Solar energy in India

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Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 20 Apr 2012 23:40

L,

AFAIK the 7 CSP plants coming up all use off the shelf imported technology. None are truly localized. Even the steam turbines are being imported. Due to these factors the power from these plants is likely to be quite expensive. Very few are doing any research on localization. So far CSP is not mainstream like PV is. Not just anyone can do it. There definitely is a huge opportunity to localize. Just as we did for wind turbines. India now has the lowest cost wind turbines in the world. Yes, cheaper than China. We however don't have the size, 3MW+ or the up time world wind turbines have. What India needs is to come up with low-cost standardized CSP designs that can be wrung for costs in the Indian market. This is how cost reduction has happened in PV and Wind. There is going to be a massive burst of PV & CSP construction over the next 5-10 years. If you want to be in the field you need to join one of the Indian companies in India. Lanco would be a good option, so would Megha engineering which is also specializing in CSP. Megha intends to build roughly 2000 MW of CSP over the next 5-10 years.
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http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-2 ... curbs.html
“We don’t want to link manufacturing with generation,” D.J. Pandian, Gujarat’s principal energy secretary, said in an interview. “There will be no requirement of local content.”

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 21 Apr 2012 00:51

Karnatak has just released its successful project bidders. For 80mw.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/ind ... ef=wl_home

Of these, eight companies plan to set up solar photovoltaic projects for 60 MW, while two will set up solar thermal projects of 10 MW each.
Twenty-two companies had participated in the tender for setting up 80-MW solar thermal and solar photovoltaic projects called for by KREDL, the State nodal agency for promoting renewable energy. This was as part of Karnataka Solar Mission targeting 350 MW of solar projects by 2016. “The next round of tenders will be floated soon after the financial closure for all these projects is achieved. It could be about six months from now,” Mr Kumar said.

The projects are allocated under ‘reverse bidding' process where projects will be allocated to bidders who have quoted the steepest discounts to the tariff of Rs 14.50 fixed by KREDL. For photovoltaic plants, Helena Power Private Ltd and Jindal Aluminium Ltd have offered the highest discounts of 656 and 625 paise per unit and have been allotted 10 MW capacity each. Sunborne Energy Services India and Atria Power Corporation will be setting up solar thermal plants, offering discounts of 41 and 3 paise per unit, respectively.


The lowest bid came in at INR 7.94/kWh (USD 0.152/kWh) by Helena Power Pvt. Ltd. for a 10 MW PV plant and the highest successful bid at INR 8.50/kWh (USD 1.63/kWh) by Welspun Solar AP Pvt. Ltd. for a 7 MW PV plant. Other successful bidders include Sunborne Energy Services India Pvt. Ltd. and Atria Power Corporation Ltd., each with 10 MW CSP plants, and Jindal Aluminum Ltd., GKC Project Ltd. and Sai Sudhir Energy Ltd. each with 10 MW PV plants. Additionally, ESSEL Infrastructure Ltd. - Gulbarga and ESSEL Infrastructure Ltd. - Badami will build 5 MW PV plants, with United Telecoms Ltd. finishing off the batch with a 3 MW PV plant.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vipul » 21 Apr 2012 18:21

Azure Power to set up rooftop solar power project in Gujarat.

Two days after the Chief Minister, Mr Narendra Modi, mooted a rooftop solar power generation policy, Azure Power, an independent power producer in the solar energy sector, has announced plans to develop India’s first megawatt (MW) scale rooftop project in the Gujarat capital. The company would set up a 2.5 MW plant at an investment of Rs 25 crore.

To be set up under the Gandhinagar Photovoltaic Rooftop Program (GPRP), this would be the first project of its kind in India wherein the energy from an aggregated rooftop portfolio would be sold to one off-taker. The project will also be attractive for rooftop owners through a revenue sharing arrangement for 25 years. Power companies having PPAs with the State Government will off-take solar power at Rs 11 per unit and pay Rs 3 per unit to rooftop owners who install solar equipment.

This way cities can become energy generators and power companies selling in cities can meet their renewable purchase obligations (RPOs), Mr Inderpreet Wadhwa, CEO, and Mr D. J. Pandian, Principal Secretary (Energy), Gujarat Government, said here on Saturday.

The model would demonstrate aggregation of 60-plus rooftops under a single project. The concept has the potential to tap into 1,000 MW of rooftop solar power across Tier-I and II cities, they said.

Azure Power was selected for this project through a competitive bidding process conducted by the Gujarat Energy Research and Management Institute (GERMI). The projects will include a mix of Government and private rooftops. This programme is expected to encourage public participation and increase solar power generation awareness.

Mr Pandian said the GPRP is expected to revolutionise solar power generation on rooftops in Gandhinagar and then in the State. Rooftop solar installations have a huge market potential in India.

Azure Power is targeting to achieve 100 MW of solar power generation capacity by 2014 across India.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby brihaspati » 23 Apr 2012 08:19

Theo ji,
I did egg on people on both sides to arrange for initial meets. :P But I am not entirely happy that we do not have indigenous tech entirely. If the Spanish collaboration goes through, I will still be unhappy.

I think there are some simple solutions to the pumping problem that can reduce the energy waste. I am not an engineer! :D So I have got some of my concept designs now being tested on by those properly "qualified". Regarding insulation, I am sure DRDO or ISRO can help out. carbon composites? Maybe expensive at first - but long term costs versus gains through efficiency?

Regarding heliostat - thats a universal hard nut. But I think there are two possibilities. Essentially the mirrors must align up along paraboloid sections with ever increasing focal length [concentric paraboloids]. Practically within the day there is little "vertical" adjustment required if the mirrors are aligned along an appropriate paraboloid arc [the arc's focal plane itself will have to change over the days but not the curvature]. This holds some possibilities that can be explored.

Regarding thin-film : there is another possibility - in our climate, it might be possible to generate hydrogen directly from water using thin films under strong sunlight.

Prem
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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Prem » 24 Apr 2012 21:30

http://www.ecofriend.com/india-turns-wo ... -park.html
India turns on the world’s largest solar power park
We had always wondered why South East Asia and Africa were so far behind on solar technology considering how most of the region is far more suitable for tapping the sun’s endless riches, when compared to Europe and North America. Part of the problem is the economic constraints that come attached while lack of political will is a bigger reason. But seems like the wheels have started to roll in the right direction as India, the self proclaimed big brother of the region has now switched on the biggest solar power plant on the planet.India’s Western state of Gujarat has vast stretch of land that is prime for a solar power park of this magnitude as it the desert land is bathed in sun all year long and is very thinly populated. The new solar power plant in Gujarat will produce 214 megawatts as of now and when it is complete in 2014, it will generate a whooping 500MW of clean solar power. The project is part of the 600MW solar energy power program taken up with another 100MW of solar power already being generated elsewhere.The solar power park in Gujarat is now spread over 3000acres and it will help India immensely to achieve its target of generating15 percent of clean energy by 2020. That though will still take some doing as currently only 6 percent of the nation’s power consumption comes from green energy sources. But, in a country where clean energy sources are available in plenty, the project in Gujarat will hopefully help kick start a change towards emission free future. On completion, the current solar power plant itself will cut down on emissions by 8 million tones and save 900,000 tons of coal each year.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 25 Apr 2012 22:50

Copper PV contacts are now a reality w/ 19.7% efficiency. Wafer Cost declines of another 30% are now possible.

http://www.pv-magazine.com/news/details ... z1t4eIPVe0
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IIRC Kersi had advocated this technology for India as it is relatively low tech and all components except the receiver glass tubing can be made locally.

http://www.cleanenergyauthority.com/sol ... ia-042512/

The company is building two, 125 megawatt CSP systems using its Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) technology. The technology uses a series of flat reflectors arranged to focus sunlight on water-filled tubes, heating the water into steam that powers a steam turbine generator. The company focusses on using low-cost components that are relatively common and easily manufactured, allowing for them to be locally produced, according to Katherine Potter, a spokesperson with AREVA Solar. In India, 80 percent of the projects’ components are being locally sourced, she said.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 02 May 2012 18:30

http://pib.nic.in/newsite/pmreleases.aspx?mincode=28

Grid-interactive power generation capacity of 7111.66 MW from wind power and 940.09 MW from solar power has been added in the country during the last 3 years. No capacity addition has taken place from Geothermal energy which is presently at research and development stage. Renewable power generation capacity addition of 14660.65 MW has taken place during the 11th Plan period. This comprises of 10259.60 MW wind power, 1418.85 MW small hydro power, 1996 MW biomass power, 46.20 MW waste to power and 940 MW solar power.

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Good read.

http://www.economist.com/node/21553480

Is the sun the answer to India’s energy problems?

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 02 May 2012 18:32

http://www.economist.com/node/21553480

ON A salt plain near the border with Pakistan lies half a billion dollars’ worth of solar-energy kit paid for by firms from all over the world. A million panels stretch as far as the eye can see. Past a dishevelled brass band is a tent crammed with 5,000 people who cheer when Narendra Modi, the chief minister of Gujarat, declares the solar park open: “I pray, sun god, that today Gujarat will show the way to the rest of the world for solar energy.”

Despite the uncomfortable cult of personality around Mr Modi, Gujarat is an easy place to do business. And solar power would appear to be an obvious winner for India. The country has plenty of sun and flat, idle land. India is energy-hungry, but electricity supply is sporadic. Costly diesel generators are popular. Solar power could replace them. And solar parks, which look like giant Lego kits, are easier to build than conventional power plants. The new park, in a place called Charanka, has just over 200 megawatts (MW) of capacity running, making it the biggest site in India. It took 16 months to build. No one builds nuclear power stations nearly that fast.
In this section

Two other factors make an Indian solar boom seem possible. Conventional energy generation, which in India means burning cheap but dirty local coal, is a mess. Power stations charge local electricity boards 3-4 rupees ($0.06-0.08) per kilowatt hour. The state coal monopoly is unable to dig up enough of the black stuff, forcing power firms to buy pricier imported coal. Hopes that India might find abundant natural gas off its coast have been dashed. Many observers think the price of conventional power will have to rise to 5-6 rupees.

Meanwhile, the cost of solar equipment has fallen by a third since 2010, reckons Alan Rosling of Kiran Energy, a solar firm backed by American private equity. Cheaper solar and pricier conventional power have persuaded many that solar will soon be competitive without subsidies. V. Saibaba, the boss of Lanco Solar, a firm that makes and operates solar parks, says that by 2016 Indian solar will match the price of conventional electricity.

That should mean a building boom. Sunil Gupta of Standard Chartered, a bank, reckons India’s share of new global solar installations will rise from 1% this year to 5% by 2015. India’s central government has set a target for 20,000MW of installed solar generation by 2022, from under 1,000MW today. That would still represent a miserly 5% or less of total power-generation capacity in India, and cost perhaps $30 billion-40 billion to build—a fraction of the investment in new coal-fired plants. So plenty of folk think the official target will be smashed. D.J. Pandian, a civil servant in charge of energy policy in Gujarat, believes his state alone will easily reach 10,000MW of capacity in a decade.

But not everyone agrees. “Half of these plants won’t be here in ten years,” says a German boss at the new solar park—bad news, since the contracts are for 25 years. Too many firms have cut corners, he reckons. A Chinese executive raises his eyebrows at India’s plans to force solar firms to buy some equipment locally. “The supply chain and economies of scale are not there,” he says. An American manager scoffs: “We’ve all been coming to India for years and they’ll never get there…They don’t have the infrastructure.” The difficulty of getting plugged into the grid and a shortage of water to clean panels are common worries.

Solar faces two other problems. First, Gujarat’s state government has guaranteed high prices of 15 rupees for the first 12 years of operation to solar producers, which should mean they make money. But at the national level there is a separate system. It relies on “reverse auctions” in which those solar producers who commit to producing power at the lowest cost win the right to operate. In the second national solar auction, of 350MW, in December, the winning firms committed themselves to selling solar power for as little as 7.5 rupees.

Many people doubt that it is possible to make money at these prices. An Indian engineer says the auction was “a farce” and that it is impossible to build a solid plant and operate it for less than 10 rupees. Firms bidding below, say, 8.5 rupees must assume that technology will improve (likely), equipment prices will keep falling (perhaps, but some manufacturers are losing money), or that they can make their sums work by borrowing cheap dollars rather than dear rupees (a foolish risk).

Second, if prices do not fall steeply, there may be little appetite for solar power. The grid is rickety. Many states’ distribution firms (the generators’ main customers) are financial zombies. Today the cost of solar subsidies is hidden—pooled with the overall generation bill in states such as Gujarat or, for projects under the national scheme, buried in the finances of a big state-owned conventional power firm.

Such bureaucratic subterfuge works on a small scale. But if the bill for solar swells, it is not hard to imagine the kind of public backlash against subsidies that has hit cash-strapped Europe. India’s politicians may then start to ignore contracts. To solve India’s energy problems, solar firms must deliver blindingly low prices.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 02 May 2012 18:38

http://www.rechargenews.com/energy/sola ... 312295.ece

India says developer Lanco 'flouted' NSM rules, but 'no scam'
The Indian government has indicated it will treat Lanco Infratech leniently, despite acknowledging that the developer “flouted” some rules in pursuing projects under the National Solar Mission (NSM).
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http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/com ... ef=wl_home
Lanco Solar has announced the commissioning of 56 MW grid-connected solar photovoltaic power plants in Gujarat.

This includes three plants of 35 MW owned by Lanco Infratech Ltd and 21 MW built as turnkey EPC for other developers — the Gujarat Power Corporation Ltd (5 MW), GSPC Pipavav Power Company Ltd (5 MW), GHI Energy Pvt Ltd (10 MW) and Gujarat State Electricity Corporation Ltd (1 MW).

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So much for all those doom gloom companies that claimed bids were unviable.

http://articles.economictimes.indiatime ... olar-power

The National Solar Mission, which aims to install 20,000 MW capacity of solar energy by 2020, has commissioned 89% of its allotted capacity in its first stage, government officials said.

The government had signed power purchase agreements (PPA) with 28 solar power developers for 140-MW solar photo voltaic (PV) projects in January 2011, out of which 125-MW of capacity stands commissioned currently.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 04 May 2012 03:23

http://www.mydigitalfc.com/economy/tn-p ... -years-938

TN plans solar parks to add 1000 mw in 5 years

TN Vision 2023 document envisages total investments of Rs 450,000 crore in the energy sector over the next 11 years for new thermal capacity addition of 20,000 mw, renewable energy capacity addition of 10,000 mw including 5000 mw solar power and in augmenting transmission and distribution infrastructure to support the new capacity additions, among others.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vasu » 04 May 2012 11:58

I am also very interested in knowing the technological developments in the solar sector, and I think we can use this thread to post updates on new developments from around the world.

Perhaps with better materials and technology, in future the solar farms will shrink to a fraction of what they are today for the same output (and cheaper to set up and run).

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby chaanakya » 04 May 2012 19:55

Theo_Fidel wrote:http://www.mydigitalfc.com/economy/tn-plans-solar-parks-add-1000-mw-5-years-938

TN plans solar parks to add 1000 mw in 5 years

TN Vision 2023 document envisages total investments of Rs 450,000 crore in the energy sector over the next 11 years for new thermal capacity addition of 20,000 mw, renewable energy capacity addition of 10,000 mw including 5000 mw solar power and in augmenting transmission and distribution infrastructure to support the new capacity additions, among others.

Kudankulam NPP construction began in 1997 ( as per wiki) . Looks like contruction of NPPs takes decades (15 years to say the least for 1000MW) compare to wind or Solar. But then we have learnt from exalted ones that Wind power is polluting and solar panels explodes. Better not to take the risk.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby JimmyD » 04 May 2012 21:05

chaanakya wrote:But then we have learnt from exalted ones that Wind power is polluting and solar panels explodes. Better not to take the risk.


I certainly hope this is sarcasm! :)

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 04 May 2012 22:12

chaanakya wrote: Looks like contruction of NPPs takes decades (15 years to say the least for 1000MW) compare to wind or Solar.


The first land acquisition and investigations started in 1988. That is when the first contract was struck.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Amber G. » 07 May 2012 20:28

FYI - I have a simple problem which I saw in a contest in Physics thread. Wonder if any expert here will like to take a crack at that.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Amber G. » 08 May 2012 22:06

May be of interest - Two stories ..
Why SolarCity Is Succeeding in a Difficult Solar Industry
The secret is using existing technology.

After a steady stream of bankruptcies, poor earnings reports, and canceled IPOs for clean-energy companies, this week SolarCity bucked that trend by announcing that it had filed the necessary paperwork with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for an IPO.

The key difference between SolarCity and many other clean-energy startups is that it isn't trying to take on incumbents with new technology. It makes money by deploying existing solar technology with a novel approach to financing.

SolarCity designs, installs, and maintains solar-energy systems fitted to homeowners' roofs. Instead of asking for a big upfront payment, it leases the systems. As the panels produce power, surplus electricity is sold back to the local utility. Combined with the savings that come from using less power from the grid, this will typically reduce the homeowner's electric bill by enough to offset the lease payments.

*****

What Happened to First Solar?
Cheap panels from China have forced the U.S. solar giant to lay off workers and close factories, but the company says it sees a way out of its mess.
A little over a year ago, First Solar seemed to be on top of the world. The U.S. solar giant was one of the largest and most successful solar-panel manufacturers, and solar power plant builders, in the world. It had the lowest manufacturing costs in the industry and the highest market capitalization of any solar-panel manufacturer.

Just a year on, the company's situation is starkly different. Last month, First Solar announced it would close one factory in Germany, shut down four other production lines, and lay off 30 percent of its workers. Last week, it announced a massive loss of $450 million for the first quarter of 2012. The announcement surprised analysts, who had predicted the company would have significant profits. Last fall, First Solar's CEO abruptly left the company, and its image suffered after it had to replace thousands of defective solar panels. Its stock has plummeted from about $130 a year ago to $17 on Friday.

"First Solar is definitely having pains right now. It's not the runaway leader it's been in past years," says M.J. Shiao, senior analyst for solar markets at GTM Research.

First Solar isn't the only solar company in financial trouble. Over the last several years, solar-panel manufacturers in China have built new factories and flooded the market with inexpensive solar panels, driving down prices, which fell by 50 percent last year alone. That has reduced or eliminated profit margins and forced some solar-panel companies out of business.
<Rest please see the link ...>
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First Solar's costs are still among the lowest, if not the lowest, in the industry. But it has trouble competing for two main reasons. First, some other solar-panel companies are selling at cost or below cost, possibly enabled by government support. "When crystalline-silicon solar-panel prices were still in the range of $1.50 to $2 per watt, First Solar, with its lowest cost of production—about 70 to 80 cents a watt—was doing very well. Now the prices for silicon panels have crashed to under $1 a watt," Shiao says.

Second, its thin-film, cadmium-telluride solar panels are less efficient than the silicon solar panels made by manufacturers in China. This limits the kind of applications the panels are good for—for example, they aren't well-suited to roofs, where space is at a premium. The lower efficiency isn't as much of a disadvantage for large, ground-mounted installations, where space is typically less expensive, and where First Solar has found its niche. But even for this application, First Solar has had to charge far less than its competitors, something it can no longer do.

Yet, despite everything, some analysts say that First Solar's prospects look good in the long term. Companies selling at or below cost probably can't do that forever and stay in business. If First Solar outlasts them, its lower costs will again become a competitive advantage.

First Solar says that in the near term, it can count on customers who don't want to buy solar panels from companies that are selling at too low of a price, for fear that those companies will go out of business and not be able to support the panels over their entire 25-year life.

First Solar also isn't just a solar-panel manufacturer, but also a builder of solar power plants. A large share of the cost of solar power comes from things other than solar panels, including designing and building complete solar-power systems and connecting them to the grid. In general, installation is the most profitable part of the industry, and revenues from this side of the business—and the backlog of solar projects that it's contracted to build (projects that also create a steady demand for its solar-panel factories)—might keep First Solar afloat.

In its earnings call last week, First Solar said it has other advantages over its competitors. It has more experience installing large solar power plants, which is important for guaranteeing performance. It's also developing technology to make its solar power plants more attractive to utilities. Solar power is intermittent, with power output dropping and spiking as clouds pass overhead. To compensate, First Solar offers detailed forecasts to help utilities plan for how much power the panels will produce. It also installs power electronics that help smooth out fluctuations in voltage and frequency. Yet, although First Solar emphasized power electronics, others are also developing such technology.

In its earnings call, First Solar predicted better times ahead, and emphasized its new strategy of marketing its panels and solar power plants not in places such as Germany, where the industry is driven by subsidies, but in places such as India, where solar power could compete on its own because it's sunny and prices from conventional electricity sources are relatively high.

Subsidized markets can be unpredictable, and subject to shifting political winds. After higher-than-expected costs for a feed-in tariff in Spain, the government ended the program and the market disappeared. Similar things have happened in other countries. That unpredictability makes it difficult to plan how many factories to build.

Focusing on new markets, at first glance, wouldn't seem to help First Solar much. The same factors that make these markets attractive to First Solar make them attractive to other manufacturers as well, the same ones it has trouble competing with in subsidized markets.

First Solar does, however, have at least one significant advantage. In places such as India, which are hot and humid, First Solar's technology is better suited to the climate. At high temperatures, the power output of silicon solar panels drops, but First Solar's thin-film solar panels fare better than silicon panels. In humid areas, clouds and haze also diffuse sunlight, and thin-film solar panels do better in diffuse light than silicon ones. As a result, the performance gap between thin film and silicon narrows in these places.

Breaking into these new markets may prove challenging, though. Without a government guarantee of a return on investment, as is the case in Germany, it will likely be harder, at least at first, to convince banks to finance large projects, and companies could run into problems negotiating local politics in India.

But if the first large projects are financially successful, that could spur more investment and lead to growth that's even faster than what's been seen in subsidized markets, says Travis Bradford, president of the Prometheus Institute for Sustainable Development. (Subsidies have allowed the solar industry to double in size every two years for much of the past decade.)

"First Solar is saying it can compete in many markets around the world without subsidies," Bradford says. "That could open up markets that are orders of magnitude larger than the ones we see today
.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Amber G. » 08 May 2012 22:12

Meanwhile of interest -

Improved materials could make solar-thermal power cheaper, and energy storage easier.

..Cheap Solar Power at Night
Halotechnics (http://www.halotechnics.com/) has this promotional video.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 08 May 2012 22:50

Report on how the JNNSM is doing so far. Fascinating and very detailed. Domestic manufacturing continues to struggle and reasons are quite interesting.

http://ceew.in/pdf/CEEW-NRDC-National_S ... 0Apr12.pdf

Most jobs, 60%+, are after manufacturing!
Image

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 09 May 2012 00:15

BTW Karnataka Solar Bid prices are out.

Image

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Prem » 11 May 2012 00:56

http://gigaom.com/cleantech/lessons-lea ... ral-india/

lessons learned from an entrepreneur electrifying rural India

The co-founders of two-year-old startup Mera Gao Power are about a month away from generating enough revenues from their solar-power microgrid service in villages in rural India to cover all of their company’s costs. Well, all of their costs except their own salaries, which is about another year away, co-founder Nikhil Jaisinghani tells me in an interview. And Jaisinghani means that in a good way.The 11-person company has been rocking it lately, and is finally on track with a product that their customers want, enough experience in the marketplace to make the business work, and a recent $300,000 grant from USAID that is helping the team expand. By the end of 2012, Mera Gao Power wants to have electrified 70 villages with its solar panels, cell phone charging service, and distribution lines and potentially raise another round of funding from an impact investor to scale the business even more.
But things weren’t always so sunny for the scrappy U.S.-born co-founders Jaisinghani and Brian Shaad — who met in Nigeria and originally were interested in finding a way for Nigerian villagers to use the natural gas that is unearthed in oil recovery but is usually burned off and wasted. Instead the two went off to India, with little experience with solar technology, but with the idea that an electrification product needs to be sold as a service that is paid off over time, instead of sold via a high upfront fee that requires a microloan.One microgrid system that can electrify about 50 households costs $1,200 and includes two solar panels, two batteries and four distribution lines. Each house that signs up for the service and pays the subscription and a small connection fee, gets two LEDs and access to the system. Jaisinghani says that there’s no problem with demand once the system is installed and that at least a quarter of the villagers commonly sign up for the service before its even connected.

( 300 million households can be electrified in 6 Billion$)

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 15 May 2012 23:58

Bids for Solar in MP are in.

Welspun Group, Alpha Lead Bidders in Indian State Solar Auction

Welspun (WLCO) Group, India’s largest solar photovoltaic developer, and Alpha Infraprop Pvt. led with the lowest bids in an auction for 200 megawatts of solar capacity in the central state of Madhya Pradesh, a government official said.


Alpha Infraprop, a Mumbai-based company that’s building a coal-based generation plant in Andhra Pradesh state, submitted the lowest bid for 20 megawatts of capacity, committing it to sell solar-based power at 7,900 rupees ($147) a megawatt-hour, Mehta said. That’s about 13 percent lower than the global average for a photovoltaic project using crystalline panels, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Welspun offered the second-lowest bid of 8,050 rupees a megawatt-hour for 125 megawatts of capacity, Mehta said.

Simplex Infrastructure Ltd. and Acme Tele Power Ltd. (ATPL) followed with bids of 9,590 rupees and 12,450 rupees a megawatt- hour, according to a list from Acme, which was present at the bid opening.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby nandakumar » 07 Jun 2012 18:08

Theo Fidel had been arguing for pumped storage of water as a means of storing surplus solar energy for using during the night, in this forum. I came across an alternative idea in a blog post caputuring discussions in a seminar on renewable energy as below.

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/9232?utm ... gle+Reader
The blog post captures a graphical presentation of how this idea might work. But I have not been able to copy the image. Relevant portions of the text is as below.

Energy Storage
Hermann Pengg gave one of the more interesting presentations of the conference. It’s just a pity that he, like many other keynote speakers, took 15 minutes to get to the meaty part of the presentation leaving precious little time for the important details.

Audi have teamed up with SolarFuel to demonstrate their ‘Power to Gas’ concept. The driver (excuse the pun) is the need for long-term storage of renewable energy to cover demand during what can be 2-3 weeks of low wind under the large high pressure systems which can sit over Europe in winter and summer. Pumped hydro storage is seen as the most efficient but storage volumes even where there are hydro schemes are usually only the order of days, and Germany has precious little anyway.

The idea is to use excess electricity to hydrolyse water into hydrogen and oxygen and then react a CO2 stream with the hydrogen to create methane, which can then be pushed into the gas grid. The gas grid has enormous storage capacity, so in this way the excess renewable energy can be stored for conversion back to electricity in gas plants when needed.




The claimed theoretical efficiency for the conversion from electricity to gas is 60% but it would be good to see more details to support that. I also have questions about the CO2 stream needed for the reaction.

Power to Gas looks like an interesting concept, that makes use of existing infrastructure to solve possibly the biggest challenge of having a high penetration of renewables. The efficiency of the process does not look great and still needs to be demonstrated, but any storage of the volumes and over the time scales required may be better than none.

seminar

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 08 Jun 2012 03:40

Nandakumar,

It is an interesting concept. Something similar has been proposed for Texas using Ammonia. It is far easier to get it from atmosphere and coal is plentiful to provide syngas Ammonia. The Ammonia cycle had a claimed efficiency rate of 70%+ however. Ammonis is relatively easy to liquify as well. The 60% claimed here is less than ideal still it is an option.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 11 Jun 2012 23:24

Some more thoughts.

Pumped storage is ideal for daily use. This sort of Synthetic fuel maybe necessary for long term 2-3 month backup. It helps that we are a very dry sunny country in winter, our seasonal solar variations are relatively low. Even during monsoon demand is low and much of country is dry.

I had done a calculation to show that just the Koyna Dam near Satara is enough to provide load balance for 24 hour period for whole of India. This is the advantage of the Western Ghats. Something few countries have. Ideally though we would be to spread the storage sites country wide.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby RoyG » 12 Jun 2012 02:13

Not exactly renewable but promises to revolutionize power generation...magnetized targeted fusion. India should try to invest in a similar type of program.

http://www.canadianmanufacturing.com/de ... ergy-62713

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 13 Jun 2012 00:09

Roy,

Thanx for posting that.

It is is an interesting plan. We know fusion works.
The problems so far have been the instabilities that develop in plasma as we try to scale up. This project does unfortunately go through that same instability bottleneck. I fear physics will become overwhelmingly complex at higher energies. Worth a small amount of investment to find out but I suspect a working prototype is a good 30 years away despite what they claim.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Gaurav_S » 13 Jun 2012 04:33


jamwal
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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby jamwal » 20 Jun 2012 14:10

Jhujar wrote:http://gigaom.com/cleantech/lessons-learned-from-an-entrepreneur-electrifying-rural-india/

lessons learned from an entrepreneur electrifying rural India

panels, cell phone charging service, and distribution lines and potentially raise another r instead of sold via a high upfront fee that requires a microloan.One microgrid system that can electrify about 50 households costs $1,200 and includes two solar panels, two batteries and four distribution lines. Each house that signs up for the service and pays the subscription and a small connection fee, gets two LEDs and access to the system. Jaisinghani says that there’s no problem with demand once the system is installed and that at least a quarter of the villagers commonly sign up for the service before its even connected.


This electrification is enough to light up only a couple of small LED bulbs in a house. Hardly useful for anything except essential lights. In some ways, it's better to have big plants generating 100s of MWs of electricity rather than such small micro-projects. It'll prevent duplication of efforts and I suppose easier to manage. Solar electrification on a small scale seems sensible only if every house has it's own solar panel, but that is hampered by the cost for the usually poor villagers

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby krishnan » 20 Jun 2012 14:25

lots of homes dont even have this essential lighting....atleast will help the school/college going kids or in kitchen....

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 07 Jul 2012 08:43

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 727624.cms

Investors are recreating the oil rush of a century ago, only this time they are descending with fistfulls of cash on dustbowls and barren tracts in Tamil Nadu's districts like Cuddalore, Tirunelveli and Tuticorin, hoping to make big bucks from the harsh sun that shrivels crops and makes these areas almost completely inhospitable.

With the government set to roll out an exclusive solar power policy in a month, there is a mad scramble for land. Buyers are ready to purchase more than 1,000 acres in a single deal to set up solar farms in Cuddalore, Tirunelveli and other barren areas, say industry sources. Tamil Nadu has a high average solar energy incidence and number of sunshine hours per year. The new policy is likely to incentivise investments in solar power generation, as in Gujarat.

The scramble for land has resulted in a huge rise in revenue from property registration in the first quarter of this fiscal. Officials say there has been increase of more than 50% in registration revenue in Cuddalore and Tirunelveli over the corresponding period last year. Chennai, by comparison, registered an increase of barely 4% this quarter.

Nathan S, a realtor in Tirunelveli, says he is in the process of identifying large land holdings in these districts. "Many high networth individuals and companies have approached me for land to set up solar power farms," he said.

Land costs 3 lakh to 4 lakh per acre in Tirunelveli district, but is cheaper in the Tuticorin and Ramanathapuram districts.

Confederation of Real Estate Developers Association of India governing council member N Nandakumar said that the surge in revenue collection in Cuddalore , Villupuram and Vellore belt has been mainly due to industrial activity.
"Industrial units and corporates are in expansion mode and are buying vast tracts of land in barren areas," he said. There has been a huge spike in demand for land in districts like Tirunelveli, Tuticorin and Ramanathapuram.

Operating solar power farms has been expensive so far, with solar panels costing 12 crore per MW.However,with Gujarat setting up massive solar power farms and Chinese solar panel manufacturers entering the fray, the cost of equipment has fallen drastically to 8 crore per MW. Industry sources said around five acres is needed to generate 1MW of electricity.

Investors are betting that the state's new policy will make generation of solar power, both for use and for sale, a viable option. High power consumers in the state are also exploring the option of investing in solar farms to slash their power bills. "Though solar power is a costly source of energy , government incentives could make it an attractive investment option," an official said. An official said the increase in land registrations fetched the state 1,578 crore in the first quarter, an astonishing jump from 229 crore in the corresponding period last year. Estimates reveal that Cuddalore and Tirunelveli regions top the list with a rise in registration revenue of 68 % and 55% respectively

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 27 Jul 2012 21:42

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/ban ... 685692.ece

State gets its largest solar power plant

A 5-MW eco-friendly solar power plant has been commissioned by Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. (BHEL) at Shivanasamudra near Mandya.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 09 Aug 2012 00:48

http://www.solarserver.com/solar-magazi ... -2017.html

Uttar Pradesh introduces draft solar policy, goal of 1 GW by 2017

The Indian state of Uttar Pradesh has published a draft solar policy with a goal to install 1 GW of solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) plants by 2017. An initial goal of 150 MW by 2014 has also been set.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Murugan » 09 Aug 2012 15:21

krishnan wrote:lots of homes dont even have this essential lighting....atleast will help the school/college going kids or in kitchen....


+1

All the govt should focus differently for very low demand domestic use initially. Should give direct subsidy to the producers/distributors like they do in LPG/Kerosene/PDS products instead of people running helter skelter for claiming subsidies separately.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 09 Aug 2012 21:33

A good read. That guy Jigar Shah sounds like one smart cookie.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/12/magaz ... wanted=all

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby krishnan » 13 Aug 2012 16:21

While riding bike with one of my relative...he remarked something about solar power that almost made me loose balance and fall down

"these guys are stealing power from sun...dunno what will happen to the sun"

:rotfl:


and telling you he was very serious...

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Lalmohan » 13 Aug 2012 17:25

tell him that we'll compensate for it with the power that we are stealing from the indus waters

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Gaurav_S » 14 Aug 2012 06:47

^^lol

Noobie question here. I see many developed countries use solar panels on national highways to maintain proper signage, lighting etc. to increase safety. Is there any state which has done more towards installing solar panels in this manner? Installing solar panels, signage that doesn't need much maintenance (as we are not good at maintaining) should be encouraged. Though I fear if solar panels installed in such way will be there after few weeks as they won't be dirt cheap. :evil:

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Pratyush » 14 Aug 2012 14:12

Dont know about other states, but the moolchand intersection in Delhi used to have a Solar powered traffic signal setup. About 5-6 years ago.

It was taken out during and new lights installed without removing the old lights before the CWG. The New lights dont work and the old ones are still being used but with grid power.

BTW, the new Yamuna expressway has some light fixtures that are solar powered.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vasu » 17 Aug 2012 12:18

The US is using climate finance to kill the Indian solar panel industry: CSE

The United States is using the climate ‘fast start financing’ to its pervert advantage for ruining the Indian domestic solar photo-voltaic (PV) manufacturing industry – says Centre for Science and Environment (CSE). Currently, 80 per cent of the Indian manufacturing capacity is in a state of forced closure and debt restructuring with no orders coming to them, while the US manufacturers are getting orders from Indian solar power developers, say CSE’s researchers.

As the nation’s ambitious Solar Mission’s first phase draws to a close next year, CSE is analysing the state of renewable energy resources and infrastructure in India and the country’s preparedness to meet the Mission goals.

Explains Chandra Bhushan, CSE’s deputy director general: “Fast start financing is a US $30 billion fund set up under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The fund, adopted at the Copenhagen climate meeting in 2009, is supposed to help developing countries deal with climate change impacts and limit greenhouse gas emissions.”

He adds: “The US has been very ingeniously using this fund to promote its own solar manufacturing. The US Exim Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) have been offering low-interest loans to Indian solar project developers on the mandatory condition that they buy the equipment, solar panels and cells from US companies. This has distorted the market completely in favour of US companies.”

The Government of India has been aggressively promoting solar power projects since 2010 as part the National Action Plan on Climate Change. The Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM), plans to install 22,000 MW of solar energy by 2022 by using a mix of feed-in-tariffs and Renewable Purchange Obligations (RPOs). Within three years, 2009-12, India has gone from almost zero to close to 1,000 MW of solar installations in the country.

Though the JNNSM mandates a domestic content requirement -- meaning all projects must buy domestically manufactured solar equipment -- it does it only for the crystalline PV technology and not for the thin-film PV technology.

Taking advantage of this loophole – say CSE researchers -- the US Exim Bank and OPIC have been offering very low rates of interest (about 3 per cent) and a long repayment schedule (up to 18 years) to Indian solar project developers on the condition that they buy thin-film panels manufactured by US companies.
Loans from Indian banks come with an interest rate of close to 14 per cent or more. This has skewed the market completely in favour of thin-film panels imported from US despite the fact that thin-film has lower efficiency when compared to crystalline panels. Close to 60 per cent of the panels installed in India are thin-film type even though only 14 per cent of global capacity is thin-film.

As recently as on July 19, US Exim Bank authorised two other loans totalling US $57.3 million to Solar Field Energy Two Private Limited and Mahindra Surya Prakash Private Limited, respectively, “to finance the export of American solar panels and ancillary services to India”.

Says Kushal Yadav, head of CSE’s Renewable Energy team: “Interestingly, the US government has put anti-dumping duties on solar equipment imported from China because of the alleged subsidies that China is giving to its solar manufacturers. However, the US is engaging in a similar practice in India by subsidising loans for buying American equipment!”

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 03 Sep 2012 06:54

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-0 ... r-capacity
India may auction a third of the solar projects planned by 2017 in the current financial year to double the nation’s sun-powered capacity as it seeks additional clean-energy investments to combat power shortages.

Of the 3,000 megawatts of solar plants proposed to be built starting in 2013, contracts for “1,000 megawatts or a little less” may be tendered in the first batch, Tarun Kapoor, joint secretary at the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, said yesterday in a phone interview from New Delhi.

The plan provides some guidance to solar utilities and manufacturers, which have said India must demonstrate a reliable pipeline of projects to draw the investment needed to meet its targets. India is aiming for 20,000 megawatts of solar power by 2022 and most of the country’s existing capacity of 1,040 megawatts was built in the past year.


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