Mass Rapid Transit in India

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Suraj
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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Suraj » 27 Jun 2020 05:04

The Chinese focused on building these kinds of heavy infrastructure machinery just to avoid being bottlenecked by monopoly western suppliers like Herrenknecht . We are going to be forced to do the same - to avoid dependency on both the west and the Chinese . It certainly isn’t going to be easy or quick but it is the only viable long term approach.

This is the same as our military being tied to imported armaments . When the shooting starts and the supplies become risk factors, the importance of domestic solutions just becomes more critical.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rishirishi » 27 Jun 2020 06:00

vsunder wrote:A substantial number of TBM machines being used in India have been sourced from China. In addition, Chinese technicians are used to help service the machines and operate the machines to help with the geotechnical aspects as the TBM moves forward. The fact that flights between China and India are suspended and the Galwan crisis has had an impact with TBM operations for Namma Metro. TBMs have been lowered but seem not operational. How will this be remedied, for example cutters need to be changed quite frequently in the Bangalore projects since the TBM will traverse through hard rock. How will this issue be addressed with spare parts? Mumbai coastal road project is also a CRCHI TBM fabricated in Changsha, China. Out of the 18 TBMs in operation on the Mumbai Metro, 8 are from Chinese companies and the remaining 10 are from Western companies which were fabricated in their Chinese plants. It would be hopeless now to stop the supply of spare parts etc at this late stage of the project.

For example Herrenknecht AG is a leading supplier of TBMs to the world market and one of their main factories is in Guangzhou. They supply many TBMs to projects in India. OK to cancel projects, but what about ongoing projects that have significant Chinese machinery and are at advanced stages, what then?? Also it will be ironic if L&T gets a project but uses a Made in China TBM and then consultancy of geotechnical nature from China.


Demand that it is made in India and exported from India.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rohit_K » 30 Jun 2020 01:17

Bombardier Wins Kanpur & Agra Metro’s 201 Coach Rolling Stock & Signalling Contract

Bombardier Transportation today emerged as the lowest bidder for supplying 201 standard gauge coaches (rolling stock) including the train-control and signalling system for the 32.385 km Kanpur Metro and 29.40 km Agra Metro‘s Phase 1 projects.

L2: BEML - Hitachi
L3: Alstom

CRRC’s technical bid was rejected, so their financial bid was not opened.


If and when awarded, this will be Bombardier’s second major win in 2 months. Back in May, they won the 82.15 km Delhi – Meerut RRTS line’s rolling stock contract for 210 coaches (30x6 + 10x3) which they intend to manufacture at their Savli, Gujarat facility.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby vsunder » 30 Jun 2020 01:28

^^^ What happened to the second line for Lucknow, Vasant Kunj to Charbagh? This is full of narrow lanes and very congested and will be a mess to work and tunnel in with decrepit and very old buildings. Also Varanasi had some ropeway and Metro project, what is the status?

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby csaurabh » 30 Jun 2020 20:47

Suraj wrote:The Chinese focused on building these kinds of heavy infrastructure machinery just to avoid being bottlenecked by monopoly western suppliers like Herrenknecht . We are going to be forced to do the same - to avoid dependency on both the west and the Chinese . It certainly isn’t going to be easy or quick but it is the only viable long term approach.

This is the same as our military being tied to imported armaments . When the shooting starts and the supplies become risk factors, the importance of domestic solutions just becomes more critical.


Agreed and I would like to point out that the basic problem here ( and for the military production ) is not just our babus, MoD, armed forces, whatever. They are only part of the problem. The real problem is that we are still a technologically backward 3rd world country.
The Chinese took decades to get where they are in terms of technologically. We are slowly moving in the right direction but we are nowhere there yet and will not be for many decades. Unless this basic fact is understood and prepared for rest all is hot air.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Suraj » 30 Jun 2020 21:10

csaurabh wrote:
Suraj wrote:The Chinese focused on building these kinds of heavy infrastructure machinery just to avoid being bottlenecked by monopoly western suppliers like Herrenknecht . We are going to be forced to do the same - to avoid dependency on both the west and the Chinese . It certainly isn’t going to be easy or quick but it is the only viable long term approach.

This is the same as our military being tied to imported armaments . When the shooting starts and the supplies become risk factors, the importance of domestic solutions just becomes more critical.

Agreed and I would like to point out that the basic problem here ( and for the military production ) is not just our babus, MoD, armed forces, whatever. They are only part of the problem. The real problem is that we are still a technologically backward 3rd world country.
The Chinese took decades to get where they are in terms of technologically. We are slowly moving in the right direction but we are nowhere there yet and will not be for many decades. Unless this basic fact is understood and prepared for rest all is hot air.

That is why the Chinese emphasized acquisition and theft of technology and IP, and their corporate law required foreign entities to form JVs and sharing technology with local partner, which they then proceeded to grab and use. A fast growing economy needs rapid infusion of technology, and not all of it can be obtained above board at first world prices because... we don't have the money to do that. Therefore it's necessary that national policy ensure the acquisition of technology by other means.

There's nothing outrageous or unprecedented about the above. We've had decades long legislative requirements around pharma IP that only protected a process patent and not a product one, so generics makers could make it by another process. It has stood the test of sustained attempts by big pharma to overturn that.

So it's redundant to say 'it'll take time and effort' - that's been already said in the originally quoted post.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Krita » 30 Jun 2020 21:11

If and when awarded, this will be Bombardier’s second major win in 2 months. Back in May, they won the 82.15 km Delhi – Meerut RRTS line’s rolling stock contract for 210 coaches (30x6 + 10x3) which they intend to manufacture at their Savli, Gujarat facility.

Owned by Alstom.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Mollick.R » 23 Aug 2020 01:48

Trains in trouble: The pandemic has thrown metro rail projects into disarray
By Shantanu Nandan Sharma, ET Bureau Last Updated: Aug 22, 2020, 11:00 PM IST

For the last five months, the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) has been losing Rs 9.3 crore every day, the company has estimated. The biggest and the healthiest among India’s metro operators, the DMRC has thus far managed to absorb the financial shock inflicted by the total shutdown of metro rail operations across the nation since March 22.

The shutdown was subsequently extended multiple times as the virus spread across the nation, paralysing the country’s network of mass rapid transit systems, popularly called the metro.
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Since the lockdown, the DMRC has regularly been paying salaries to its employees, and has also repaid Rs 79 crore towards the interest component of its loan from the Japanese International Corporation Agency ( JICA).

But the bigger problem that appears to be looming large is that the transporter is yet to repay the balance of this year’s loan instalment — Rs 1,163 crore, to be precise — with only seven months of the current fiscal remaining.
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E Sreedharan, former managing director of DMRC and the man who ushered in the metro revolution in India, told ET Magazine in a telephone interview that the pandemic has not caused the problems ailing metro rail projects in India, but have merely exposed them.
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“The problem is, the metro is built on borrowed money. Debt is about 55-60% of the total project cost. Even without Covid, it’s not easy to repay the loan unless a large part of a city is covered by the metro,” he says, adding that the government needs to raise the metro subsidy, officially called viability gap funding (VGF), from 40% to 60%, to make metro projects sustainable.

Sreedharan further claims that the Hyderabad Metro, built on a public-private-partnership mode, has been in serious financial trouble. “Had it not been owned by cash-rich L&T, it would have collapsed by now. The Delhi Metro, which had a ridership of 30–32 lakh a day before Covid, somehow built a reserve; so, it can still take the Covid shock to an extent. Problems will be acute for metros such as Bangalore and Chennai,” he adds.
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When contacted, Hyderabad Metro chief NVS Reddy refused to divulge the company’s financials except to say that the 11% interest rate for its loan has been pretty high. From this year, the Hyderabad Metro’s nine-year repayment schedule will begin.

The metro took a loan of Rs 12,000 crore from a consortium of banks led by the State Bank of India. The interest component itself is reported to be about Rs 1,300 crore per annum. The state-owned metros, however, are somewhat luckier. The Delhi Metro, for example, managed to secure the loan from JICA with about 2% interest rate, that too with a longer 30-year tenure and 10 years of moratorium.
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The rate of other multilateral funding agencies such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank is about 6-6.5%. Metros in Bengaluru, Kochi, Nagpur, Pune and Surat have tied up loans from France’s AFD mainly because the Japanese loans are now tied to a clause of mandatory procurement from their companies, something that pushes up the project cost.

Reddy of the Hyderabad Metro argues that a mass rapid transit system cannot be judged merely from a return on investment point. “For a city, a metro is as essential as drainage and sanitation systems. So, there should be a social cost-benefit analysis and not just a financial one.

The calculation should incorporate savings in pollution and travel time, among others,” he says, as he argues his case for a government bailout. Several big-ticket infrastructure projects, including metros, are now pinning their hopes on the KV Kamath-headed panel constituted by the Reserve Bank of India earlier this month to oversee resolution of stressed assets created by Covid-19.

In fact, until the virus disrupted metro businesses from March-end, both Delhi and Hyderabad had operational break-even while other metros such as Chennai and Bengaluru were expected to reach that point after more phases got completed, taking the trains to most parts of these cities, thereby ensuring robust footfall and revenue. Barring Hyderabad and Mumbai, which are PPP projects, most other metros in India have been structured along the lines of the Delhi Metro — a 50:50 ownership between the Centre and the state where it is located. A 9.6-km stretch of Jaipur Metro is the only example where a metro is owned only by a state government, apart from Rapid Metro Gurgaon, which started life as a private metro and had to be bailed out by the Haryana government after it went bankrupt.

As metro is rapidly expanding across the country, with many smaller cities readying to embrace it, the question is whether our metro financing model is equipped with hardy shock absorbers to negotiate crises like Covid.

Experts say we have not learnt much from the world’s experiences. In most cities around the globe, government’s funding of metro rail is far higher than India’s 40%. After all, the return on investment of any metro is so slim that its savings, if any, will be wiped out during an unforeseen crisis. Four profit-making metros — Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo and Taipei — are financially successful not because of passenger fares but due to their deft handling of the real estate that they own.
OP Agarwal, CEO of World Resource Institute India and a former transport specialist at the World Bank, says: “To be financially sustainable, we need to change our attitude.

For instance, we must have a 15-storey building in a metro station, not a few 50 sq ft shops.”

This is one area where even the DMRC, considered by many as a model metro, has failed to deliver. In 2019– 20, for example, DMRC managed only Rs 462 crore from rentals and another Rs 97 crore from leases as against Rs 3,122 crore from passenger fares.

Covid-19 has been a disaster for the metros as it has been to many other sectors. Even after the metros reopen, they will continue to bleed heavily because of social distancing and other Covid protocols. The ridership will be about 25%. Metro employees should take a salary cut of 10-15%, which could be paid back a year later.

The problem is that a metro is built on borrowed money.

Debt is about 55-60% of the total project cost. When there is a moratorium, the metro will run okay. But once the loan repayment and interest burden come, problems arise.

Even without Covid, it’s not easier to repay the loan unless a large part of a city is covered by the metro. As far as I know, the Hyderabad Metro has been in serious financial trouble. Had it not been owned by cash-rich L&T, it would have collapsed by now. Delhi Metro, which had a ridership of 30-32 lakh a day before the pandemic started, somehow built a reserve. So, it can still take the Covid shock to an extent.

Problems will be acute for metros in Bengaluru and Chennai. Even Kochi Metro’s phase-I is just 24 km. That’s too little to make the metro viable.

Other than Covid, where is the key problem that ails the metro system?

Look, the pace of metro construction in India has been very slow. It is about 25 km per annum as against China’s 250-300 km. India must build at least 100 km of metro lines annually for the next 15 years.

The government of India’s metro rail policy of 2017 is flawed. You can’t put so many conditions on building metros.

On top of it, more burdens are now put on state governments. Also, after the detailed project report is submitted, the government of India is taking too long to sanction a project.

The pace of metro construction in some cities such as Mumbai, Bengaluru and Chennai has been unacceptably slow. The main problem is frequent transfer of managing directors of the respective metro rail corporations, the posts being held by IAS officers. The Bengaluru Metro is a classic example.


Aren’t financing models also a problem?
Funds are available for a metro. But if we take too long to construct a metro project, the project itself becomes unviable.

Also, we need to increase more commercial exploitation to enhance revenue. Further, the viability gap funding (government’s subsidy) should be increased to 60% from the current level of 40% to make the metros viable. Metros can’t keep on increasing passenger fares. That will erode ridership. The government should consider the metro as a social project.
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Read Full Article Here//ET News Link.........

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/transportation/railways/trains-in-trouble-the-pandemic-has-thrown-metro-rail-projects-into-disarray/articleshow/77695501.cms
Last edited by Mollick.R on 23 Aug 2020 02:20, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Mollick.R » 23 Aug 2020 01:55

Mollick.R wrote:Trains in trouble: The pandemic has thrown metro rail projects into disarray
By Shantanu Nandan Sharma, ET Bureau Last Updated: Aug 22, 2020, 11:00 PM IST


Experts say we have not learnt much from the world’s experiences. In most cities around the globe, government’s funding of metro rail is far higher than India’s 40%. After all, the return on investment of any metro is so slim that its savings, if any, will be wiped out during an unforeseen crisis. Four profit-making metros — Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo and Taipei — are financially successful not because of passenger fares but due to their deft handling of the real estate that they own.
OP Agarwal, CEO of World Resource Institute India and a former transport specialist at the World Bank, says: “To be financially sustainable, we need to change our attitude.

For instance, we must have a 15-storey building in a metro station, not a few 50 sq ft shops.

This is one area where even the DMRC, considered by many as a model metro, has failed to deliver. In 2019– 20, for example, DMRC managed only Rs 462 crore from rentals and another Rs 97 crore from leases as against Rs 3,122 crore from passenger fares.



To mention and put things in perspective as world says for Pakis
Every Nation has an Army, in Pakistan Army has a nation.

Similarly we can say
Cities have a MRTS/ Metro System for it, But for Hong Kong Metro has a city for it.


A must watch video , specifically after 04:30 mins onwards..........


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELy9fOX8vtc


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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Mollick.R » 12 Oct 2020 12:37

10,000 explosions for Metro-3 tunnels in 3 years
By Shashank Rao, Mumbai Mirror Last Updated: Oct 12, 2020, 10:52 AM IST

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Carshed cost escalation
The Maharashtra government on Sunday announced the change of location of carshed from Aarey to Kanjurmarg. MMRC officials said this will delay the Rs 32,000-crore project by three to four years. They said the corporation is losing Rs 4.5 crore every day and has an added burden to pay Rs 2,000 crore as interest on loan; this, they said, would further rise by the time the new carshed comes up.

Senior officials said they will have to extend the line by another 7 km to take it to the carshed in Kanjurmarg. The project would cost an additional Rs 150 crore per kilometre of work, including signalling, overhead cabling and track laying.



https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/transportation/railways/10000-explosions-for-metro-3-tunnels-in-3-years/articleshow/78613893.cms

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby arshyam » 12 Oct 2020 13:27

^^ Interesting - so they are changing the metro's route itself for political expediency. Sure, Andheri-Powai-Kanjurmarg will attract some traffic I suppose, but this will kill off any chances for a future extension to Borivali and Mira-Bhayandar. The Western Railway line is super congested as it is, and the metro could have helped relieve some of that load super-dense crush load. But who cares, one has to look good in social media, no? :|

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rishirishi » 13 Oct 2020 02:41

With a ridership of 3 million per day, a small hike in price of Rs 15 will result in 4,5 crores increase in revenue per day (50% increase in ticket revenue). probably around RS 1000 crores per year.

So is a hike of 15 rupees so expensive? What can you get for Rs15? Why should you not pay a fair price for the metro?

Metro prices around the world.
https://www.priceoftravel.com/595/public-transportation-prices-in-80-worldwide-cities/

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby A Nandy » 13 Oct 2020 14:38

https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/busin ... 57521.html

Aarey has been saved. But who will save Mumbai?
The decision of the Maharashtra government to relocate the metro car shed away from a green belt is a grim reminder of the mess that Mumbai has witnessed with regards to infrastructure development.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Mollick.R » 15 Oct 2020 17:29

Finally..............

Walk from Delhi Metro to Terminal-1 to be a breeze
TNN | Oct 15, 2020, 04.35 AM IST

NEW DELHI: From December, Delhi Metro commuters won’t have to trudge between the domestic terminal of Indira Gandhi International Airport and the train station through busy traffic. A dedicated 370m subway constructed by Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) will seamlessly connect the Terminal-1 station of Magenta Line (Botanical Garden-Janakpuri West) with the departure and arrival terminals.

Apart from escalators and elevators, the subway will have travelators so that passengers don’t have to walk all the way. This will be the first subway in the city to have travelators.

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Image Courtesy// Times of India Article....

Read Full Article from//Time of India Link......
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/walk-from-metro-to-t1-to-be-a-breeze/articleshow/78669773.cms


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