Mass Rapid Transit in India

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Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 18 Jan 2010 22:33

The Thread to discuss Mass rapid transit of India. Some links -------

Image

India's first advanced MRT -
Dilli Metro

India's first Subway -
Kolkata Metro

Our own MRT coming up in Bangalore, Kerala
Namma Metro

Mumbai Metro One -
Mumbai Metro

India's first Monorail -
Mumbai Mono

Chennai Metro -
Chennai Metro

Metro of the Nizam city
Hyderabad Metro

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 18 Jan 2010 22:36

Excellent Article. Sorry for posting in full

SMEs ride the Metro boom

From train tokens to ear tags that track the medical history of cattle to prevent the mad cow disease in Europe. For Noida-based radio-frequency identification (RFID) company, APK Identification, the journey has been eventful indeed.

When brothers Alok and Puneet Kapoor pooled together Rs. 20 lakh to start the company in 2003, they had an inkling that RFID was going to be big. Europe was taking to RFID for several applications and would need cheap suppliers. However, their big break came not from Europe, but from the Delhi Metro project.

All thanks to “Metro Man” E. Sreedharan’s decision to indigenise the supply chain to make it dependable and to bring down costs.

“At the replacement stage, it is all the more important to have vendors in the domestic market where we operate. We cannot go to Italy or Germany every time. During operation and maintenance stage, we will need support from these people,” says the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) managing director. As a young technocrat, he was in charge for designing and implementing India’s first metro in Kolkata in 1970. His achievements include the completion of the Konkan Railway within budget and ahead of schedule in the 1990s.

Sreedharan is staunchly opposed to handing out projects to private players because “they will get parts from China or other places where it is cheap and move on. They will not have any interest in developing the ancillary industry.”

The Metro has spawned an industry whose value is estimated at around Rs. 80,000 crore, if one were to take into account all metro projects coming up in Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore.

In the process, several small companies like APK Identification are blossoming.

In 2005, the company won the contract to supply electronic tokens used as tickets. Delhi Metro’s then supplier, a leading international manufacturer, provided them at Rs. 240 per token. APK provides them at Rs. 20 a piece.

Over the last three years, the company has supplied over 21 lakh tokens to the DMRC, saving it around Rs. 43 crore. In the bargain, APK has seen its business expand and new opportunities open up. “The National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, national ID card and several other initiatives have all decided to take to RFID applications; the Metro has clearly shown the way,” says Puneet Kapoor, who plans to bid for these tenders.

APK is now entering tie-ups with companies overseas to provide electronic ear tags that will help record the medical history of cattle.

The company is not alone in benefiting from the Delhi Metro. Around 40 components and services — from lights to glasses, air-conditioning systems and track fittings — which used to be supplied by foreign vendors are now being supplied by Indian companies. “When we started operations there was almost zero percent contribution from Indian suppliers. But now, in many areas [of Metro operations], they supply 30 to 60% of our components,” says Sreedharan.

Take for example Delhi-based Sidwal Refrigeration. Owned by S.S. Sidhu, the company supplied air conditioner components to a railways coach factory in the late 80s. In 2000, it was chosen as the local partner by an Australian company supplying air-conditioners to the Metro.

But the Metro soon found that the price demanded by the foreign supplier was prohibitive, and decided to source directly from Sidwal in 2005. The company claims to have saved the Metro Rs. 15 crore so far.
Recently, it got orders from BEML (formerly known as Bharat Earth Movers Limited), Bangalore, a supplier of coaches to the Delhi Metro. The order has given Sidhu the confidence to participate in bids for metro projects in Europe. “We have a larger facility now and we are very competitive in our pricing when compared with the overseas suppliers,” says Sidhu.

Similarly, there are others like Mumbai-based Siepmann’s Card Systems, which supplies smart cards used by regular commuters, and landscaping firm SK Garden Traders.

Set up by brothers Vishwanath and Ravindranath Bhas, Siepmann’s was selected in 2006 by the Delhi Metro to replace its existing international vendor. “The Metro was the first to bring in the smart card technology to a transport infrastructure project and today the railways, the Delhi Transport Corporation and several other agencies are all trying to install similar systems,” says Ravindranath.
SK Garden Traders’ 37-year-old owner, Sunil Kumar, too has gained significantly thanks to the Metro contracts. “I set up my business in 1992 but I did not have a steady stream of orders or revenue.” Since 2002, Kumar has done jobs worth over Rs. 2 crore for the Metro. “You can say that my business has grown with the Metro I have continuity in orders that promises to extend for several years from now and because of this, I am able to invest in people and equipment.”

Making Way
Sreedharan says he is dead against the practice of calling tenders repeatedly for components that require technical expertise. “We identify some people and give them repeat orders. This way they are also able to develop their ability [in supplying quality products].” Government departments usually lose out on capable vendors because they rotate their orders frequently, he adds. The Delhi Metro project is estimated to have handed contracts worth less than Rs. 1 crore to over a hundred companies. The total worth of such contracts is about Rs. 500 crore. This means, a clutch of small companies got repeat orders over the last seven years.

“The Metro has contributed immensely to the cause of small businesses by standardising almost every sphere of activity and encouraging businesses to upgrade their capabilities. I think the Metro experience in dealing with small companies should be extended to all construction activities in the country so that there’s improvement in the way projects are executed,” says Anjan Roy, economic adviser to FICCI.

However, it is necessary that the people heading the projects have a track record of impeccable integrity. “If all orders are given to a clutch of companies, then questions may be asked,” says a top government official heading an infrastructure department based in Delhi, requesting anonymity. Sreedharan agrees with that caveat. He says that even while giving development orders, it must be ensured that the “system is seen to be transparent and just”.

All said, a well-oiled vendor network will be more important as Bangalore, Chennai, Mumbai and Hyderabad start their Metro systems. Several businesses that are trying to grow may find an opportunity in these massive Metro projects.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby vipins » 18 Jan 2010 22:41

DMRC soon to start trial runs on Gurgaon section

The trial runs for the Metro section commencing from Gurgaon will start on January 29, a Delhi Metro spokesperson said.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby nachiket » 19 Jan 2010 05:21

Does anyone know why the Delhi Metro and the other new underground rail systems being started in India use overhead electric wires for providing power instead of the Third-rail system used for the Kolkata Metro(and most other electric urban rail systems around the world) ?

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 19 Jan 2010 07:12

The point to note is that the Delhi metro New Delhi Railway station - IGI airport line as all the metro projects in Mumbai, Bangaluru, chennai etc will be on Standard gauge and not broad gauge.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby shiv » 19 Jan 2010 07:26

nachiket wrote:Does anyone know why the Delhi Metro and the other new underground rail systems being started in India use overhead electric wires for providing power instead of the Third-rail system used for the Kolkata Metro(and most other electric urban rail systems around the world) ?


I suspect it is because India's cannot be stopped from stepping on tracks.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 19 Jan 2010 07:45

Much safer to have overhead wires. People have a tendency to fall on the tracks on metro rail stations. It is dangerous to have an electrified rail on the ground there.

The second reason I suspect is that the third rail is problematic.
1. During maintenence, the staff have to be extra careful. Accidentally touching that line can be fatal.
2. At the point of track junctions where the train shifts from one track to the other, the train's power is maintained by the rear bogies while the front end of the train reaches the opposite track to get the power on.
3. There is always huge friction and sparking because a metal plate rubs against the electified track.

The overhead wire is a technology that India is very comfortable with, and has none of the disadvantages of the third electrified rail.

My two naye paise.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Hitesh » 19 Jan 2010 10:56

How clean have the authorities kept the Delhi Metro? Have they managed to keep the stations clean and tidy? What about bathrooms and drinking facilities and trash facilities? I have not visited Delhi in such a long time and will visit in February. So I am very curious about the state of Delhi Metro now.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 19 Jan 2010 11:29

Delhi Metro is spic and span.

On the stations one will often find young boys with a cleaning towel in hand wiping off dust off the farthest nooks and corners of the station platforms.

There was a menace with many birds making nests in the overhead platforms, in the process causing short circuits and tripping the electical systems, not to mention dirtying the stations. Their innovation is a multicolored concentric ring pattern which is hung all across the station. It makes the birds feel that some evil big eye is watching them and viola, no nests in the stations!

The Delhi Metro does not have toilets for passagners on the station premises. No problem onlee.
The staff are very strict with pan chewers, and I have seen people being hauled up in the rare occasion when someone spits around.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rahul M » 19 Jan 2010 11:37

nachiket wrote:Does anyone know why the Delhi Metro and the other new underground rail systems being started in India use overhead electric wires for providing power instead of the Third-rail system used for the Kolkata Metro(and most other electric urban rail systems around the world) ?

third rails attract a lot of jilted lovers and other suicide attempts. even other than the sad problem itself, it holds up the line for near about an hour, often at peak time.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Hitesh » 19 Jan 2010 11:57

Gagan wrote:Delhi Metro is spic and span.

On the stations one will often find young boys with a cleaning towel in hand wiping off dust off the farthest nooks and corners of the station platforms.

There was a menace with many birds making nests in the overhead platforms, in the process causing short circuits and tripping the electical systems, not to mention dirtying the stations. Their innovation is a multicolored concentric ring pattern which is hung all across the station. It makes the birds feel that some evil big eye is watching them and viola, no nests in the stations!

The Delhi Metro does not have toilets for passagners on the station premises. No problem onlee.
The staff are very strict with pan chewers, and I have seen people being hauled up in the rare occasion when someone spits around.


I am glad to hear about the strictness about pan chewers. How good are the amenities and are they widely available in stations? How can I tip the young boys who keep the station platforms clean? Is it a good idea to tip those boys?

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby vina » 19 Jan 2010 12:15

Does anyone know why the Delhi Metro and the other new underground rail systems being started in India use overhead electric wires for providing power instead of the Third-rail system used for the Kolkata Metro(and most other electric urban rail systems around the world) ?


Unlike other metros, the Indian metros are largely over ground systems, with underground part being quite small indeed. So yeah, instead of the 3rd rail you can go for the overhead catenary I guess.

But however systems do exist (like in Channel tunnel for instance) where the engine extends a "boot" kind of thing to tap power from the 3rd rail in the tunnel and uses the catenary while traveling outside.

I guess, in case of evacuation in a tunnel, the overhead could be safe. You dont want bumbling passengers walking into the electrified 3rd rail.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Raja Bose » 19 Jan 2010 12:38

Ahem...an important question...does Dilli Metro still have those PYT drivers?? :mrgreen:

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Sachin » 19 Jan 2010 13:41

Rahul M wrote:third rails attract a lot of jilted lovers and other suicide attempts. even other than the sad problem itself, it holds up the line for near about an hour, often at peak time.

But even without a third rail, dont jilted lovers find it convinient to jump down to the tracks when a train is fast approaching? And even this would hold up the train, I guess. They have to clean up the mess.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby vipins » 19 Jan 2010 20:05

Gagan wrote:
The Delhi Metro does not have toilets for passagners on the station premises. No problem onlee.


sir ,there are toilets in some stations by sulabh international.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby shiv » 19 Jan 2010 21:23

Sachin wrote:
Rahul M wrote:third rails attract a lot of jilted lovers and other suicide attempts. even other than the sad problem itself, it holds up the line for near about an hour, often at peak time.

But even without a third rail, dont jilted lovers find it convinient to jump down to the tracks when a train is fast approaching? And even this would hold up the train, I guess. They have to clean up the mess.


OT but why wait for a train when the third rail is waiting for you?

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby vera_k » 19 Jan 2010 22:10

Gagan wrote:The Delhi Metro does not have toilets for passagners on the station premises.


There's the question of priorities again. Beats me how a public transit system can be allowed to be built without toilet facilities.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 20 Jan 2010 00:11

nachiket wrote:Does anyone know why the Delhi Metro and the other new underground rail systems being started in India use overhead electric wires for providing power instead of the Third-rail system used for the Kolkata Metro(and most other electric urban rail systems around the world) ?


Overhead Wires
* Delhi Metro
* Mumbai Metro
* Chennai metro

Third Rail Supply
* Kolkata Metro
* Namma Metro
* Hyderabad Metro

Delhi preferred overhead wires because of it's broadway coaches. There is a limit of 1000 V that can be supplied through third-rail. Mumbai and Chennai both already have the necessary infrastructure and technology for overhead supply through local trains. Therefore they have gone for that.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 20 Jan 2010 00:14

shiv wrote:OT but why wait for a train when the third rail is waiting for you?


To rest assure that you'll atleast be killed by one if the other doesn't! :twisted: :twisted:

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 20 Jan 2010 00:19

Raja Bose wrote:Ahem...an important question...does Dilli Metro still have those PYT drivers?? :mrgreen:

A few of the gal drivers are :eek: :cry: B o m b s h e l... you get the picture. And they look smart in those uniforms to boot.

vipins wrote:sir ,there are toilets in some stations by sulabh international.

Outside the platform premises I think. But not inside.

All stations have CISF security. You are frisked at entry, baggage must be opened and shown to the security staff where there is no baggage X ray machine. The plan is to have baggage X ray machines at all stations.

Also the Train Drivers are more like minders. The trains drive and stop themselves. Controlled from their control room. One gentleman who got to visit the control room said it was like a space station / PSLV launch control room. :twisted:

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 20 Jan 2010 00:32

The most amazing thing is the plan in Delhi for the Airport line.

The airport line will be standard gauge as opposed to broad gauge for the rest of the metro system. Apart from a very modern station at New Delhi Rly station, all check in counters and baggage handling will be at New Delhi Rly station itself. The baggage will be taken over and transported to IGI airport delhi, on the same train. Takes a lot of load off the airport check in counters.

There was some delay in deciding the track alignment for this New Delhi Rly Station - IGI airport line. Earlier the line was supposed to pass beneath the Parliament and the North and South blocks. The netas and babooze were scared that should a bomb go off, that would be like right under their musharrafs. So they made DMRC change the alignement to a few hundred meters away. :D Even though Mr Sreedharan said that the tunnel will be like 20 - 30 meters underground, and the structures above will be absolutely safe.

PS: The metro systems in massa land suck big time. All old bogies, crumbling-blackening infrasturcture, very frequent breakdowns, dirty (cigerette butts and refuse on the tracks and on platforms), ill maintained. Sometimes one can see a few couples indulging in *sharam sharam* in the trains. The two systems in India - Delhi and Kolkata, by comparision are far cleaner and modern. But dilli metro is really cool - very modern, well maintained and PLENTY of extremely high quality eye candy around (Rajiv Chowk - Kashmiri gate - Vishwavidyalaya etc)

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 20 Jan 2010 00:45

Gagan wrote: But dilli metro is really cool - very modern, well maintained and PLENTY of extremely high quality eye candy around (Rajiv Chowk - Kashmiri gate - Vishwavidyalaya etc)


Gagan, I wanted to know if all stations are provided with escalators.

I have come to like underground systems but seems like we'll be getting only 6 km underground stretch (Bangalore, Kerala). Chennai metro will have half of the entire system of Phase 1 underground (20 km).

Kolkata Metro is having a new hitech line being built which will pass under the Hoogli river ! :eek: :eek: :eek: Underground stations and tunnels have that awe about them that can't be had by overhead lines.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 20 Jan 2010 01:02

In India the weather is good enough for overhead tracks and stations to be confortable without air conditioning. We in India can't imagine the problems faced in the west because of the cold weather. The temperatures frequently drop below 0 degree Celsius and stations and trains need to be heated for this.

In Delhi, The stations have two different levels (weather underground or over ground)
Level 1 is where the ticketing counter and security is. To get to this level from the street, one has to use stairs or an elevator for the handicapped.
Level 2 is from level 1 to station platform. Here escalators and lifts are there.

Some huge junction stations - have tracks at two levels! The stations are themselves like a huge airport or a shopping mall with escalators and glass lifts everywhere.

The kashmiri gate station has 4 huge levels - the tracks are on the lowest and the highest levels (more like 100m apart vertically) The two middle levels consist of very well lighted high ceiling atriums and very artistically done. Some of the delhi stations are Shopping malls cum metro stations.
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This huge escalator at Kashmiri Gate is like 4 - 5 stories high!

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Civil Lines station.

Very very modern.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 20 Jan 2010 01:12

Some random images from the internet of the Delhi Metro:
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The minders at stations make the Dilli billies line up before they board train at stations. One is supposed to enter the car from the two sides of each door while the passangers who are exiting the cars will come out from the middle of each door. Discipline is one point sorely needed in Nai Dilli and Delhi metro seems to be doing a good job of it.

Image

Some of the pictures are from this blog: RisingCitizen

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 20 Jan 2010 01:27

Workers work inside a pillar at the Namma Banguluru metro site.

Image
click for large pic.

The caption reads:
Amar, Akbar Anthony. Or, Ram, Robert, Rahim.
15 July 2009

KPN photo

The accidents on the Delhi Metro project have raised serious questions over worker (and public) safety, and somewhat clouded a proud infrastructure success. Unmindful of all that, three unsung heroes toil manfully on a pillar for the Bangalore Metro project on CMH Road on Wednesday.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 21 Jan 2010 09:37

First monorail car lands in Mumbai
The first rail car for the Mumbai monorail project has reached the city from transportation solution major Scomi's Kuala Lumpur works. It is expected to be unveiled by the Maharashtra Government on the Republic Day.

The Scomi Group, in consortium with L&T, had secured in November 2008 a Rs 2,460-crore order from the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) to build and commission a 19.54-km monorail system. The project is scheduled for completion in 30 months. Scomi will also operate and maintain the system for three years.

A monorail system train runs on a narrow beam that grip the wheels of the cars. It is a light-weight system and its cost of execution is less compared to conventional rail systems.

Mr Suhaimi Yaacob, Country President, Scomi India, said more than 30 per cent of the foundation work for the monorail project was complete and the first phase from Gadge Maharaj Chowk (Jacob Circle) to Wadala (about 11 km) would be operational by December. The second phase of nine km from Wadala to Chembur would follow.

Scomi will deliver 60 monorail cars to make 15 sets of four-car trains. The first monorail car will play a pivotal role in the preliminary systems interface testing, which is critical in ensuring that the monorail system runs smoothly, he said.

The MMRDA plans to set up a 100-km monorail network in the Mumbai metropolitan area in the next seven years at a cost of Rs 12,000 crore.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby amol.p » 21 Jan 2010 14:29

Check out why Ahmedabad's Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a winner

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) are dreaded words in the capital but the urban transportation concept has become immensely popular in Ahmedabad since the pilot corridor is nothing like its Delhi counterpart. In fact, they have learnt from Delhi's mistakes to make it a successful venture.

It is a closed BRT system. So, the buses don't go out and other buses are not allowed in.

It recently got the Sustainable Transport Award by Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) in Washington. "We started with a ridership of 17,000 people daily in October last year. This has grown to 35,000 in three months," said Prof Shivanand Swamy of CEPT University, Ahmedabad, which conceptualised the BRT model.



http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/art ... 483886.cms

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Sachin » 21 Jan 2010 19:56

Gagan wrote:Also the Train Drivers are more like minders. The trains drive and stop themselves. Controlled from their control room. One gentleman who got to visit the control room said it was like a space station / PSLV launch control room. :twisted:

Are you sure on this part? Because I had seen a documentary on National Geographic on the Delhi Metro. In that they had shown the driver's job. He did have more work to do than just making announcements. But what I could make out was that, he could also contact the Signal Control room any time he wanted (which is not possible in Mumbai Suburban networks). And I don't think they mentioned that the driver's actions can be taken over/over ruled by some one in the Control Room.

The Control Room, I agree would be more flashy and like a Launch control room. There would be the huge LCD Signal Panel, in which the entire route and signal positions would be marked. Train movements will be marked on line on this panel. Crude versions of these (using LEDs, beepers etc.) are in place in the Indian Railways.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 21 Jan 2010 20:42

Delhi Metro Control facility

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 22 Jan 2010 03:27

Sachin ji

I have personally seen delhi metro trains coming to a stop on the station by themselves, with the drivers sitting on the opposite side as the controls. I think the controls are on the port side (Left side of the car).

I asked this one gentleman - and engineer who had visited the DM's control center, and he confirmed that they indeed can do that. He said that at some point in the future the drivers might be removed altogether.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 22 Jan 2010 11:14

Reliance Infra inks second pact for Mumbai metro
Reliance Infrastructure (RInfra) of the Anil Ambani Group will receive Rs 1,532 crore from the Centre and Rs 766 crore from the Maharashtra Government as a ‘Viability Gap Funding' for implementing the Rs 8,250-crore second phase of the Mumbai Metro Rail Project.

This fully elevated metro will have 27 stations en route. RInfra has won the project on a build-own-transfer basis for a concession period of 35 years and an extension clause of another 10 years.

The 32-km Charkop-Bandra-Mankhurd corridor will provide a vital link between Mumbai's western suburbs and Navi Mumbai. It will be a big help from the viewpoint of cross-connectivity in the extended Mumbai metropolitan region.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Sachin » 22 Jan 2010 11:25

Gagan wrote:I have personally seen delhi metro trains coming to a stop on the station by themselves, with the drivers sitting on the opposite side as the controls. I think the controls are on the port side (Left side of the car).

Hmm.. this could be like the DLR in London. I have seen advertisements in which Delhi Metro called for drivers. I think they had to have a Diploma in Mech or Elec. Engineering. Yep, even in the TV show which I saw the driver was seated on the left side.

A related link http://www.rediff.com/news/2002/dec/27delhi.htm .

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby vipins » 22 Jan 2010 13:08

Gagan wrote:Sachin ji

I have personally seen delhi metro trains coming to a stop on the station by themselves, with the drivers sitting on the opposite side as the controls. I think the controls are on the port side (Left side of the car).

I asked this one gentleman - and engineer who had visited the DM's control center, and he confirmed that they indeed can do that. He said that at some point in the future the drivers might be removed altogether.


There are markings on the line as 'normal stopping' and train stops just over it.
One thing driver does is controlling the doors.All doors seem to be synchronized with driver's cabin door.
They usually check once before closing the door.
Driver doesn't make any announcement ,its all automatic but there are minor glitches in it as some stations are announced after train had already left them.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 24 Jan 2010 09:36

Image

The first monorail rake which arrived from Malaysia being lifted to be mounted on a concrete beam in Mumbai

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 25 Jan 2010 05:13

There are parallel metal rods / rail like structures on three places on both ends of the platform between the lines.
These are supposedly markers which the train identifies as its stop points.
The metro trains slow down and one can see them correcting themselves to come to a stop at the exact point.

The metro stations have markings on the platform where the doors will be, and passengers are supposed to line up at those places to enter the trains. The trains come to a stop exactly at the same place every time.

KrishG
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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 26 Jan 2010 21:33

Trial run of Mumbai Monorail

[youtube]uRGoPAta0IA&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

Hmmmmm......I thought that Trial run actually means running the thing ! It is like a trial walk! :-? :-?
Mere paise wapas karo !! :(( :((

jamwal
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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby jamwal » 27 Jan 2010 00:09

Some observations on Delhi Metro:

1) Efficiently run and very clean as compared to any other public place.

2) Impressive infrastructure, buildings and utilisation of resources by means of ads, malls, book and eating joints etc.

3) Covers most areas in Dilli except South.

4) As coverage increases, so does crowding, which gets intolerable very frequently. There was a news article which mentioned increasing the no. of coaches from 4 to 6. Hopefully that will help a bit.

5) New trains manufactured by Bombardier are more spacious but seem to have some teething problems. Braking is not as smooth, speakers for announcements and LED displays seem to be of low quality. But they have additional features in LED map display of stations and AC charging points.

6) Delays are rare.

7) AFAIK, drivers have control over doors at least. In stations where there are no passengers waiting to board the train, doors are kept open for 10-15 seconds only.

8) A large portion of people unless rebuked behave like a****** . No basic common sense like standing in lines, not running on premises, not pushing other passengers.

9) The people cleaning the station are hired helpers (contractual )from some private companies. Minimum basic wage is Rs 140 to Rs 170 per day for unskilled and skilled workers respectively (Info from a board at some station)

10) Photography is banned for some reason, security maybe. Many foreign tourists clicking away are prohibited from doing so by the station staff.

11) Delhi terminal for Gurgaon line will be impressive when its opened 8)

12) Eye candy at "Rajiv Chowk - Kashmiri gate - Vishwavidyalaya". Debatable :P

Suraj
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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Suraj » 27 Jan 2010 00:30

Crowding in the new DMRC lines is due to the progressive opening of lines, due to which the system is somewhat unbalanced, resulting in congestion in places. Once the entire ~200km Phase 2 network is open in mid 2010, things should run more smoothly. DMRC also significantly underestimated the popularity of the NOIDA line, which generated nearly twice the passenger traffic they originally estimated. As a result their trainset allocation didn't go to plan, and they have too few trainsets to address the current demand.

On that matter, I wish BHEL/L&T would ramp up indigenous metro trainset manufacturing. We can't entirely depend on ROTEM/Mitsubishi and Bombardier for this, with metro networks growing or coming up in New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Hyderabad and a few smaller cities.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Gagan » 27 Jan 2010 02:24

jamwal wrote:12) Eye candy at "Rajiv Chowk - Kashmiri gate - Vishwavidyalaya". Debatable :P

Very strongly disagree!
The eye candy is amazing! The best time is between 8 and 10 AM around Vishwavidyalaya, and between 3-7 PM at all these three locations. (This I assume from expected behaviour pattern of the feline species time of venturing out of caves).

The candy is much better than Jammu - more numerous, more aggressively dressed, and surprisingly approachable.

Try it - and post a full report in the love and marriage nukkad dhaga / nukkad dhaga.

jamwal
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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby jamwal » 28 Jan 2010 00:24

Eye candy is much better, but is out-numbered 10 to 1 by the dehati crowd that boards from New Delhi and Chandani Chowk stations (Indian Railways). Never tried approaching any of the species. I keep myself busy with a book or music player onlee :oops:


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