Renewable Sources of Energy

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Haresh
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Haresh » 20 Nov 2014 00:50


Rishirishi
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Rishirishi » 21 Nov 2014 04:31

http://www.forbes.com/sites/peterdiamandis/2014/09/02/solar-energy-revolution-a-massive-opportunity/


The cost of solar panels is dropping exponentially. The first and most important technological change is the falling cost per watt of silicon photovoltaic cells over the past few decades. Check out the plummeting cost from $76 in 1977, to less than $0.36 toda


Typical coal and nuclear power plant cost approx 1dollar per w. But it can produce electricity 24 hours per day. Solar on the other hand does not require any fuel.

What is more interesting is the battery capacity. Which is set to drop to 300 dollars per kvh in 2015 (from 1200 in 2010). It is expected to drop to 200 dollars per kwh by 2020. A typical Electric vehicle will require a battery pack of 50 KVh to meet the 300KM range. Hence for an extra of Rs 5 lacs you get a car that can run on less then a rupee per km. that is the same as having a car that can do about 80Km per litre :shock:


Some simple calculations.
Cost of rooftop PV system with 6KWH will be 2160 dollars
Cost of a battery pack 25KWH will be 5000 dollars.
Hence for 7200 dollars (4.3 lacs) one would have an independant system with power 24 hours. Sufficient to sustain 2 AC in the daytime and one in the eveing + all the other typical household gadgets.

With an interest rate of 10% over 10 years the Monthly outgoing will be Rs 6000,- Each year the real cost will drop becase of inflation (in stead of increase on electricity charges).

In stead of building mega large plants, India must focus on Solar power, and try to bring it to the mases. During the 50's they dreamt of having a phone in each village. Today each villager has one. :D Can we go the same way with solar power.

vivek.rao
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby vivek.rao » 25 Nov 2014 23:47

http://www.gmpartsonline.net/parts/2012 ... mCallOut=1



[ 1 ] HYBRID COMPONENTS / HYBRID COMPONENTS / BATTERY / BATTERY
Part Number: 20979876

battery Volt
MSRP Core $2,994.64 Online Price $2347



http://green.autoblog.com/2014/01/10/ch ... ost-34000/
There's a growing hubbub in the plug-in vehicle community over what looks like some ridiculously cheap replacement batteries for the Chevrolet Volt going up for sale. GM Parts Online, for example, is selling a replacement Volt battery with an MSRP of $2,994.64 but, with an online discount, the price comes down to $2,305.88. For the 16-kWh pack in the 2012 Volt, that comes to a very low $144.11 per kilowatt hour (kWH). But is it a real deal? How can it be, when a Chevy dealer may quote you a price of up to $34,000 to replace the pack?

For a 16-kWh Volt pack, $2,305.88 comes to a very low $144.11 per kWh. But is it a real deal?

Battery packs in alternative propulsion vehicles are usually priced by the kWh and, historically, they've been thought to be in the range of $500-per-kWh for OEM offerings. Since automakers are understandably secretive about their costs, we still don't know what the real number is today, but we do know it varies by automaker. Tesla, for example, has said it pays less than $200-per-kWH at the cell level but, of course, a constructed pack would be more. Whatever is going on, li-ion battery prices are trending downward.

So, $144.11 certainly sounds great, but what's the story here? Kevin Kelly, manager of electrification technology communications for General Motors, reminded AutoblogGreen that GM Parts Online is not the official GM parts website and that, "the costs indicated on the site are not what we would charge our dealers or owners for a replacement battery. There would be no cost to the Volt owner if their battery needs replacement or repair while the battery is under the eight year/100,000 mile limited warranty coverage provided by Chevrolet."

vivek.rao
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Posts: 3775
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby vivek.rao » 25 Nov 2014 23:58

http://www.gmpartsonline.net/parts/2012 ... mCallOut=1



[ 1 ] HYBRID COMPONENTS / HYBRID COMPONENTS / BATTERY / BATTERY
Part Number: 20979876

battery Volt
MSRP Core $2,994.64 Online Price $2347



http://green.autoblog.com/2014/01/10/ch ... ost-34000/
There's a growing hubbub in the plug-in vehicle community over what looks like some ridiculously cheap replacement batteries for the Chevrolet Volt going up for sale. GM Parts Online, for example, is selling a replacement Volt battery with an MSRP of $2,994.64 but, with an online discount, the price comes down to $2,305.88. For the 16-kWh pack in the 2012 Volt, that comes to a very low $144.11 per kilowatt hour (kWH). But is it a real deal? How can it be, when a Chevy dealer may quote you a price of up to $34,000 to replace the pack?

For a 16-kWh Volt pack, $2,305.88 comes to a very low $144.11 per kWh. But is it a real deal?

Battery packs in alternative propulsion vehicles are usually priced by the kWh and, historically, they've been thought to be in the range of $500-per-kWh for OEM offerings. Since automakers are understandably secretive about their costs, we still don't know what the real number is today, but we do know it varies by automaker. Tesla, for example, has said it pays less than $200-per-kWH at the cell level but, of course, a constructed pack would be more. Whatever is going on, li-ion battery prices are trending downward.

So, $144.11 certainly sounds great, but what's the story here? Kevin Kelly, manager of electrification technology communications for General Motors, reminded AutoblogGreen that GM Parts Online is not the official GM parts website and that, "the costs indicated on the site are not what we would charge our dealers or owners for a replacement battery. There would be no cost to the Volt owner if their battery needs replacement or repair while the battery is under the eight year/100,000 mile limited warranty coverage provided by Chevrolet."

Vips
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vips » 30 Jan 2018 03:06

Enercon readies biggest wind turbines for India.

The firm’s Chief Risk Officer, Wolfgang Juilfs, told BusinessLine on Sunday that the company has started offering machines of rated capacity of 3.5MW. It is developing suppliers for the machines, which will come in two versions — one with blades that will sweep a circle of 138 metrrs and the other 126 metres.

The height of the tower on top of which the turbines would be placed will depend upon the site, but it could be as high as 131 metres, in which case the tower will be a hybrid of a concrete structure and tubular steel, Juilfs said.

He said wind energy companies could participate in competitive bids now if the projects need to be commissioned by 2019-20end. Enercon will be ready with its machines by then. These, then, will be the biggest wind turbines to be sold in India.

The Indian market is dominated by machines of a nominal capacity of around 2MW and 120 metre high. The only other company to have a 3MW machine is another German company, Nordex.

Vips
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vips » 13 Mar 2018 19:35

Suzlon commissions India's largest wind turbine generator.

Renewable solution provider Suzlon Group today announced the installation and commissioning of its new product, S128, claiming it to be the largest wind turbine generator (WTG) in India.

The first prototype of S128 has been commissioned at the Sanganeri site in Tamil Nadu, a company statement said, adding that testing is underway with certification expected in third quarter of calendar year 2018.

The company said that the S128 WTG is available in 2.6 MW to 2.8 MW variants and offers hub heights up to 140 metres. The S128 wind turbine generator is the latest addition to Suzlon's product portfolio and features the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) technology.

The company claimed that the wind mill also consists of the country's largest rotor blade measuring 63 meters and has a rotor diameter of 128 meters. The SB 63 blade has been engineered and developed by Suzlon utilising carbon fibre which provides the capability to utilise thinner aerodynamic profiles.

This next generation turbine is well equipped to improve energy yield and support competitive tariff environment in India while protecting customers return on investment (ROI).

Vasu
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vasu » 04 May 2018 14:39

Here's how two rural entrepreneurs are powering Centre's 'gobar-dhan' scheme

"Poo to Power" may sound awkward and impractical, but Aditya Aggarwal and his brother Amit have done it in Karnal, Haryana. Two industries, one producing wire nails and another tinner rivets, owned by the family run on 100% electricity produced from cattle dung they get from nearby 'gaushalas' or cow sheds. The cattle dung-based power plant started in 2014 and that too without government support. The bio-gas plant generates close to two megawatts of power daily.

Sukhbir Singh of Silani village in Jhajjar stumbled on the idea to produce electricity from chicken faeces at his poultry farm to escape the clutches of corrupt electricity department officials in 2010. Singh, his father Subedar (retired) Ram Mehar and brother Ranbir had several cases against the local electricity department. Today, their bio-gas plants generate enough power to meet most of the electricity needs of four poultry farms.

Such real life change-makers and several others like them in Punjab, Uttarakhand and Tamil Nadu have come in handy for the Modi government to make its "Gobar-Dhan" scheme distinct from other government schemes by encouraging entrepreneurs to convert cow dung and other bio-mass available in rural areas to generate electricity, gas and fertiliser and make it a part of their business model.

According to government estimates, India has about 30 crore cattle population and about 30 lakh tonnes of cattle dung is produced daily. This can be a major source for bio-gas and manure. The government plans to roll out the scheme across 350 districts in the first phase and cover the rest during the second phase. In 2018-19, it targets to set up about 700 bio-gas plants across the country by providing performance-based incentives to gram panchayats, self help groups (SGHs) and bulk generators like gaushalas. Officials say government will provide 25% advance amount as incentive for panchayats and SGHs.

Vasu
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vasu » 09 May 2018 11:44

Renewable power sector employs over one crore people globally; Solar leads the clean energy drive

With the countries across the globe gradually moving towards clean energy in sync with their goals under the Paris Agreement on climate change, jobs in the renewable energy sector globally crossed 10 million mark in 2017. All the countries together had created over half-a-million new jobs in the sector last year, a 5.3% increase from 2016.

Though most of the countries are making efforts to move towards low-carbon economy, six of them - China, Brazil, the United States, India, Germany and Japan - have constantly been on clean energy path with representing more than 70% of jobs globally in the renewable sector.

The figures show that the solar photovoltaic (PV) industry remains the largest employer of all RE technologies, accounting for close to 3.4 million jobs worldwide including 2.2 million jobs in China and 1,64,000 jobs in India.

Biofuels, hydro-power (both small and large) and wind are the other three segments in the RE sector which employ maximum number of people across the globe. With China and India moving fast towards solar and wind, 60% of all renewable energy jobs are in Asia.

India has set a target of installing 175 GW of renewable power by 2022. This includes 100 GW from solar power, 60 GW from wind power, 10 GW from biomass power and 5 GW from small hydro power. India’s cumulative solar installations stand at 19.6 GW as on December, 2017. The country had added record 9.6 GW of solar power last year - over 10% of what all the countries together installed (94GW) in 2017.

According to Mercom Communications India, Karnataka and Telangana had installed the highest amounts of utility-scale solar capacity, adding roughly 2.1 GW each, in 2017. Together, they accounted for approximately 50% of the total capacity added in India last year. Andhra Pradesh was ranked third with 1,225 MW of solar installed.

India’s solar power installation growth is, however, being largely driven by imported modules. The IRENA’s annual review noted that the manufacturing of solar PV modules is limited in the country, given the availability of inexpensive imports, mostly from China.

“The market share of domestic firms decreased from 13% in 2014-15 to 7% in 2017-18. As of September 2017, the average price for imported modules was USD 0.39 per Watt compared with USD 1.44 per Watt for domestic products and a large share of the existing manufacturing capacity stands idle”
, said the IRENA’s review report.


Such a massive difference in module cost per Watt between Chinese and domestic modules.

Rishirishi
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Rishirishi » 12 May 2018 00:20

India needs to copy China.

“We build solar all over the world but China is the only place where every component we need is available just a few kilometers away. If we need something, we can get it in an hour. No shipping. No contracts. It just shows up in a pickup truck. The key is to keep our factories running continuously and, in China, we have everything we need close by.”

http://www.freeingenergy.com/what-is-the-secret-behind-chinas-low-cost-solar-panels/

Vasu
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Re: Renewable Sources of Energy

Postby Vasu » 22 May 2018 09:51

Don't go on the size, go on the intent.

Arunachal gets its biggest solar plant

The one megawatt-capacity plant, implemented by the Arunachal Pradesh Energy Development Agency (APEDA), was commissioned on April 1 this year with an estimated cost of Rs 850 lakh received as incentive grant under the 13th finance commission. The work on the plant began on April 19, 2016 and was completed on March 30 this year. Harayana-based M/S Dynamic Powers executed the work on the plant.

He [Pema Khandu] said work is going on to fulfil the target set by the Centre for rural electrification within this year under Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Gram Jyoti Yojana (DDUGJY). "As of now, 10% off-grid power connectivity in villages of the state are being implemented by the APEDA and the state government is contemplating to install solar plants in various health centres and upcoming mini-secretariats in the districts," the chief minister said.


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