The Indian National ID Card Project

The Technology & Economic Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to Technological and Economic developments in India. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Pranay
BRFite
Posts: 1458
Joined: 06 Feb 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranay » 13 Jan 2011 22:24

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 277802.cms

Aadhaar crosses a milestone...

Fifteen-year-old Sukrity today became the proud recipient of the one millionth unique identification number — Aadhaar.

With Sukriti, who lives in North Tripura, the government has successfully given out Aadhaar number to 10 lakh residents of the country since September 29 last year, when the first number was issued.

"It took us nearly six weeks to cross one lakh enrolments. However, it has taken us almost the same time to ramp up from one lakh to one million Aadhaar enrolments. This success is an auspicious milestone, en-route to our goal of issuing 600 million Aadhaar numbers in the next four years," Unique Identification Authority of India Chairman Nandan Nilekani said in a statement.

Interestingly, the youngest person to receive the Aadhaar number was a 13-day-old baby while the oldest person to receive the same was 103 years old.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 23 Jan 2011 18:35

UID project overambitious, say experts.

It takes no more than candle wax and a tube of fevicol to deceive the unique identification project claimed JT D’souza, a Mumbai-based forensic expert, at a conference on ‘The implications of the UID project in India’ on Saturday. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), headed by Nandan Nilekani, is a mammoth project to provide Indian residents with a unique 12-digit identification number that will serve social welfare purposes. The enrollment process, which started in September 2010, is based on a mechanism that registers individual fingerprints and iris patterns of each and every resident of the country.

“Millions of Indians working in the agricultural sphere, on construction sites and other manual labour have worn-out fingers, resulting in what is technically referred to as low-quality fingerprints,” said D’souza, adding that there is a high probability of excluding them from the proposed benefits.

“The technical glitches in the system form just one part of this overambitious project,” said Usha Ramanathan, who has been closely tracking and debating the UID project. “It is a clear cut violation of privacy whereby all agencies associated with the UIDIA will have access to personal database.”

“We should not misunderstand UID numbering with an entitlement-based identity card,” said Dr Ramakumar, associate professor, Centre for Development Studies, TISS. “The project refers to Indians as ‘customers’ and there is no fixed budget that has been determined for the entire procedure.”

At an enrollment site in Delhi volunteers at the registration desk were a clueless lot, claimed Ramanathan. “The homeless were given addresses of NGOs that had allegedly adopted them, and the ages of most people were renegotiated,” she said.

Sudip
BRFite
Posts: 378
Joined: 28 Oct 2008 05:42
Location: Paikhana

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Sudip » 24 Jan 2011 02:56

Vipul wrote:At an enrollment site in Delhi volunteers at the registration desk were a clueless lot, claimed Ramanathan.


Because the illiterate hapless are clueless about the benefits UID, so UID is not good WOW what a conclusion.


Vipul wrote: “The homeless were given addresses of NGOs that had allegedly adopted them, and the ages of most people were renegotiated,” she said.


She seems too upset for homeless. I wonder what would be her alternate recommendation if the above is not done. the homeless dont really have any home and dont really know their age and entering the NGO address and estimated age is totally acceptable. Also whats the big deal in entering NGO address. I am sure there is a mechanism to update address as needed. Homeless are not the only indians whose addresses will change over the period of their lifetime.
Age estimation has been done for decades for passport, ration card, licenses, birth certificates etc so why the shor now?? More surprising is the DDM who comfortably calls them 'experts' and types out their BS without putting an ounce of brain

RamaY
BRF Oldie
Posts: 17249
Joined: 10 Aug 2006 21:11
Location: http://bharata-bhuti.blogspot.com/

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby RamaY » 28 Jan 2011 03:32

The khulji of NGOs is that they can be audited. Often times the numbers are padded to gain additional funds/resources.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 54548
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby ramana » 18 Feb 2011 03:56

Karnataka extends UID to all the districts


Bangalore, Feb 17 (IANS) The Karnataka government Thursday extended the Unique Identification (UID) number project Aadhaar to the remaining 28 districts of the state following its successful implementation in Tumkur and Mysore districts.

'The cabinet has decided to implement Aadhaar in all districts to ensure every citizen residing across the state has a UID number, which will be helpful in establishing one's identity for several benefits,' the state's Higher Education Minister V.S. Acharya told reporters here.

The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), set up by the central government under the chairmanship of Nandan N. Nilekani, co-founder of IT bellwether Infosys Technologies Ltd, is the implementing agency in coordination with the state's e-governance department.


'The process of registering will be taken up in phases beginning with Bangalore Rural district on April 1 and in the city in May. We propose to cover the entire state by December,' Acharya said.

According to the state's e-governance Principal Secretary M.N. Vidyashankar, citizens above 15 years of age have to furnish documentary evidence prescribed by the authority as proof of identity, home address and date of birth under 'know your resident information'.

'Biometric details such as photograph, fingerprints and iris (prints) will be taken during registration for preparing the UID number card. For children below 15 years, a number will be given on the basis of birth certificate and their number will be part of the parental card,' Vidyashankar said.


The UID project was initiated in the state on a pilot basis in October 2010 and has covered about 650,000 people in Tumkur and Mysore districts till date.

The cabinet has also decided to implement the central Sixth Pay Commission recommendations in government and aided polytechnic colleges in the state for the teaching faculty.


'The new pay scales will be offered from April 1 to the beneficiaries and the state government will incur Rs.71 crore towards meeting the revised wage bill,' Acharya pointed out.


The pay checks of the faculty in these colleges would go up by two times, he said.



Vidyashankar is a good man.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 11 May 2011 19:30

Gujarat launches its own UID project.

Gujarat government has launched a separate unique identity (UID) project for every individual residing in the state, finding that the Government of India`s UID project under top I-T honcho Nandan Nilekani is still largely on paper.

Under this project, every individual living in Gujarat will have a separate UID number, which will feature several details-whether the person is below poverty line (BPL) or above poverty line (APL), and whether he pays income tax, permanent address, property ownership, including land, houses and vehicles owned, and whether he is entitled to reservation benefit.

Two government departments - state civil supplies and revenue - are working overtime to make the state`s own UID project a big success. While the civil supplies department is already in the process of completing a database required for getting essential commodities from the ration shop, the revenue department will add rest of the details related to income and property. "A pilot project has already been implemented in Moria village of Banakantha district", said state civil supplies secretary Raj Kumar, adding, "Now, we plan to implement it in one village in every taluka." Thereafter, the project will move to the urban areas.

To cost Rs 15 crore to the state coffers, a major feature of the state`s UID is that it will be activated only when the biometric impression is put to the attached computer. "All information will be contained in a simple bar code, which will be read by a hand-held scanner on a designated computer on getting the biometric detail," Kumar said, adding, "We have begun by sticking the bar code on ration cards. The e-gram centres in 13,000 villages will take biometric impressions to read the barcoded information. Based on the information, each individual will be entitled to government schemes, including ration from public distribution shops."

"The revenue department will pick up the job of infusing more information once the civil supplies department finishes work of bar-coded ration cards," a senior department bureaucrat said, adding, "We plan to hire agencies to gather data. We expect the work will start in June and will be completed by early next year." The Union government`s National Informatics Centre (NIC) has already prepared software for the whole project.

Sachin
Webmaster BR
Posts: 7999
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Undisclosed

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Sachin » 14 May 2011 12:31

Vipul wrote: Gujarat government has launched a separate unique identity (UID) project for every individual residing in the state, finding that the Government of India`s UID project under top I-T honcho Nandan Nilekani is still largely on paper.

I am not even thinking of the merits or demerits of this scheme. But I feel both the systems should be "compatible" with each other and in a position to share data seamlessly and efficiently.

wasu
BRFite
Posts: 110
Joined: 24 Sep 2000 11:31

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby wasu » 15 May 2011 00:45

Cover story in Business World on Aadhar ..Lot of potential for this one project to usher in a lot of change..

http://www.businessworld.in/bw/2011_05_ ... umber.html

dnivas
BRFite
Posts: 254
Joined: 05 Dec 2008 05:54

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby dnivas » 17 May 2011 15:42

wasu wrote:Cover story in Business World on Aadhar ..Lot of potential for this one project to usher in a lot of change..

http://www.businessworld.in/bw/2011_05_ ... umber.html


That was a nice read. thank you

Sudip
BRFite
Posts: 378
Joined: 28 Oct 2008 05:42
Location: Paikhana

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Sudip » 17 May 2011 21:31

The trouble with big brother’s eye
American defence contractor L-1 Identity Solutions — which has names associated with the CIA and other US defence organisations in its top management — together with US-based Ernst & Young and Accenture. The three foreign companies will be implementing biometric solutions for UIDAI that includes designing, supplying, installing, commissioning, maintaining and supporting the multi-modal automatic biometric identification subsystem.

IBM was and remains in census business and is currently part of World Bank’s e-Transform Initiative of the developing world of which the UID scheme is a component.

all USbased firms are subject to the Patriot Act that obligates American companies to share their data with Washington


L-1 also mentions on its website its experience with Pakistan’s unique identity agency NADRA (National Database & Registration Authority), which, Krishna says ‘appears to be created on the same business model that is packed by people with intelligence and military links’


“The UIDAI feared to have linked CIDR with the National Intelligence Grid — created to connect 21 existing databases with Central and state government agencies — and National Population Register and L-1 and Accenture who work in close affinity with US intelligence agencies,”


“The UIDAI should have been preceded by a constitutionally-sound legal framework and parliamentary oversight. Both of these are missing, making it an unconstitutional project,” says Supreme Court lawyer Praveen Dalal. “Constitutionally, preparation of a legislation/Bill is the duty of the Indian government and it must be passed by Parliament. But in this case, an authority like UIDAI is suggesting the Bill which is itself devoid of any constitutional validity,” says Dalal, adding the enrolment procedures and the exercise of taking biometric details too is “unconstitutional”.


the district administrations in Mysore and Bengaluru initiated steps making UID numbers compulsory at various levels in state government offices. The move leaves no chance to stay away from the scheme.

Similarly, India’s national payment gateway, National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI) aims to link Rupay, its soonto- be-launched domestic payment gateway on the pattern of Visa and MasterCard, with the UID programme. The move will allow customers to use their UID numbers as their banking passwords. All this makes UID a compulsory card that will link with it a person’s other information too which is contrary to UIDAI’s policy.

Pranav
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5280
Joined: 06 Apr 2009 13:23

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranav » 19 May 2011 06:19



Very valid concerns. All these foreign contractors must be thrown out.

On the other hand, some Jholawalas hate UID because it will strengthen the state and reduce corruption. Which will make things harder for Maoists and EJs.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 01 Jun 2011 19:20

Kerala to become first state to issue UID to all citizens.

After achieving 100% literacy and universal primary education, Kerala is aiming to become the first state in the country to issue Unique Identity Number (UID) to all its citizens within a year.

This was adopted as one of the pilot programmes of the Congress-led UDF Government that assumed office in May 2011, chief minister Oommen Chandy told a meet-the-press here.

Though it was a scheme initiated by the Union Government, the state on its own would bear the cost of Rs. 49.50 crore required to complete the exercise, which would be later reimbursed by the Centre, he said.

“Issuing UID would benefit people in many ways. We are keen to complete it as early as possible. That is why we are taking special initiative for this. This has been conveyed to a senior official concerned,” he said.

The state agencies like Keltron, Akshaya and IT @School had been entrusted with the field work like enumeration, taking photographs and computer processing to create the “unique Id number” for each and every citizen.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 03 Jun 2011 01:01

Creating an eye-capturing business.

By deploying the first proof of concept for the UID project, 4G Identity Solutions became the first company to introduce the iris biometric technology in India.

It took 39-year-old Sreeni Tripuraneni, a well-trained vascular surgeon in the UK, just over two years to completely study the efficacy of the iris technology (the iris is the coloured part of the eye surrounding the pupil), the algorithms for which were patented by John Daugman, professor at the University of Cambridge, back in 1994.Though Tripuraneni embraced the iris biometric technology for patient recognition in the UK a decade ago (in 2001), he now takes pride in the fact that his company – 4G Identity Solutions – is the first to have introduced it closer home by deploying the first proof of concept for the unique identification (UID) project in March 2010.

“Post the completion of my medical informatics course at the University of Bath, I started working on electronic patient records and how to use biometrics to identify a patient brought to an emergency room in a state of shock. My task was Herculean – getting to know the patient, his past medical history and blood group, and start quick treatment in the Golden Hour (the first hour of treatment, in medical terminology). In 2001 I found that iris was one of the most unique biometrics technologies, and since then I have been working on it,” recalls Tripuraneni.

Full of ideas and a fire in his belly, Tripuraneni came back to India in 2003 and started interacting with politicians and bureaucrats on home turf to understand government systems here. He found that governments were having problems in extending distribution of welfare schemes and those below the poverty line (BPL) had no access to state welfare programmes.

Keen to grab a piece of this niche demand, Tripuraneni made his boldest gamble: He set up 4G Identity Solutions (whose tagline says it all – ‘Authentic People, Unique IDs’), and became an exclusive licensee to US-based Iridian Technologies (to whom John Daugman sold his patent) for the Indian market.

“When I decided to come back to India, I thought of bringing the best technology to a country like this, where we have a huge population of BPL people, and where governments spend billions of rupees to eradicate poverty but none of this reaches the target audience. So, I thought the iris technology would help governments streamline their systems,” the chairman and chief executive of 4G says matter-of-factly.

Walking down memory lane, the doctor-turned-entrepreneur says his company made its first deployment to the Andhra Pradesh civil supplies department in 2005, cleaning up 5.6 crore people's irises and a demographic data base of 8.2 crore people, eliminating duplication from the data base.

“The technology helped the AP civil supplies department save more than Rs 1,000 crore per annum through this Rs 30 crore contract awarded to us. This is clearly evident in their budget reduction from 2009 until now. While the budget of the department was Rs 3,500 crore in 2009, it was reduced to Rs 3,000 crore in 2010 and Rs 2,400 crore this year,” Tripuraneni adds.

Flush with the success of the maiden deployment, 4G Identity integrated the iris technology with other programmes of the Andhra Pradesh government, including one to identify the real beneficiaries of Rajiv Gruhakalpa, a housing scheme for the low-income urban population. Then followed a similar project using multiple-biometrics (both iris and fingerprinting) for a UN-funded World Food Programme scheme in Odisha’s Rayagada district.

“Having tasted success with these projects, we had implemented the technology for several states, including the AP Police and the Delhi Home Guards for recruitment. Corporates too have a big problem in identifying prospective employees while recruiting, as some use fake identities for getting employment. Reliance Industries Limited and ADP (in Hyderabad and Pune) are two such stories,” Tripuraneni says, adding that the company has begun a dialogue with other state governments for replicating the implementation of iris technology in their public distribution systems (PDS).

“PDS is important to any state government and officials from Gujarat and Chhattisgarh have already visited our Hyderabad office and looked at our solutions. We are shortly going to close an order in Sikkim for their PDS which covers 600,000 people, the execution period of which is six months. We are also working with the ministry of home affairs for border management.”

For 4G Identity Solutions, the icing on the cake, however, came in the form of the UID in March 2010. The project had begun shaping up and they wanted to see how the biometrics (iris and fingerprints) worked on the ground. 4G was the first company to give a proof-of-concept to UID officials for enrollment and later ran it in the Medak and Krishna districts of Andhra Pradesh.

But why did the UID Authority choose the iris technology? The answer: “The iris is the only internal organ which we can see from outside, but we cannot touch it as it is behind the transparent cornea. Its growth in the mother's womb stabilises by the age of 12 weeks and it will not change after that throughout a human's life time. It is also very rich in features, having 256 different reference points (unique points to take samples), compared with finger prints that have 35 reference points. It is a fool-proof technology, much faster to deploy and can be used for real time identification.”

For enrollments to the UID or for other state government-run initiatives, 4G uses an iris recognition system complete with video camera to capture the sample and store it in a data base, which can be scanned through millions of samples to get an accurate identity.

As an empanelled agency for the UID project, 4G Identity is now working in six states for the Department of Posts, three states for State Bank of India, six circles for the Union Bank of India and for the government of Sikkim. Tripuraneni says the Central government has a target of enrolling 60 crore people by 2014 and the remainder in three years from then. “Internally, we, as an empanelled agency, have set a target of completing four crore enrollments this year,” he adds.

4G Identity Solutions is a big beneficiary of various state government initiatives and the Centre's UID project. The company clocked Rs 55 crore in revenues in the last financial year, 95 per cent of which came from the government sector. "We currently have an order book of Rs 200 crore, to be executed by the end of March 2012. So, we will be a Rs 250-crore company by the end of this fiscal," says a beaming Tripuraneni.

However, things will change when the UID project is completed and wound up, he says. Once the unique IDs are issued to all citizens, corporates too will get a piece of the action. The country will see more corporate applications of iris technology, especially in the banking, insurance and healthcare sectors for checking address proofs, identifying policy holders and the right nominees. “We will be tapping that sector. This business (iris technology) will grow to some thousands of crores of rupees in the next 10 years or so,” he predicts.

Tripuraneni thinks that state governments are more proactive in terms of embracing the iris technology, for the simple reason that it is they who are in touch with citizens, and not the Central government.

“States are answerable to citizens and so they have more responsibility to deliver welfare schemes in time. So, wherever there is a strong political leadership, they are thinking beyond. Many chief ministers in the country are proactive in adopting such technologies to deliver and monitor schemes,” he adds.

4G Identity is also planning to take wing and expand its business to the US and the UK this year, to start with. "Now that we have created success stories here, we will be opening offices in the US and UK and explore opportunities there. We have already got an order from one of the African countries -- Republic of Chad -- for military identification, which will take six months from now to complete. Also, inquiries are coming in from south Asian countries like Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal, and from African countries. We are currently in discussions with them," he says.

“Iridian Technologies was acquired by US-based L1 Identity Solutions Inc, which was later bought by French conglomerate Safran Group's Sagem. Professor Daugman's patent will expire in July 2011, post which it will be an open-market technology. Hence, it will not be a hindrance for us to enter the US or the UK market,” he adds.

Pranay
BRFite
Posts: 1458
Joined: 06 Feb 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranay » 23 Jun 2011 22:48

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 964677.cms

NEW DELHI: Applicants for new domestic LPG cooking gas connections can now produce the letters of allotment of Aadhaar numbers issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) as proof of identity and proof of address.

State-owned fuel retailers have advised their "LPG distributors to include the letter of issue of Aadhaar numbers with photograph and address issued by UIDAI as proof of identify and address for release of new LPG connections," Bharat Petroleum and Hindustan Petroleum said in identical press statements here.

"Henceforth, the Aadhaar (Letter issued by UIDAI) will be included in the list of documents sufficient for issue of new domestic LPG connections," they added.

a_bharat
BRFite
Posts: 660
Joined: 07 Aug 2009 09:54

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby a_bharat » 19 Jul 2011 16:47

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2011/07/17/man_sues_registry_after_license_mistakenly_revoked/?page=full
Massachusetts began using the software after receiving a $1.5 million grant from the US Department of Homeland Security as part of an effort to prevent terrorism, reduce fraud, and improve the reliability and accuracy of personal identification documents that states issue.

At least 34 states are using such systems. They help authorities verify a person’s claimed identity and track down people who have multiple licenses under different aliases, such as underage people wanting to buy alcohol, people with previous license suspensions, and people with criminal records trying to evade the law. Lisa Cradit, a spokeswoman for L-1 Identity Solutions, the largest developer of the software, said it can reduce fraud by 80 percent.

The system looks at each driver’s license photograph stored in the state’s computers, mapping thousands of facial data points and generating algorithms that compare the images to others in the mathematical database, said State Police spokesman David Procopio. The software then displays licenses with similar-looking photographs - those with two or more images that have a high score for being the same person. Registry analysts review the licenses and check biographical information, criminal records, and drivers’ histories, in part to rule out cases with legitimate explanations, such as drivers who are identical twins.

Last year, State Police obtained 100 arrest warrants for fraudulent identity, and 1,860 licenses were revoked as a result of the software, according to Procopio.

“The advantage of securing the identity of 4 1/2 million drivers is of considerable state interest, and that is what this software does,’’ Kaprielian said.

In Pennsylvania, which began using the system in 2007, officials say they have directed 1,500 cases of suspected fraud to police. New York detected roughly 3,500 instances of possible fraud, resulting in 600 arrests since a system was adopted in 2010.

“Our goal is one person, one license,’’ said Jackie McGinnis, a spokeswoman for the Department of Motor Vehicles in New York. “And this is a good way to detect people who have multiple licenses for multiple reasons.’’

jagga
BRFite
Posts: 659
Joined: 22 Mar 2010 02:07
Location: Himalaya Ki God Mein

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby jagga » 17 Aug 2011 21:44


Sudip
BRFite
Posts: 378
Joined: 28 Oct 2008 05:42
Location: Paikhana

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Sudip » 19 Aug 2011 04:29

[quote="jagga"][/quote]
Too much wishy-washy and one-sided. Talking about american spies in cabinet, alleging nilekani is eating money. No technical content in the conversation, just political mud-slinging. They keep stressing "I card". Its not a card, but a number. the quality of the paper, lamination, hologram doesnt matter.

habal
BRF Oldie
Posts: 6883
Joined: 24 Dec 2009 18:46

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby habal » 20 Aug 2011 16:51

basically what it means is that the present dispensation have decided to transfer all biometric details of 1 billion Indians to american corporates conveniently headed by ex-CIA chaps. This is the deal. This will walk us faster to 'one-world company'.

RoyG
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5180
Joined: 10 Aug 2009 05:10

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby RoyG » 20 Aug 2011 19:36

L1 Identity Solutions?

sum
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10057
Joined: 08 May 2007 17:04
Location: (IT-vity && DRDO) nagar

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby sum » 20 Aug 2011 21:20

Oh, the third Vendor Accenture is also French!

Isnt Accenture Amir-khan ( ex-Arthur Andersen)? :-?
( Not that it means they will steal our identities but just general Q)

sumishi
BRFite
Posts: 514
Joined: 30 Oct 2008 00:03
Location: Innerspace

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby sumishi » 31 Aug 2011 15:31

The Interpol chief had called for global ID card: Interpol chief calls for global electronic identity card system: April 06, 2011

Safran, a French company, owned by the French government, completed the acquisition of L-1 Identity Solutions (started by CIA spooks and Homeland Security guys) to become the world leader in biometric identity solutions
Safran completes the acquisition of L-1 Identity Solutions Becomes world leader in biometric identity solutions: July 26, 2011

It is all leading towards a global management of biometric identities. A global surveillance system!

gakakkad
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4475
Joined: 24 May 2011 08:16

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby gakakkad » 31 Aug 2011 15:43

^^^ Interpol is nobody. It has no enforcement capacity.

sumishi
BRFite
Posts: 514
Joined: 30 Oct 2008 00:03
Location: Innerspace

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby sumishi » 31 Aug 2011 15:56

gakakkad wrote:^^^ Interpol is nobody. It has no enforcement capacity.

Look how the West misused the UN resolution on Libya.
Look how NAC functions.
Look how Sonia Maino wields power behind the scenes.
Events are not always determined by interactions through the cell walls of organisational official capabilities. It is the powerful people across organisations who interact in devious ways to get things done their way.

Pranay
BRFite
Posts: 1458
Joined: 06 Feb 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranay » 02 Sep 2011 20:08

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/02/world ... ml?_r=1&hp

For decades, India’s sprawling and inefficient bureaucracy has spent billions of dollars to try to drag the poor out of poverty. But much of the money is wasted or simply ends up trapping the poor in villages like Kaldari, in a remote corner of the western state of Maharashtra, dependent on local handouts that they can lose if they leave home.

So now it is trying something different. Using the same powerful technology that transformed the country’s private economy, the Indian government has created a tiny start-up of skilled administrators and programmers to help transform — or circumvent — the crippling bureaucracy that is a legacy of its socialist past.

“What we are creating is as important as a road,” said Nandan M. Nilekani, the billionaire software mogul whom the government has tapped to create India’s identity database. “It is a road that in some sense connects every individual to the state.”

For its proponents, the 12-digit ID is an ingenious solution to a particularly bedeviling problem. Most of India’s poorest citizens are trapped in a system of village-based identity proof that has had the perverse effect of making migration, which is essential to any growing economy, much harder.

The ID project also has the potential to reduce the kind of corruption that has led millions of Indians to take to the streets in mass demonstrations in recent weeks, spurred on by the hunger strike of an anticorruption activist named Anna Hazare. By allowing electronic transmission and verification of many government services, the identity system would make it much harder for corrupt bureaucrats to steal citizens’ benefits. India’s prime minister has frequently cited the new system in response to Mr. Hazare’s demands.

The new number-based system, known as Aadhaar, or foundation, would be used to verify the identity of any Indian anywhere in the country within eight seconds, using inexpensive hand-held devices linked to the mobile phone network.

It would also serve as a shortcut to building real citizenship in a society where identity is almost always mediated through a group — caste, kin and religion. Aadhaar would for the first time identify each Indian as an individual.

The identity project is, in a way, an acknowledgment that India has failed to bring its poor along the path to prosperity. India may be the world’s second-fastest-growing economy, but more than 400 million Indians live in poverty, according to government figures. Nearly half of children younger than 5 are underweight.


One cannot improve human beings,” said Ram Sevak Sharma, the director general of the identity program. “But one can certainly improve systems. And the same flawed human beings with a better system will be able to produce better results.”

To build the database, the Indian government has created a highly unusual hybrid institution: a small team of elite bureaucrats who are working with veterans of Silicon Valley start-ups and Bangalore’s most-respected technology companies. Despite the scale of its task, the organization has deliberately been kept small. At its peak, no more than a few hundred people will work on the project, and private contractors will do much of the work of enrolling citizens. It costs the program about $3 to issue each Aadhaar number, Mr. Nilekani said, and more than 30 million have been issued so far. The process is free and voluntary.


The operation’s tiny footprint and seemingly technical mission have kept the project from drawing much scrutiny so far. Just as the information technology industry grew stealthily beneath the nose of the bureaucracy that had traditionally smothered private enterprise, the identity database is quietly embedding itself in India’s bureaucratic fabric even as other efforts to reform India’s government and economy seem to have stalled.

Century-old labor and land laws stifle industry and mobility, making it hard to build factories and create jobs. Restrictions on foreign investment protect small shopkeepers and domestic industries but also hamper investment that could modernize agriculture. Yet efforts to change these rules often fail to overcome entrenched interests.

The identity database has so far met only muffled opposition. Privacy watchdogs worry that the identity numbers will be abused by a snooping state that cares little for civil liberties. Leftists fret that the database will lead to an erosion of the state’s role in helping the poor. But powerful and corrupt bureaucrats, politicians and businessmen who thrive on the current system’s opacity have yet to object publicly, though they almost certainly will once the challenge to the way they do business becomes evident.

India’s identity database will be an order of magnitude larger than the world’s largest existing biometric database, the US-Visit program for visas, which has data on about 100 million people. To register all 1.2 billion Indians, the system will need to collect 12 billion fingerprints and scan 2.4 billion irises. It is a project of epic proportions — not unlike the challenge of governing the world’s largest democracy.


With its grid of chest-high cubicles in cheerful colors, the suite of offices could belong to a high-tech start-up like so many others in the booming city of Bangalore. On the second floor of the Touchstone Building, part of a nondescript technology office park off a traffic-choked ring road, the government’s own start-up is at work.

In one glass-walled conference room, bankers on leave from their jobs in finance were planning how to use the Aadhaar and hand-held mobile technology to bring banking to India’s 600,000 villages without laying a single brick.

In another, programmers worked out how Aadhaar’s open software architecture could be used to build an ecosystem like the ones Google and Apple created, embedding the number in every aspect of life. That could eliminate trillions of pages of bureaucratic paperwork, remnants of the License Raj, the old system that governed India’s closed economy. Indians face obstacles almost every time they ask anything of their government — a driver’s license, subsidized grain, a birth certificate. Digitizing these systems would eliminate countless opportunities for graft.

geeth
BRFite
Posts: 1195
Joined: 22 Aug 1999 11:31
Location: India

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby geeth » 07 Sep 2011 18:59

http://www.im4change.org/rural-news-update/cabinet-committee-to-decide-on-aadhaar-npr-convergence-9865.html


Rural News Update
Cabinet committee to decide on Aadhaar-NPR convergence print article [Share this article]

-Live Mint


A cabinet committee had allowed the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), the nodal agency for the Aadhaar project, to collect biometric data until the National Population Register (NPR) rolls out, Union home minister P. Chidambaram said on Thursday.

Chidambaram’s statement follows media reports that Aadhaar and NPR projects are duplicating each other’s work and wasting public money.

“UID was authorized to collect the biometric details for a limited period until NPR kicks off,” the minister said.

He said the home ministry has sent its comments on the matter to the cabinet committee, “which will take a final call on this.”

Under the Aadhaar project, the government aims to provide unique identification (UID) numbers to all residents of the country. The Registrar General of India is heading the NPR project, under which all residents will be issued identity cards.

NPR, which collected basic demographic data of citizens during census 2011, was also supposed to collect biometric data, while UIDAI was supposed to cull out duplications to issue UID numbers. But things did not work out as planned, said an expert.

“NPR has issued the request for proposal for enrolling agencies just last week and is yet to set up even data centres for the project. There has to be a six months jump-start to a project. On the other hand, UIDAI has already issued some 30 million numbers so far,” said a consultant who specializes in e-governance and technology. He asked not be identified.

Officials from the home and finance ministries and the department of information technology met last week to discuss the issue.

“The talks are ongoing and some solution should emerge out of discussions over time,” said an official who attended the meeting, asking not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the matter.

“UID was given the mandate to enrol the first 100 million people through the system of multiple registrars by March 2011, till NPR started its enrolment process,” said another official privy to the discussions, who also asked not to be identified. “Later the finance ministry extended it to 200 million people by March 2012, assuming that NPR would do the rest.”

The official said UIDAI recently wrote to the cabinet committee, asking for additional funds to enrol the entire population of 1.2 billion.

The Economic Times reported UIDAI has asked for an extra `15,000 crore.

“The duplication is basically over collecting biometrics, and discussions have started to identity a way of convergence between the two projects,” the official added.

The consultant quoted earlier said though there is a fair amount of duplication in what the two agencies are doing, there is a great deal of difference in their approaches. NPR wants to first digitize all the demographic data it has collected and then identify people from that database for biometrics, while UIDAI is doing it all at the same time.

“No matter how fast NPR does the biometrics, UID will still be ahead of it,” he said.

**************

May be a continuation of this, I read another news which says the Home Ministry is complaining against UID Authority that UID outsourced work is not 100% secure and people are getting their UID on data based on false affidavits etc...where as the Censor authorities are Govt people who visit every household and collect data..hence there is a social audit as well to identify the person.

Looks like Chidu has been entrusted with the task of killing the project.

sumishi
BRFite
Posts: 514
Joined: 30 Oct 2008 00:03
Location: Innerspace

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby sumishi » 21 Sep 2011 19:59

Aadhaar: on a platform of myths : The Hindu - July 18, 2011
-- R. Ramakumar (Associate Professor with the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai)

The Aadhaar project, just as its failed counterpart in the U.K., stands on a platform of myths. India needs a mass campaign to expose these myths.


Two countries. Two pet projects of the respective Prime Ministers. Unmistakable parallels in the discourse. “The case for ID cards is a case not about liberty, but about the modern world,” wrote Tony Blair in November 2006, as he was mobilising support for his Identity Cards Bill, 2004. “Aadhaar…is symbolic of the new and modern India,” said Manmohan Singh in September 2010, as he distributed the first Aadhaar number in Nandurbar. “What we are trying to do with identity cards is make use of the modern technology ,” said Mr. Blair. “Aadhaar project would use today's latest and modern technology ,” said Dr. Singh. The similarities are endless.

Mr. Blair's celebrated push for identity cards ended in a political disaster for Labour. The British people resisted the project for over five years. Finally, the Cameron government scrapped the Identity Cards Act in 2010, thus abolishing identity cards and plans for a National Identity Register. On the other hand, India is enthusiastically pushing the Aadhaar, or unique identity (UID), project. The UID project has been integrated with the Home Ministry's National Population Register (NPR). The “National Identification Authority of India Bill” has been tabled in Parliament. Globally, observers of identity policies are watching if India learns anything from the “modern” world.

The experience with identity cards in the United Kingdom tells us that Mr. Blair's marketing of the scheme was from a platform of myths. First, he stated that enrolment for cards would be “voluntary”. Second, he argued that the card would reduce leakages from the National Health System and other entitlement programmes; David Blunkett even called it not an “identity card,” but an “entitlement card.” Third, Mr. Blair argued that the card would protect citizens from “terrorism” and “identity fraud.” For this, the biometric technology was projected as infallible.

All these claims were questioned by scholarly and public opinion. A meticulous report from the London School of Economics examined each claim and rejected them (see “High-cost, High-risk,” Frontline, August 14, 2009). This report argued that the government was making the card compulsory across such a wide range of schemes that it would, de facto, become compulsory. It also argued that the card would not end identity fraud in entitlement schemes. The reason: biometrics was not a reliable method of de-duplication.

The Indian discourse around Aadhaar is remarkably similar. Almost identical arguments are forwarded in support of the project to provide a population of over one billion people with UID numbers. I argue that Aadhaar, just as its failed counterpart in the U.K., is promoted from a platform of myths. Here, there is space for three big myths only.

Myth 1: Aadhaar number is not mandatory.

This is wrong; Aadhaar has stealthily been made mandatory. Aadhaar is explicitly linked to the preparation of the NPR. The Census of India website notes that “data collected in the NPR will be subjected to de-duplication by the UIDAI [Unique Identification Authority of India]. After de-duplication, the UIDAI will issue a UID Number. This UID Number will be part of the NPR and the NPR Cards will bear this UID Number.”

The NPR is the creation of an amendment in 2003 to the Citizenship Act of 1955. As per Rule 3(3) in the Citizenship Rules of 2003, information on every citizen in the National Register of Indian Citizens should compulsorily have his/her “National Identity Number.” Again, Rule 7(3) states that “it shall be the responsibility of every Citizen to register once with the Local Registrar of Citizen Registration and to provide correct individual particulars.” Still further, Rule 17 states that “any violation of provisions of rules 5, 7, 8, 10, 11 and 14 shall be punishable with fine which may extend to one thousand rupees.”

The conclusion is simple: Aadhaar has been made compulsory, even before passing the Bill concerned in Parliament. Under the project's guise, the State is coercing individuals to part with personal information; this coercion comes with a threat of punishment.

Myth 2: Aadhaar is just like the social security number (SSN) in the United States.

There is a world of difference between the SSN and Aadhaar. The SSN was introduced in the U.S. in 1936 to facilitate provision of social security benefits. A defining feature of SSN is that it is circumscribed by the Privacy Act of 1974. This Act states that “it shall be unlawful for any…government agency to deny to any individual any right, benefit, or privilege provided by law because of such individual's refusal to disclose his social security account number.” Further, federal agencies have to provide notice to, and obtain consent from, individuals before disclosing their SSNs to third parties.

The SSN was never conceived as an identity document. However, in the 2000s, SSN began to be used widely for proving one's identity at different delivery/access points. As a result, SSNs of individuals were exposed to a wide array of private players, which identity thieves used to access bank accounts, credit accounts, utilities records and other sources of personal information. In 2006, the Government Accountability Office noted that “over a 1-year period, nearly 10 million people — or 4.6 per cent of the adult U.S. population — discovered that they were victims of some form of identity theft, translating into estimated losses exceeding $50 billion.”

Following public outcry, the President appointed a Task Force on Identity Theft in 2007. Acting on its report, the President notified a plan: “Combating Identity Theft: A Strategic Plan.” This plan directed all government offices to “eliminate unnecessary uses of SSNs” and reduction and, where possible, elimination of the need to use SSN to identify individuals. It's quite the contrary in India. According to Nandan Nilekani, Aadhaar number would become “ubiquitous”; he has even advised people to “tattoo it somewhere,” lest they forget it!

Myth 3: Identity theft can be eliminated using biometrics.

There is consensus among scientists and legal experts regarding the limitations of biometrics in proving identity. First, no accurate information exists on whether the errors of matching fingerprints are negligible or non-existent. A small percentage of users would always be either falsely matched or not matched at all against the database.

Second, errors of matching would stand significantly amplified in countries like India. A report from 4G Identity Solutions , contracted by UIDAI for supply of biometric devices, notes that:

“It is estimated that approximately five per cent of any population has unreadable fingerprints, either due to scars or aging or illegible prints. In the Indian environment, experience has shown that the failure to enrol is as high as 15 per cent due to the prevalence of a huge population dependent on manual labour .”

A 15 per cent failure rate would mean the exclusion of over 200 million people. If fingerprint readers are installed at Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MNREGS) work sites and ration shops, and employment or purchases made contingent on correct authentication, about 200 million persons would remain permanently excluded from accessing such schemes.

The report of the UIDAI's “Biometrics Standards Committee” actually accepts these concerns as real. Its report notes that “fingerprint quality, the most important variable for determining de-duplication accuracy, has not been studied in depth in the Indian context.” However, this critical limitation of the technology has not prevented the government from leaping into the dark with this project, one whose cost would exceed Rs.50,000 crore.

It is said that the greatest enemy of truth is not the lie, but the myth. A democratic government should not undertake a project of the magnitude of Aadhaar from a platform of myths. The lesson from the U.K. experience is that myths perpetrated by governments can be exposed through consistent public campaigns. India direly needs a mass campaign that would expose the myths behind the Aadhaar project.

sumishi
BRFite
Posts: 514
Joined: 30 Oct 2008 00:03
Location: Innerspace

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby sumishi » 21 Sep 2011 20:04

^^
UIDAI clarifies on Aadhaar: The Hindu - September 15, 2011
-- R.S. Sharma (Director-General and Mission Director, UIDAI)
[Many comments to this article on the website]

In his article “Aadhaar: on a platform of myths” (Edit Page, July 18), R. Ramakumar points to the failure of the U.K. National I.D. card project, the non-mandatory nature of the Social Security Number (S.S.N.) of the United States, and the possible failures of the biometric identification system to strengthen his case against Aadhaar. By doing so, he questions the motive of the project and the intentions of the government.

At the onset, it is important to state that while myths are dangerous, half truths are even more damaging. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) has consistently allayed misplaced fears by articulating facts. For the benefit of the readers of The Hindu, we wish to clarify the contours of the Aadhaar project.

Firstly, the need for the intervention has to be understood. Millions of residents in India, especially the marginalised, lack nationally valid and reliable proof of identification. Aadhaar — backed by biometric de-duplication — is a secure and robust identification infrastructure that covers two shortcomings in the existing identity databases: fraud and duplication. Importantly, mandating Aadhaar in other databases for improvements in service delivery is the prerogative of the departments concerned. Moreover, UIDAI has consistently held that while it will not mandate Aadhaar, service providers could do the same while ensuring that there have been adequate opportunities for residents to enrol for Aadhaar.

It has to be further clarified that there are no penal consequences if a person does not choose to get an Aadhaar number. The Registrar General of India (RGI) is one of the important registrars of the UIDAI (which follows a multi-registrar approach) having the responsibility of preparing the National Population Register (NPR) under the Citizenship Rules 2003. The UIDAI will issue Aadhaar numbers to residents who enrol for Aadhaar through the RGI.

Secondly, viewing the Aadhaar exercise through the U.K./U.S. prisms is unfair since both those highly developed nations face problems that are dissimilar to those faced by India. Resultantly, the solutions also may need to be different.

The S.S.N. scheme in the U.S. was originally established for the sole purpose of administering the Federal government's social security pension scheme. However, it has evolved from a single-purpose to a multi-purpose identifier and acts as the de-facto identifier for taxation purposes, to open bank accounts, to receive benefits from the state and for private services.

Though the S.S.N. is not mandatory for U.S. residents, it is a requirement for all employed residents and some other categories of individuals.

Service providers (government and private) are allowed to mandate S.S.N. in order to deliver services. Though U.S. privacy law does state that services cannot be denied if an individual does not reveal their S.S.N., it is important to note that the same law also requires that S.S.N. be disclosed if mandated by federal statute. Further, the law only requires that the individual be informed if it is mandatory or voluntary to disclose and under what authority the S.S.N. is being sought and how it will be used. While comparisons between India and the U.S. are not warranted, the fact remains that identifiers are an essential and integral need of an efficient public service delivery system. In India, just as the resident has the option to get an Aadhaar, a service provider may choose to use Aadhaar as an identification framework for delivering their services.

The U.K. also has de-facto identifiers in the form of National Insurance and National Health Service (N.H.S.) numbers. The comparison of the introduction of a mandatory I.D. card in the U.K. in the context of security with a developmental initiative of the Government of India of Aadhaar is misleading and incorrect. Further, equating views on the impact of the U.K. I.D. card project to the Indian scenario is unjustified.

Understanding biometrics

Finally, the manner in which biometrics are being used in the Aadhaar project and the difference between a 1:N (during the time of enrolment) and a 1:1 check for authentication needs to be understood. At the time of enrolment, the resident's biometric data is compared to all other data sets in the UIDAI's CIDR (Central Identities Data Repository) to ensure uniqueness. During authentication, the resident's data is compared to the data linked to her/his Aadhaar number thereby significantly reducing scope for errors. The UIDAI recognises that no single technology is perfect but a combination of technologies can help reduce the possibility of inaccuracy. Therefore, in addition to collecting fingerprints, UIDAI also captures iris scans and a photograph. The Authority is aware of the technological limitations and is therefore using technology as appropriate and as required for the purpose of developing the identity infrastructure for India. Furthermore, since services cannot be denied in cases where residents may not have adequate and/or imperfect biometric attributes, the Authority has put in place an exception handling mechanism which ensures that the technology is reasonably supplemented so that it does not become an impediment between entitlements and beneficiaries.

The Government of India spends a sizeable proportion of the taxpayers' money on hundreds of welfare schemes for the benefit of millions of people. To that effect, it recognises the importance of establishing an effective identification infrastructure for its residents and is committed to creating the same in a cost effective and secure manner. In fact, deliberations with regards to creating such an infrastructure have been taking place within policy circles since 2006. Therefore, to allege that such a critical project has been undertaken without due diligence is in fact a myth. The UIDAI has engaged in a series of consultations with multiple stakeholders and continues to do so as it implements the Aadhaar project,

State-of-the-art technologies used in online railway reservation by the Indian Railways and the telecom revolution have convincingly demonstrated that India is capable of using high-end technology in the service of the common man and that we don't always need to follow the progression of developed nations to solve our unique problems.

The Aadhaar project has a pro-poor, inclusive agenda which is an enabler for better delivery of services and enhanced transparency in governance. Comparing it to other I.D. projects in the western world without understanding its context is over-simplistic and needs to be countered.

sumishi
BRFite
Posts: 514
Joined: 30 Oct 2008 00:03
Location: Innerspace

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby sumishi » 21 Sep 2011 20:07

^^
Response to UIDAI's clarification: The Hindu - September 20, 2011
-- R. Ramakumar
[Many comments to this article too on the website]

R.S. Sharma's response (“UIDAI clarifies on Aadhaar,” Op-Ed Page, Sept.15) to my article titled “Aadhaar: On a platform of myths” (Edit Page, July 18) demands comprehensive rebuttal. In my article, I had raised three arguments related to Aadhaar. In these three respects, I characterised the arguments of the government as “myths”. Mr. Sharma tries to refute my arguments and calls them “half-truths”. This response is to challenge Mr. Sharma to point out where exactly are the half-truths in my article.

My first argument was on the compulsoriness of Aadhaar, sought to be thrust through its linkages with the Home Ministry's National Population Register (NPR). I stand by it. The NPR is a part of the larger Multi-purpose National Identity Card (MNIC) project, begun after the Kargil war to cleanse India of “illegal immigration”. Registration in the NPR is compulsory. The information about individuals that is compulsorily required in the NPR includes a “National Identity Number”. It is the UIDAI's mandate to provide de-duplicated ID numbers to the NPR; and the ID number that would appear in the NPR will be the Aadhaar number. To quote Home Minister P. Chidambaram: “The MNIC has to be issued to every citizen, for which the Government has decided to set up a UID authority.”

However, there is no mention of the collection of biometrics of individuals in Citizenship Rules 2003, which empowers the NPR. The collection of biometrics was stealthily made part of the NPR sometime after 2003. This stealth measure allowed the UIDAI to piggyback on NPR, thus allowing for quick enrolment. Mr. Sharma's effort is to hide this link, by stating that Registrar-General of India is just one of UIDAI's many Registrars. But are not the RGI and the UIDAI arms of the same government? Or, is it that the UIDAI considers control of “illegal immigration” as a “developmental initiative”?

Secondly, at four places in his response, Mr. Sharma states that Aadhaar is not comparable with identity initiatives in the West. At no place, however, does he state what the specific problem in such a comparison is. Mr. Sharma cherry-picks from the U.S. federal statute to make his overstretched claim that the Social Security Number (SSN) is necessitated by law in the U.S. Yet, he neatly overlooks my arguments based on the U.S. President's “Strategic Plan” in 2007, which aimed to reduce/eliminate the use of SSN to identify individuals. How can Mr. Sharma claim that the SSN has “evolved” into a “de-facto identifier” in the U.S., when its own President is trying to reduce/eliminate its use?

Thirdly, Mr. Sharma' position that biometric technology has “limitations” and will be used only “as appropriate and as required” represents an enormous climb-down from the UIDAI's earlier claims that biometric errors are insignificant. It is plausible that this climb-down is inspired by the enormous difficulties faced by the UIDAI in de-duplication and the rising costs therein.

There is much to write about errors of biometrics, but it would suffice here to state that the UIDAI's Biometric Standards Committee had listed the limitations of this technology in its 2009 report. While noting the possibility of high error rates in using fingerprints under normal conditions, this report had shied away from providing any estimates of error in the use of IRIS images, owing to the “absence of empirical Indian data”. It suggested the use of IRIS images only “if they [the UIDAI] feel it is required”.

However, this cautionary note did not prevent the UIDAI from plunging into IRIS data collection, even as no cost-benefit analysis for the overall project is anywhere in sight. Will anyone in the government stand up and be accountable for these spending decisions?

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 27 Sep 2011 19:02


Supratik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 6435
Joined: 09 Nov 2005 10:21
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Supratik » 27 Sep 2011 23:48

Re: Ramakumar's article:

SSN is one of the defacto identifiers in the US.
Biometrics is part of the immigration process.
The rest of the article is sheer skullduggery.

Pranay
BRFite
Posts: 1458
Joined: 06 Feb 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranay » 28 Sep 2011 21:20

http://news.outlookindia.com/item.aspx?736594

More than a million people will enroll for unique Aadhaar identity number per day by October which has so far been provided to 37 million people across the country, chairman of Unique Identification Authority of India Nandan Nilekani said today.

"The goal is to give 1.2 billion people unique number and that is well on its way. We have already given unique numbers to 37 million people, another 50 million people enrolled and are waiting to get numbers," Nilekani said at a function here.

He said while "new people are getting enrolled across the country at the rate of 6,00,000 a day in about 20,000 locations, by October the figure will be one million people per day".


Aadhaar is a 12 digit individual identification number, which will serve as a proof of identity and address anywhere in India.

Nilekani said there is little possibility of duplicates arising out of the system because only one ID is issued to a person taking his biometric signature.

"One ID means that if you are coming with a false name, that is going to remain for the rest of your life... Something which no one would like," he said.

Nilekani said every person who gets an ID from the Aadhaar system also gets an online ID. The online ID can be used to verify the identity of a person anywhere.

Nilekani said they would set up a chain of applications which will enable people to update their address in the event of being transferred to a different place.


He said the unique number will prove a boon to those who do not get access to various financial services and social benefits.

In this regard, he reminded of a notification issued by the Finance Ministry last year recognising Aadhaar number as an officially valid document to satisfy the know-your-customer norms for opening bank accounts.

This notification is expected to promote financial inclusion of the poor and the hitherto excluded by making it possible for them to easily establish their identity and open bank accounts.

He said the banking correspondence in rural areas, who would be equipped with micro ATMs under a new government initiative, will have online verification capabilities and people with aadhaar number can reap benefits from it also.

Pranay
BRFite
Posts: 1458
Joined: 06 Feb 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranay » 30 Sep 2011 05:45

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 178068.cms

Unique identification authority said the Aadhaar cards issued by it are a valid residence proof for opening a bank account. "Aadhaar is a valid 'Know Your Customer' (KYC) document for opening a bank account," Unique Identification Development Authority of India (UIDAI) chairman Nandan Nilekani said.

"Aadhaar letter has two parts - identity and address. If the address which a person shows to the bank, is the same address as on the (Aadhaar) letter, then it is also a proof of residence." This comes at a time media reported that as per RBI notification Aadhaar is not a valid residence proof. However, the central bank reportedly accepted its validity as identity of a person.

Nilekani said, "In a few days, we will be starting online authentication of address and identity. If the address matches through online authentication, then it will be treated as current address"

chaanakya
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9513
Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby chaanakya » 08 Oct 2011 12:31

Well went to Adhaar Card Issue Centre. The process was smooth. Software seems robust.
Took Finger print for all 10. Thumbs together and rest grouped together for Left and tight.
Iris scan. Seems ok
Photo. Cheap tye webcam. Removes all illusion about oneself.
Form filling seems daunting. Bilingual with English.
Documents required
1.Residence proof, Ration Card or driving Card, Passport(first and Last page), Voter ID card, ID card issued by employer.
2. Date of Birth: SSLC, Birth Certificate , Passport .

Any one of the above documents from each group is enough.
If Document for DOB is something else then it would be called "declared" and not "verified"

Software was linked to Ration Card (PDS Card) being issued as Smart Card.

Data entry, verification, scanning of biometrics took about 20 minutes for each.
I understand that centres meant for public had long Q before one reaches the counter.

Fairly basic setup for centre.

State Govts are declared as Registrar for UID and each state has designated a Dept as Nodal Dept for issue and maintenance of data. Private Vendors are appointed for State Specific Applications while Adhaar software is by TCS . Easily linked to other software(Fron end)
Adhaar will be generated at Kolkata. Data will be uploaded to Bangalore for De-Dup. Card will be sent in 15 days or so, I was informed at the address mentioned.

The card issued to one seemed very flimsy. Needs to be laminated. About size of Credict card/Pan card. They could have generated card like Pan Card as Adhaar is going to last very long time ( at least till Indv is alive)

Upon data entry, they would ask you to confirm spellings and other details. Thats good.

They issue printed Ack containing all details fed.
I noticed that they have used defaults for two items
1. Can be used for Bank Account information :yes
2. Personal Information can be shared :yes.
Could be used for Railway E-tickets or mobile tickets

They did not informed about these choices before printing Ack and default is selected as such. Troubling for many.

Other things are ok
Also linked to NPR
Adhaar could be linked to other database for different Schemes of Govt, which is being planned.

I am not sure as to how all information lying in different databases would be collected for an Individual. Middlewares?

CCTNS would be linked as Police has already asked for juicy bits of info.
NATGRID as well.

Pranay
BRFite
Posts: 1458
Joined: 06 Feb 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranay » 12 Oct 2011 19:51

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 321326.cms

The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) - mandated to issue unique identity number cards to all the residents of the country - has won a major battle against the bureaucracy.

The authority is all set to get financial autonomy to implement the UPA II's pet project. "We are fully backing the UIDAI," deputy chairman of Planning Commission Montek Singh Ahluwalia said.

"I am going to take up the issue of delegation of financial powers to the UIDAI with the finance secretary tomorrow," he said.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 17 Oct 2011 22:26

UIDAI hits MGNREGA roadblock.

Nandan Nilekani lead the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) has hit a Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee (MGNREGA) roadblock. The government had refused to make unique number or Aadhaar mandatory for making wage payment to people enrolled under the world’s largest social security scheme unless all residents are covered.

The reason given was that MGNREGA is a universal scheme and anyone can demand work. Unless all resident in a district have an Aadhaar number, accepting UIDAI’s request will be in violation of the job guarantee law.

“Only when Aadhaar becomes universal the UIDAI request can be accepted,” a plan panel member said, while adding that there was still a long way for UIDAI to achieve the goal.

The UIDAI wanted the government to declare Aadhaar must for issuing the job cards to foster enrolment of people for the unique identity number scheme. But, the rural development ministry found that very few Aadhaar numbers have been issued to those enrolled in MGNREGA even in state such as Jharkhand, where it was launched first.

Nilekani had recently told reporters that Aadhaar number will be linked for MGNREGA bank accounts for electronic transfer of wages. It was the next step UIDAI was looking at after the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) declared Aadhaar as enough for one to open a bank account.

UIDAI chairperson Nilekani had recently met Rural Development minister Jairam Ramesh and plan panel member Mihir Shah to explore the possibility of linking Aadhaar with MGNREGA bank accounts.

Once that happens, Nilekani had proposed the MGNREGA workers will get the facility of withdrawing the money at their doorsteps through banking correspondent model. A person having a small hand-held machine linked with the banks server through mobile based internet service is called banking correspondent.

The plan panel was also skeptical on the banking correspondent model as it has been employed in small pilots but not vigorously tested in the tough rural landscape, where mobile connectivity is still a problem.

“A lot of issues would have to be sorted out before UIDAI is made mandatory for MGNREHA bank accounts,” the member said.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Vipul » 08 Dec 2011 22:20

Nilekani’s ID bill gets unique rebuff from house panel: “No”

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Nandan Nilekani’s unique ID project has just got a royal kick in the butt from the parliamentary standing committee on finance.

The committee, which vetted the National Identification Authority of India Bill 2010 to give the Unique ID Authority of India (UIDAI) headed by former Infosys chief Nilekani, has, according to a report by CNBC TV-18, recommended that the Bill be trashed and be replaced with another, more acceptable, one.

While the government does not have to go by the committee’s recommendations, given the fiasco over foreign direct investment (FDI) in retail, where it had to hastily backtrack, it cannot afford to eat crow again over UIDAI.

Like FDI, the unique ID project is not central to the Congress party’s electoral interests, and there is no unanimity over it even in the cabinet. In fact, key members of Sonia Gandhi’s National Advisory Council have questioned it. Aruna Roy has called the project “invasive” which could “facilitate communal targeting of certain minorities.”

Like FDI, the unique ID project is not central to the Congress party’s electoral interests, and there is no unanimity over it even in the cabinet. As analysed by Firstpost as early as September this year, Nilekani’s project, which is backed primarily by Manmohan Singh, faces serious opposition from within the government. Given the weak equations among the PM, Pranab Mukherjee and P Chidambaram in the wake of the 2G scam, and given that the same three players have different views on the unique ID project, there is a good possibility that Nilekani’s project will be either cut to size or mothballed.

While the finance ministry is worried about the bills Nilekani is going to rack up, the home ministry says the UID project – which is about capturing biometric and other data of residents and giving them a unique ID – will clash with its own National Population Register (NPR). Even the Planning Commission, headed by the Prime Minister’s pal Montek Singh Ahluwalia, says the UIDAI’s books need to be audited.

“The home ministry says the data collected by the unique ID project is not good enough for its own National Population Register (NPR) – a project to provide citizens with identity cards….the ministry wants to collect its own data since it finds the Unique ID Authority of India’s (UIDAI’s) data unreliable. It also thinks iris scanning is a waste of money,” Firstpost reported in September.

A Business Standard report quoted an NPR source as saying: “We can collect the data for the whole country by 2014 and at half the cost.”

While the home ministry’s NPR will cost Rs 13,438 crore, UIDAI’s will cost Rs 17,864 crore. If both projects are cleared, which the finance ministry is sure to veto, the country would have been saddled with a humongous bill of Rs 31,302 crore for two ID projects that would essentially have done the same thing.

A report in India Today says the UID project has faced opposition on four counts: “the inclusion of residents as opposed to citizens; issues related to privacy of those being assigned the UID numbers; duplication of the work being done for preparing the NPR using the same biometric attributes; and the massive expenditure that the project entails.”

Criticising the “hasty manner” in which the scheme is being implemented, the committee apparently expressed concerns that collection of biometric data by private parties could leave sensitive data in the wrong hands and could possibly be “misused”.

But the real issue obviously is the fact that politicians don’t like professionals invading their turf – and that is why Nandan Nilekani is being given the thumbs down by the system.

In an interview to The New Yorker, Nilekani rhetorically asked his interviewer: “Am I a virus?”

Pranav
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5280
Joined: 06 Apr 2009 13:23

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranav » 09 Dec 2011 15:26

On the PalmSecure biometric technology from Fujitsu - http://www.technologyreview.in/blog/mimssbits/27057/

Image

Image

Supratik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 6435
Joined: 09 Nov 2005 10:21
Location: USA

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Supratik » 10 Dec 2011 18:57

UID was originally conceived by the NDA but could not be implemented. I don't see exactly
why they are opposing now. This is one of the few visionary things that MMS has done.
They should ignore the standing committee report and go ahead with it.

vera_k
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3105
Joined: 20 Nov 2006 13:45

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby vera_k » 11 Dec 2011 01:56

^^^

Let me take a guess. Based on their agenda, issuing IDs to non-citizens would be a non-starter. On that count, the UID is going back in time, if it is trying to be a modern version of the US social security number. Of course, there might not be any better option than to register non-citizens as citizens, but there would be reason enough to oppose doing it by stealth.

Pranav
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5280
Joined: 06 Apr 2009 13:23

Re: The Indian National ID Card Project

Postby Pranav » 11 Dec 2011 15:54

vera_k wrote:^^^

Let me take a guess. Based on their agenda, issuing IDs to non-citizens would be a non-starter. On that count, the UID is going back in time, if it is trying to be a modern version of the US social security number. Of course, there might not be any better option than to register non-citizens as citizens, but there would be reason enough to oppose doing it by stealth.


Tagging all residents is an essential first step if one wants to identify citizens and non-citizens.


Return to “Technology & Economic Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests