Make in India

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johneeG
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Make in India

Postby johneeG » 27 Oct 2014 13:58

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In his maiden Independence Day address, Prime Minister Narendra Modi invited the global business community to set up manufacturing facilities in India.

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‘Make in India’ pitch from Sept. 25

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Re: Make in India

Postby johneeG » 27 Oct 2014 14:16

'Made in China' campaign launched with 'Make in India'
PTI Sep 25, 2014, 12.47PM IST

BEIJING: Seeking to retain its manufacturing prowess, Chinese government has launched a " Made in China" campaign with a host of tax concessions coinciding with Prime Minister Narendra Modi's " Make in India" pitch.

China will encourage high-tech imports, research and development (R&D) to upgrade 'Made in China', a decision by the Chinese central government said.

Under the new campaign China will use tax breaks to encourage enterprises to upgrade their equipment and increase R&D efforts to improve the manufacturing industry.

Companies that bought new R&D equipment and facilities after January 1 or possess minor fixed assets will have taxes reduced based on value, the Cabinet, presided over by Premier Li Keqiang, has decided.

Imported high-tech equipment will also enjoy tax deductions in aviation, bio-medicine production, manufacturing of railway and ships, electronics production including computer and telecommunications, instrument production and those used in making IT products and software, state-run Xinhua news agency reported today.

The new decision coincides with the global launch of Modi's 'Make in India' campaign today.

The Indian Embassy here, Consulates in Guangzhou, Shanghai and Hong Kong held special investment promotion events showcasing the 'Make in India' campaign.

China's new move aims to prompt technical improvement of companies, especially innovation of small and medium-sized enterprises, which in the last three decades propelled it to become world's second largest economy and made it a powerhouse of the manufacturing industry.

The cabinet asked government organs to implement the new measures as soon as possible to arm "Made in China" with advanced technology and equipment, encouraging more competitive products with high added value, the report said.

China's manufacturing sector, a key driver of its economic growth, is regarded highly competitive in the global market.

Analysts believe the measures will not only start a new round of innovation but also spur fixed asset investment, and in the bigger picture contribute to stabilising economic growth.

Zhu Jianfang, chief economist of CITIC Securities, said the measures will lighten burdens of enterprises in the real term and prompt the upgrade of outdated equipment.

Combined tax deduction of A-share listed companies is expected to reach 233.3 billion yuan (USD 38 billion) in the first year after the policy takes effect, equal to 7.8 per cent of their total cash flow in 2013, according to the calculation of the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE).

Zhu said three aspects of problems will be eased, citing weak domestic demand and investment amid slowing economic growth, lagging equipment in manufacturing sector and low technical level of home grown companies.

Zeng Gang, analyst from the SSE, expects the move to help China's manufacturers greatly improve their global competitiveness and produce more self-invented merchandises.

"Under the guidance of the government, the enterprises will actively invest in fixed assets, upgrade their technologies and equipment, which will be a boon to current economic growth and nurture growth potentials in the long run," Zhu said.
FEATURED ARTICLES


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New Modi Mantra: Substitute non-essential imports, make them in India


Saving India from the ‘Made in China’ onslaught: What’s the panacea?

Some of India’s industries are suffering at the hands of inbound cargo-bearing Chinese ships. These include steel, electronics, silk, footwear, ceramic products, khadi, auto parts…the list is long. Guardians of India’s foreign trade have to step in with adequate alterations in our customs tariff regime to ensure our manufacturing sector survives the Chinese onslaught across these industries. We are proud of our Indian importer community. But we cannot blindly put to risk the very future of our manufacturing sector for the present pleasure of limited profits from Made in China offerings!

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Re: Make in India

Postby SBajwa » 27 Oct 2014 19:10

1. Technical training needed for industry like Plumbers, Electricians, Robotics (to work in factories), environmentalists, etc.

2. Standards needs to be established to be same across every manufactured thing (Metric system, etc) which is most common in world so that export is easy (also how to change labels for export to a country where different system is used Canada vs. USA).

and so forth!!

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Re: Make in India

Postby member_28797 » 27 Oct 2014 19:16

Deleted
Last edited by Suraj on 27 Oct 2014 21:51, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Poster warned for trolling.

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Re: Make in India

Postby member_22733 » 27 Oct 2014 20:55

narendranaik wrote:Deleted


Can you go easy on the stereotyping please? Based on some of the posts here, I can very well stereotype that being rude, uncivil and obtuse is a signature of the next generation India. You seem to be very certain that everyone who comments on this issue is an armchair general, do you have any data to back that up?

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Re: Make in India

Postby ArmenT » 27 Oct 2014 23:08

SBajwa wrote:2. Standards needs to be established to be same across every manufactured thing (Metric system, etc) which is most common in world so that export is easy

Maybe I'm parsing the above statement incorrectly, but I thought India was already on the metric system (technically, the SI system to be precise) for a few decades now. Is there anything manufactured in India, that is in a different standard of measurement?

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Re: Make in India

Postby SBajwa » 27 Oct 2014 23:41

Is there anything manufactured in India, that is in a different standard of measurement?


I am not sure whether the standards are enforced for all industries from Toys, computers, Steel, food, automobile to Cosmetics, etc. Do we have a department that checks/enforces these standards?

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Re: Make in India

Postby partha » 27 Oct 2014 23:44

Made in China was not a response to Make in India campaign. It was planned much before.

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Re: Make in India

Postby johneeG » 28 Oct 2014 08:36

With 3D tech, manufacturing may become more simpler and affordable. I think the main thing is to provide energy i.e. electricity and communication(roads, railways, internet, phones).

Modi has already moved to give bank accounts to all. It will also facilitate small industries.

I think Bhaarath should concentrate on this 3D tech and see if it can be used as vehicle to cheap and affordable manufacturing for small scale industries.

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Re: Make in India

Postby SaiK » 29 Oct 2014 06:44

partha wrote:Made in China was not a response to Make in India campaign. It was planned much before.



so what? anything is fair in love and war. when it comes to china and pakis, it will be always a war no matter what the means are.

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Re: Make in India

Postby member_28756 » 29 Oct 2014 09:17

SaiK wrote:
partha wrote:Made in China was not a response to Make in India campaign. It was planned much before.



so what? anything is fair in love and war. when it comes to china and pakis, it will be always a war no matter what the means are.

Not war but more of cooperation and competition when it comes to economy remember we are seeking billions of Chinese investment or at least Modi is.

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Re: Make in India

Postby partha » 29 Oct 2014 09:20

SaiK wrote:
partha wrote:Made in China was not a response to Make in India campaign. It was planned much before.



so what?

Nothing. I was just saying whatever Indian media claimed - that Made in China was in response to Make in India - was wrong. That's all. Indian media report is linked in the first post.

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Re: Make in India

Postby RamaY » 02 Jan 2015 04:34

This Indian start-up could disrupt health care with its powerful and affordable diagnostic machine

Kahol and his Indian engineering team built a prototype of a device called the Swasthya Slate (which translates to “Health Tablet”) in less than three months, for a cost of $11,000. This used an off-the-shelf Android tablet and incorporated a four-lead ECG, medical thermometer, water-quality meter, and heart-rate monitor. They then enhanced this with a 12-lead ECG and sensors for blood pressure, blood sugar, heart rate, blood haemoglobin, and urine protein and glucose. In June 2012, they sent this device to 80 medical labs for testing, which reported that it was as accurate as the medical equipment they used — but more suitable for use in remote and rural areas, because it was built for the rugged conditions there.

By January 2013, Kahol’s team had incorporated 33 diagnostic tests, including for HIV, syphilis, pulse oximetry, and troponin (relating to heart attack) into the Swasthya Slate and reduced its cost to $800 per unit. They also built a variety of artificial-intelligence–based apps for frontline health workers and started testing these in different parts of India.

According to reports that Kahol shared with me, in Muktsar Punjab, the number of antenatal care visits increased from 0.8 to 4.1 per mother after the Swasthya was deployed there. The blood-pressure and urine-protein sensors allowed for the diagnosis of a condition called preeclampsia, which is responsible for 15 percent of maternal mortality in India. A year earlier, only 250 mothers were screened for preeclampsia, and 10 were confirmed to be preeclampsic. Because the detection was very late in the pregnancy, eight of these mothers nevertheless passed away. After the introduction of the Swasthya Slate, 1,000 mothers were screened during their third trimester, of whom 120 were detected to have preeclampsia. All were given the necessary care, and there were no fatalities.

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Re: Make in India

Postby SaiK » 02 Jan 2015 05:47

low cost should not mean low quality. that is where we can beat china!

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Re: Make in India

Postby RamaY » 02 Jan 2015 06:10

7 ways India’s entrepreneurs will kick off a new tech revolution in 2015

1. Electronic commerce: Flipkart and Snapdeal have largely focused on consumer products for the well-to-do. The real market opportunity is to address the needs of the people who will soon be coming online. New marketplaces need to be built for artisans in villages so they can design and create custom crafts for customers worldwide. Fruit sellers, sweet shops, and restaurants need apps that can showcase their products and help them take orders from neighborhood customers. Local merchants need the tools to help them provide the same types of one-hour delivery services that Amazon and Google are launching in American cities.

2. Sharing economy: Uber showed Indian entrepreneurs that app-based ride-sharing was practical even in India’s chaotic cities. But Uber targeted elite, high-end customers. The bigger opportunities will be to share rides in three-wheelers, bicycle rickshaws, and buses. Technology can also facilitate hiring of workers in the informal economy — laborers, technicians, maids, and painters — through automation. Also needed are apps for tractor-sharing on farms, jhuggi rentals, bike sharing, and seed swaps.

3. Health apps and devices: Inexpensive sensors can be connected to smartphones and tablets to result in medical devices that are as accurate as those that western hospitals use. That is what Kanav Kohol did with the Swastaya Slate, a health device with 33 sensors, for blood pressure, blood sugar, heart rate, blood haemoglobin, urine protein, and diseases such as HIV, syphilis, dengue, and malaria. Using this $800 device and the A.I.-based apps that come with it, health workers in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir are providing life-saving medical care to a population of 2.5 million people. Telemedicine can also connect people in remote villages to medical experts.

There are endless possibilities for entrepreneurs to transform India’s health-care system to provide medical care to billions of people in need, both in India and abroad.

4. App-based automation of public services: Whether it be for booking railway tickets and monitoring train arrival times or for analyzing government productivity and efficiency data, virtually every aspect of government services could be improved through measurement, monitoring, and automation. Entrepreneurs can play a key role in modernizing governance by using technology and data to stem corruption.

5. Smart cities: Small, inexpensive, Internet-connected sensors, monitoring things such as traffic patterns, air quality, noise, radiation levels, and water quality, can be used to manage pollution and waste, parking, traffic congestion, security, and almost every other aspect of a city’s functioning. Entrepreneurs can start building smart neighborhoods and then smart cities.

6. Education: No matter how hard the government tries, it will not be able to fix India’s public schools in time to educate the more than 100 million children in towns and villages with substandard educational facilities. The only solution for them rests in using technology.

The XPRIZE Foundation has launched a $15 million global competition to develop software that will enable children to teach themselves basic reading, writing, and arithmetic. Already, there are tens of thousands of apps that can teach subjects such as history, geography, music, mathematics, and science. These need customization for regions and local languages, and adaptive learning platforms in order to tailor education to the needs of the student.

7. Agriculture: At a minimum, Internet-connected smartphones can be used to educate farmers on how to improve crop yields and minimize chemical usage. Social media can connect them with each other so that they can share experiences, and sensors can help monitor soil humidity and optimize watering. Supply chains can be improved, and on-farm diagnostic technologies can increase efficiency.

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Re: Make in India

Postby chanakyaa » 04 Jan 2015 20:40

I disagree with Rajan's reservations on Make In India, particularly with Import substitution Industrialization (ISI), but he has his views..

Why is Raghuram Rajan cautioning against the "Make in India" campaign?

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Re: Make in India

Postby panduranghari » 05 Jan 2015 13:15

That was a nice article UdayM sir. Very succinct. Worth reading for Rajan Baiters.

On related note - http://www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/s ... 5_2005.pdf

Stanley Fischer - Deputy chairman of USFR wrote:Finally, what to do about the lender of last resort. Rajan emphasized liquidity, and so did the discussants. That is what central banks can provide in a crisis, but you have to bear in mind the rule that the lender of last resort should lend to the market and not to specific institutions. This whole development is paradoxically reemphasizing the role of the central bank in the management of the system. If he is right, Raghu said the key problem is going to be liquidity. That is what central banks are about.
I have reflected a long time on the Long Term Capital Management crisis. The thing that struck me most was [that] the story of LTCM could have appeared in Clappin’s book on 19th-century crises. It is a very modern crisis, but the way it was resolved was almost identical to the way that crises always used to be resolved. The central bank was brought in and banged a few heads together. There was an argument about whether they should have done it, but in the end, that was how it was resolved.


When Fischer talks everyone listens.

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Re: Make in India

Postby Altair » 08 Jan 2015 12:10

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Re: Make in India

Postby Prem » 11 Jan 2015 08:27

After PM Modi's Make in India, UK launches 'Great Collaborations' with Indian
companies

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/art ... aign=cppst

AHMEDABAD: Drawing on Prime Minister Narendra Modi's 'Make in India' call, the
United Kingdom today announced a campaign to forge collaborations with Indian companies. The programme called 'Great Collaborations' will seek greater cooperation between the
companies based in India and the UK on a range of sectors, an offical statement
of the British High Commission said today. Following an initial investment by BP of over seven billion dollar in 2011, BP and RILBSE 2.09 % plan to invest over 1.5 billion dollar in deep-water exploration and production by 2016 with approximately 50 per cent spent to date, it said.
Subject to regulatory decisions, RIL and BP are keen to progress additional investments of around 10 billion dollar to produce three to four trillion cubic feet of gas from new fields in their K6 D6
deep-water block,
the statement said. The UK Embassy has also quoted British and Indian Prime Ministers appreciating the financial ties between the countries. "I am proud of the depth and breadth of the UK's links with India. British companies such as Standard Chartered, GSK, Hindustan Unilever, BP and Vodafone have been making in India for decades. And companies such as Tata, Mahindra and CIPLA are operating in the UK and India for decades, benefiting both of our countries," British Prime Minister David Cameron "

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Re: Make in India

Postby jagga » 11 Jan 2015 14:51


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Re: Make in India

Postby member_28991 » 11 Feb 2015 09:49

Low cost does not refer low quality. It means a lot for the poor people.

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Re: Make in India

Postby arshyam » 22 Mar 2015 20:23

Not sure where else to post this:

Madurai battery cart overtakes China, gives PM’s ‘Make in India’ a head start- Padmini Sivarajah, ET

If Prime Minister Narendra Modi tried to wean international manufacturers away from China with his 'Make in India' campaign, in Madurai an entrepreneur has made the first inroads, albeit on a humble battery-operated cart.

Tejus Motors, a firm based in Thirumangalam here, will supply indigenous battery carts to FreshWorld, a start-up venture in Bangalore that supplies vegetables to households directly from farms. FreshWorld has been importing battery-run cars from China but has now ordered 20 such vehicles from the Madurai firm. Tejus will supply the first lot of carts in a month, its managing partner P Girithar Raja said.

"Our vehicles are fully indigenous. We make our own batteries and mould the chassis of the vehicles too," he said.

Raja, at a session organized by Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), said time had come to prop up green technology and provide impetus to the industry such that it could manufacture vehicles that could readily ply on roads. The symposium - entitled 'Clean Tech - Problems and Opportunities' -- pitched for use of green technology in new-age entrepreneurship.

In her keynote address, Mridula Ramesh, executive director of Sundaram Textiles, said 'clean tech' provided several opportunities. And Tejus, which was put in touch with FreshWorld by Nativelead Foundation (a non-profit organization), wants to explore those as it has plans to manufacture battery-operated tractors which Raja says would help farmers in cutting costs incurred in transporting their produce.

Saying that entrepreneurship was the way forward, P Vasu, chairman, CII Madurai zone, noted: "It is predicted that India will have the largest employable population in the world by 2020. Entrepreneurship is the best way to utilize this resource."

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Re: Make in India

Postby member_28640 » 23 Mar 2015 04:59

Tejas has had them battery operated carts for atleast 4 years iirc. Make in India should also have a database of suppliers and manufacturers. Buy in India is something that needs to be actively promoted

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Re: Make in India

Postby chaitanya » 25 Mar 2015 06:48

Came across a slick ad on youtube and went to their channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/MakeInIndiaOfficial

Some really nice videos/graphics

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Re: Make in India

Postby ArmenT » 25 Mar 2015 08:39

Make In India campaign promotion at Indian Embassy in Colombia
http://www.elheraldo.co/actividad-social/coctel-de-la-embajada-de-la-india-188533 <-- Text is in Spanish, but can be easily translated in Chrome

Disclaimer: Friend is in one of the pics.

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Re: Make in India

Postby hanumadu » 27 Mar 2015 12:46

Ford drives in, Gujarat turns into auto hub

SANAND (GUJARAT): US auto major Ford Motors Company (FMC) on Thursday commissioned its integrated manufacturing facility at motown Sanand, which is already a home to Tata Motors Ltd's Nano project.

With the commissioning of this plant, Ford India will have a total installed capacity of rolling out 4.4 lakh vehicles and 6.1 lakh engines every year. Ford is the second US auto giant to have set up its manufacturing facility in Gujarat.

General Motors already has plant at Halol near Vadodara.
Ford will manufacture its new concept sedan 'Figo Aspire' at the Sanand facility. Around 19 suppliers have al ready set up their shops at the vendor park in Sanand.

Japanese auto giant Suzuki Motor Corporation plans to invest Rs 8,500 crore over the next few years to set up three plants at Hansalpur with a total annual capacity of 7,50,000 vehicles. The construction of the first plant is already underway.

The 125 km-long belt -Sanand, Vithalapur, Hansalpur in Ahmedabad district, Manadal and Bahucharaji in Mehsana district -is emerging as an ideal location for the automobile sector.

Gujarat, which had plants of companies such as General Motors, Atul Auto and AMW , has in recent years seen auto makers such as Tata Motors Limited, Suzuki Motor Corporation, Ford, Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India (HMSI) Pvt Ltd, Honda Cars India and Hero Moto Corp setting up their projects.

With the launch of Ford's new plant, the installed capacity in state has increased to 6,98,000 units per annum. With slew of mega projects either planned or under construction, the capacity is likely to go up to 46,33,000 units per annum.
Last edited by hanumadu on 28 Mar 2015 04:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Make in India

Postby Prem » 27 Mar 2015 22:37

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/mag ... 661656.cms
Make in India: Samsung to manufacture Galaxy S6 smartphones here


NEW DELHI: Samsung unveiled its Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge smartphones at an event in India on Monday. The phones, that start at a price point of Rs 49,900 for the Galaxy S6 and at Rs 58,900 for the S6 Edge will be available in India from April 10, in sync with the global availability.
Asim Warsi, VP , Mobile and IT for Samsung India Electronics said here that the Indian R&D centers of Samsung have contributed significantly to the design and innovation that have gone into makin he new Galaxy smartphones. He also said that the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge will eventually be made in India.
Samsung will start manufacturing its latest flagships. Samsung has two manufacturing facilities in India apart from three R&D centers. Warsi said we shall begin manufacturing these cutting edge technologies in India sooner than later.It is not just manufacturing that is happening in India but a few key innovations on the two smartphones were developed in Samsung's India
..

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Re: Make in India

Postby ashish raval » 29 Mar 2015 11:09

Good move by India in Germany. It is looking for expansion outside debt striken squabbling Europe and Americas and non democratic technology "chor" China. India is an obvious destination. It has got first hand experience of Indian students and scientists in Germany and vice versa. Hope it succeeds bigwy.
http://m.economictimes.com/news/economy/policy/india-holds-make-in-india-fortnight-in-germany/articleshow/46733175.cms

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Re: Make in India

Postby chaanakya » 02 Apr 2015 23:53

Make In India: PM Modi asks RBI to use Indian paper, ink to print currency

Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants the Reserve Bank to use Indian paper and ink to print currency notes and set a target date for achieving the objective as part of the ‘Make In India’ campaign.

“Today we are celebrating 80 years of RBI. Can we not fix a date…that on any specific date, whatever currency is being printed, paper will be Indian and ink will also be Indian,” he said at the 80th anniversary celebrations of the Reserve Bank.

It is ironic that the photograph of Mahatma Gandhi, who fought for swadeshi, appears on currency printed on imported paper, PM Modi said.


‘Make In India’, the Prime Minister said, “should start from here. I believe we can do this”.


Later, RBI Deputy Governor S S Mundra said work on a factory manufacturing currency paper was in advanced stages and the country would soon have notes printed on Indian paper.


“The factory construction is in advance stages and we are confident that in the next few months, RBI will start producing bank notes,” Mundra said.

India imports the paper and ink, and then prints the notes at dedicated facilities. According to experts, use of indigenous paper and currency would also help in curbing counterfeiting of the notes.

According to the information provided by RBI, India prints 2,000 crore currency notes every year and 40 per cent of the cost goes towards import of paper and ink. It mainly imports paper from countries like Germany, Japan and the UK

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Re: Make in India

Postby Austin » 04 Apr 2015 11:17

What so special about the currency note that we have to import it , cant they be make in India ?

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Re: Make in India

Postby ArmenT » 04 Apr 2015 12:13

Austin wrote:What so special about the currency note that we have to import it , cant they be make in India ?

Currency note paper is a bit tougher than your bog standard paper and also thinner. It also needs to be able to absorb colors correctly without spreading out the ink or smudging (especially for printing the really fine lines in the design) and be able to resist the higher pressure of a currency printing press and still come out feeling "crisp". On top of that, there are also security features, such as the embedded security thread and Gandhi watermark, which are already in the blank currency paper when it comes out of the factory. The paper is a higher quality and made of different materials (cotton, for one) which is why currency notes feel different than normal paper.

If I remember correctly, one UK company makes the currency paper for a lot of countries in the world. Looks like it is a somewhat specialized business and those who know the technologies involved aren't very forthcoming with the process of manufacture.

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Re: Make in India

Postby Rahul M » 04 Apr 2015 14:22

time to move to plastic notes.

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Re: Make in India

Postby A_Gupta » 07 Apr 2015 16:52

http://www.merinews.com/article/textile ... 5584.shtml

The new long term Textile Policy which is on the anvil is likely to address the critical concerns of the textiles and textile machinery manufactures in a bid to make them globally competitive through measures such as focus on labour intensive manufacturing, skill upgradation, rationalisation of labour cost, speeding up customs clearance and reduction in the cost of capital.

An indication to this effect was given by Santosh Kumar Gangwar, Minister of State for Textiles (Independent Charge) while inaugurating industry body FICCI's conference on 'Strategy for Making India a Global Leader in Textiles and Apparels' organised jointly by FICCI and the Textiles Committee, Ministry of Textiles, Government of India.

In Focus
According to a press release issued by FICCI, Gangwar said that the textile ministry was seized of the urgent need to create jobs and upgrading the skills of workers employed in the textiles industry as "Unfortunately, in this country we have more engineers but there is woeful shortage of skilled people."

He said that the Ministry was ensuring that work on 20 textile parks is expedited and the technology upgradation plan given a fillip through an investment of Rs. 4000 crore.


Read more at: http://www.merinews.com/article/textile ... 4.shtml&cp

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Re: Make in India

Postby A_Gupta » 11 Apr 2015 05:35

http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2 ... om-germany

To this point, Modi’s drawn inspiration and ideas for his program from the East Asian experience, in particular China’s rise as the world’s factory. Much to the dismay of free-market economists, he’s shown quite clearly that while no socialist, he’s no Ronald Reagan or Margaret Thatcher either. He has no plans to replicate the Anglo-Saxon model of aggressive privatization and extensive deregulation of markets. He believes in a role for the state, as have other Asian leaders since the end of World War II.

The trouble with the East Asian model is that past successes largely depended on an authoritarian state ramming through difficult policies that could kick-start manufacturing -- repressing wages, acquiring land, giving away natural resources at cheap rates. India’s noisy democracy would never permit Modi such untrammeled power, as he’s quickly discovered.

On the other hand, the German (actually West German) model built up after the war gives primacy to the golden principle of free-market economics: competition. German governments did not intervene by running businesses (as in China or India), but by issuing regulations that ensured competition rather than oligopolies reigned in all markets. (They also set up a generous safety net to catch those who would inevitably be left behind.) In India, by contrast, there are still too many barriers to competition and regulation is patchy or absent in some sectors.

India’s Aspirations

The German manufacturing system thrives at two levels. India, too, has a large network of small and medium enterprises similar to Germany’s Mittelstand companies, but these usually operate below optimum scale, are starved of credit and have few links with global value chains. Modi needs to focus on lifting regulations that force such enterprises to operate inefficiently, such as tax breaks that encourage companies to remain below a certain size. It may be tough for India to replicate quickly the precision engineering of Germany’s automakers and other large enterprises. But by opening up more sectors such as defense to foreign investment, it should be possible to leverage the technical know-how evident in the IT sector for industry. After all, the one manufacturing industry that’s done well in India so far is automobile components, a result of opening up the sector to FDI.

Germany also highlights the need to create an inclusive environment for decision-making. For example, labor unions have always found a seat at the high table in German companies, but in exchange for that power, they’ve acted responsibly. If India is to make progress on reforming labor laws or land acquisition laws, the government needs the consent of workers and farmers. Representatives from these groups need to be consulted more actively than has been the case.

The key ultimately is to form a national consensus around a set of policies that will create jobs by giving a boost to manufacturing. In Germany, the right-wing Christian Democratic Union, largely populated by economic liberals after World War II, was able to forge just such a consensus around developing a social market economy. Governments have come and gone but the basic faith is unchanged. In India, there exists absolutely no agreement on economic reforms -- if anything the consensus leans the other way, forcing reformers to act by stealth.

member_22733
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Re: Make in India

Postby member_22733 » 11 Apr 2015 05:42

ArmenT wrote:Currency note paper is a bit tougher than your bog standard paper and also thinner. It also needs to be able to absorb colors correctly without spreading out the ink or smudging (especially for printing the really fine lines in the design) and be able to resist the higher pressure of a currency printing press and still come out feeling "crisp". On top of that, there are also security features, such as the embedded security thread and Gandhi watermark, which are already in the blank currency paper when it comes out of the factory. The paper is a higher quality and made of different materials (cotton, for one) which is why currency notes feel different than normal paper.

If I remember correctly, one UK company makes the currency paper for a lot of countries in the world. Looks like it is a somewhat specialized business and those who know the technologies involved aren't very forthcoming with the process of manufacture.


Actually, I think the question was:
Yes its complex, but is it really beyond anything we can do?

i.e. we need to set standards on what needs to be achieved and try to create the technology that would achieve it. We may fail in getting there completely, but we will have grown in our capability matrix that would make it possible to do more things than we previously were able to do.

India's missile/rocket tech. is an example of that.

If we do get there by developing the technologies that meet those standards, we would have the "bleeding edge" and that means that any more improvements in this area would give us an enormous edge over other countries.

If we keep importing technology, we would end up with a distorted capability matrix (we already have a very distorted capability matrix). That would mean we will never have true technology independence and we can never be leaders in a field that requires a lot of different technologies to come together. Kaveri engine development story comes to mind.

pankajs
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Re: Make in India

Postby pankajs » 16 Apr 2015 11:56

xpost > Make in India for the defense forces could save up to Rs 3 lakh crore over the next 12 years. Add the savings back to the defense kitty and we could have 3 lakh crore extra capital equipment for the forces.

http://articles.economictimes.indiatime ... ce-pipavav
EY study says Indian shipbuilding capacity grossly inadequate, private yards can step up
NEW DELHI: With demand in India for new naval platforms such as warships and submarines outstripping the public sector's capacity to deliver, private shipyards have the potential of scooping up annual business of Rs 25,000 crore over the next 15 years, a report on warship-building capabilities says.

While the government has been working to increase the capacity of defence shipyards, the sheer requirements of the navy - estimated at more than 95 vessels due for acquisition by 2027 - presents a unique opportunity for private shipyards to capture the market, according to the recent report by EY.

Besides, a substantial order for next-generation submarines has captured the imagination of the private sector - Pipavav Defence & Offshore Engineering Co and Larsen & Toubro are in contention for an estimated Rs 80,000 crore of contracts along with Mazgaon Docks Ltd and others. The requirement of the navy and the Coast Guard over the next few years stretches from offshore patrol vessels to amphibious fighting ships.

Comparing the existing and planned upgrade in the capability of India's defence shipyards, the report says that while at an average, government-owned yards can handle business worth Rs 30,000 crore annually in the 15-year period, there will be a huge gap in supply, leaving private yards with the scope of an annual Rs 25,000 crore business.

"The indigenous construction requires an estimated annual capacity of 107 Standard Ship Units (SSUs) in terms of the annual turnover. But even with a reasonable increase in efficiency, India's ship-building capacity, as well as the present capacity of defence shipyards, is grossly inadequate to meet even half of projected requirements," the report says.

Besides the scope for business, a related study by EY suggests that in case the government can implement its 'Make in India' plan for the defence forces, savings of at least 20% in terms of capital expenditure can be achieved over the next 12 years in military purchases. This would translate into roughly a saving of Rs 3 lakh crore.

"Considering the country's cost-saving edge, we can safely assume a saving of above 20% on major defence platforms in case they are produced in India, with or without a joint venture or transfer of technology," the report says.

This demand has spurred fresh interest in the private sector to invest in shipyards, with the takeover of Pipavav by Anil Ambani's Reliance Infrastructure Ltd the most recent example. The report identifies leading players in the segment as Pipavav, L&T, Bharati Shipyard Ltd and ABG Shipyard Ltd, which have been able to secure naval orders in recent years.

ramana
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Re: Make in India

Postby ramana » 24 Apr 2015 20:13

Can you guys do something like this for he Make in India Lion?

http://www.ericatherhino.org/

panduranghari
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Re: Make in India

Postby panduranghari » 28 Apr 2015 02:17

http://businesstoday.intoday.in/story/b ... 18617.html

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's 'Make in India' campaign is among the most ambitious programmes by any Indian government to promote local manufacturing and attract foreign investment. The initiative seeks to converge and integrate it with 'Digital India' and 'Skill India' in order to build engines of growth for the economy. Promoting skill development and entrepreneurship across various sectors, the programme will build India as a manufacturing and export hub of the world.

Manufacturing in India accounts for around 16 per cent of GDP, which is relatively low compared to more than 20 per cent in other emerging economies such as Brazil, China, Indonesia and Malaysia. While technology, product development and skilled labour are the pillars for the 'Make in India' initiative, ancillary businesses such as logistics, packaging, vendor and inventory management, as well as fulfilment solutions, need to be evolved in order to support growth.
We believe e-commerce can help achieve this purpose. Business-to-consumer (B2C) e-commerce can be one of the critical enablers for the 'Make in India' initiative. Manufacturers, especially small and medium enterprises in Tier-2 and Tier-3 cities, can use the distribution and supply chain of e-commerce companies to access both domestic and global markets.
Though many such SMEs or sellers are increasingly using online selling and marketing, there are many who would only like to focus on manufacturing, their core strength. B2C e-commerce, especially inventory-led, will enable them to do so, negating the need to spend money on marketing and distribution.
Foreign investment is a key component driving the 'Make in India' programme. Currently, the business-to-business (B2B) and the marketplace e-commerce models are completely liberalised, allowing the industry to attract both domestic and foreign funds. This is in contrast to the inventory-led B2C model, which is currently completely restricted to foreign capital. To explain the two models briefly: while the marketplace entity provides a platform, along with value-added services for merchants to sell their products directly to consumers, in a B2C or an inventory-led model, the e-commerce company would typically sell the products to the consumers. Almost all the well known ecommerce players today follow the marketplace model.
As a business model, B2C e-commerce will enable e-commerce companies to source in bulk directly from manufacturers, store it in their warehouses and then sell directly to consumers. This will negate the middlemen in the process, minimise risks for the manufacturer in dealing with complex distribution systems, and create competitive pricing for both the manufacturer and the consumer.


An Assocham-PwC white paper indicates that the e-commerce industry could have a cumulative spend of $950 million-$1.9 billion on infrastructure, logistics and warehousing till 2017 to 2020. The warehousing capacity in the country could rise 12 per cent with air cargo, transit routes, railways and other transport segments witnessing a big boost.
In the pursuit of building the manufacturing base, 'Make in India' also aims to enhance skill development and entrepreneurship for the growing base of entrepreneurs and job-seekers in the country. In a short period of time, e-commerce has managed to create job opportunities for both skilled and semi-skilled workers. Entrepreneurial ventures have facilitated the rapid emergence of e-commerce in the country. A large blue-collar workforce is increasingly getting trained and availing new job opportunities presented by the sector. The scope of employment generation in areas such as customer care (BPOs), IT and ITeS, warehousing, logistics and transportation, shipping and administration are significant additional contributions to the economy by the industry.
As the government creates the building blocks to boost manufacturing for 'Make in India', it would also be beneficial to reconsider the current policy regime restricting the growth of B2C e-commerce, especially inventory-led in the country.
A B2C e-commerce company with foreign investment is currently unable to shoulder the responsibility of manufacturers in the distribution of products, and therefore unable to pass them the benefit of increased efficiencies in the supply chain. One of the aspects that regulators may consider as part of the likely policy framework is to require the inventory-led B2C e-commerce players to create back-end infrastructure in the country and enable creation of additional manufacturing capacity.

Attracting FDI under the 'Make in India' programme is only one of the enablers. The main intent is to create a framework to channel even domestic investments into manufacturing, especially in the SME sector. SMEs have great ideas, but may not have the resources to take their products to end-consumers. Moreover, the policy framework for FDI in e-commerce can mandate the players to create an enabling environment to facilitate domestic investment in manufacturing and provide for the growth of ancillary business services to support the manufacturing sector. An enabling B2C policy on e-commerce could, thereby, create a huge booster for the 'Make in India' programme of the government.


I don't understand how B2C will improve Indian economy unless the goods are manufactured in India? Until then B2C is nothing but a trial balloon by Walmart and assorted Multi brand retailers to set up independent shops circumventing the JV rule.

Shameless PWC can't declare if this was an paid advertising or a shoddy article?

panduranghari
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Re: Make in India

Postby panduranghari » 28 Apr 2015 02:25

http://businesstoday.intoday.in/story/b ... 18617.html

India is today the fourth biggest chemical market in Asia in terms of value but still stays largely behind its potential. Especially in the last five years, India was not able to benefit from the shift of chemical markets to Asia. In spite of many positive aspects like an entrepreneurial driven business, creative engineers and generally highly motivated employees today India still is a net importer of many chemicals. And even worse, over the last years imports have grown more than twice as fast as local production.

Besides the lack of infrastructure, the problems with land availability and the complex bureaucratic processes, many downstream investments can simply not be realised in India, because the adequate feedstock is missing. And, in addition, the chemical industry has other specific requirements, which have not yet been sufficiently addressed. Infrastructure needed for chemical sites for example is noticeably different from infrastructure required for an engineering industrial park.

Other Asian countries like South Korea or on a smaller scale also Thailand were able to create the necessary infrastructure in chemical complexes with good feedstock availability and thus were able to establish a stronger chemical industry with South Korea even being a significant net exporter of chemicals.

The general problems investors in India face are reflected in the World Bank report about ‘Ease of doing business’ in which India is ranked only 142nd out of 189 countries.

Due to the problems and deficiencies, India failed to attract significant foreign investments in the chemical sector. Big multinational chemical companies did not invest adequately compared to what they invest in other Asian countries. And midsize companies often avoid India because the risk is seen as being too big to invest in India because of the negative image, which is projected in their home countries and the numerous uncertainties in processing an investment which are being reported by companies who have invested already.


Now with the change in government, the focus on ‘Make in India’ and the willingness to transform India the picture could change. If the government is really able to change the frame conditions and make investors believe that they are welcome and they will get help when needed, India has the potential to become the second biggest chemical market in Asia within the next 10 years. But only if also the right frame conditions for the chemical industry are created the investments in chemical plants will also happen in India. If the Indian government misses the opportunity to do it right, the investments to supply the Indian market will happen in the Middle East, Singapore, Malaysia, Korea and Thailand but not in India itself.

The following 6 points specific to the chemical industry need to be addressed in order to make India more attractive for investors in the chemical sector:

Provide land in notified chemical areas through the state development corporations in order to avoid the hassle of acquiring land from private owners and go through the lengthy and uncertain process of public hearing

Actively attract anchor investors in PCPIRs in order to ensure availability of sufficient chemical feedstock for downstream investments

Provide the necessary infrastructure like electricity and steam and effluent treatment facilities at internationally competitive prices

Connect the chemical sites through railroads to the major ports and create Inland Container Depots to avoid transporting dangerous goods on road and to reduce logistic cost

Set up industry specific skill development centres which address the requirements of the chemical industry for well qualified technical operators for running the chemical plants below the level of engineers

Streamline the number of permits and clearances required to build and start up a chemical plant and develop a system of ‘single window clearance’ which has as key element the responsibility of high level bureaucrats to get projects implemented

India really needs a stronger chemical industry to fulfil the rising demand of raw materials and intermediates for the growing production of end consumer products. If the points outlined above are addressed not only will the large multinational companies invest more in India but also significant additional FDI could be attracted from the large SME sector in Europe.


If we recall that post by Vilayat ji which espoused 2 essential industries India needs to become a true global power-
1. Chemical Industry
2. Ship building Industry

The author of the article makes very good points.

panduranghari
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Re: Make in India

Postby panduranghari » 28 Apr 2015 02:30

http://www.hindustantimes.com/business- ... 41635.aspx

In a move that will serve as a booster dose for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Make in India’ initiative, the government plans to revive several closed and loss-making pharma public sector units (PSUs).

Five major pharma PSUs need urgent attention, and two of them — Indian Drugs and Pharmaceutical Ltd (IDPL) and Hindustan Antibiotics Ltd — are already receiving resuscitation measures.

“With the policy to close import of bulk drugs, it is very important to revive the defunct or loss-making public pharma companies,” said Hansraj Gangaram Ahir, minister of state, chemicals and fertilisers.

The government has declared 2015 as the ‘Bulk Drugs Year’. “With an aim to strengthen the Make in India initiative, we ayre targeting to produce 100% of bulk drugs domestically and stop the API imports from China in next two to three years,” Ahir said.

These PSUs will raise funds on their own by selling land holdings with a combined valuation of Rs 1,800 crore. “For IDPL and HAL, we have unused factory land available at prime locations which will be disposed of,” said a senior bureaucrat in the department of pharmaceuticals.

The government is working on a Rs 900-crore revival package for IDPL. “About 50% of the investment would be made in the Balanagar facility, the rest would be used for Gurgaon and Rishikesh plants,” the bureaucrat said.

For HAL, the first drug manufacturing unit in India to undertake commercial production of antibiotics, the government plans to to inject about Rs 900 crore in phases.


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