Indian IT Industry

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arshyam
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby arshyam » 01 Jul 2019 18:54

Saar, as a paying customer, you are well within your rights to ask them for an explanation about the name. Companies are routinely questioned over their branding, so what's the harm in asking? While at it, you could also tell them why you find the name offensive and that you are inclined to take your business elsewhere.

Frankly, I don't think there was anything malicious about the name, especially when it is clearly a female name per their page. At best, it is tone deaf choice of name, but even the term "tone-deaf" implies that there is a tone and they didn't listen to it. Knowing our people, you would probably be the first guy to even think about complaining about the name - no one (sadly) cares about these things in our IT industry - it's always about impressing the gora customer, or thinking in western frames of reference. So much so, hardly a few Indians (me too is guilty of this) use Indic language options in software, resulting it in being crap most of the time. Same goes for branding - hardly any Indic brand names out there (Swiggy, Zomato, Ola, PayTM, Flipkart, BigBasket, Freshdesk, etc.). This name probably came out of such a thought process only.

Btw, Zoho has been operating out of India at least since 1999, when a family member worked there. It used to be called AdventNet back then and based out of Chennai. As with most startups, they were probably registered outside of India for red tape reasons, access to funding, etc.

darshan
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby darshan » 01 Jul 2019 20:16

Come on sir. Give me some credit here. There's been a feedback cycle. However, their explaining was more in line with what BRF is about. If it makes sense, their response easily cross correlated with TN thread on this forum.

And, I personally don't see anything wrong with Swiggy, Zomato, Ola, PayTM, Flipkart, BigBasket, Freshdesk, etc.

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Indian IT Industry

Postby Peregrine » 26 Jul 2019 19:02

X Posted on the Terroristan Thread

NASSCOM : INDUSTRY PERFORMANCE 2018-2019 AND WHAT LIES AHEAD

EXPORTS : US$ 137 Billion

CheersImage


Vips
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 13 Aug 2019 17:48

Reliance-Microsoft cloud tie-up poses threat to Amazon, Google in India.

Reliance Industries Ltd on Monday announced a partnership with Microsoft's Azure cloud platform, in a move that deepens the offerings of its Jio telecoms unit while posing a direct challenge to rival cloud services providers such as Amazon.com and Alphabet's Google.

As part of the 10-year alliance, Jio will build data centres across India that will be hosted on Microsoft's Azure cloud, Reliance Chairman Mukesh Ambani told shareholders at the company annual shareholders' meeting.

"We now have the capability to develop truly India-native solutions, including speech recognition and natural language understanding for all major Indian languages and dialects," said Ambani, Asia's richest man with a net worth of $46.2 billion according to Forbes.

Reliance's foray into the cloud services market - essentially selling computer services such as website hosting & data storage - could intensify competition in an Indian market dominated by Amazon Web Services (AWS), say analysts.

Ambani disrupted India's telecoms industry in late 2016 when he launched Jio with free voice and cut-price data plans, pushing some rivals out of business and forcing others to match tariffs and consolidate in a crowded sector that once comprised more than 10 carriers.

"Other cloud players like AWS and Google will have to come up with new, perhaps cheaper pricing models for India," said Satyajit Sinha, an analyst at tech consultancy Counterpoint.

Ambani has always dubbed Jio a technology company, and used it to launch internet-enabled devices, deliver entertainment services, build fibre broadband and develop other offerings.

The Reliance-Microsoft partnership could help Jio extend its services to India's booming start-up ecosystem.

On Monday, addressing Reliance shareholders via a recorded video message, Microsoft's Indian-born Chief Executive Satya Nadella said: "Together, we will offer comprehensive technology solutions – from compute and storage, to connectivity and productivity – to small and medium businesses everywhere in the country."

PRICE WAR
Jio would provide free connectivity and cloud infrastructure to start-ups, Ambani said, adding the company would offer a "bundle of connectivity, productivity and automation tools" to micro, small and medium business for as little as 1,500 rupees ($21.05) a month.

"This pricing of elementary services is really the rock bottom price," said Naveen Mishra, of tech researcher Gartner.

Rivals such as Amazon Web Services and Google offer similar services at multiple times that price, and technology analysts said Ambani's move could spark a price war in the Indian cloud market, expected to grow at an average 23% annually over the next five years to touch $5.6 billion.

Amazon's cloud services unit declined to comment on the matter. Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment. "We definitely will reassess whether we should keep using AWS or something else, because storage is a huge cost," said Aprameya Radhakrishna, the founder and CEO of Vokal, an audio-video knowledge-sharing platform similar to Quora. "India is a price conscious nation in general and anything which is competing on price will definitely get attention."

Reliance's big push into cloud services also comes as India, one of the world's fastest growing web services markets, is framing a data privacy law, drafts of which have emphasized storage of key consumer data locally.

The country's central bank has also asked foreign firms such as Mastercard and Visa to store payments data solely in India. "Companies that have a fairly mature IT adoption or those that are playing with a lot of Indian consumer data, they might prefer to move to (Reliance) because this data is guaranteed to be stored locally," said Krishna Iyer, an independent technology advisor who was previously a senior executive at cloud services firm Akamai Technologies.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vadivel » 14 Aug 2019 00:38

Vips wrote:Reliance-Microsoft cloud tie-up poses threat to Amazon, Google in India.


PRICE WAR
[u]Jio would provide free connectivity and cloud infrastructure to start-ups, Ambani said, adding the

"This pricing of elementary services is really the rock bottom price," said Naveen Mishra, of tech research
.


This is a good move.

If JioCloud can match AWS SLA they can easily gain market share, I assume prices are going to be cheap for open source os, but I guess for windows it won’t be since MS is partnering , so they will not compromise on this margins.

Also oracle, red hat and other commercial vendors would make their moola.

I think cloud object storage should and would come down drastically though, since it is not vendor specific

Bart S
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bart S » 14 Aug 2019 01:47

rhytha wrote:
Vips wrote:Reliance-Microsoft cloud tie-up poses threat to Amazon, Google in India.


PRICE WAR
[u]Jio would provide free connectivity and cloud infrastructure to start-ups, Ambani said, adding the

"This pricing of elementary services is really the rock bottom price," said Naveen Mishra, of tech research
.


This is a good move.

If JioCloud can match AWS SLA they can easily gain market share, I assume prices are going to be cheap for open source os, but I guess for windows it won’t be since MS is partnering , so they will not compromise on this margins.

Also oracle, red hat and other commercial vendors would make their moola.

I think cloud object storage should and would come down drastically though, since it is not vendor specific


OS is irrelevant here, most of Microsoft Azure (including the MS developed and maintained systems are open source).

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vikas » 14 Aug 2019 11:37

rhytha wrote:
Vips wrote:Reliance-Microsoft cloud tie-up poses threat to Amazon, Google in India.


PRICE WAR
[u]Jio would provide free connectivity and cloud infrastructure to start-ups, Ambani said, adding the

Also oracle, red hat and other commercial vendors would make their moola.

I think cloud object storage should and would come down drastically though, since it is not vendor specific


How Rhytha ji ? How would other commercial product vendors like Oracle make moola unless they give away stuff for free ?
Moreover this would threaten Cloud service providers like GCP and OPC too once JIO cloud bandwagon starts rolling and eats up Govt & Private contracts due to price dominance.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vadivel » 14 Aug 2019 15:58

Bart S wrote:OS is irrelevant here, most of Microsoft Azure (including the MS developed and maintained systems are open source).


OS is being charged, please check the on-demand or reserved pricing on AWS or Azure or Rackspace and compare it with Ubuntu/Amazon Linux etc, the prices for windows/red hat have additional costs.

Please check this site for price difference

https://www.ec2instances.info/?min_memo ... .noUpfront

Vikas wrote:
rhytha wrote:


How Rhytha ji ? How would other commercial product vendors like Oracle make moola unless they give away stuff for free ?
Moreover this would threaten Cloud service providers like GCP and OPC too once JIO cloud bandwagon starts rolling and eats up Govt & Private contracts due to price dominance.


No its not free.

For oracle the licensing is little more complicated if you port the license to AWS/AZure, obviously its cheaper to move from on-premises oracle license to OPC cloud. It offers great benefits..

https://www.itassetmanagement.net/2017/ ... cle-cloud/

GCP offerings are weak for enterprises, they where not able to get much of a toe hold in enterprise market, and its retail offerings are expensive, AWS beat them in both markets. GCP us used mostly for the AI services.

Vips
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 20 Sep 2019 04:02

IMPS rated world’s best in real-time payment service.

India’s Immediate Payment Service (IMPS) has been rated as the world’s best real-time payment service in an analysis of 54 countries that have similar facilities.

“India received the only 5+ rating, and remains the global leader in real-time payments usage,” according to the sixth annual Flavours of Fast report by FIS. IMPS is rated highest in FIS’s ‘Faster Payments Innovation Index’, beating real-time payment services of countries such as the United States, China, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and others, it said, adding that six countries, including Australia, Denmark, Poland, Romania, Singapore, and Sweden, received a 4+ rating for their real-time payments systems. Real-time payments systems are also gaining popularity around the world, and their use has increased 35 per cent globally over the past year and nearly four-fold since 2014, it said.

Daily transactions
“India saw a 10-fold increase in value and an eight-fold increase in transaction volumes through IMPS over the last year,” said the report, noting that it processes nearly two crore faster payment transactions every day.

While demonetisation was a huge boost for cashless payments, the support for mobile numbers to be used for real-time payments added convenience and largely drove volumes, the report further said.

The report highlighted infrastructure challenges for payments, pointing out that 25 crore people in India still do not have phones, and despite the presence of more than six crore merchants, there are less than 40 lakh POS devices. “Real-time digital payments can bridge some of these gaps,” it said.

The report also highlighted the role of Unified Payment Interface (UPI) and QR codes as digital payment alternatives in India.

“The growth in services based on Unified Payment Interface (UPI) has led to the creation of a wealth of new innovative payment solutions,” it said, adding that immediate payments are now built into the social fabric of the country with money transfer apps such as Google Pay and Paytm having added chatting features and WhatsApp and Hike messaging enabling money transfers.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 31 Oct 2019 23:48

India's first data centre park to come up in Navi Mumbai.

The country's first data centre park will come up on a 600-acre of land next to Taloja industrial estate in Navi Mumbai, owned by the MIDC. "Mumbai has the first mover advantage [over Chennai] and an opportunity to establish itself as yet another global data centre capital, similar to Singapore or Virginia in the US," MIDC CEO P Anbalagan told TOI.

Based on the 2018 data centre cost index released by Turner & Townsend (2019), Chennai and Mumbai are the two top locations for core data centres with a significant cost advantage. While Chennai comes at number one poition with a mere $3.8 per watt, Mumbai is a close second with $4.0 per watt. But Mumbai has several advantages including better connectivity with 10 submarine telecom cables landings as compared to the six to Chennai.

The number of internet subscribers in India is increasing rapidly because of a combination of factors including drop in cost of mobile broadband and proliferation of inexpensive smartphones. This data is currently carried through sub-sea cables and stored in data centers around the world. But India's footprint in data centres is miniscule-less than 2% of the global capacity. Also, no core data centre has been installed in India due to a lack in quality infrastructure with reliable power though edge data centres, that are small-scale and located close to busine- ss units, are already operational here.

Anbalagan said the first phase involves an investment of Rs 30,000 crore, half of which is FDI. The park will be built on 150 acres of land and the plot allotment is expected to start in January 2020. Phase-II of the park at Khalapur, where MIDC also owns land, will be even bigger, Anbalagan said. It will be on 500 of the total 2,000 acres of land.

A recent Parliament bill makes it necessary to have data originating in India to be stored within the country.

An assessment paper study by MIDC stated: "Global trends in data localization and privacy are also being reflected in India through the new in-country data residency regulations wherein the Supreme Court declared privacy as a fundamental right and the Justice BN Srikrishna Committee released its first draft of the Personal Data Protection Bill on July 27, 2018. Once the Personal Data Protection Bill 2018 gets enacted, the entire data storage volume generated in India will reside within Indian shores and will also be processed and analysed within Indian precincts."

csaurabh
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby csaurabh » 12 Nov 2019 07:37

There is a big IT boom taking place in India. I wonder how many are aware.
All kinds of government departments and organizations you have never even heard of are coming crawling out of the woodwork issuing EOIs ( Expression of Interest ) demanding an app, website or services for their little thing. Being signed up into startup portal, I get heaps and heaps of these emails.
It is a good time to be an IT entrepreneur. Too bad I'm not one.

sum
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby sum » 21 Nov 2019 07:44

Very interesting interview with Dr Paulraj. The Chinese truly have reached another level in AI etc, going by his words. Very good inputs towards India too and why we are literal nobody despite all our "IT prowess":
China's tech advance is scaring the US: Wireless pioneer

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby NRao » 21 Nov 2019 10:51

sum wrote:Very interesting interview with Dr Paulraj. The Chinese truly have reached another level in AI etc, going by his words. Very good inputs towards India too and why we are literal nobody despite all our "IT prowess":
China's tech advance is scaring the US: Wireless pioneer


The Chinese are very well positioned. Well enough for the US DoD to coin "Counter AI"

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby ArjunPandit » 21 Nov 2019 16:16

sum wrote:Very interesting interview with Dr Paulraj. The Chinese truly have reached another level in AI etc, going by his words. Very good inputs towards India too and why we are literal nobody despite all our "IT prowess":
China's tech advance is scaring the US: Wireless pioneer

a lot of it is driven by access to data. Chinese have no inhibitions in it and are driven by the heft of motivated CPC. We on the other hand are sitting on reams and reams of data in all domains. Govt has started things at their own pace....

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby chola » 21 Nov 2019 16:37

ArjunPandit wrote:
sum wrote:Very interesting interview with Dr Paulraj. The Chinese truly have reached another level in AI etc, going by his words. Very good inputs towards India too and why we are literal nobody despite all our "IT prowess":
China's tech advance is scaring the US: Wireless pioneer

a lot of it is driven by access to data. Chinese have no inhibitions in it and are driven by the heft of motivated CPC. We on the other hand are sitting on reams and reams of data in all domains. Govt has started things at their own pace....


Also driven by a lack of ethics. It is not just AI but in many other fields too. Just as they do not worry about privacy and human rights in implementing AI, they don't care about the ethical questions of genetic and biological engineering or the risks involved in cracking physics.

Autonomous killer drones, genetically-engineered super humans (or half-humans) or artificial suns and black holes that risk civilization and the planet are less likely to slow their scientists and engineers than those in the West and India based on culture and philosophy alone never mind the all powerful profit motive ingrained among chini-types.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby chola » 21 Nov 2019 17:16

BTW, the Amreeki embargo against chinis at Stanford described by Dr Paulraj is actually helping the PRC by reversing their brain drain.

Cheen, like India, provides US campuses and laboratories with a lot of scientists and researchers from grad students to experienced professionals lured by Amreeki money and conveniences.

Now the chinis are "encouraged" to go back to Cheen by both the US and chini government. Indians on the other hand, in spite of the H1B issues are still welcomed so Bharat's brain drain still continues.

Coupled with the laxer ethical and moral constraints, we'll see them becoming more of a challenge in the future. Many on Wall Street think they might be on the cusp of an innovation takeoff because of the trade/tech war. In fact, they are forced to go high tech because their cheap export advantage is being eroded by rising salaries and annihilated by US tariffs and embargoes.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby chola » 22 Nov 2019 15:49

There is no technical barrier to genetically enhancing and cloning humans. The remaining barrier is legal and ethical.

Are we as willing? If not then we will inevitably fall behind in exploring and applying advanced technologies that will relentlessly affect who we are as humans.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-11-19/china-baby-dna-tests-used-by-parents-to-check-for-prodigy-kids

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cloned-police-dogs-china-beijing-security-forces/

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby asgkhan » 05 Jan 2020 15:15

Our company is having a re-think of their outsourcing plans after multiple goof ups by our chengdu counterparts.

I was brought in to manage the last mile connectivity between the client and customers which was outsourced to Cheenis 18 months back.

Comprehensive audit and post multiple failures post go live has finally brought the discussion on moving the pipeline back to bangalore.

I am loving it working with the Chengdu team. Some thoughts after working with them for 8 months:


1. Face is paramount importance. Loss of face has resulted in one of the senior devs getting transferred out of the dept.
2. Rigid structure. Only the senior dev will work with the goras. Stand up calls, very limited inputs by the jr dev.
3. Communication skills are pathetic. They cause so much confusion when working cross global countries. I understand their engrish now. People ping me and ask me what the hell was the discussion about post the discussion. :D
4. They are extremely rude to their countrymen, moderately rude to Indians, and quiver in their pants when discussing with Goras.
5. Their names are very difficult to pronounce, so they attach a xtian name to their emails. I make it a point to refer to them by their Cheeni names.
6. Their reluctance to accept failure, after 2 failures post go launch, they wanted to replace me as their project manager. Program manager refused and now they are back reporting to me with their tail tucked in between their legs.
7. Overall, goras trust Indians more than Cheeni. Their fuse is shorter when dealing with Cheeni.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby V_Raman » 05 Jan 2020 19:37

csaurabh wrote:There is a big IT boom taking place in India. I wonder how many are aware.
All kinds of government departments and organizations you have never even heard of are coming crawling out of the woodwork issuing EOIs ( Expression of Interest ) demanding an app, website or services for their little thing. Being signed up into startup portal, I get heaps and heaps of these emails.
It is a good time to be an IT entrepreneur. Too bad I'm not one.


I am interested in becoming one. Will be great if you can provide links on how to sign up for these opportunities!

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Zynda » 05 Jan 2020 20:56

Usually, on this website you will find published open tenders from Govt. Institutions.

https://eprocure.gov.in/eprocure/app

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby SriKumar » 05 Jan 2020 21:04

asgkhan wrote:7. Overall, goras trust Indians more than Cheeni. Their fuse is shorter when dealing with Cheeni.
In general (nothing to do with a particular IT project or anything like that), their trust of Chinese dropped significantly in the last 5 to 10 years. Especially in the last 5 years- everyone now knows (at all levels) that any technology that they touch, they will take. I've heard stories from goras who traveled to China that their suitcases in hotel rooms were checked out when they were not in the room. Said person had also traveled to India and said nothing of that sort had happened there.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby morem » 06 Jan 2020 00:21

anyone who travels to China from my organization ( US firm ) is provided a new laptop and a cellphone specifically for the duration of the travel and has no data not relevant to that project.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 08 Jan 2020 01:38

How India’s premier science institute fired up Wipro’s growth as an IT giant.

As one of India’s leading technology companies, Wipro is today largely known for its Information Technology (IT), engineering, and consulting services. But what brought Wipro into the IT industry was its computer systems business in the 1980s.

Image
Wipro Series 86.

The origins of the company’s most flourishing business in the 1980s and 1990s can be traced back to IISc’s Digital Systems Lab at the School of Automation (now the Department of Computer Science and Automation or CSA).

“This really was the birth of our IT business—what is now the globally successful business by which Wipro is most known across the world. So, it would be quite accurate to say that the Wipro IT business was born in IISc,” said Azim H Premji, the founder chairman of Wipro, while addressing those gathered at IISc’s convocation ceremony held in September 2019.

“Approaching IISc was a natural choice because they had the required expertise,” says Sridhar Mitta, who joined Wipro in 1980 as Research & Development manager. This collaboration helped Wipro launch their minicomputers in India in 1981. These computers were used primarily by the industry and the research community.

Before Wipro, IBM and other multinational companies (MNCs) were meeting the computing needs of Indian consumers. But in 1974, IBM found itself in a quandary when the Indian government passed the Foreign Exchange Regulation Act, capping the expansion of MNCs. The next three years were a trying time for many MNCs doing business in India. In 1977, the newly elected government under Morarji Desai began promoting indigenous industries, forcing IBM to exit operations.

There was also a change in how computers were developed all over the world. “From the expensive vertically integrated systems where computer vendors had to develop components—such as CPU, memory, and the operating system—by themselves, the world was moving towards more open and cheaper, horizontally integrated systems. Customers or vendors could buy, integrate sub-systems and peripherals from different vendors,” explains Mitta.

Following these developments intently in the late 1970s was Wipro, which was until then in the business of producing vegetable and refined oils. The company decided to fill the void in the computer systems business by cashing in on IISc’s expertise. IISc, around the same time, was keen on boosting collaboration with industry through its consultancy arm, the Centre for Scientific and Industrial Consultancy (CSIC).


To formalise the partnership, Wipro awarded a consultancy project to IISc through CSIC, by signing an agreement in July 1979. In a letter dated 5 October 1979, IISc’s Registrar wrote to Ashok Narasimhan, General Manager of Finance & Planning, Wipro, stating: “The Indian Institute of Science has undertaken a project for the design and development of microprocessor-based minicomputer systems for M/S Wipro Products Limited, Bombay. It is envisaged that the design and production knowhow would be transferred to M/S Wipro Products Limited, in another fifteen months. Preliminary work on the project has been carried out during the past four months.” The value of the consulting project was approximately Rs 14 lakh. The start-up named its business Wipro Information Technology Limited and became a subsidiary of Wipro Products Limited.

“The institute constituted a committee to advise us on what computer we should make,” said Premji. “This consulting project involved surveying the literature on computers being made all over the world. And it was also a platform for technical discussions, conceptualisation, and design review between Wipro’s R&D team and IISc.”

NJ Rao, who was heading the Digital Systems lab at the time, had a strong foothold in a technology that was beginning to revolutionise the field of computers—microprocessors. Acting as the brain of the computer, these compact electronic circuits have become ubiquitous today, present in everything from computers and phones to cars and trains. Microprocessors replaced an older technology called vacuum tubes. Computers built using vacuum tubes were not suitable for widespread use due to their size.

The first digital computer developed in 1946, ENIAC, used 18,000 vacuum tubes, and it stood 10 feet tall, weighed over 3 tonnes, and filled a 1,500-square-foot room. Machines that used vacuum tubes also required massive amounts of power and were prone to failure as the tubes burned out frequently. With the advent of microprocessors, computers could become smaller, faster, and more reliable. Given this changed scenario, Mitta says, the Indian government under Moraji Desai issued a directive asking Indian companies to develop minicomputers with microprocessors.

IISc had researchers with other expertise relevant to computers too, such as systems design, in both hardware and software. They worked at the Centre for Electronics Design and Technology (CEDT), an Indo-Swiss collaboration founded to make students industry-ready. The Centre offered practical courses in building microprocessor-based systems, recalls Y Narahari, who was a BE student at IISc at the time and is currently the Chair, Division of EECS, IISc. Two faculty members from CEDT, Serge Boada and HS Jamadagni, were already working on 16-bit microprocessors, which were much faster than 8-bit ones.

Wipro had another reason to look for support from IISc. According to Rao, in 1979, Intel released its Microprocessor Development System, a tool to help students and engineers familiarise themselves with its newly launched 8086 microprocessor and help develop microprocessor subsystems. “It would have been really difficult for a company to import the Intel Microprocessor Development System,” he says. “So IISc procured it. This was used by the CSA faculty and students, and the Wipro team.”

The Wipro team worked out of the Digital Systems Lab, setting the stage for close interactions between academia and industry. Several discussions, deliberations and experiments later, the team drew up plans for the architecture of its minicomputer: microprocessors, system buses that connect various components, operating system and computer housing. The consultancy project lasted for over a year, after which, the start-up, Wipro Information Technology Limited, shifted to its first office at 45, Dickenson Road, Bangalore.

In 1981, Wipro launched its first minicomputer named Wipro Series-86, which, according to Rao, was the best minicomputer architecture developed indigenously in India at that time. Powered by the Intel 8086 microprocessor and Intel Multibus, the operating system was licenced from the US-based Sentinel Computer Corporation. A CEDT team, headed by Kishore Babu, designed and built the computer housing.

With this, Wipro’s computer systems business took off in the Indian market. Their first-year revenue was Rs 2 crore, according to Mitta. “The chosen architecture proved to be so robust,” Rao adds, “that it served Wipro for the next three generations, with Series 286 and Series 386.”

This collaboration benefitted IISc as well. Narahari remembers that a member from the Digital Systems Lab named Victor Jayakaran was hired by Wipro as one of their first employees. “Out of the first few employees of Wipro, several were trained in this lab,” he says. “IISc students were given an opportunity to work for a start-up like Wipro.” Many IISc alumni joined Wipro during its first two years: Vallab Kulkarni, Srikant Seshadri, Anand Talwai, Anujan, Varma, and Ravi Bail. Narahari himself had been offered a position in Wipro in early 1982 but he chose to join the ME program in the School of Automation. And, as Premji observed, Wipro, with its 40-year-old association with IISc, continues to recruit from IISc and do “collaborative projects at the cutting edge of technology”.

Though the project with IISc drew to a close, the collaboration continued over the years. More recently, IISc and Wipro have come together for a project titled Wipro-IISc Research Innovation Network (WIRIN). “It is a big programme, where teams from IISc and Wipro have started working on autonomous systems, artificial intelligence and robotics,” says Narahari. They will be working on building ‘driverless cars’ and India’s first indigenous ‘Metal 3D Printing Machine’, according to Premji. The project also includes funding PhD students and setting up of the Autonomous Systems and Robotics Lab at IISc. Wipro is funding this initiative in a major way, adds Narahari. “It’s a multi-year program, we have just completed one year.”

“We must encourage and foster collaboration across different sectors,” said Premji in his convocation address, “across education and research institutions, industry, civil society, and government.”

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby V_Raman » 08 Jan 2020 03:27

Zynda wrote:Usually, on this website you will find published open tenders from Govt. Institutions.

https://eprocure.gov.in/eprocure/app


Thanks!

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby CalvinH » 08 Jan 2020 09:45

csaurabh wrote:There is a big IT boom taking place in India. I wonder how many are aware.
All kinds of government departments and organizations you have never even heard of are coming crawling out of the woodwork issuing EOIs ( Expression of Interest ) demanding an app, website or services for their little thing. Being signed up into startup portal, I get heaps and heaps of these emails.
It is a good time to be an IT entrepreneur. Too bad I'm not one.


One of my school mate is an IT supplier for government bodies and he told me that he did 3 Cr business last year (he was doing <1 Cr annual for many years). Looks like government is finally catching up with digitization.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby csaurabh » 10 Jan 2020 10:35

V_Raman wrote:
csaurabh wrote:There is a big IT boom taking place in India. I wonder how many are aware.
All kinds of government departments and organizations you have never even heard of are coming crawling out of the woodwork issuing EOIs ( Expression of Interest ) demanding an app, website or services for their little thing. Being signed up into startup portal, I get heaps and heaps of these emails.
It is a good time to be an IT entrepreneur. Too bad I'm not one.


I am interested in becoming one. Will be great if you can provide links on how to sign up for these opportunities!


You can sign up to portals like Startup India or the respective state startup missions ( like for me Kerala Startup misssions ). I think that should do it.
Be aware though that there is stiff competition. Any EOI gets at least 15-20 entries.

Here is one EOI I received yesterday for your reference. ( Copy paste has somehow garbled it )

Code: Select all

Matsvafed lnventorv Management Svstem

Matsyafed, the Kerala State Co-operqtive Federation for Fisheries Developrnent Ltcl is
an Apex Federation of primary level welfare societies in the coastal fishery sector with the
objective of ensuring the economic and social development of the fishermen. Matsyafecl has
established many commercial units to support the fishermen in procuring fishing inputs and
marketing their output, in addition to production and marketinS of by-products. Tho
Commercial Division facilitates the availability of best quality f shing inputs at comparativelv.
reasonable price in the fishlng villages. lt also provides prompt servjce facllities to the flshe,
folk in their fishing villages.
Matsyafed OBM Division is one of the major commercial units of Matsyafed. l-hc
division imports Suzuki and Yamaha Outboards Motors di.ectly from japan & Tha and and
sells it directly to flshermen through its chain of 14 Vyasa Store in the marine clistricts of
Kerala. lt has also about 10 OBM workshops in different part of t(erala to take care of the
repair and service of the engines. Matsyafed is the main importer of YAMAHA afd SUZU (
brands ofOutboard N4otors (OBMs) in South lndla. Spares of Suzuk .and yamaha OBMs are
also imported for enabling the fisherrnen to repair their OBMs with genuine spares. ln acid tron
to the OBMS we purchase and distribute Lubricant oil for using in Outboard Motors, llfe saving
appliances, float, rope, crates, and insulated boxes etc.
The System shall be able to manage / monitor the lnventory of Matsyafed,s OBI/
division, vyasa store and workshop detalls on a real time basis. lt should aiso be able to
generate MIS based on various parameters that aids in effective decision making.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 25 Jan 2020 22:45

Country's first Super Fab Lab inaugurated by Kerala CM.

The country's first Super Fab Lab, which will give a major push to the hardware industry in the country and the only such facility outside the U.S., was launched at the Integrated Startup Complex of the Kerala Startup Mission (KSUM) here on Saturday.

Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan inaugurated the facility through remote control from Palakkad, where he attended a function at the government Polytechic College. The Super Fab Lab will function in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

The Fab Labs concept, the only one outside the U.S., is the brainchild of Dr Neil Gershenfeld, presently the Director of MIT Centre for Bits and Atoms, who set up the first Fab Lab in the U.S. about 17 years ago, KSUM said.

Dr Gershenfeld was in the city for nearly a week to personally supervise setting up of the Super Fab Lab. Fab Labs are fabrication laboratories offering digital fabrication and computation.

Dr Gershenfeld asserted that the new facility, the only one outside the U.S., not only "has the tools to make anything, it also makes the tools that make things. It will break down boundaries between the digital and physical worlds," he said.

Relying on Computer Aided Design with additive and subtractive manufacturing, the Super Fab Lab allows researchers, innovators and developers to do things beyond the purview of the states existing fab labs. Dr Gershenfeld said the Super Fab Lab is a pioneering venture by Kerala and would let people produce what they consume

The state-of-art facility enables the state to produce machines locally, for access throughout Kerala. It can be for business, education and almost anything. "It is an exciting initiative and the whole world is watching what is happening here so that they can follow on your footsteps", Dr Gershenfield was quoted as saying by Kerala Startup Mission in a release.

The Super Fab Lab, which is poised to give Indias hardware industry a huge leap by allowing researchers, innovators and developers to do things beyond the purview of the states existing fab labs, will function in collaboration with MIT, it said.

KSUM CEO Dr Saji Gopinath said the Super Fab Lab will give a huge boost to Keralas industrial sector.

"Innovations that happen at the Lab can soon get translated to the industrial sector and we may see quite a few startups springing up in the near future," he said.

The KSUM Super Fab Lab has state-of-the-art machines worth more than Rs seven crore in a 10,000 square feet area.

The Super Fab Lab is set to make ISC one of the countrys most sought-after investment hubs, coming as it is after electronics hardware incubator Maker Village and its biotech counterpart Bio-Nest.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rishirishi » 26 Jan 2020 05:45

Rs seven crore in a 10,000 square feet area.


Rather big words being used here.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby csaurabh » 27 Jan 2020 23:40

Vips wrote:Country's first Super Fab Lab inaugurated by Kerala CM.

The country's first Super Fab Lab, which will give a major push to the hardware industry in the country and the only such facility outside the U.S., was launched at the Integrated Startup Complex of the Kerala Startup Mission (KSUM) here on Saturday.

Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan inaugurated the facility through remote control from Palakkad, where he attended a function at the government Polytechic College. The Super Fab Lab will function in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

The Fab Labs concept, the only one outside the U.S., is the brainchild of Dr Neil Gershenfeld, presently the Director of MIT Centre for Bits and Atoms, who set up the first Fab Lab in the U.S. about 17 years ago, KSUM said.

Dr Gershenfeld was in the city for nearly a week to personally supervise setting up of the Super Fab Lab. Fab Labs are fabrication laboratories offering digital fabrication and computation.

Dr Gershenfeld asserted that the new facility, the only one outside the U.S., not only "has the tools to make anything, it also makes the tools that make things. It will break down boundaries between the digital and physical worlds," he said.

Relying on Computer Aided Design with additive and subtractive manufacturing, the Super Fab Lab allows researchers, innovators and developers to do things beyond the purview of the states existing fab labs. Dr Gershenfeld said the Super Fab Lab is a pioneering venture by Kerala and would let people produce what they consume

The state-of-art facility enables the state to produce machines locally, for access throughout Kerala. It can be for business, education and almost anything. "It is an exciting initiative and the whole world is watching what is happening here so that they can follow on your footsteps", Dr Gershenfield was quoted as saying by Kerala Startup Mission in a release.

The Super Fab Lab, which is poised to give Indias hardware industry a huge leap by allowing researchers, innovators and developers to do things beyond the purview of the states existing fab labs, will function in collaboration with MIT, it said.

KSUM CEO Dr Saji Gopinath said the Super Fab Lab will give a huge boost to Keralas industrial sector.

"Innovations that happen at the Lab can soon get translated to the industrial sector and we may see quite a few startups springing up in the near future," he said.

The KSUM Super Fab Lab has state-of-the-art machines worth more than Rs seven crore in a 10,000 square feet area.

The Super Fab Lab is set to make ISC one of the countrys most sought-after investment hubs, coming as it is after electronics hardware incubator Maker Village and its biotech counterpart Bio-Nest.


Having worked with Kerala Startup Missions 'Fab Lab' ( Trivandrum ), all I can say is :lol: :lol:

The so called fab lab would be embarrassed even by a small private machine shop.

To be very charitable to those people, I think they mean well. But their brains are totally colonized by 'MIT' and they only do what 'MIT' expects from a 'fab lab'. I tried telling them once to keep a lathe in the fab lab and they replied that MIT doesn't seem to want it !

Seems like an excuse to sell off American expensive equipment and materials under the brand name of 'MIT'.

To be fair, Kerala fab lab guys do run some decent educational programmes for the local college students and I guess that's the real use of it.

I called my contacts at the KSUM and asked them what there would be in this 'Super fab lab'. According to them they would be keeping a metal laser cutter, an industrial CNC mill, a waterjet machine, a 3D printer and some various odds and ends. It's okay I guess, doesn't really make a difference in a big industrial city like Kochi ( which has a big ship building industry ).

But look at the marketing on this thing. The first ever 'Super Fab lab' outside the US. Poised to be a big game changer for Indian industrial sector! It can not only make anything, but make the tools that make things! (WTF? ) Collaboration with MIT!
:rotfl: :rotfl:
Nice one, American salesmen. Too bad our politicos fall for it every time.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby arvin » 28 Jan 2020 05:54

csaurabh wrote:
Vips wrote:Country's first Super Fab Lab inaugurated by Kerala CM.

Nice one, American salesmen. Too bad our politicos fall for it every time.


https://www.theweek.in/news/sci-tech/20 ... -labs.html

Vijayan has planned no less than 20 such lab all over the state as per above link. Looks more like student training focussed. But with the current investor perception of the state, the students might end up in industrial hubs of TN, KA, MH, GJ, TS.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby csaurabh » 28 Jan 2020 09:23

arvin wrote:
csaurabh wrote:


https://www.theweek.in/news/sci-tech/20 ... -labs.html

Vijayan has planned no less than 20 such lab all over the state as per above link. Looks more like student training focussed. But with the current investor perception of the state, the students might end up in industrial hubs of TN, KA, MH, GJ, TS.


Well he could have just improved the infrastructure of the current 100+ engg colleges in the state, but no, fab lab is more politically appealing. MIT, after all. Well, I can only hope it does some good.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Julian_Bashir » 07 Feb 2020 05:43


Karan M
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Karan M » 07 Feb 2020 06:41

arvin wrote:
csaurabh wrote:


https://www.theweek.in/news/sci-tech/20 ... -labs.html

Vijayan has planned no less than 20 such lab all over the state as per above link. Looks more like student training focussed. But with the current investor perception of the state, the students might end up in industrial hubs of TN, KA, MH, GJ, TS.


Which is good. It exposes our guys to a lot more stuff early on and who knows how many will start up their own stuff.

Easy to be cynical, but if 20 labs are indeed set up, it will make a substantial difference on the ground by training our engineering students to be that much better. And yes, if they move to industrial hubs elsewhere, that's ok too. They may well return to KL one day and set up their own firms once they earn some money, get some experience.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby AdityaM » 01 Mar 2020 05:10

can someone please tell me what this processor is used for

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X HEDT Processor with 64 Cores 128 Threads 292MB Cache x16 PCIe 4.0 Max Boost Clock of 4.3Ghz

it costs 3.9 lakhs on a sale!!

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby suryag » 01 Mar 2020 09:13

Sir Data center Server loads

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Prasad » 01 Mar 2020 11:00

Those are workstation CPUs. Render farms, animation, cad, video editing etc type workloads.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bart S » 01 Mar 2020 17:02

Yes, these are for workstations not servers. Similar chips for servers exist for certain applications, but in general server chips are more optimized for heat and cooling (practical considerations) rather than raw clock speeds.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 12 Mar 2020 18:02

In four years of a national mission, total supercomputers built: Three

INDIA HAS produced just three supercomputers since 2015 —less than one a year on average — under the National Supercomputer Mission (NSM), a dedicated programme aimed at boosting the country’s overall computing facilities and launched that year, according to information obtained under the Right to Information Act from the Ministry of Electronics and IT (MeitY) and Department of Science and Technology (DST).

The MeitY and DST handle the National Supercomputer Mission, and the mission’s nodal agencies are the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), Pune, and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru. According to the RTI reply, monetary grants to the tune of Rs 750.97 crore, or just 16.67 per cent of the total budget of Rs 4,500 crore, was disbursed during the last four-and-a-half years to these two agencies. The NSM was conceived as a seven-year mission ending in 2022.

The NSM envisaged setting up a network of 70 high-performance computing facilities. These were to be installed at many of India’s top academic institutions and scientific establishments like IITs, the Indian Institutes of Science, Education and Research (IISERs), National Institute of Technology (NITs) among others. It was also an effort to improve the number of supercomputers owned by India viz-a-viz the global leaders.

However, skewed funding for the NSM during the initial years slowed down the overall pace of building supercomputers.

“In the initial years, funds were limited and the mission was making slow progress. That has improved now and the mission has gathered momentum now with government support,” said an official involved in the NSM, who did not wish to be named.

The initial phase, experts say, took additional time as they had to design newer systems in the complete absence of any readily-usable one to assemble softwares on. “As the technology was not available, a lot of work had to be done during the initial months. Later, the servers and networks were built after which the softwares were stacked on to them, thus putting together a supercomputer,” the official explained.

Globally, China continues to lead the supercomputer race. It added eight more supercomputers in the last six months taking its existing numbers to 227. This giant leap helped China retain its top position, followed by the US (119 supercomputers), as per the TOP500 report of November 2019. Other countries in this league are Japan (29), France (18), Germany (16), The Netherlands (15), Ireland (14) and the United Kingdom (11). All other countries, including India, own only one top performing supercomputer, the report said.

NSM’s first supercomputer — PARAM Shivay installed in IIT-BHU, Varanasi, was inaugurated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in February 2019, nearly four years post the mission-launch. This 837 TeraFlop capacity HPC was built at a cost of Rs 23.50 crore, the RTI reply said.

The second supercomputer with a capacity of 1.66 PetaFlop was installed at IIT-Kharagpur, and cost Rs 47 crore. The third system, PARAM Brahma, installed in September last year at IISER-Pune, has a capacity of 797 TeraFlop, and cost Rs 23.50 crore, the RTI reply said.

This Rs 94 crore has been spent so far for three advanced computing facilities. The balance allotted budget, experts said, was used in building assembly for components and developing indigenous systems to put together these massive High Performance Computing (HPC) systems, officials involved in the NSM, said.

The budget disbursement by both DST and MeitY towards this mission has been uneven during the last four years, the RTI reply revealed. Twice during the last four-and-a-half years, DST failed to sanction any budget either to IISc (2015-16) or C-DAC (2017-18).

So far, C-DAC has received Rs 144.47 crore between 2015 and September 2019 while IISc has been awarded Rs 265.50 crore by DST alone during the period. MeitY has sanctioned Rs 341 crore to C-DAC alone.

“There will soon be 11 supercomputers; expected to be installed by 2020 or latest by March 2021. All will be indigenously manufactured. Besides, the next phase will involve developing capability building, which is an ongoing process,” the official said. Three supercomputers are expected to be installed in the near future, one each in IIT-Kanpur; Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR), Bengaluru and IIT-Hyderabad, the RTI reply said.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rishirishi » 06 Apr 2020 05:19

AdityaM wrote:can someone please tell me what this processor is used for

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X HEDT Processor with 64 Cores 128 Threads 292MB Cache x16 PCIe 4.0 Max Boost Clock of 4.3Ghz

it costs 3.9 lakhs on a sale!!


Most probably gaming.


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