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Indian Health Care Sector

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Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 19 Jan 2016 16:58

The Wiki page on the Indian pharmaceutical sector, contains a remark, that the majority of the production and/or value of drugs in India, is accounted for by multinational companies.

This can't be right, can it? With so many Indian pharma companies, producing multiple medicines, the Indian drug companies must be ahead, in India itself.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A_Gupta » 27 Jan 2016 08:48

http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/health36 ... -ahluwalia
India’s health care sector is poised at a crossroads, and the direction taken now will be critical in determining its trajectory for years to come. In a recent Brookings India paper on the Indian government’s health care policy, we argue that it should prioritize expanding and effectively delivering those aspects of health that fall under the definition of “public goods’” for example, vaccination, health education, sanitation, public health, primary care and screening, family planning through empowering women, and reproductive and child health.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby chanakyaa » 04 Feb 2016 04:42


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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby kmkraoind » 14 Mar 2016 19:21

If done well, our street food alone will be a big tourist attraction. At last, somebody is taking care of this issue. In Bengaluru, there is an area called VV Puram and its a street food paradise. Lets create "street food streets" in every big town and multiple in a city.

Health Minister Shri J P Nadda launches project Clean Street Food 20,000 roadside vendors to be skilled under PMKVY in the first phase

Union Minister for Health & Family Welfare Shri J P Nadda launched Project Clean Street Food in the presence of Shri Rajiv Pratap Rudy, Union Minister of State for Skill Development & Entrepreneurship (Independent Charge), here today. The project of Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) aims at to raise the safety standards of foods sold on streets across the capital city of New Delhi by training 20,000 roadside vendors on aspects of health and hygiene, in the first phase.

As part of Project Clean Street Food, FSSAI will partner with the Ministry of Skill Development & Entrepreneurship to train street food vendors at more than 40 centres across Delhi under the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) category of the Governments flagship skills training scheme- Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojana (PMKVY).

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Nitesh » 15 Mar 2016 14:18

There is news about lot of drugs getting banned, practically all available all the shelf products are banned

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 402468.cms
http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... ned-drugs/

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Nitesh » 17 Mar 2016 09:31

Request do docs, too many scientific names given here, no clarity. Can you all guide about what will be the substitution of popular brands?

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 17 Mar 2016 20:07

Any news about the 2 major Indian public sector pharmaceutical firms, IDPL and HAL( Hindustan Antibiotics)?

How are they doing? Are they struggling or thriving, do they export generic drugs, or confine themselves to India? Why do we never hear about what they are doing or not doing?

One good indirect fact, is that they have not thus far, been subject to any US FDA or any other country's scrutiny, criticism or sanction.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby SSridhar » 27 Mar 2016 15:52

India’s rotavirus vaccine launched - The Hindu
Inching a step closer to universal immunisation, the Health Ministry on Saturday launched the [b]country’s first, indigenous rotavirus vaccine to combat diarrhoeal deaths.[/b]

Health Minister J.P. Nadda called it an ‘historic moment’ for the country, adding that the launch of Rotavac was “a new milestone towards expanding the coverage of full immunisation in the country aimed at reducing child mortality”.

Diarrhoea caused by Rotavirus is one of the leading causes of severe diarrhoea and death among children less than five years of age. In India, between 80,000 to one lakh children die due to Rotavirus diarrhoea annually while nearly 9 lakh children are admitted to hospital with severe diarrhoea. Another 32.7 lakh children visit the hospital as out patients due to the disease.

The vaccine was being introduced initially in four States — Andhra Pradesh, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Odisha — and would be expanded to the entire country in a phased manner, Mr. Nadda said. “Adding this life-saving vaccine to our immunisation programme will not only improve the health of our children but also reduce hospitalisation and other conditions associated with diarrhoea due to Rotavirus such as malnutrition, delayed physical and mental development among children. Reduced hospitalisation lower the economic burden on the family and the health cost burden on the country,” he added. The Rotavirus vaccine was developed indigenously, under a public-private partnership between the Ministry of Science Technology and the Health Ministry.

The Rotavac is in addition to three new vaccines that have been introduced in India’s Universal Immunis-ation Programme (UIP) including Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV), Measles, Rubella (MR) vaccine, and Adult Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccine. With these new vaccines, India’s UIP will provide free vaccines against 12 life threatening diseases, to 27 million children annually, the largest birth cohort in the world. The IPV was intro-duced in six States from Nov. 30, 2015 for double protection against polio.


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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby member_28108 » 27 Mar 2016 17:36

Both IDPL and HA are doing well and are making large volumes of generic drugs and also some primary products for the national and international market. Their real thrust is in low cost drugs for national programs.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 28 Mar 2016 09:49

prasannasimha wrote:Both IDPL and HA are doing well and are making large volumes of generic drugs and also some primary products for the national and international market. Their real thrust is in low cost drugs for national programs.


Thanks, nice to know that some public sector units are doing well, and that too with very little publicity!

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Bade » 03 Apr 2016 04:07

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/Clamp-from-IIT-M-to-help-surgeons-suture-blood-vessels/articleshow/51623227.cms

After one such tiring training session nearly five years ago, the surgeon briefed engineers in the department of engineering design at IIT-Madras about the need for devices that can help people like him. Two years ago, an M Tech student in the department of engineering design at IIT-Madras decided to develop a clamp for micro vascular surgeries as a part of his engineering project. "I spent several days listening to doctors and watched them perform surgeries. I realised that the procedure was complex and long because the blood vessels collapse when they suture it," said Anand Parikh.

Clamps are used to stop blood flow into vessels that need to be sutured. Traditionally, once a doctor clips the vessels with these clamps, it shrinks, making it tough for doctors to do the end-to-end stitches. Nstomoz was developed to ensure that the vessel does not collapse. This innovation won the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award for the product at earlier this month.


In laboratory conditions, the clamp was found to help surgeons suture vessels at twice the speed of the conventional method. The team is now looking at manufacturing these surgical clamps for the market. "We have filed for two patents. The product will be launched from the incubation ecosystem of IIT Madras," said department of engineering design professor Venkatesh Balasubramanian.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 30 May 2016 17:12

Recently, a few Indian pharmaceutical companies were reported as being given "Establishment Inspection Reports" by, who else, the US FDA.

Why don't we hear of such reports from Japanese inspectors, or Brazilian, Russian, Nigerian, Australian, Mongolian et al? Surely, these countries want to be sure of what they are importing, don't they? Or do they have some other method?

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A_Gupta » 19 Jun 2016 20:23

Hyderabad on “high alert” for potential polio outbreak. Officials announced on Wednesday that a strain of active, vaccine-derived type 2 polio virus had been found in the water at a sewage treatment plant in Hyderabad, the capital of Telangana state in southern India that is home to over seven million people. Twenty-four sections of the city have been declared “most-sensitive areas” for a future outbreak. This discovery has prompted a precautionary vaccination drive that will begin Monday and reach 300,000 children, according to a statement from India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. Thanks to collaboration between federal and state governments, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and non-profit organizations, India detected its last case of polio in West Bengal in 2011 and was declared polio-free in 2012. Despite this success story, experts such as regional health officer Rajesh Singh have expressed mounting concern: “When the vaccine is given through the mouth, the liquid that gets dissolved and passed on in the form of stool accumulates in the sewage system. The virus in that vaccine becomes a stronger and more resistant strain.”


from: http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2016/06/17/fr ... e-17-2016/

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Suraj » 24 Dec 2016 01:44

Prices of HIV, diabetes and angina drugs slashed by up to 44 per cent
Prices of over 50 essential drugs including those used for treatment of HIV infection, diabetes, anxiety disorders, bacterial infections, angina and acid reflux have been capped by the government, leading to a price cut in the range of 5 per cent to 44 per cent. The National Drug Pricing Regulator has also fixed the retail prices of 29 formulations.

“NPPA has fixed/revised ceiling prices of 55 scheduled formulations of Schedule-I under Drugs (Price Control) Amendment Order,2016 and retail price of 29 formulations under DPCO, 2013 in related Notification /order dated 23.12.2016,” National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA) said in a statement.

On being contacted about the price reduction, NPPA Chairman Bhupendra Singh told PTI: “The prices have been reduced in the range of 5 to 44 per cent, with the average being about 25 per cent”.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 25 Dec 2016 19:16

Any reason why we only read of the US FDA inspecting and critiquing, if not sanctioning, Indian pharmaceutical firms? In the last few days, yet another Indian drug company, Divi Labs, came under scrutiny. And Divi, far as I know, was a company that was praised for its management and quality a few years ago.

Does anyone know of Japanese, Vietnamese, Russian, British, et al doing the same. I do know of one case of GVK Pharma being sanctioned by the European Union, but that is very rare. It's almost always the US doing it.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A_Gupta » 04 Jan 2017 14:09

The epidemic called Uddanam Nephropathy
http://www.thehansindia.com/posts/index ... hy-/271886

Pawan Kalyan’s visit to north coastal Andhra Pradesh has once again brought to fore the vexed issue of dozens of villages in several mandals of Srikakulam district suffering from Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown etiology (CKD).

The problem is so serious that it has attracted international concern. Even World Health Organisation (WHO) has taken up the problem. The epidemic is called Uddanam Nephropathy. This nomenclature was adopted at the 2013 World Congress of Nephrology.


Estimates suggest that about 4,500 people died of renal failure in the last decade in this region. Even conservative estimates suggest that a third of population in Uddanam region suffers from CKD. Around 120 villages in six mandals are affected by CKD. The endemic mandals are Itchapuram, Kanchili, Kaviti, Mandasa, Sompeta and Vajrapu Kotthuru.

The traditional causes of CKD include diabetes, hypertension, primary glomerular disease, or obstructive nephropathy. But, the CKD found in Uddanam region is not attributed to any of these reasons.

The causes of Uddanam nephropathy still remain elusive despite several studies. Writing in the ‘American Journal of Kidney Disease,’ Anirban Ganguli, Georgetown University (May 2016), says, “Although the association of specific occupations with endemic nephropathy has highlighted the issue of environmental toxins and heat stress, the cause of Uddanam nephropathy is still an enigma.”

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A_Gupta » 06 Feb 2017 01:58

http://reliefweb.int/report/india/india ... -childhood
World Health Organization congratulates India for launching one of the world’s largest vaccination campaign against measles, a major childhood killer disease, and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), responsible for irreversible birth defects.

The campaign launched today to vaccinate more than 35 million children in the age group of nine months to 15 years with MR (measles and rubella) vaccine, once again demonstrates India’s commitment to improve health and well-being of its people by protecting children against vaccine preventable diseases.

The first phase of the campaign is significant as it is expected to accelerate the country’s efforts to eliminate measles which affects an estimated 2.5 million children every year, killing nearly 49 000 of them. The campaign also marks the introduction of rubella vaccine in India’s childhood immunization programme to address CRS which causes birth defects such as irreversible deafness and blindness in nearly 40 000 children every year.

India has made important efforts and gains against measles in recent years. Measles deaths have declined by 51% from an estimated 100 000 in the year 2000 to 49 000 in 2015. This has been possible by significantly increasing the reach of the first dose of measles vaccine, given at the age of nine months under routine immunization programme, from 56% in 2000 to 87% in 2015. In 2010 India introduced the second dose of measles-containing vaccine in routine immunization programme to close the immunity gap and accelerate measles elimination. Nearly 118 million children aged nine months to 10 years were vaccinated during mass measles vaccination campaigns between 2010 and 2013 in select states of India.

Today’s campaign, the first in the series to cover a total of 410 million children across the country over the next 2 years, is a truly remarkable, world-beating effort. Apart from improving the life-chances of millions of children in India, the campaign is expected to have a substantial effect on global measles mortality and rubella control target as India accounts for 37% of global measles deaths.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby shiv » 06 Feb 2017 09:00

Varoon Shekhar wrote:Any news about the 2 major Indian public sector pharmaceutical firms, IDPL and HAL( Hindustan Antibiotics)?

How are they doing? Are they struggling or thriving, do they export generic drugs, or confine themselves to India? Why do we never hear about what they are doing or not doing?

One good indirect fact, is that they have not thus far, been subject to any US FDA or any other country's scrutiny, criticism or sanction.

Saw this thread by accident.

Hindustan Antibiotics is barely alive/all but dead. It is, as far as I know - a sick unit. As per news - production stopped years ago. Ironic. The place paid for my education.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 117509.cms

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 10 Feb 2017 20:59

^
Unfortunate. I am pretty sure I read that HAL was the first producer of penicillin in all of Asia. So it has a chequered history!

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A Nandy » 09 Apr 2017 08:24

Cancer drugs, being the top focus for research and development, corner the lion's share of medicines launched globally, yet only a handful make it to developing countries like India.
Only seven oncology drugs were introduced in India over five years (2010-2014), when nearly 50 breakthrough therapies were rolled out globally.

For instance, we have only 2,000 oncologists in India whereas the number of cancer patients amounts to over 10 million.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 087833.cms

The state of availability and research into cancer medicine seems dire. Is the non-availability of globally released cancer medication targeting control of the demography in India?

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A Nandy » 15 Apr 2017 19:19

http://www.deccanchronicle.com/science/ ... parts.html

Earlier this month, a team of young doctors from Medanta: The Medicity in Gurgaon on the outskirts of the capital successfully performed a surgery on the failing spine of a woman and inserted for the first time a 3D printed titanium implant giving the woman a completely new lease of life.

Almost miraculously four days after the surgery, the woman was walking. Had traditional surgical techniques been adopted, according to the doctors she would have walked after months.

Dr Naresh Trehan, founder of Medanta, said, "3D printing technology has opened up whole new vista to re-create body parts to save lives."


If the risk of rejection of printed parts is low, we should encourage growth of this technology. 3D printed body parts may well save lives when no donors are available.

It seems ears and spines have been made, but parts which need more vascularisation are tougher to make. Anyone want to elaborate on what that means?

http://www.gadgetsnow.com/tech-news/3D- ... 422022.cms


http://www.iflscience.com/technology/3d ... ainstream/
One really exciting application of 3D printing is the generation of body parts. The level of detail that this technology can produce often supersedes that of traditional methods, offering patients a superior fit or design, and they can often be produced at an impressively low cost.

Researchers have turned to 3D printing to produce a wide variety of body parts. Around two weeks ago we heard the story of a teenager who received a 3D printed bright pink robotic prosthetic arm to replace the arm that she lost in a boating accident many years ago. The arm, which was produced by a trio of biomedical engineering students at Washington University in St. Louis, only cost $200 in total; a fraction of the normal cost of prosthetics which are usually a minimum of $6,000. The recipient, Sydney Kendall, could use shoulder movements to manipulate the arm to perform tasks such as throwing a ball and moving a computer mouse.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby A_Gupta » 13 Jun 2017 21:41

http://www.hindustantimes.com/health/bh ... r6VNK.html
Bhutan, Maldives eliminate measles, India on the road to stopping new infection
Bhutan and Maldives have eliminated measles, a highly infectious infection that kills 134,000 persons, mostly children under-5 years, worldwide each year. The two countries have completely stopped virus transmission, with no indigenous measles case being reported in Maldives since 2009, and in Bhutan since 2012.


In India. 90% children receive the first dose of MMR under the universal immunistaion programme, but only 50% receive the booster dose.

MR-VAC is made by Serum Institute of India

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby VKumar » 13 Aug 2017 09:52

63 children died in 4 days, due to encephalitis in GORAKHPUR hospital. Our public health system is practically non existent and corrupt.

It seems the children died as there was no oxygen available. The oxygen supplier hadnt been paid for months.

In encephalitis, treatment is supportive and its the body that must fight back. Oxygen is a basic requirement.

This hospital is located in an encephalitis endemic district.

There are 86 districts in India that are endemic to encephalitis. Government provides inoculation.

Population below age of 15 are more susceptible. It spreads through culex mosquitoes. original vectors are pigs and water birds.

People go out for open defacation and contract the disease.

30% patients die, another third are physically or mentally crippled for life.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Malayappan » 13 Aug 2017 12:38

Re Gorakhpur / Japanese Encephalitis -

A long read but worth it if one wants to understand the problem or at least the dimensions to the problem -

The Gorakhpur mystery

Preventing the scale of deaths requires -
- far higher capacity in diagnostics, and decentralised
- far higher capacity of doctors / interns / paramedics

Long haul. Difficult to see quick results especially in the UP - Bihar - Assam encephalitis belt.

Will be great to hear comments of the Medical folks in BRF..

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby VKumar » 13 Aug 2017 19:59

My learning is
1. 100 pc inoculation with booster
2. Stop open defecation
3. Slaughter the pigs from roaming in the fields to eat human faeces
4. Build at least one more large and modern hospital in each district of India.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby chetak » 01 Oct 2017 14:05

Lisa wrote:Chetakji,

Agreed 100% but how does such a crap service deliver a life expectancy of 80+ years? IMHO, yes there are issues but in reality complaints arise from expectations being considerably larger than necessity, thus the narrative of failure. I would deeply love for the Indian medical service to be such a failure because even with such a failing an average indian could enhance his or her longevity by almost 20%. Agreed?

To make the necessary investment get ready to pay more tax.

On a side bar, when you have time look at longevity in the US and compare it with Cuba, its almost the same. Ask yourself, how does poor Cuba afford its citizens the same life expectancy as the richest county in the world. Answer is primary healthcare investment. Again, get ready to pay more tax.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... expectancy


Lisa ji,

consider the following

the UK has a much smaller population. in healthcare terms the poor among the rural and urban populations may not be as differentiated as they are in India

Food and water hygiene standards are enforced legally. On a very recent trip to the UK, at my hotel, there was no bottled water and I was told that its perfectly normal and OK to drink water water directly from the tap without first running it through some sort of a filtration device like we do in India.

At the client's place, they took pride in offering me bottled water saying that even though they did not need to, they did so because visitors would see that they went the extra mile.

I drank water out of the tap in germany too, in fact I preferred it to bottled water and at restaurants, I made it a point to ask for tap water.

They have access to fairly good quality medical care, health and safety information is freely available on the telly, people are more conscious of what they eat, their surrounding hygiene, the reduced incidence of attacks by air and water borne vectors, and a proactive govt and other social care systems that are fairly effective.

In India bad water, bad food, bad surroundings which are conditions self created by callous Indians themselves result in any number of illnesses which is not adequately addressed by a equally callous state/municipal health care system which results in degraded immunity which leads back to illness again. Rinse and repeat tens of times during an unfortunate lifetime and it virtually guarantees early mortality.


Literacy rates are higher and dissemination of information is faster, reliable and more effective than in India.

India statistics on LE are skewed because we have a distinguishable urban and rural population and the statistics for life expectancy, as well as the underlying parameters affecting it play out very differently among the various socioeconomic strata of the layered Indian society.

Nutrition, access to reliable health care and environmental factors can be very very different when applied to the various socioeconomic layers, even in the same city/town/urban/rural populations.

If you look at the "isolated" social indicators in some southern states and compare the same "isolated" values, apple to apple, with some northern and NE states you will see what I am trying to get at. Don't look at why but just look at the absolute numbers only.

From such figures, if you arrive at or surmise a value for "life expectancy" in India as a whole, you will not get the true figures, in fact, you will not even not even come close.

BTW, NHS is not a crappy service, its a well administered service that has been overwhelmed enormous loads imposed on it, mostly by immigration free loaders, who use it without actually contributing any tax to the support system.

The original pie has not increased in size but it is now being spread very thin because of the much increased demands being made upon it without the matching resource allocation to supplement it

A similar system runs in canada with a very very similar over flow of canadians landing up in India as medical tourists for the very same reasons.

So, on a PPP model, if you look at LE figures, in comparable populations in India and UK, you may be surprised to find that the LE is probably the same, give or take.

BTW, don't compare cuba and scandinavian countries when talking about health care. They are Outliers in this category.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby Lisa » 01 Oct 2017 17:09

Chetakji,

Would not care to argue with a word that you have written. Cuba is where I have a gripe. They have consistently made vast investments in primary healthcare, something that I think has not been done in India on account of the fact that Congress was far too busy in running a party than building a nation. We now have a situation where 60+ years of catch up needs to be done and sadly taxes will have to raised and people will just have to get used to it. Irrespective of variations of population size, if poor Cuba can do it than why not India?

Provision in particular of quality Healthcare and Education need to assumed as a fundamental human right in India.

P.S. One stat on the way out,

Cuba 7.52 physicians/1,000 population (2014)

United Kingdom 2.81 physicians/1,000 population (2015)

India 0.73 physicians/1,000 population (2014)

and there are people on this site that want to compare medical services in India with the UK!

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby chetak » 01 Oct 2017 17:27

Lisa wrote:Chetakji,

Would not care to argue with a word that you have written. Cuba is where I have a gripe. They have consistently made vast investments in primary healthcare, something that I think has not been done in India on account of the fact that Congress was far too busy in running a party than building a nation. We now have a situation where 60+ years of catch up needs to be done and sadly taxes will have to raised and people will just have to get used to it. Irrespective of variations of population size, if poor Cuba can do it than why not India?

Provision in particular of quality Healthcare and Education need to assumed as a fundamental human right in India.

P.S. One stat on the way out,

Cuba 7.52 physicians/1,000 population (2014)

United Kingdom 2.81 physicians/1,000 population (2015)

India 0.73 physicians/1,000 population (2014)

and there are people on this site that want to compare medical services in India with the UK!


Lisa ji,

Thank the russians and their socialist models for the cuban excellence in health care as well as their well earned reputation for excellent and world class medical education.

There has been a lot of russian investment in Cuba in the past. Those smart cuban guys have leveraged it very well and it continues to pay them a handsome dividend even today and it will continue to do so in the future too.

It is our Indian physicians who are sitting in the UK (manning a good part of their NHS, if I might add!!!), and also in the US of A. Sadly, they are adding to their statistics and subtracting from ours.

In fact, I know a few Indian docs who do locum duties in the UK when some NHS docs there go on leave.

They do well in India just on their part time locum income from the UK.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby Suresh S » 02 Oct 2017 02:45

Chetak something that u may not know. Thousands of cuban doctors are forced by their govt to go abroad without their families to earn money and most of this is taken by the cuban govt. The doctors family is not allowed to leave cuba and is used as collateral so that the doctor is forced to do exactly what the govt wants. A major source of revenue for the cuban govt (hard currency dollars and euros). I do not think u want to copy cuba too much.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby Yagnasri » 02 Oct 2017 04:37

Models of Cuba or UK may not be suitable for India. Every nation has its own issues and advantages. Heath care does not mean we have more hospitals or doctors etc.Cleanliness is a major problem in India and that is being addressed in a major way. But we need to do a lot more. We also need to do more in areas a better lifestyle with things like Yoga, better food, sleep (yes sleep is very critical which people like myself not able to get nowadays) and those things do not cost much.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby chetak » 02 Oct 2017 11:08

Suresh S wrote:Chetak something that u may not know. Thousands of cuban doctors are forced by their govt to go abroad without their families to earn money and most of this is taken by the cuban govt. The doctors family is not allowed to leave cuba and is used as collateral so that the doctor is forced to do exactly what the govt wants. A major source of revenue for the cuban govt (hard currency dollars and euros). I do not think u want to copy cuba too much.


I didn't say that I admired them. I simply pointed out that they have an excellent system of healthcare and medical education that was basically soviet inspired and soviet established.

These guys have leveraged the soviet system, adapted it to cuba and also made it their own. The commies are notorious for their evil behaviour and also for savaging their own populations.

In India, public funded and govt established educational institutions are leveraged by our "very smart" citizens to emigrate and settle abroad.

Is this a better system than what the cubans run?? You tell me.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby SBajwa » 02 Oct 2017 18:38

by lisa
On a side bar, when you have time look at longevity in the US and compare it with Cuba, its almost the same. Ask yourself, how does poor Cuba afford its citizens the same life expectancy as the richest county in the world. Answer is primary healthcare investment. Again, get ready to pay more tax.


People in USA have low life expectancy due to obesity (too much food) and not because of health care.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby A_Gupta » 02 Oct 2017 18:56

SBajwa wrote:
by lisa
On a side bar, when you have time look at longevity in the US and compare it with Cuba, its almost the same. Ask yourself, how does poor Cuba afford its citizens the same life expectancy as the richest county in the world. Answer is primary healthcare investment. Again, get ready to pay more tax.


People in USA have low life expectancy due to obesity (too much food) and not because of health care.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4112220/
"Why do Americans have shorter life expectancy and worse health than people in other high-income countries?"
emphasis added.
Abstract

Americans lead shorter and less healthy lives than people in other high-income countries. We review the evidence and explanations for these variations in longevity and health. Our overview suggests that the US health disadvantage applies to multiple mortality and morbidity outcomes. The American health disadvantage begins at birth and extends across the life-course, and it is particularly marked for American women and for regions in the US South and Midwest. Proposed explanations include differences in health care, individual behaviors, socioeconomic inequalities, and the physical and built environment. While these factors may contribute to poorer health in America, a focus on proximal causes fails to adequately account for the ubiquity of the US health disadvantage across the life-course. We discuss the role of specific public policies and conclude that while multiple causes are implicated, crucial differences in social policy might underlie an important part of the US health disadvantage.

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby Lisa » 02 Oct 2017 22:48

SBajwa wrote:
by lisa
On a side bar, when you have time look at longevity in the US and compare it with Cuba, its almost the same. Ask yourself, how does poor Cuba afford its citizens the same life expectancy as the richest county in the world. Answer is primary healthcare investment. Again, get ready to pay more tax.


People in USA have low life expectancy due to obesity (too much food) and not because of health care.


SBajwaji

Context, context, context.

All was being said to show how HIGH life expectancy in Cuba is not to show how low life expectancy in US was. Either way, position 30 and 31 are not LOW by any means. Link enclosed,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... expectancy

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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Aug 26 2015

Postby niran » 03 Oct 2017 10:11


The link for India says 66 years, which is false since 1994 Indian males 68+ females 73+. i remember it well scored a Gold medal in PSM

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Suraj » 19 Oct 2017 02:29

Why Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana has failed India's poor
India’s nine-year-old government health insurance programme, the world’s largest, has not eased the burden of healthcare costs borne by its poorest families, a new study has found.

The Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) offers medical insurance up to Rs 30,000 for a family of five living below the poverty line (BPL)–defined as the ability to spend Rs 33 per day in urban India and Rs 27 per day in rural. It is, however, limited to inpatient treatment or hospitalisation.


The programme has not led to any reduction in out-of-pocket expenditure–personal spending–by its 150 million beneficiaries, according to a 2017 study published in Social Science Medicine, a global journal.

India’s health-related out-of-pocket expenditure, which pushes families into indebtedness and deeper poverty, is among the world’s highest. In a low-middle income group of 50 nations, Indians ranked sixth among the biggest out-of-pocket health spenders in 2014, as IndiaSpend reported on May 8, 2017.


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