Indian IT Industry

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darshan
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby darshan » 15 Jul 2020 17:50

I guess that no one wants to see an independent Indian giant so everyone buying a seat at the table. Hopefully, some Indian only giants do emerge to counteract.



Google To Invest $4.5 billion In Jio Platforms As Its First Investment From The India Digitisation Fund
https://swarajyamag.com/insta/google-to ... ation-fund

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 15 Jul 2020 18:04

I hope so too. But it takes first resources for doing a breakthrough and money to achieve scale.

Reliance now has come up with a indigenous 5G solution which it aims to export to the rest of the world. In comparison what is Airtel doing? It is tying up with Verizon to launch online meeting service :)

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 15 Jul 2020 20:12

In comparison what is Airtel doing? It is tying up with Verizon to launch online meeting service :)

RIght. Wasn't there a fairly competent Indian video meeting product, that can partially replace Zoom for example. Someone on BR mentioned it a few weeks ago.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 15 Jul 2020 20:29

"Abhijit Iyer-Mitra is a gasbag with an incredibly poor opinion about India and knows little about the fields that he is supposedly an expert in ( Defense research, engineering, etc. ). He is a hotel management grad.."

I think this is true, however he has a funkiness, liveliness and outspokenness which makes him very listenable/readable, particularly listenable. In this respect, he is a refreshing departure from the majority of commentators on public issues. And the fact that he is 'right-wing' makes him an asset for India. Last year, during the Article 370 removal discussions, he boldly characterised the NY Times and Washington Post correspondents in India as "white trash". Ouchh! This was on a very widely viewed Indian discussion program. In an article in "The Print", he wrote critically about all the 'champagne socialists' who are ganging up on Modi in the international media.

Apart from his unfair labeling of the Indian IT industry, he has also tried to debunk the notion that India before colonisation was some great economic power. And he pounces on the word 'industry' in his dismissiveness. ( industry to him means machinery which transmits energy, not manual work).

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby csaurabh » 16 Jul 2020 09:14

AIM (Abhijit Iyer Mitra) has written utter nonsense regarding Rafale, Tejas, and engineering and research in general. He is also a big fan of importing, esp. from US. His views on economics are not much better. There are far better defense journalists for example look up Amit R. Kashyap in youtube.
AIM should transform himself into a purely political/cultural commentator similar to Lootyens gang ( except right wing ) and keep his mouth shut on defense and economic issues which he has no clue about.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Ambar » 18 Jul 2020 05:29

Abhijit Iyer Mitra has a pathological hatred for Modi , he is the same one who mocked when the PM tripped on the steps of Atal Ghat in Kanpur. He was made to cool off his heels behind bars when he made some ill-conceived and ill-thought out comments about Orissa and its people. I am curious how this chap with no background either through training, education or occupation ended up being a "defense analyst" and a "journalist". He is said to be close to SuSwamy, so who knows where the end of thread is and who holds it.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby darshan » 31 Jul 2020 01:50

Are there any Indian companies similar to mikrotik, ubiquity, etc.?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rahul M » 31 Jul 2020 02:04

Varoon Shekhar wrote:In comparison what is Airtel doing? It is tying up with Verizon to launch online meeting service :)

RIght. Wasn't there a fairly competent Indian video meeting product, that can partially replace Zoom for example. Someone on BR mentioned it a few weeks ago.

zoho.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 31 Jul 2020 06:52

Chennai emerges a data centre hub with new projects worth ₹8,300 cr.

Chennai is set to become the nation’s second major data centre (DC) hub, after Mumbai. The city, which already hosts a number of smaller DCs, is now seeing investment commitments of of ₹8,300 crore by three large companies.

Under MoUs signed with the Tamil Nadu government recently, Yotta Infrastructure (of the Hiranandani group) will invest ₹4,000 crore; HDCI Data Centre Holdings will invest ₹2,800 crore, and Singapore-based ST Tele Media, ₹1,500 crore. “We expect many more data centre companies to follow suit,” said a senior government official.

Among the reasons for the the trend are the submarine cables landing in Chennai, and various State governments wanting to have data centres located in India, said sources. Chennai’s geographic proximity to key Asian cities also gives it an edge.

Additionally, the city has adequate real estate and power, which are critical for data centres. A proactive State government that encourages IT infrastructure adds to the advantages.

Undersea cable stations
Chennai has sound optic fibre network connectivity with three undersea cable landing stations. The combined capacity of these is about 14.8 terabytes per second. This, coupled with a high scale of network reliability, has led to the city’s emergence as a data centre hub, said a 2018 CBRE report .

With remote working the new norm and companies adopting cloud rapidly, there is an upsurge in data centre services. Further, lower data tariffs, smart TVs, emerging technologies, OTT consumption, personal data protection policy and various Digital India programmes are driving the demand, said Sunil Gupta, Managing Partner and CEO, Yotta Infrastructure.

Global connection
On selecting Chennai, Gupta said the fibre landing stations make it easy for data centres to get connected globally. Also, for data centres, it is critical to be present in regions where the demand is high. “As India gets bandwidth-hungry, we may see more companies investing in landing stations and even witness subsea cables terminating into data centres,” he said.

Chennai is India’s largest cable landing station after Mumbai. There are different submarine cables landing in the city from the Bay of Bengal Gateway — SeaMeWe-4, BRICS, Tata TGN-Tata Indicom and i2i Cable Network (i2icn).

Yotta’s data centre, to be built on a 13-acre campus at Hiranandani Parks on the Singaperumal Koil-Oragadam highway, will host four buildings with a capacity of 20,000 racks, said Gupta.

A spokesperson for Sify, which had set up a DC in Chennai in 2000, said the city is emerging not as a substitute but as an equal contender along with other traditional IT hotspots like Mumbai and Bengaluru. The city holds an advantage in that it is a coastal area and hence a cable landing station can be built.

A submarine cable landing station makes perfect sense to accommodate and service the undersea data traffic coming in from the Pacific side. A cable landing point is the location where a submarine (or undersea) data cable makes landfall. It is critical infrastructure and is used to terminate intercontinental cables. Network services then help carry the data further on or terminate it into a DC. So, a cable landing station is an extension of the network services that a service provider offers, said the spokesperson.

On the other hand, DC is a point at which data is stored. From an operational sense, a network will terminate into a DC at some point. But the primary function is storage of client data. Data is stored at a DC that has a network leading in and out of it for transfer. The technology of data storage is continuously evolving with data computing bringing in Big Data analytics, AI, Machine learning, the spokesperson said.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vayutuvan » 31 Jul 2020 08:44

What do they do? Do they have any deep IP?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Mollick.R » 06 Nov 2020 12:36

Just like GST, Labour laws, Doing away with APMC act & Bringing Co-operative banks Under RBI This one is also Biggggggg


Govt relaxes rules, facilitates work from home for tech industry
By Surabhi Agarwal, ET Bureau Last Updated: Nov 05, 2020, 11:35 PM IST

In a massive reform for the tech industry, which will facilitate permanent ‘work from home’ and ‘work from anywhere’ for the companies, the government has done away with most of the registration and compliance requirements.

Under the Other Service Provider (OSP) guidelines of the Department of Telecom (DoT), the registration requirement for OSPs has been done away with altogether and the BPO industry engaged in data related work have been taken out of the ambit of OSP regulations. Also, requirements such as deposit of bank guarantees, for static IPs, frequent reporting obligations, publication of network diagram, penal provisions etc. have also been removed. Similarly, several other requirements, which prevents companies from adopting ‘Work from Home’ and ‘Work from Anywhere’ policies have also been removed, the government said in a statement on Thursday.

The industry has been requesting for these relaxations which are currently temporary to be made permanent and was in dialogue with the government on these reform measure. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that the prowess of India’s IT sector is recognised globally and the government is committed to doing everything possible to ensure a conducive environment for growth and innovation in India.

“Committed to furthering ‘Ease of Doing Business’ and making India a tech hub! GoI has significantly simplified Other Service Provider (OSP) guidelines of the Telecom Department. Compliance burdens of BPO industry will be greatly reduced due to this,” Modi said.

Union minister for electronics and IT, Ravi Shankar Prasad also tweeted that the Govt has taken a major reform initiative to liberalize the regulatory regime for OSPs. “This will boost the IT/ ITeS/ BPO industry and create a friendly regime for Work from Home in India. #DigitalIndia.”

Ashish Aggarwal, Head of Public Policy at Nasscom said that the latest DoT guidelines are a bold reform for the Indian BPM/ ITES industry. “Nasscom has worked closely with the government on this and it is to the credit of the government and specially the DoT who have gone the extra mile to ensure that all the requirements of the industry are met. The reforms will give a tremendously strengthen India as the global BPO outsourcing hub, encourage remote working leading to newer job opportunities in smaller cities,” he added.

The industry applauded the move with experts such as former Infosys board member TV Mohandas Pai calling it a “Great move by Govt for all citizens” and a “wonderful reform” on Twitter.


https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/tech/ites/govt-makes-work-from-home-for-tech-industry-permanent/articleshow/79065334.cms

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby VinodTK » 06 Nov 2020 19:40

Amazon Web Services to invest Rs 20,761 crore in data centres in Telangana
Hyderabad: In a major boost to Telangana, Amazon Web Services (AWS), an Amazon.com company, has announced an investment of Rs 20,761 crore ($2.77 billion) to create multiple data centres, making it the largest FDI investment in the State.

AWS is investing to set up an AWS Region with three Availability Zones (AZs) in Hyderabad. The AWS Asia Pacific (Hyderabad) Region is expected to start operations by mid of 2022.
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nam
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby nam » 06 Nov 2020 20:00

Hopefully WFH provides flexibility to the companies to hire people in Tier 2 cities. Allows them to reduce cost, employees would prefer to be in small town, reduce travel time and over population.

Not to mention the economic growth that would be available to Tier 2 cities.
Who wouldn't want to work for a Blore based company from Goa..

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby V_Raman » 07 Nov 2020 01:07

Why cant reliance start a domestic cloud company like Ali-Cloud - even a small one using OSS like OpenStack?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby KJo » 07 Nov 2020 01:12

V_Raman wrote:Why cant reliance start a domestic cloud company like Ali-Cloud - even a small one using OSS like OpenStack?


They can, they have the money and they have the people.
But Indian mindset has been, and more true lately is to settle for modest gains for minimum risk. Creating a domestic cloud increases the risk. While reward is also higher, investors prefer revenues from mundane backoffice jobs.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bart S » 07 Nov 2020 01:33

nam wrote:Hopefully WFH provides flexibility to the companies to hire people in Tier 2 cities. Allows them to reduce cost, employees would prefer to be in small town, reduce travel time and over population.

Not to mention the economic growth that would be available to Tier 2 cities.
Who wouldn't want to work for a Blore based company from Goa..



This has already happened and is becoming almost permanent, at least within the Chennai SAAS scene. Big bodyshops will take time to get there or might never make that transition. Check out Sridhar Vembu's twitter channel for regular updates - as CEO of a co, he works out of his village now and seems very happy doing so.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bart S » 07 Nov 2020 01:36

darshan wrote:Are there any Indian companies similar to mikrotik, ubiquity, etc.?


Not exactly, but the closest are Tejas Networks, Sterlite, HFCL etc. There was also a desi wifi router with pretty decent quality, though I can't remember the name right now.

Actually it shouldn't be that difficult to make a ubiquiti type co...much of their code base is simply existing open-source tooling which they integrate with hardware and provide support for - their wifi requires genuine R&D though.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby V_Raman » 07 Nov 2020 01:58

I dont even see Jio getting into services like Oncall, Emergency comms platforms like Everbridge - focused on India - JioReach sounds like a nice name :-)

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Ambar » 07 Nov 2020 04:54

Reliance Jio did sign a agreement with Microsoft to use the laters cloud capability on the formers infrastructure to sell affordable cloud services to MSME. If the venture materialized or not i am not sure.

https://news.microsoft.com/2019/08/12/j ... -in-india/

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Ambar » 07 Nov 2020 04:58

nam wrote:Hopefully WFH provides flexibility to the companies to hire people in Tier 2 cities. Allows them to reduce cost, employees would prefer to be in small town, reduce travel time and over population.

Not to mention the economic growth that would be available to Tier 2 cities.
Who wouldn't want to work for a Blore based company from Goa..


That would be healthy and wonderful. De-population of our extremely overcrowded, over polluted and severely resource strained cities is exactly what we should aim for. WFH may not be possible in all cities but those cities with decent amount of IT companies can definitely explore this option of allowing permanent WFH or opening offices in tier 2 or tier 3 cities. It will help them cutdown on expensive real estate as well as salaries. One of the biggest obstacles though is a cultural issue where many asian managers expect their staff to be present in front of their eyes from 9 to 6 ( or in India 9 to 8 PM ). If they can overcome that cultural barrier then the companies can use the savings on R&D or employee benefits.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby KJo » 07 Nov 2020 07:31

Ambar wrote:
nam wrote:Hopefully WFH provides flexibility to the companies to hire people in Tier 2 cities. Allows them to reduce cost, employees would prefer to be in small town, reduce travel time and over population.

Not to mention the economic growth that would be available to Tier 2 cities.
Who wouldn't want to work for a Blore based company from Goa..


That would be healthy and wonderful. De-population of our extremely overcrowded, over polluted and severely resource strained cities is exactly what we should aim for. WFH may not be possible in all cities but those cities with decent amount of IT companies can definitely explore this option of allowing permanent WFH or opening offices in tier 2 or tier 3 cities. It will help them cutdown on expensive real estate as well as salaries. One of the biggest obstacles though is a cultural issue where many asian managers expect their staff to be present in front of their eyes from 9 to 6 ( or in India 9 to 8 PM ). If they can overcome that cultural barrier then the companies can use the savings on R&D or employee benefits.


Ambar, agree with your post, it is a great development especially in India. It will help de-congest a lot of cities like Bangalore.
While the cultural issue is an obstacle, I don't see this as a long term problem. COVID has forced things to change and people will eventually realize that it is possible and change themselves. I don't live in the Bay Area, but I am getting calls from well known companies from the Bay Area for Remote jobs. Never happened before. Things are changing.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby nandakumar » 07 Nov 2020 08:12

Bart S wrote:
darshan wrote:Are there any Indian companies similar to mikrotik, ubiquity, etc.?


Not exactly, but the closest are Tejas Networks, Sterlite, HFCL etc. There was also a desi wifi router with pretty decent quality, though I can't remember the name right now.

Actually it shouldn't be that difficult to make a ubiquiti type co...much of their code base is simply existing open-source tooling which they integrate with hardware and provide support for - their wifi requires genuine R&D though.

The name of the Indian company that makes routers is D-Link. It is a BSE listed company too. Ot st least at one time. Don't know if it is still around.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rahul M » 07 Nov 2020 09:54

D-Link Corporation is a Taiwanese multinational networking equipment manufacturing corporation headquartered in Taipei, Taiwan. It was founded in March 1986 in Taipei as Datex Systems Inc.
- Wikipedia

all D-link items were made in china anyway.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby nandakumar » 07 Nov 2020 10:33

Rahul M wrote:D-Link Corporation is a Taiwanese multinational networking equipment manufacturing corporation headquartered in Taipei, Taiwan. It was founded in March 1986 in Taipei as Datex Systems Inc.
- Wikipedia

all D-link items were made in china anyway.

Oops! Sorry I got it wrong. They have been around for so long in India I thought they were an Indian company. The IT guys in my office back in the late 90s would swear by its routers and they are a listed company since 2001.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby SridharMatlaparthi » 07 Nov 2020 11:48

KJo wrote:
V_Raman wrote:Why cant reliance start a domestic cloud company like Ali-Cloud - even a small one using OSS like OpenStack?


They can, they have the money and they have the people.
But Indian mindset has been, and more true lately is to settle for modest gains for minimum risk. Creating a domestic cloud increases the risk. While reward is also higher, investors prefer revenues from mundane backoffice jobs.


We do have some players like Ctrl+S, ESDS, Sify etc who are having decent datacenters and are handling large enterprise loads - though not on the scale of AWS / GCP or Azure. They are yet to develop a customer facing frontend which allows self-service, but are slowly gaining mass.
They need to be encouraged to scale up.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby darshhan » 07 Nov 2020 13:50

KJo wrote:
V_Raman wrote:Why cant reliance start a domestic cloud company like Ali-Cloud - even a small one using OSS like OpenStack?


They can, they have the money and they have the people.
But Indian mindset has been, and more true lately is to settle for modest gains for minimum risk. Creating a domestic cloud increases the risk. While reward is also higher, investors prefer revenues from mundane backoffice jobs.


Correct. But this is especially very true for senior Ambani. He will never pump money into risky ventures or a start up like enterprise. For his scale and size, his R&D expenditure would be extremely minimal. Neither does he believe in innovation. He openly even says at meetings that I am a baniya and I am interested in only those projects where there are returns. And I doubt if this will change anytime in future. His thought process is totally opposite to that of companies like L&T and Bharat Forge.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby A Nandy » 07 Nov 2020 14:38

https://cio.economictimes.indiatimes.co ... r/79094386

The Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology on Friday released the draft data centre policy which said that the government will work towards providing “infrastructure status” for the data centre sector, at par with other sectors like Railways, Roadways, and Power.

The status will help the sector avail long-term credit from domestic and international lenders at easier terms and will give a boost to the investments, the draft said. The policy also aims to simplify clearances for setting up data centres in the country.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby nam » 07 Nov 2020 15:09

Ambar wrote:That would be healthy and wonderful. De-population of our extremely overcrowded, over polluted and severely resource strained cities is exactly what we should aim for. WFH may not be possible in all cities but those cities with decent amount of IT companies can definitely explore this option of allowing permanent WFH or opening offices in tier 2 or tier 3 cities. It will help them cutdown on expensive real estate as well as salaries. One of the biggest obstacles though is a cultural issue where many asian managers expect their staff to be present in front of their eyes from 9 to 6 ( or in India 9 to 8 PM ). If they can overcome that cultural barrier then the companies can use the savings on R&D or employee benefits.


The cultural change has to be pushed from the top. A simple policy of allowing WFH by the CEO will cause cultural change overnight. With Indian companies now becoming MNC's, managers will have employees in other countries, whom they would probably not meet in person ever!

If our desi managers want, they can make employees work on weekend from home to get the job done.

Companies can hire people from Tier 2 cities and offer them WFH, with monthly visit to a Tier 1 city office. It will reduce need for office space, salaries, probably higher productivity due to travel time saved. The employees will have better life in smaller cities, kids having access to cheaper schools. Fundamentally everything is cheaper.

My relatives who work in HSBC & GS Blore have put their stuff in to storage and moved out of the city in to hometown for WFH. So given an option, it works out well.

The only drawback is for the ones who consider office as an escape from their spouse... :D

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Bart S » 07 Nov 2020 19:52

nandakumar wrote:
Bart S wrote:
Not exactly, but the closest are Tejas Networks, Sterlite, HFCL etc. There was also a desi wifi router with pretty decent quality, though I can't remember the name right now.

Actually it shouldn't be that difficult to make a ubiquiti type co...much of their code base is simply existing open-source tooling which they integrate with hardware and provide support for - their wifi requires genuine R&D though.

The name of the Indian company that makes routers is D-Link. It is a BSE listed company too. Ot st least at one time. Don't know if it is still around.


The company that I had in mind was Digisol.
https://www.digisol.com/about-us/

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby SRoy » 07 Nov 2020 20:04

nam wrote:Companies can hire people from Tier 2 cities and offer them WFH, with monthly visit to a Tier 1 city office. It will reduce need for office space, salaries, probably higher productivity due to travel time saved. The employees will have better life in smaller cities, kids having access to cheaper schools. Fundamentally everything is cheaper.


++100. Yes.

We are following exactly that.

All leads and developers downward visit office every quarter for a 2 week duration for quarterly review and planning.
The hardware design team goes to office more frequently on need basis.

All PM and upwards visit office every month for 5 days.

The arrangement has been working out very well.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Ambar » 07 Nov 2020 20:47

I certainly hope the trend stays. Cities like Bangalore were never designed to hold 1/5th of its sheer population today, so they'll benefit immensely if there's a distribution of population across smaller cities and towns. Speaking to the people i know , both in real estate and workerbees, it is mostly small and midsize companies that have renegotiated on lesser floorspace in Bangalore and Pune, but bigger companies are maintaining their existing offices. Like someone above said, the trend needs be set by the C-level so the middle management is forced to change its "nanny" culture. The savings for large players like accenture, Microsoft, IBM etc in India will be enormous if they allow permanent WFH or move to smaller cities. Its not just the expensive real estate but an army of security guards, water tankers, generators, buses etc that they can get rid of and use that money on better employment benefits and R&D.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rahul M » 07 Nov 2020 21:03

My cousin who works for a big data products co. visits his office, which is a 2hour flight from his hometown, every couple of months or so. This has been the trend since last year, so well before Covid hit India.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby darshan » 07 Nov 2020 23:04

Bart S wrote:
darshan wrote:Are there any Indian companies similar to mikrotik, ubiquity, etc.?

Actually it shouldn't be that difficult to make a ubiquiti type co...much of their code base is simply existing open-source tooling which they integrate with hardware and provide support for - their wifi requires genuine R&D though.

Agree and that's the reason I had brought it up. Ventures like this can provide meaningful value added employment, reduce imports, and can provide increased security value. Low tech but there's enough engineering population to accommodate everything from low to high tech and keep it in house.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby srin » 09 Nov 2020 06:50

V_Raman wrote:Why cant reliance start a domestic cloud company like Ali-Cloud - even a small one using OSS like OpenStack?


It used to exist a few years ago but at that time it was quite raw. It was available for some of their chummy partners where I used to work. We were required to evaluate it as an alternative to AWS. Much of the setup required us to get in touch with them. Not sure where it is right now.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby RajaRudra » 09 Nov 2020 15:00

Regarding the WFH, I am personally in the raw end. :)

After spending 6 to 7 years out side India, now im living in a Bangalore.
I had built three houses specifically for renting in a tier 2 city with small IT parks nearby.

Now, all the three are empty. Luckily i am working now. But my actual plan is to go to my own city and start a small hostel or PG in the three houses together.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby uskumar » 09 Nov 2020 20:13

This cloud business really frightens me. Everyone and his grand mother are moving to cloud in next 3 years. It is going to create a bubble with everyone working on migration and lot of people required during that phase. After that we will be in duopoly situation with aws and azure holding 85% market share. What happens after that to all these people. They will have no job and number of opening created at that time will be less than now.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby V_Raman » 10 Nov 2020 03:08

WFH will eventually be disastrous for the economy. people congregating/traveling to do business essentially drives our modern way of life and all the economic activity that comes with it. What good is IT if there are no business to use the software and the cloud needed to run that software. It maybe good for the environment - but crippling for the economy nonetheless. This will eventually depress salaries and real estate prices. I guess I can continue to farm my land and be a software engineer at the same time to make ends meet. IMO of course.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vayutuvan » 10 Nov 2020 05:10

nam wrote:Hopefully WFH provides flexibility to the companies to hire people in Tier 2 cities. Allows them to reduce cost, employees would prefer to be in small town, reduce travel time and over population.

Not to mention the economic growth that would be available to Tier 2 cities.
Who wouldn't want to work for a Blore based company from Goa..


RE prices and "value for money" wise, Hyderabad is a tier 2.5 city.

Vips
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 10 Dec 2020 06:28

DRDO demonstrates quantum communication between 2 labs.

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) on Wednesday successfully demonstrated communication between its two labs using Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) technology, which is a 'robust' way to share encryption keys, said an official statement.

In the QKD technology, encryption keys are sent as qubits in a fibre optic cable. Quantum computing uses qubits as basic resources, similar to how bits are used as basic resources in classical computing.

The QKD is designed in a way that if an illegitimate entity tries to read the transmission, it will disturb the qubits -- which are encoded on photons -- and this will generate transmission errors, leading to legitimate end users being immediately informed.

'Secure communications are vital for defence and strategic agencies world over and distribution of encryption keys from time to time is an important requirement in this context Quantum based communication offers a robust solution to sharing the keys securely,' said an official statement.

Defence Minister Rajnath Singh congratulated the DRDO for successful demonstration of QKD-based communication between its two labs in Hyderabad, said the statement.

The Defence Research and Development Laboratory (DRDL) and The Research Centre Imarat (RCI) were the two labs that participated in this demonstration.

'Quantum Communication using the time-bin QKD scheme was performed under realistic conditions. The setup also demonstrated the validation of detection of a third party trying to gain knowledge of the communication,' the statement added.

Time-bin encoding is used to encode qubit on a photon.

nam
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Re: Indian Economy News & Discussion - Nov 27 2017

Postby nam » 10 Jan 2021 00:59

This is bit OT, but as we were discussing about Indian digital platform.

Apparently we now have https://tooter.in/, which is the Indian version of twitter. What is wonderful is that the Indian PM is now on this platform, along with other important people in the Indian Government.

As I mentioned earlier, the way to grow a Indian Digital ecosystem is get important and famous people on it. The crowd will follow.


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