a news conference that nuclear and fossil fuel used to be the pillars of Japanese energy policy but now it will add two more, renewable energy such as solar, wind and biomass, and an increased focus on conservation.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Kersi D » 11 May 2011 10:31

Vasu wrote:One of the fallouts of the tsunami in Japan was that the claim of the pro-nuclear energy lobby that nuclear energy is safe and under control was severely dented. As expected, Japan's going in for a massive rethink, and probably retooling of its energy policy. Possible lessons for the rest of the world.

Japan to scrap plan to boost nuke energy to 50 percent

Japan will scrap a plan to obtain half of its electricity from nuclear power and will instead promote renewable energy as a result of its ongoing nuclear crisis, the prime minister said on Tuesday.

Mr. Kan told a news conference that nuclear and fossil fuel used to be the pillars of Japanese energy policy but now it will add two more, renewable energy such as solar, wind and biomass, and an increased focus on conservation.


Yes. nuclear energy has suffered a setback with the Japanese tsunami. But I think it may not become a big issue. What may (and must) happen is that the level of safety and controls will increase and hence the plants may become costlier.

I do not see any great potential of solar energy in Japan, they barely have space to live and grow their own food. What may be suitable for them is off shore wind farms, which are too expensive with today's technology.

Kersi

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby chaanakya » 12 May 2011 11:52

Recently I was moving around in Maharshtra. I saw the wind farms. Towers were not working when passing through the area in the morning. On return , in the evening I saw all units were working. Does anyone have any idea about the production there and generation/time graph? Farms were near Pune. TIA

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Kersi D » 12 May 2011 20:11

chaanakya wrote:Recently I was moving around in Maharshtra. I saw the wind farms. Towers were not working when passing through the area in the morning. On return , in the evening I saw all units were working. Does anyone have any idea about the production there and generation/time graph? Farms were near Pune. TIA


I have seen wind farms(s) on the road from Pune to Ahmednagar. I think it belongs to Tata Power. I have also seen wind farms around Gandhidham, Samakhliya and Mundra in Kutch region. I believe they are owned privately by many medium companies.

One major manufacturer of wind mills is(was) Suzlon but this company is having some problems. I know that there are other
manufacturers but I am not able to get the names offhand.

Kersi

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby chaanakya » 12 May 2011 20:28

^^ Thanks
I will get the info from TP. It was indeed seen from Pune Ahmednagar Road and got some hazy photos and also remember someone briefing that there was some wind power mini pilot project run by TP in Lavasa.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Pranav » 19 May 2011 06:28

Actually the cheapest power is hydro-electric. With modern dam design, siltation issues can be taken care of. There is huge potential in J&K, Himachal and Arunachal Pradesh.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby chetak » 20 May 2011 14:49

Kersi D wrote:
chaanakya wrote:Recently I was moving around in Maharshtra. I saw the wind farms. Towers were not working when passing through the area in the morning. On return , in the evening I saw all units were working. Does anyone have any idea about the production there and generation/time graph? Farms were near Pune. TIA


I have seen wind farms(s) on the road from Pune to Ahmednagar. I think it belongs to Tata Power. I have also seen wind farms around Gandhidham, Samakhliya and Mundra in Kutch region. I believe they are owned privately by many medium companies.

One major manufacturer of wind mills is(was) Suzlon but this company is having some problems. I know that there are other
manufacturers but I am not able to get the names offhand.

Kersi



Many of the wind farms are owned by celebrities like tendulkar, aishwarya rai and their ilk.

Their financial advisers get them a good tax break along with the very heavy depreciation involved. There is a very big interest from those with unaccounted income.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby chaanakya » 30 May 2011 19:17

Röttgen sees rewards in non-nuclear policy

By Gerrit Wiesmann and Quentin Peel in Berlin
Published: May 23 2011 19:54 | Last updated: May 23 2011 19:54

Norbert Röttgen believes a policy of phasing out nuclear power could boost German industry and economy
Phasing out nuclear power in the next decade could boost competitiveness and “reap enormous pay-offs for the economy”, Germany’s environment minister has claimed in a powerful snub to critics.

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Re: International Nuclear Watch & Discussion

Postby Theo_Fidel » 04 Jun 2011 03:54

Germany's power situation and why they think they can live without nuclear. Keep in mind their offshore wind farms in the North Sea alone is planned to be 12,000 MW, though they are thought to have a potential of 100,000 MW or so. It is doable. If Germany pulls it off, they will dominate in this technology and they know it.

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea ... gy-in-2010

New Renewables Near 17% of Electricity Supply in 2010

The German Ministry for the Environment and Reactor Safety reports that in 2010 renewable energy generated more than 100 TWh (billion kilowatt-hours) of electricity, providing nearly 17% of the 600 TWh of supply.

Wind turbines and biomass plants delivered more than 70% of renewable generation.

Biogas plants powered with methane from manure alone generated nearly 13 TWh.


Image

7,400 MW of Solar PV Installed in One Year

Doubling its previous record, the German solar PV industry installed 7,400 MW from nearly one-quarter million individual systems in 2010, according to the finial report by the Bundesnetzagentur.

In December alone, Germans installed more than 1,000 MW of solar PV, enough solar capacity to generate 1 TWh of electricity under German conditions. While they represent only half that installed in June 2010, the December installations were 50% greater than total solar PV installed in the USA in 2010 and as much as that rumored to have been installed in Japan last year.


Here is the power contribution on Feb 7th 2011. Note the smooth wind power curve and the predictable PV burst during peak hour in the day.

Image

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby uddu » 04 Jun 2011 10:24

'India can generate 48,000 Mw through wind energy'

ndia has a potential of generating over 48,000 Mw through wind energy farms, and for that it would require just 1 per cent of its land, according to an estimate by the Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET).

The centre, in its initial study at the coastal district of Rameswaram in Tamil Nadu, has showed it is possible to generate power through offshore wind farms. So far, these farms had been developed onshore. To examine the feasibility of offshore wind farms, the centre conducted the first phase of its study at Dhanushkodi in Rameswaram.

For the next level, it is awaiting approval from various government agencies.

C-WET is an autonomous research and development institution under the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE).

“Our initial finding showed that it could be possible to generate power by setting up offshore wind farms,” C-WET executive director S Gomathinayagam said on the sidelines of the CII-organised Power 2009 summit.

Of the total 15,000 Mw of renewable energy, 10,528 Mw is wind energy, he told Business Standard. Tamil Nadu continues to maintain the number one position in the country in wind power generation, with 42 per cent of the total installed capacity in the country.

The data measurement include wind speeds, wind direction, sea temperature, sea current characteristics and wave data for environmental research, design and development of offshore wind farm and potential impacts of these measured parameters on wind farms.

“So far, Rameswaram has shown good potential, where wind power density of about 350-500 Watts per sq metres has been recorded. This was measured with velocity along with the height and measuring through sound deduction technology,” he said.

“We are now going for the next level by setting up a 100-metre mast, which would require clearance from 10 government departments,” said Gomathinayagam. MNRE has funded Rs 1 crore for this project.

Apart from the offshore, the centre has installed 620 stations across the country to measure data and 261 places have been identified as potential locations, which can go beyond 200 Watts.

So the question is while India having a long coastline, can we not have offshore wind power plants all across the peninsula? Also why not decentralize the solar power generation so that even individuals can generate electricity and the excess be fed into the electric lines? I don't know much more about it. But it seems very much possible.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby JwalaMukhi » 04 Jun 2011 23:07

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/ ... 5820110525
With solar hitting its stride, a plan to make it a fundamental part of new infrastructure and buildings is no surprise. But if this policy goes forward, it will clearly be one of he strongest policies in support of solar energy in the world.

"Taking [Fukushima] as a lesson, we will lead the world in clean energy such as solar and biomass, as we take a step toward resurrection," Kan told reporters last month. He wasn't joking.

The plan to make it compulsory to put solar panels on all new buildings is expected to be unveiled at the upcoming G8 summit in Deauville, France as part of a broader plan to increase renewables and energy conservation.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby chaanakya » 05 Jun 2011 09:24

^^ JwalaMukhi

After FUK-D Japan may be heading for SOL-D as these solar panels are stated to be more explosive than Nooklear reactors and likely to create greater disaster according to some fissicyst. So it could be retrograde step.

oth Japan has realised , better late then never, the importance of renewable energy in the field of residential load requirement.
Buildings worldwide consume 30% of total power produced. They have more than sufficient root-top area to produce renewable energy or replacement RE devices to reduce energy demand on the grid.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Theo_Fidel » 05 Jun 2011 09:40

Was it Steve Chu why said that the rooftops in the US alone could provide for all the energy needs of the country. Very under-rated resource.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Hitesh » 17 Jun 2011 19:26

Without a nationwide smart grid and energy storage facilities, it will be always a mirage and a pipe dream.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby nithish » 19 Jun 2011 22:59

India’s largest solar power to go live in a fortnight

India’s largest solar power project will be commissioned in a fortnight. Moser Baer’s 30-MW project in Patan in Gujarat is likely to be commissioned by the end of this month or in the following week. The twin solar projects at Patan of 15 MW each have entailed an investment of around R450 crore.

“The combined capacity of our projects in Patan makes it by far the largest solar project. Many projects with similar size and slightly larger ones are coming up, but they make take time,” KN Subramanium, CEO, Moser Baer Solar Systems told Hindustan Times.

“The Photovoltaic project using thin film technology is expected to give better yield. This requires 7-8 acres for generating one megawatt depending on technology of thin film and land profile available at a specific site,” he said. According to him, the Patan project will remain the largest in solar sector in the country at least till the end of this year.

Recently, major electricity distribution company Torrent Power Ltd, entered the solar sector and is building a 50 MW project in Gujarat.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby uddu » 23 Jun 2011 19:17

First week with Tata Indica Vista EV
http://www.owningelectriccar.com/first- ... ta-ev.html

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby a_bharat » 30 Aug 2011 12:10

Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear

A surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the 'wind lens' could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Klaus » 07 Oct 2011 06:27

The following article looks at the current state of development in the offshore wind farm market, insights are also offered into techniques being developed for helicopter support, search and rescue missions within these huge fields. The links to the article can be found here:

Link 1
Link to complete edition
Alternate link to complete edition

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Pranav » 29 Oct 2011 19:57

Success for Andrea Rossi's E-Cat cold fusion system, but mysteries remain - http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/201 ... si-success

Also 1 MW E-Cat Cold Fusion Device Test Successful - http://pesn.com/2011/10/28/9501940_1_MW ... uccessful/

This could be a big deal.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Klaus » 03 Nov 2011 04:51

Part 2 of the growing offshore wind farm industry and the associated growing helicopter support opportunities is detailed in this report: Link

The entire edition can be found here: Link.

An alternative link.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Pranav » 03 Nov 2011 12:28

Artificial solar leaf comes to life - http://www.tgdaily.com/sustainability-f ... es-to-life


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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby joshvajohn » 03 Nov 2011 18:19

Indian solar energy industry will need 1 lakh people by 2022
http://articles.economictimes.indiatime ... olar-power

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby joshvajohn » 11 Nov 2011 06:59

India Doubles Solar-Power Installation Target as Industry Booms
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-11-1 ... booms.html

India’s solar market to reach 9 GW by 2016
http://www.renewableenergyfocus.com/vie ... w-by-2016/

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby devaraj_d » 01 Jan 2012 15:45

Kersi D wrote:I am working in the field of energy (mostly thermal) for the past 20+++ years. My views on the energy supply scenario may be out of sync with some people on this forum. Let us discuss our future energy options.

My argument are based on the current technology and pricing.
India is a growing economy. Whether you call it fast / slow / moderate / Hindu growth, it is immaterial.
Our requirements for electrical power are going to increase, partly due to our increase in population, partly due to increase in our purchasing power and economic growth.

India has no option. We will have to use coal and nuclear power for the next 10 - 30 years. All the other sources like wind power, solar power etc will continue to be marginal sources of power.

Our installed electric power capacity is about 170,000 MW of which about 60%+ would use coal. Our installed capacity of nuclear power is barely 5,000 MW. I guess that our demand would increase by about 1,000++ MW every year. I do not think that solar and wind and geothermal and what-not can change this equation. They have too many limitations on locations, seasons, time of the day (or night) etc. And what about the investments ? On an average a solar / wind based power plant cost 100 - 300% MORE than a conventional coal based power plant. (Yes even a nuclear power plant would cost 100+% more or than a conventional coal based power plant.)

One source which is being used today and should be further encouraged is waste bio-mass eg. baggase. As an example if ALL our sugar mills use high pressure (100+ kg/cm2g) and high temperature (540 Deg C) boilers and turbines, they could produce considerable excess power to be sold to the local grid. I believe that this is quite prevalent in UP but not in Maharashtra. Considering that we have a huge agriculture "industry" and we produce a lot of agricultural "wastes", these material can be a useful source of energy. However I do not think that we are "wasting" these wastes, perhaps they can be used more productively. Gobar gas is another avenue which is not utilised properly.

This scenario can change if there is a sharp drop in the investment costs of say solar power panels.

This scenario can change if say India discovers a huge cache of oil/gas which can be used instead of coal

I look forward to a healthy debate

Regards
Kersi

k e r s i k d o t i w a l l a a t r e d i f f m a i l d o t com

PS We will later discuss about the environmental aspects of the various energy sources



For the past couple of months I did some research around issues of Energy as my career depends on it. Your opinion is indeed what I have discovered after my research. Not only for India, for the whole world as well, renewable sources of energy will be minor contributors to the energy mix for at least several decades. if we want to grow we need energy and for that we will be burning coal unless, as you said, cheap oil (highly unlikely) or gas. Renewables are too expensive, unpredictable, have low power & energy density to be added into the energy mix.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby kenop » 27 Apr 2012 01:55


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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Yagnasri » 27 Apr 2012 10:49

any further news on the artificial leaf which can generate power? There were few reports and thereafter full silence.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby pankajs » 30 Apr 2012 18:40

Wind farms can cause climate change, finds new study
Satellite data over a large area in Texas, that is now covered by four of the world's largest wind farms, found that over a decade the local temperature went up by almost 1C as more turbines are built.

This could have long term effects on wildlife living in the immediate areas of larger wind farms.

It could also affect regional weather patterns as warmer areas affect the formation of cloud and even wind speeds.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby abhischekcc » 01 May 2012 14:48

Pranav wrote:Actually the cheapest power is hydro-electric. With modern dam design, siltation issues can be taken care of. There is huge potential in J&K, Himachal and Arunachal Pradesh.


Correct! And on top of the energy they also give, reliable and controlable supply of water - leading to better food production as well as protection from floods. Besides, they are carbon neutral - no GHG emissions. Despite this, the environmental lobby hates hydro.

India has up to 150 GW of hydro power potential, but it is locked up because of monkeys like Medha and Teesta.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby JimmyD » 02 May 2012 18:36

pankajs wrote:Wind farms can cause climate change, finds new study
Satellite data over a large area in Texas, that is now covered by four of the world's largest wind farms, found that over a decade the local temperature went up by almost 1C as more turbines are built.

This could have long term effects on wildlife living in the immediate areas of larger wind farms.

It could also affect regional weather patterns as warmer areas affect the formation of cloud and even wind speeds.


These news sources are distorting the truth - using the term "climate change" (which has a specific implication) to refer to localized changes in temperature. There were quite a few rebuttals to the sensationalization of the study by various media outlets (including a complaint by the author of the study himself).

No, wind farms are not causing global warming
Don't believe the headlines. Wind farms do not cause 'global' warming.
Much ado about nothing: Wind farms = global warming?

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Theo_Fidel » 02 May 2012 18:42

abhischekcc wrote:India has up to 150 GW of hydro power potential, but it is locked up because of monkeys like Medha and Teesta.


It is not just Medha types. Much of the Ganga basin has been abandoned for religious sentiment. NE has a problem with Assam not getting a cut it feels it is due.

It is a combination of wind/solar with Hydel pumped storage that will free India. Though I think the Western Ghats are a better bet for pumped storage.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby kenop » 05 May 2012 22:02

Talking pumped, a company has come up with an innovation where instead of water, gravel is raised to a higher potential
http://gigaom.com/cleantech/the-story-of-energy-cache-a-drop-dead-simple-energy-idea/

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Katare » 05 May 2012 23:48

India's coal reserve numbers are worthless if you believe the recent CAG audit reports. Our geological survey includes the coal available all the way down to 3 KM deep, while no one digs deeper than 300meters. Coal quality is very low, lot of assumption based on outdated methods and limited exploration, average calorific value is also low and most of it is located in the most sensitive ecological/tribal areas that are unlikely to be available for mining. Rail infrastructure required to transport those gigantic quantities of low quality coal would not be available at the rate and capacity needed by economy.
We'll have to go for renewable -
Earth receives 10000 times more radiation from sun than all of humanity's energy needs combined (all types, transport, electricity). ~90+% of the earth surface is inhabitable (70% water, waste land, forests, marshes etc) that can be used for collecting solar energy. Land required for solar energy is usually useless for any other purposes.
Good news is –
Solar cells cost has come down to critical $1/watt s thanks to China. It may drop down to 10ct/watt in next decade making it possible for pretty much every house hold to have a couple of panels to reduce their energy cast
Solar is available only a part of the day -
Solar thermal (which I work on) works on concentrating sun spectra on to a receiver tube to heat synthetic oil (or salt) which is then used to create steam to feed into a traditional coal/gas type of power plants. This heated oil (500-800C) is stored underground in large and inexpensive insulated tanks for use during nigh or to meet fluctuating demand.
Wind-
Wind speeds increase exponentially, so if you can go a couple of KM high by way of tethering a 5MW turbine can generate 5GW of electricity. Energy is available, technology is within reach but t economics and capital is not available.
Renewable as a new kid on the block, can't compete against a carbon based multi-trillion dollar energy industry optimized over couple of hundred years without level playing field.
Nuclear-
How many men have died due to nuclear power plant disasters? Compare that to how many has died trying to dig coal and drill oil? It's like everyone's worried about Hijacking a plane but no one pay's attention that a terrorist can kill same number of people in a crowded bus in some rural area. Nuclear safety is more hype than substance.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Theo_Fidel » 06 May 2012 06:55

Oh! Katare, watch out for the nuclear ka bethall's to descend on you now...
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Tulsi Tanti... ..Founder of Suzlon Wind power.

http://www.firstpost.com/india/how-wind ... 99336.html

In my book Let’s Save the Planet, I’ve discussed simple measures to end energy poverty by 2020. On the assumption that 50 GW is the installed capacity by 2020, wind could by itself generate as much as 650 TwH in the next 10 years. Wind power will secure India approximately $23 billion by reducing the dependency on imported coal and fossil fuels. Including renewable energy in the mix will have a threefold effect:

1. Make affordable energy accessible to all: Wind is actually not an expensive technology. Improved technology and instillation of larger MW machines have brought down the costs of generating a kilowatt-hour of energy from wind

2. Reduce carbon emissions: A single 1.5 MW turbine can produce over 4,491 MWh of electricity per year and reduce CO2 emissions by over 3,000 tons – equivalent to planting 85,514 trees. Wind installations in India have resulted in reducing CO2 emissions cumulatively by 91 million tons

3. Create employment opportunities leading to growth: Every megawatt of new wind capacity creates 15 jobs on a direct and indirect basis. In total, 219,000 job-years have been created due to the wind industry thus far. By 2020, the wind industry is expected to create more than one million jobs

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby kenop » 06 May 2012 11:15

Katare wrote:Wind-
Wind speeds increase exponentially, so if you can go a couple of KM high by way of tethering a 5MW turbine can generate 5GW of electricity. Energy is available, technology is within reach but t economics and capital is not available.

The future is going to be interesting in this context. Flying a generator is not the best idea though.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Theo_Fidel » 07 May 2012 03:53

http://ibnlive.in.com/generalnewsfeed/n ... 95300.html

Advocating the need for energy security, former president APJ Abdul Kalam on Sunday said India's power requirement will increase to four lakh MW by 2030 and focus should be on renewable energy generation to meet the situation.

With the growing population, by 2030 the country would have a population of 1.4 billion and the energy requirement would increase from 1,99,000 MW to 4,00,000 MW, he said inaugurating the Centre for Innovation in Energy Research at the Central Electro Chemical Research Institute (CECRI).

In order to meet the same, one should look into possibility of energy security by minimizing energy utility and wastage, he said. Focus should be on the production of renewable energy in the form of wind, bio-fuel and solar energy, he said, adding that hydro drive model may be considered seriously by Indian scientists.

Vipul
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vipul » 07 May 2012 23:41

India barely taps 2.5 per cent of its renewable energy potential.

India has achieved an installed renewable power capacity of 24,914 mega Watts (MW) as of end March 2012, against its potential renewable power generating capacity of 10,76,160 MW – about 2.3 per cent of the potential.

The 24,914 MW of renewable power capacity installed so far in India comprises 17,353 MW wind power, 3,395 MW small hydel power, 3,325 MW bio-power and 941 MW solar power, according to information provided by minister of new and renewable energy Dr Farooq Abdullah.

He said various studies undertaken in the past have estimated a potential of about 90,000 MW for power generation from wind, small hydel and biomass sources in the country in the medium term (up to 2032).

The potential for solar energy has been estimated for most parts of the country at around 30-50 MW per square km of open, shadow-free area covered with solar collectors. Even if we take one per cent of the 32,87,263 square km land mass of the country, it would be enough to generate 986160 MW of solar power.

The combined potential of wind, small hydel, biomass and solar energy sources could then be as high as 10,76,160 MW.

Estimates of potential for power generation in the country from solar, wind, small hydro and biomass resources in the medium-term (up to 2032) have put the potential for solar energy at 30-50 MW per sq. km, wind power at 490,002 MW, small hydro power at 150,003 MW, bio-power from agro-residues at 170,004 MW, cogeneration from bagasse at 50,005 MW and energy from waste (including urban/municipal waste and industrial waste) at 27.306 MW, adding up to a total 89,900 MW equivalent, the minister said.

He, however, said not all of this potential might be suitable for grid-interactive power for technical and / or economic reasons.

While solar power potential in most parts of the country per square km is based on availability of open, shadow free area covered with solar collectors, the potential for wind power is based on areas having wind power density (wpd) greater than 200 W/m2, assuming land availability in potential areas at 1 per cent and requirement of wind farms at 12 ha/MW.

The total installed power generation capacity in the country from various sources – both renewable and non-renewable - stood at 2,00,037 MW as of 31 March 2012. This included thermal power capacity (coal/gas/oil) of 1,31,353 MW, large hydro projects 38,990 MW, nuclear 4,780 MW and renewable 24,914 MW, he added.

Katare
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Katare » 11 May 2012 10:25

3M and Gossamer start up largest aperture parabolic trough

This was covered in detail at ABC news too. I have filed 6 patents on reflector part of this technology. Pretty interesting time for solar...

Vipul
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vipul » 11 May 2012 23:04

Suzlon creates country's largest wind park.

The Jaisalmer Wind Park being developed by the Suzlon Group has crossed 1,000 Mw of installed capacity and has reached 1,064 Mw (one gigawatt) on April 1. This makes the wind park, the largest of its kind in the country, Suzlon claimed in a filing with the Bombay Stock Exchange.

The company initiated the development of the wind park in 2001. Suzlon said in the filing that its entire wind portfolio -- from the earliest 350 Kw model to the latest S9X - 2.1 Mw series -- has been used to create the park.

The wind park consists of a cluster of wind farm sites in Jaisalmer district, including Amarsagar, Badabaug, Tejuva and Soda Mada.

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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Theo_Fidel » 12 May 2012 02:31

Vipul wrote:The Jaisalmer Wind Park being developed by the Suzlon Group has crossed 1,000 Mw of installed capacity and has reached 1,064 Mw (one gigawatt) on April 1.


Technically this would make it largest in the world. :eek:

The previous largest was somewhere in Texas for 750MW of so.


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