Indian IT Industry

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Bade
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bade » 31 Dec 2015 23:00

That is the Infosys prize you are talking about...for fundamental researchers...and a fair amount of money.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vayutuvan » 01 Jan 2016 07:06

Yes. What more do you want him to do? What happened to Ratan Tata, Azim Premji, and - more importantly - a myriad other undeserving fast talking marketing bouzos who made millions nay billions in the interregnum? What did they give back to applied research leave alone fundamental?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bade » 01 Jan 2016 08:17

VT, I am not the one accusing him. As I said he has done enough, but the second rung in their 40s and 50s (not the co-founders) need to do innovate with different ideas.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby SriKumar » 01 Jan 2016 10:22

mahadevbhu wrote:the biggest IT firms became so because of maintaining a laser like focus on profits and money.

where is the money in aero projects? there are hardly a handful of companies that build planes and why would Infy address those technologies where the scope of scaling up is low.
In addition to what Bade has written; Tata has a unit that does similar work (in simulation) and this is primarily to support their automotive division (as I understand it). I would assume other automotive companies like Mahindra have it too...they certainly need it. EADS out of Europe has an office (dont know the details of what work is done but it is in a non-IT domain).
http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... alore.html

GE R&D is another. There are other companies but low-key and not well-known. Definitely, the profits are not as high as in IT, but currently some outfits do exist, and with Modi's Make-in-India and Parrikar's approach, there is a substantial new opportunity in the making. The problems with working in this sector are well-known and articulated in other threads...one major thing being working with desi gorment. Expanding on this would be OT for this thread.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vayutuvan » 03 Jan 2016 01:28

I am the wikipage of TV Mohandas Pai who is an ex-INFY board member.

T.V. Mohandas Pai

A couple of highlights from the Wikipage:

1. He has about 728K shares of INFY stock which were given to him as ESOP. With current INFY share prices and a conversion rate of $1 = INR 60, he is worth 13-14 million USD. While it is a decent amount, no where near what some of the SV venture capitalists can splurge on startups.

2. He is a CA. His strength is finance, taxing, and human resources. He has leveraged that into setting up the organization Akshaya Patra which feeds about 1.2 million school children in 7K public schools.

3. "Mohandas is a member of the Board of CSIR-Tech Pvt Ltd (www.csirtech.com)". That is an interesting company in that it commercializes technology developed through R&D at CSIR labs as well as getting proper protection for the IP which belongs to Indian public. In essence, they protect the interests of Indian public.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby MN Kumar » 04 Feb 2016 13:52

Root server location across the world:

http://www.root-servers.org/

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 06 Feb 2016 10:21

the high dollar/euro prices of any serious physical and virtual tool is a barrier to entry for anyone outside attempting to develop tech with local currency funding. take a serious genetic r&d lab - most of the hifi machinery would have to be imported and so would the consumables.

SV capitalists have the benefit of dollar printing machine hence can buy such stuff for toilet paper rolls in comparison by selling toilet paper startup stakes into the market for real dollars.

this is where china is trying to rectify the weakness - to develop the whole nuts and bolts ecosystem from ground up and they are seeing quite a bit of success in that. they are undercutting sector by sector with local champions - the high markup us/eu/japani cos might find going quite tough in 10 years across a wide spectrum of sectors.

a real 'power' has to be strong everywhere, or be a tight vassal state like (UK)....if one is in-between people will quickly find your weak points and exploit that. today india and china suffer due to lack of many such small but crucial areas like engines.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Prasad » 06 Feb 2016 20:27

TO give a simple example - canon, nikon, sigma are all high tech japani camera companies. They used to build stuff in japan, then moved to china since costs were lower. Yongnuo a chinese company started making knock-offs. Cheaper lower quality stuff like remote-triggers. People used them as throw-away stuff since it was that cheap. Now, they're making flashes that are quality-wise good enough that many prefer it as they're cheaper! They're that good now. All within a decade.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rishirishi » 07 Feb 2016 03:41

Prasad wrote:TO give a simple example - canon, nikon, sigma are all high tech japani camera companies. They used to build stuff in japan, then moved to china since costs were lower. Yongnuo a chinese company started making knock-offs. Cheaper lower quality stuff like remote-triggers. People used them as throw-away stuff since it was that cheap. Now, they're making flashes that are quality-wise good enough that many prefer it as they're cheaper! They're that good now. All within a decade.


This may also be because chinease gov gives incentives to local companies. I have observed several chinease brands who have become semi popular and know in China. But even in China people prefer the global brands. In reality the chinease brands do not have any cost advantage, as most of the largescale manufactuing is already taking place in china. One example are mobile phones. The Chinease phones mostly sell in China and other low cost countires. Enven in China Apple and Samsung dominate.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 07 Feb 2016 06:40

thats how they start off. once a brand becomes respectable (xiaomi now, lenovo/huawei earlier) they go global and start commanding the same price premium that samsung does. in any case even the developing country markets + china is a huge chunk in many segments.


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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Arunkumar » 12 Feb 2016 07:22

^^ good thing its in hyderabad. ORR in Bangalore spared from one more monster facility.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 12 Feb 2016 07:34

^^ thank the lord for small mercies. all iphone munnas can also emigrate there.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby NRao » 05 Mar 2016 09:06



WAY to go.

BTW, thx for that post, very informative and extremely encouraging. Very glad there are people who pay attention to what India needs rather than Syria or SCS.

question/s:
* 64 bits I assume
* What %age of Fab is within? That is a boat load!!
* Any work with GPUs? (Seems the SS Arch scales to a large number of CPUs and IF each has 16 cores, those are competing with GPUs)
* $50 mil sufficient?
* Where/whom can youngsters in India get in touch?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Shreeman » 05 Mar 2016 09:45

>>> Location: Nerd: who likes to Goog a lot of tihs; posts how she hates govt. and gets laughed at by TLAs.

To whom it may concern: you misspelled, tihs and she. We dont have any in the (s)he department. I hear there is one masquerading as an american, but thats just a rumor.

Also, what is a TLA?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vayutuvan » 05 Mar 2016 11:02

Three letter agency?

member_28437
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby member_28437 » 05 Mar 2016 11:13

question/s:
* 64 bits I assume
32,64 and 128 bit (storage systems need 128 bit when you architect with unified memory and storage address space). We have
our own secure microkernel OS.

* What %age of Fab is within? That is a boat load!!
Currently only proto in 180nm is with SCL. I think they may move to 90nm. Everything else is outside. But plenty of design capability in India to
tapeout at 14/16 nm levels. Intel has started a micro-arch lab in Blr. So now core CPU design is also being done by teh MNCs in India.
By 2025, we should have tons of arch. and design talent.


* Any work with GPUs? (Seems the SS Arch scales to a large number of CPUs and IF each has 16 cores, those are competing with GPUs)
Avoiding GPUs for now (need to keep scope in control), for vectors we use a UCB style vector thread processor. See hwacha.org. If needed a good open source GPU is available based on an older AMD ISA. http://www.miaowgpu.org/


* $50 mil sufficient?
Not really but for initial proto, more than enough. Once we spend about 2-5 Mill USD then we can worry about budget.

* Where/whom can youngsters in India get in touch?
We have a formal internship program. See http://rise.cse.iitm.ac.in/shakti.html

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby NRao » 05 Mar 2016 20:36

macaque wrote:So it makes sense to outsource fabrication till demand picks up to justify local fabs.



prashanth wrote:
macaque wrote:What is crucial is that all the design IP (especially the RS channel for Mil applications) originates and stays
in India.


Thanks for your reply sir. One question. How difficult/easy is it to reverse engineer the architectural level blocks from the layout level (GDS) design?


++. No fear of loss of IP is outsourcing fabrication?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby member_28437 » 05 Mar 2016 20:59

Not really, tough to guess arch from GDS , but access to die does open security risks but those can be mitigated.

-------

Thanks for your reply sir. One question. How difficult/easy is it to reverse engineer the architectural level blocks from the layout level (GDS) design?

++. No fear of loss of IP is outsourcing fabrication?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby NRao » 06 Mar 2016 01:13

@macaque,

* Any mentoring programs? Not internships
* Language of choice? Perhaps top two languages a youngster should master?

Thanks in advance.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby member_28437 » 06 Mar 2016 06:25

Tough to mentor remotely. But both our and the UCB program is easy enough to follow and contribute online.


For chip design, only two languages worth mentioning - Bluespec and Chisel. Do not even bother with Verilog, System Verilog or System C
For OS type SW - Rust and of curse you have no choice but to avoid learning C++. C++ is like measles. One would rather
avoid it but you cannot !
Higher level app languages - take your pick - full GC collect Rust, Swift, Erlang, Haskell, F#, Scala

NRao wrote:@macaque,

* Any mentoring programs? Not internships
* Language of choice? Perhaps top two languages a youngster should master?

Thanks in advance.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Shreeman » 08 Mar 2016 11:54

why the name macaque, can we adjust to a little more human sounding? almost feels like literally calling someone a monkey by responding with a polite address.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby SaraLax » 08 Mar 2016 14:59


Suraj
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Suraj » 08 Mar 2016 20:34

macaque, please suggest a more human sounding name for your profile name. Would MadhuSN work ?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby member_28437 » 11 Mar 2016 19:08

My open source work is done under a non profit called Macaque Labs. Drawing inspiration from the Bonnet Macaques at IIT. You can call me Madhusudan, which is my name but anyone who hangs around the Macaques would be honored to be equated to them ! Absolutely wonderful creatures who seem to be far more evolved than us in most respects ! Among other things, their ability to rear their children is in striking contrast to how we torture our kids at Institutes of higher learning !

Shreeman wrote:why the name macaque, can we adjust to a little more human sounding? almost feels like literally calling someone a monkey by responding with a polite address.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby vasu raya » 12 Mar 2016 17:51

Upgrading India’s cyber security architecture

A fully operational cyber command is the need of the hour, given that India’s digital capabilities lag significantly behind regional and global players

Two things set aside India’s digital spaces from that of major powers such as the United States and China: design and density. India is a net information exporter. Its information highways point west, carrying with them the data of millions of Indians. This is not a design flaw, but simply reflects the popularity of social media platforms and the lack of any serious effort by the Indian government to restrict the flow of data. Equally important is the density of India’s cyberspace. Nearly 500 million Indians use the Internet today, but they do not access the Internet from the same devices. Apple’s market share in the U.S., for instance, is 44 per cent, but iPhones account for less than 1 per cent in India. The massive gap between the security offered by the cheapest phone in the Indian market and a high-end smartphone makes it impossible for regulators to set legal and technical standards for data protection.

Digital intrusions

Arun Mohan Sukumar


With little control over the hardware used by Indian Internet users as well as the information that is carried through them, India’s national security architecture faces a difficult task in cyberspace. India’s infrastructure is susceptible to four kinds of digital intrusions: espionage, which involves intruding into systems to steal information of strategic or commercial value; cybercrime, referring to electronic fraud or other acts of serious criminal consequence; attacks, intended at disrupting services or systems for a temporary period; and war, caused by a large-scale and systematic digital assault on India’s critical installations.

Indian authorities have spent the lion’s share of their resources tackling localised cybercrime while responding to major attacks on a case-by-case basis. Recognising the strategic dimensions of cyberspace, the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) created the position of the National Cyber Security Coordinator in 2014, a welcome first step. There is, however, no national security architecture today that can assess the nature of cyber threats and respond to them effectively. India’s civilian institutions have their own firefighting agencies, and the armed forces have their own insulated platforms to counter cyber attacks.

Unlike nuclear energy, a neat division between civilian and military use of cyberspace is difficult. Just as the Indian Army may face serious cyber attacks from non-state actors in Pakistan, the digital assets of a major Indian conglomerate — say, the Oil and Natural Gas Corporation — may be taken down by a military. The asymmetric character of digital warfare requires a multi-agency organisation that is technically equipped, but also bases its decision on sound strategy and regular policy inputs.

What could such an agency look like? The first requirement is to house it with permanent and semi-permanent staff that is technically proficient in cyber operations, both defensive and offensive. India faces a shortage of officers trained in creating and breaking encrypted platforms as well as using digital networks for intelligence gathering. Were such a National Cyber Security Agency (NCSA) to be created, it should have a functional “nucleus” or secretariat. The second requirement is to coordinate the agency’s policy functions and operations. The current cybersecurity policy, articulated in 2013 by the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, is basically a statement of first principles. The NCSA should be guided by a document outlining India’s cyber strategy, much like its nuclear doctrine.

India currently has a top layer of agencies performing cyber operations — the National Technical Research Organisation, the National Intelligence Grid, and the National Information Board, to name a few — but there is also an additional layer of ministries performing governance functions. The Ministries of Defence, Home, External Affairs and IT should be part of a policy wing that provides their assessments of local and regional developments. India’s intelligence agencies should separately provide their consolidated inputs to aid the operations of the NCSA.

Last, India should not hesitate to build its offensive cyber capabilities. This would involve the development of software designed to intrude, intercept and exploit digital networks. The deployment of cyber weapons is not a low-cost affair, as the digital trail allows adversaries to track and possibly predict the development of future technologies. Nevertheless, a cyber arsenal serves the key function of strategic deterrence. India’s cyber command should be the primary agency responsible for the creation and deployment of such weapons.

Given the power entrusted in such an agency — as with India’s nuclear command, it would report to the PMO — it should have political or parliamentary oversight. In particular, the use of its capabilities against Indian citizens or domestic networks must be guided and supervised by a legal framework.

A fully operational cyber command will take years to complete. It is the need of the hour, given that India’s digital capabilities lag significantly behind regional and global players. Whatever final form India’s cyber command takes, the government would do well to pursue a two-pronged strategy in the interim. First, advocate restraint in cyberspace as a global norm. India is an active participant in discussions around the Tallinn Manual, which is a set of non-governmental guidelines for engagement during war. A group of government experts will convene later this year under the aegis of the UN — India is expected to be at the table — to discuss norms that trigger cyber war. At these forums, India should underline the basic premise that it is impossible to thwart all cyber attacks, and therefore encourage nation-states to restrain from deploying cyber weapons. Second, the government should draft recruitment guidelines to hire and train a cadre of cyber specialists. Attracting such officers may require high pay scales and other benefits — a model the U.S. has aggressively pursued — but they would bring in India’s best minds. If India’s cyberspace has built-in vulnerabilities, it also has a highly skilled IT workforce, which should be harnessed by the government for strategic use.

(Arun Mohan Sukumar heads the Cyber Initiative at the Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi.)

Singha
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 18 Mar 2016 06:53

I loved the name and have commented on it in admin forum - a powerful dharmic monkey is a ancient indian symbol of wisdom and strength.

I hope the other admins dont fuss over this 8)

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby ramana » 23 Mar 2016 04:53

Yes let him be.

So you are into chip design and languages?

And from IITM my alma mater. How is the forest?

Hope you get traction.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 22 Apr 2016 10:59

New Delhi: It promises to a tough year for those in the Information Technology (IT) industry. Recruitments are likely to be 20% less this year as big firms like TCS and Infosys are increasing their focus on automation, says industry body Nasscom.
In June 2015, the IT industry body had predicted that the $143-billion domestic software industry might hire 2.75 lakh in 2016-17, up from about 2.3 lakh during 2014-15.
According to Nasscom chairman CP Gurnani, who is also the chief executive of TechMahindra, the drop in recruitment would not impact the revenue growth which is pegged at 10-11% in the current financial year.

"I think we are still maintaining that overall industry will grow at 10-11% this year. The hiring will not be as linier as we have seen in the past. The digital world leads to automation, automation leads to relatively lesser recruitments. Secondly, digital also means to get closer to the customer. I think you will see recruitments slowing down compared to last year. I think it will be like 15-20% relatively lesser in headcounts. But it will not impact the revenues," Gurnani said.
A recent report by Mumbai-based Centrum Broking had said that the big five software exporters - TCS, Infosys, Wipro, HCL and Cognizant - together added a net 24% fewer employees in 2015 at 77,265, thanks to their automation drive.
The massive plunge in net additions was led by the Chennai-based Cognizant (down 74.6% from 2014) and HCL (down 71%) which have been very keenly focusing on improving utilisation rates through automation, Centrum said.
"Software vendors across the pack are focusing on automation and we believe that 2015-16 will be an inflection point. The result is that these five companies have net added 24% fewer employees in 2015," the report noted, adding this came at a time when these companies' combined dollar revenue grew 9.8%.
TCS had earlier this week announced that it too would be hiring less number of freshers.

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Indian IT Industry

Postby Peregrine » 28 Apr 2016 14:20

Department of Electronics & Information Technology : ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

IT-ITES Exports revenue :

The Indian software and services exports including ITES/ BPO are estimated at US$107.8 billion in year 2015-16 as compared to US$ 97.8 billion in year 2014-15, a 10.3 % growth in dollar terms.
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby VenkataS » 29 Apr 2016 01:24

First year they have crossed $100 billion exports. That is awesome.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby kmkraoind » 01 May 2016 11:59

Cross posting. A great initiative. It will ease pressure on Tech cities like (NCR, Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad, Pune).

STPI @stpiindia

#IndiaBPOScheme for BPO jobs in smaller/muffassil towns, RFP is released today. @rsprasad #Digitalindia @GoI_DeitY

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Peregrine » 05 May 2016 16:09

Peregrine wrote:Department of Electronics & Information Technology : ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

IT-ITES Exports revenue :

The Indian software and services exports including ITES/ BPO are estimated at US$107.8 billion in year 2015-16 as compared to US$ 97.8 billion in year 2014-15, a 10.3 % growth in dollar terms.
Cheers Image
VenkataS wrote: First year they have crossed $100 billion exports. That is awesome.

Vekata Ji :

Thanks your comment. It is not only awesome but also fantabulous even mind-boggling!

Here is the list of the Top Eight Exports of India in 2015-2016 in US$ Billions

1. PETROLEUM PRODUCTS------------------------: 030.42348

2. PEARL, PRECIOUS, SEMIPRECIOUS STONES-----: 022.44722

3. DRUG FORMULATIONS, BIOLOGICALS-----------: 012.64656

4. GOLD AND OTHER PRECIOUS METAL JEWELRY---: 011.02704

5. R M G COTTON INCL ACCESSORIES-------------: 009.09044

6. MOTOR VEHICLE/CARS-------------------------: 006.72097

7. PRODUCTS OF IRON AND STEEL-----------------: 006.17332

8. IRON AND STEEL-------------------------------: 005.56219

TOTAL-------------------------------------------: 104.09122

What an Industry! The IT Exports are more than the Total of the Top Eight Commodities Exported by India. NO AIR POLLUTION. NO NOISE POLLUTION. NO WATER POLLUTION. Yes Sir, What an Industry. HATS OFF TO THE INDIAN IT INDUSTRY!

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby KJo » 05 May 2016 19:12

Not sure who is right and who is wrong here.

Indian woman wins lawsuit on gender discrimination against Wipro in London - See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... Piive.dpuf
http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... n-2785259/

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Sachin » 06 May 2016 13:22

KJo wrote:Not sure who is right and who is wrong here.

There was this V.P type of a chap at Vegetable Oil.Co heading IIRC its BPO business there. He has also now been sacked. But from what I know the woman and he was involved with each other willingly. Things went the wrong way when the woman started demanding her pound of flesh, and the whole nasty story came out. Veg.Oil.Co kicked out both the parties, but the woman seems to have still got her money. The man now is in the US, with another India based IT company (not an IT "Major", but would be an IT "Subedar").

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Sachin » 11 May 2016 14:03


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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby member_28663 » 19 May 2016 03:47

Indian organizations targeted in Suckfly attacks
The first known Suckfly campaign began in April of 2014. During our investigation of the campaign, we identified a number of global targets across several industries who were attacked in 2015. Many of the targets we identified were well known commercial organizations located in India. These organizations included:

One of India's largest financial organizations
A large e-commerce company
The e-commerce company's primary shipping vendor
One of India's top five IT firms
A United States healthcare provider's Indian business unit
Two government organizations
Suckfly spent more time attacking the government networks compared to all but one of the commercial targets. Additionally, one of the two government organizations had the highest infection rate of the Indian targets. Figure 1 shows the infection rate for each of the targets.


http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/i ... ly-attacks

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Suraj » 03 Jun 2016 04:50


KJo
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby KJo » 03 Jun 2016 18:11

Update for all your Rahul Jobs fans. 8)
Will he do a Mahdi and end up heading housing.com again?

Rahul Yadav Admits To His Startup Falling Apart, May Not Get Second-Time Lucky

Image

When the ‘bad boy of startups’ asks a question on Facebook about what to do next with his venture, you cannot really blame the Internet when people go crazy.

This ‘bad boy’ of Internet, as you must have guessed, is none other than Rahul Yadav. Why is he called that? Well, he has a vibrant history.

Rahul Yadav was one of the former CEOs and co-founder of Housing.com, a real estate portal, who dropped out of IIT Mumbai to start the venture. All went well for some time, but last year in March the news of conflicts between Yadav and investors were heard where he asked investors to ‘stop messing around with’ him. The clash got a little out of hand when on July 1 a collective decision by the board was taken to oust Yadav by the very company he founded and built. The given reason being, “The board believed that his behaviour is not befitting of a CEO and is detrimental to the company.” Now that does not happen to your everyday 'garden-variety' entrepreneur, does it?

With all this happening, it did not take a lot of time for Rahul Yadav to receive both criticism and appreciation from the startup ecosystem. Where some found his arrogance ‘a recipe for disaster’, others saw a “hint of Steve Jobs” in him. His polarizing personality received much attention from the startup world and hence, he became the very much liked ‘bad boy of startups’.
What is Intelligent Interface (ii)?

In September, Rahul announced his upcoming venture called Intelligent Interface (ii) on Facebook.

The startup is an eGovernance startup currently in the development stage. The startup was created for the Government departments that will help them use internet and technology tools to save costs, besides expediting service delivery. At a Flipkart event held last year, Yadav said that a single simple online rental agreement can help the government save nearly Rs 2,000-3,000 crore.

Created with much hopes, Yadav expected to get his first contract from government by the beginning of this year. He also said that the venture has very powerful people on the board. Some of them being Flipkart's Sachin, Binny Bansal, Micromax’s Rahul Sharma, Paytm’s Vijay Shekhar Sharma and Yuvraj Singh’s YouWeCan Venutres. Now when these names get together, everyone knows that a startupto look out for is coming is coming to town.

To everyone’s shock, on May 20th Rahul posted this on Facebook, and internet went into a tizzy.

Intelligent Interfaces (ii) for Government is not working out.
Should I make ii for enterprises or come back to real estate?


Singha
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Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 03 Jun 2016 20:19

good thing is - he is not in this for the money.

bad thing - even he does not have a clear idea what he is after :)


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