Indian IT Industry

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arvin
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby arvin » 15 Jul 2017 15:26

Singha wrote:infy ceo came in a driverless golf cart today built in their mysore office. anyone know what tech is used ?


Good to see IT companies atleast atttempting to catch up with efforts put in by Apple, google and Tesla. The top 5 giants have hugh warchest and they should use it develop IP like this.
Also a nice way to convey message to employees that we have automated this. We can automate many things.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vikas » 17 Jul 2017 14:54

Singha wrote:things that Govt could mandate:
- minimum 30 days severance pkg or upto the notice period whichever is longer.
- you can ask ppl to leave the next day but pay them for 30 days
- health insurance cover must be there for 3 months and emp has option of paying something for 3 more months. kind of a desi cobra. often aeging parents are tied to this.
- employer must give a relieving letter without coercive tactics do this, do that.
- maximum notice period 45 days.
- illegal to keep degree certificates and passports in custody


In my KB, they pay 3 months Basic pay if they ask you to leave very next day and thats pretty much it. But if you want to leave very next day, You will have to pay 3 months full salary.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby symontk » 17 Jul 2017 15:46

Singha wrote:A section of cos in massa send a security guy to escort out a laid off staffer.cube is packed by admin and sent later.

But that is over there. Does not look good asking person to put in papers or else termination . Implied dhamki is termination letter will set a nasty tone to spoil the entry into next job


In US folks have guns, building security over there is practically nil. In the famous chip company, there was fear that some of the laid off colleagues will come back and shoot at them later

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Gus » 17 Jul 2017 17:55

Singha wrote:- employer must give a relieving letter without coercive tactics do this, do that.


definitely need some sort of independent 'employment verification' thing that one can use to verify employment without having to beg HR.

I had to make couple dozen calls and emails over a few weeks to get a letter of previous employment (needed for mortgage application, in a format they recognize) and it got ugly with me having to say stuff like "I did not come this far down this process of closing a house and to get into issues like this and losing it..I will make your life miserable by calling every day and copying emails to everybody". The dude kept telling me that I can use the offer letter, and the relieving letter - and together they make up for verification of employment :x

The fun part? I was a transfer and we were still the same company :evil:

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Zynda » 21 Jul 2017 10:07

Opinion | 'Expect 100,000 to 200,000 Jobs to be Lost Every Year For The Next Three Years'

Last weekend, I was in Pune just after the suicide of a techie who was feeling depressed as he saw a very bleak job landscape for IT professionals. During my visit, I met several people in Pune and the common talk was about the IT jobs scarcity / layoffs.

The previous week, I was in Chennai where I met a senior manager heading marketing for a software services company. Her CTC was Rs 35 lakh. She had come for a job change and when I asked her why she wants to leave her present employer, a top 10 software services company, her response was shocking.

She said in the last six months, in her department alone, she was asked to send off 6 people – 25% of her total staff. She is having sleepless nights because she does not know when the Axe will fall on her. According to her, the company has identified, a supporting service like Marketing as expendable. She is a single mother and she does not know where to go if she loses her job. The point is she is still employed, but the Axe looming over her Head is something which is very difficult to describe.

As a Headhunter, I keep meeting people across industries looking for jobs. Most of them are in the middle management level and above. The people who meet me / call me on phone are in general those who are in dire need of jobs.

These days, I find that the number of calls / people who come and meet me has increased 5 fold. The reason either they have lost jobs or the sword is hanging.

Four weeks ago, I met an engineer from IIT in a 5 star hotel in Mumbai with the added qualification of a MBA from IIMA. He was 33 years old. To his credit, he was not asked to leave. He was an entrepreneur who ran out of funds. In the last eight months, he has been living on his wife’s savings. She is pregnant and now on leave.

I could see the desperation on his face. He was willing to take up a job anywhere in India. Regarding salary, I told him that he should not negotiate and try to get a CTC matching his peers. Reason he is unemployed. The advice I gave him was, first get a job, don’t worry about location or CTC. No potential employer will underpay you. Even if they pay you less in the beginning, knowing your strength, they will increase your salary so that they don’t lose you.

The other day a Fintech COO came to my office in Bangalore. He is 46 years, engineer, MBA from a reputed organisation. He has worked in some of the top FMCG companies in India – MNC and Indian. 2 years back, the start up bug caught him. He joined a Fintech company as a COO. Unfortunately, the company ran out of funds and he had to leave.

The anecdotal incidents I have described above is something which I am witnessing for the first time in my 30 years in Executive Search in India.

For the first time, across sectors – IT / BPO / Telecom/ Retail / BFSI / Autos etc etc , companies are laying off people in large numbers.

In the IT industry alone, we expect about 100,000 to 200,000 jobs to disappear every year for the next 3 years. Beyond 3 years it is difficult to predict what will be the extent of job losses.

Recently, Tata Motors, gave a VRS for middle managers. CTS did the same some time back. Ashok Leblanc did this exercise 2 years back.

I am aware of a top steel company having identified 7000 people excess on their rolls.

Some of the top industrial Groups in India have decided to deploy / redeploy people within, rather than go for outside recruitment. Obviously, specialised positions are exempt.

As a person whose future depends upon Executive Recruitment, I keep close watch on the happenings globally.

Two years back, the World Bank, predicted that in India 60% of the jobs as we know will disappear. In China, according to the same study, it will be 70%. In the western countries, the jobs which will disappear will be around 50%.

We will be soon in the area of driver less cars, robots cooking at McDonalds/Dominos.

While we can say that India is different, let us not forget that the banking industry, before our eyes, we have seen ATM’s have replaced cash tellers in banks. Further, PAYTMs are fast replacing ATMs.

We are entering an era of jobless growth globally. Robots will increasingly play more and more important roles in our life.

Yesterday I was watching Elon Musk speaking about need to control Robots. According to him, if we don’t, the Robots will rule the earth. A scary prospect indeed.

So what do we do after 10 years when jobs will become increasingly difficult to get. Some experts are talking about UBI – Universal Basic Income. Already, some of the European countries are trying this out.

To conclude, I would say that things are not as bad as painted. There are silver linings among the dark clouds.

Knowledge workers will always be in demand. Today it may be big data, Hadoop, analytics, AI etc etc. I am told that an engineer who is well qualified and experienced in self driving cars can get a salary of US$ One million in Silicon Valley today. :eek: A mind boggling figures, isn't it for a 30 year old.

Coming to India, I see that this is a great opportunity for us to overtake the western countries due to our superior intelligence and education.

Kris Lakshmikanth is a Founder Chairman & Managing Director of The Head Hunters India Pvt. Ltd. Views expressed are personal.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Zynda » 21 Jul 2017 10:09

On the same note...

IT Sector Job Losses Echo in Parliament, LS Clears IIIT Bill

New Delhi: The issue of massive IT job losses resonated in Parliament on Wednesday and members in the Rajya Sabha expressed concern over rampant layoffs. In its response, the government said it will work towards providing safeguards to the employees.

During the Question Hour in Upper House, Congress member Anand Bhaskar Rapolu raised the issue and sought to know about the steps the government was taking to protect the interests of the workers who were facing rampant and “unceremonious termination” of their services.

Responding to the concerns, Labour Minister Bandaru Dattatreya said the government would work to provide safeguards to the employees.

Dattatreya said the government was trying to provide social security and over one crore new workers have been brought into the ambit of the employees provident fund net. He said that an interest rate of 8.65% was being provided this year on EPF. The government was also focusing on portfolio management, he said.

During the discussion, members raised several related concerns about efforts required by the academia and industry to match demand and supply, need to increase placements, availability of faculty, among other things.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Rishirishi » 21 Jul 2017 18:06

IT industry in india has had continious growth for the past 25 years. Middle and top management is simply overpayed, because too many rely on providing cheap services.

For future, India will need to focus on quality not price.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby KJo » 21 Jul 2017 19:45

What is happening in India is very normal and has happened in the US also. Back in the dotcom era, everyone and his mom was in IT. They needed people so badly, and there was a deluge of funds. RB was still a munna not yet in SillyValley.
Then came the bust and it was a disaster. All the pretenders left the field and joined other avenues of career.

Compare this to India, Indian IT had a fantastic run from 1997-98 to 2017 - about 20 years of boom time. People made fantastic amounts of money and had career growth and all that. It's been a great 2 decades, way above normal or average. Things are in correction now. Many will have to leave IT and get into other areas.

Frankly I don't know what has changed from last year because Trump has not changed any laws, he has merely barked and Indian IT has been spooked so much. "Automation" is an excuse, nothing cataclysmic has happened.

And yes, no more days of "shadow resource" or pushing in incompetent untrained bodies and calling them experts. Things will definitely change and it will be for the better.

It concerns me that IT kids are taking drastic actions like killing themselves because of a downturn. It just goes to show how much they were coddled and pampered by everyone - parents, teachers, managers... Life is tough and there is no free lunch. No one is responsible for ensuring anyone's livelihood. Back in the day, it was hard to get a call at Infosys. We had to study for the interviews which were tests and there would be sample questions. I remember getting Lathi charged by the guards at Kirloskar Company, Mysore when I had gone there for an interview along with many other graduate invitees. Here I was getting thrashed with a lathi and my dad had a company almost next door. :eek:
How these kids are spoilt today. They want everything handed to them. Else they strap on a bum and do soosai.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Javee » 22 Jul 2017 12:43

Heh, I still remember the event where a security guard at Infosys saw our resume and told us that we don't have a chance and gave us tips to improve it.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Santosh » 23 Jul 2017 00:27

The current situation of layoffs is happening because IT companies are seeing that clients want to spend their budgets on automation, continuous delivery, big data, machine learning etc. none of which is trivial. If you have plain Java/.NET/PHP programming skills, it is a tough road to get on to the skill sets in demand. IT companies are simply taking advantage of zzzz barking, global slowdown what ever you call it and are trying to trim the fat. The bottom 10% will have to face the axe regardless of whether one is in tech or tech management. That's not too much considering the baggage IT industry has accumulated in the past few years.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby CalvinH » 23 Jul 2017 01:01

How many here works in corporate IT in leadership roles? the ones who actually decide the budgets. I will prefer hearing from them and not from disillusioned consulting/services folks..

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby hanumadu » 17 Aug 2017 17:47

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/tech-mncs-continue-to-hire-thousands-in-india/articleshow/60095641.cms
What slowdown? MNC tech firms are hiring thousands

"If a company wants to hire 1,000 people in a quarter for things like data analytics, India is the only place where you will find people available at that kind of scale, and it will remain so," Sandeep Mathur, former Oracle India managing director, said. MNCs, he said, had long stopped coming to India for cost. "They need people to address their growth challenges and even automation codes have to be written by humans."

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 18 Aug 2017 08:08

i can confirm that netz is in middle of large scale hiring both at lateral levels and on campus (they go to around 25 colleges all over india). I myself was in the team to a top rated instt in blr which grants mtech/integrated mtech in embedded and IT. I got to meet around 8 candidates from the shortlisted pool. all of them were sub-300 rank in GATE among 1 lakh exam takers. some were btech from nit, some from other colleges. some were very personable and confident, others a bit hesitant being first interview.

overall they are doing very interesting term projects - ai, ml, databases, analytics, computer vision, mobile, security, pattern recognition - eg a duo made a android app that registers into google maps and firebase , and a server that pulls that data from the back end. using this they able to play around with uberish concepts and employee geofencing. another had used a intel depth sensing camera and some math algorithms to detect hand (finger and palm) and use finger and palm movements as a smart pen for drawing. another had sourced some parts from aliexpress and made a low cost 3d printer. another built a model of a spine and embedded it with motion sensors to capture data on movement which can be used to judge patients by physios. another made something for voice recognition using cots chips. they also have a indoor drone lab and i could see people playing around there with circuit boards and flash programmers probably to try their own code.

all are familiar with java, javascript, python(some) android(some), latest frameworks, linux kernel, FOSS libraries for sound/motion/vision/matching (pythonCV is one)....the click nearly every box cos like amazon/fbook/google/msft or any other product co would look for.

in purely raw programming skills, the picture has not changed much - out of 5 maybe 1 was really skillful...in some ways languages like java coddle the user. all could use Hashmaps in java but 1 could explain how to implement efficiently a hash table in C.

so we are producing good folks in spades, only thing is industry should use them well ...

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby EswarPrakash » 18 Aug 2017 14:18

CalvinH wrote:How many here works in corporate IT in leadership roles? the ones who actually decide the budgets. I will prefer hearing from them and not from disillusioned consulting/services folks..


Cloud - whether it is a fad or not, it is having serious impact on traditional software delivery models. Infrastructure is being slowly shut down in large organisations to move to cloud. I am in the M$ side of things and they are seriously pushing cloud into a wide array of company sizes and they are seeing success. The traditional programming models targeting physical resources is being gobbled up by "client side" programming and that is a major shift and disconcerting to people who have been doing years of it. The current demand is for front-end development and I believe the churn is partly because of that.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby chetak » 18 Aug 2017 21:05

Here is the text of the mail released by the Infosys board today:

It has come to the attention of the Board that a letter authored by Murthy, the Founder of Infosys has been released to various media houses attacking the integrity of the Board and Management of the Company alleging falling corporate governance standards in the Company. The Board takes great umbrage to the contents of the letter and places on record the following:

• Murthy's continuous assault, including this latest letter, is the primary reason that the CEO, Dr. Vishal Sikka, has resigned despite strong Board support.

• Murthy’s letter contains factual inaccuracies, already-disproved rumours, and statements extracted out of context from his conversations with Board members.

• The Board assures its shareholders, employees, customers and communities that it is committed not to be distracted by this misguided campaign by Murthy and will continue to adhere to the highest international standards of corporate governance as it executes its strategy of profitable growth for the benefit of all Infosys stakeholders.

• The Board has been engaged in a dialogue with the Founder to resolve his concerns over the course of a year, trying earnestly to find feasible solutions within the boundaries of law and without compromising its independence. These dialogues have unfortunately not been successful.

• The Board declines to speculate about Murthy’s motive for carrying out this campaign, including the latest letter. The Board believes it must set the record straight on the false and misleading charges made by Murthy because his actions and demands are damaging the Company and misrepresent its commitment to good corporate governance.

FACT: Since Vishal Sikka was appointed as MD and CEO in August 2014, Infosys has delivered competitive financial performance through profitable revenue growth.

• Infosys has, under the leadership of Vishal, developed and articulated a strategy to transform itself to meet the rapidly changing needs of the marketplace in the 21st century. The Company was lagging significantly behind industry in growth rates when Vishal took over and now we are in top quartile from a performance perspective.

• Infosys has grown in revenues, from $2.13B in Q1FY15 to $2.65B this past Q1. This was done while keeping a strong focus on margins, closing this past quarter at 24.1% operating margin, beating some competitors for the first time in many years, and improving against nearly everyone in the industry.

• The revenue per employee of the Company has grown for six quarters in a row. Attrition has fallen, from 23.4% in Q1FY15 to 16.9% this past Q1, and high performer attrition is much lower than the overall Company attrition.

• The Company grew its $100M+ clients from 12 in Q1FY15, to 18 this past Q1, and increased its large deal wins from ~$1.9B in FY15 to ~$3.5B this past year. This has all been done while improving overall utilization (excluding trainees), to a 15-yr high this past quarter, and an all-time high including trainees, while improving our cash reserves, rewarding Infoscions with a new equity plan, and returning Rs. 19,000 Crores as dividend (including dividend distribution tax) over the last three years. This has all been done while improving standing with clients, to the highest ever in the 12 years with a jump of 22 points in CXO satisfaction.

FACT: Infosys has continued to maintain the highest standards of corporate governance that the Company is known for.

• The Board of Infosys is carrying out its shareholder mandate to be an independent board, working towards the best interest of the stakeholders.

• The Board has sought the counsel of some of the most respected governance experts and legal advisors in the world, which have thoroughly investigated all anonymous allegations and concluded that no wrongdoing occurred. For Murthy to imply – with no evidence whatsoever – that three well-respected international law firms, members of the Infosys Board and certain employees are engaged in some grand global conspiracy to conceal information is not tenable on its face. It is important to mention here that Murthy was interviewed as part of the investigation by Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP in pursuance of the investigation in the Panaya acquisition, and was invited and welcomed to provide any information or evidence he believed would support the allegations being investigated. He did not provide any evidence since none exists. However, he has not mentioned this is his media communication against the investigation.

• As previously announced by the Company on June 23, 2017, the Board thoroughly investigated each anonymous allegation with the assistance of highly respected external counsel and experts and determined that the allegations were entirely without merit. The Board will make no additional disclosure of the investigation report because further disclosure would be inconsistent with best corporate audit practices and would compromise the confidence of employees that they could report honestly, openly, and candidly to the company in any future investigation or legal matter.

• The Board also believes that any further use of resources and time on these matters would be a distraction for the Company and would enable those wishing unfairly to attack Company personnel to continue this harmful conduct. Therefore, the Board has formally closed the investigations of the anonymous allegations so that the Company can focus on strategy, performance, and the creation of shareholder value. The Board remains focused to continuing to support Infosys’s strategy, which it believes is in the best interests of the Company’s shareholders, employees, clients and communities.

FACT: Murthy’s has made repeatedly made inappropriate demands which are inconsistent with his stated desire for stronger governance.

Illustratively:

• Murthy has demanded that the Board adopt certain changes in policy, else he will attack board members in the public, which threat was carried out when the Board did not acquiesce;

• He has demanded that the Board appoint specific individuals onto the Board under similar threat, without appropriate disclosure and without regard to basic determinants of appropriateness or fit of the candidate for the role as a Board member;

• He has demanded operational and management changes under the threat of media attacks;

• Notwithstanding that the remuneration package of senior management was approved overwhelmingly by shareholders (including members of the promoter group), Murthy preferred his dictat to prevail with no place or tolerance for the outcomes of shareholder democracy.

• Murthy wanted the demands to be adhered to without attribution to him.

The Board has, in its fiduciary role to consider all shareholder inputs, treated each demand from Murthy as a suggestion and only acted on suggestions which we believed was in the best interest of the company and declined to act on others. Over time the demands have intensified, which when declined by the Board resulted in the threats of media attacks being carried out.

FACT: Murthy may be in the process of engaging in discussions with certain key stakeholders of the Company to further his criticisms of the Board and Management.

We are concerned that this type of campaign runs the risk of confusing investors and undermining the Company’s management efforts.

FACT: The Board is a fully independent Board, with professionals as its members who have been appointed by a clear majority of the shareholders.

• Given the commitment of the Board to remain independent and pursue a chosen strategy, the Board currently has no intention of asking Murthy to play a formal role in the governance of the organization.

• Co- Chair of the Board, Ravi Venkatesan has repeatedly over the past few weeks publicly stated his and the Boards support for Dr. Sikka. The Company categorically rejects any speculation or allegation of discord between the Infosys Board and Sikka.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby VishalJ » 03 Oct 2017 18:19

Is this the future?

@AroonDeep https://twitter.com/AroonDeep/status/915138348590575616
Just got my first verified WhatsApp message — a flight ticket.

Image

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 26 Oct 2017 08:08

The Fascinating Story of How India’s First Indigenous Computers Were Built.

Did you know that the credit for kick-starting India’s computer revolution goes to a epic clash between two scientific titans? Here’s the interesting story!

Over the years, computers have come to play a significant role not just in the lives of ordinary Indians but also in their work. The last few decades especially have seen rapid advancements in the field of computer technology in India. For many Indians, this is a welcome consequence of the LPG (Liberalization Privatization Globalization) reforms unleashed by the government in 1991.

However, while it was certainly an important turning point, the year 1991 was not when India’s computer revolution came into existence. The story begins in the tumultuous years just before India’s Independence.

A statistician who would later go on to be one of the main architects of India’s planning regime, Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis, had been asked by colonial administrators to conduct estimates of the paddy crop in Bengal in the aftermath of the famine. It was while doing this that he felt the need for computing machines and decided to try developing them locally.

With this thought at the back of his mind, Mahalanobis founded the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI) in Calcutta in 1932 and introduced mechanical desk calculators for the first time. In 1943, he also set up the Indian Calculating Machine and Scientific Instrument Research Society to explore the fabrication of such devices locally.

However, it was only after India got its hard-won independence that he got the opportunity to work towards developing indigenous computers. The development of India’s scientific capabilities was a key interest of then-Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and he gave the responsibility of spearheading this project to two of his most trusted scientist-aides — Mahalanobis and Homi Jehangir Bhabha (who, interestingly, shared a fierce professional rivalry!).

Since acquiring computing power and capability necessary was integral to the success of this effort, Mahalanobis and Bhabha began a race to kickstart India’s computer revolution. Both of them decided to work towards acquiring contemporary computers, build national institutions that would specialise in this technology, and, most importantly, develop indigenous capability.

With the specific aim of developing an analog computer to support the work done at ISI, Mahalanobis set up an Electronic Computer Lab and hired two talented graduates for the purpose- Samarendra Kumar Mitra and Soumyendra Mohan Bose.

While the task may sound easy, back then, it definitely wasn’t. Thanks to the absence of locally-made computer components in India and a scarcity of foreign exchange (along with a tedious bureaucratic process) to import components, finding ready-made parts for the computer was near impossible.

So the enterprising duo scoured the junkyards and war surplus depots to dig up scrap material that they then re-purposed into computer components in their workshop. For instance, in the absence of magnetic tapes or floppy disks, data was punched into cards made of stiff paper!

Their ingenuity and tireless efforts bore fruit when India finally got its first indigenous analog computer (that could solve linear equations with 10 Variables and related problems) in 1953.

By then, Bhabha had already founded the Electronics Committee that would go on to lay the blueprint for India’s computer development in 1970s and spawn new institutions like the Department of Electronics. Thus began India’s computer revolution. Interestingly, both Mahalanobis and Bhabha bonded well with Western scientists and used this network to forge closer ties with the global computer community.

A few years later, a new race began between these two scientific titans — the race to build India’s first indigenously-developed digital computer. Under Mahalanobis’s guidance, ISI collaborated with Jadavpur University to work towards the same. At the same time, Bhabha was blazing his own trail at Tata Insititute of Fundamental Research (set up by JRD Tata in 1945 after Bhabha wrote to the Tata Trust requesting financial assistance to set up a scientific research institute).

While Mahalanobis had won the previous race, this one was aced by Bhabha when his team built a full-scale digital computer in 1959. Commissioned for routine work in early 1960, the machine was formally christened TIFR Automatic Calculator (TIFRAC) by PM Nehru in 1962.

Recalling the excitement of the TIFR team when the first program was run on TIFRAC, PVS Rao (a member of the pioneering team) narrates in the opening essay of the book, Homi Bhabha and the Computer Revolution (edited by RK Shyamasundar and MA Pai),

“It was a small machine language program cumulatively adding one number to another; it looped a number of times and stopped after a specified number of cycles. To the design team, the first Indian computer running a ‘stored program’ was as much a milestone as the first Indian reactor sustaining a chain reaction of nuclear fission!”

Having built India’s first generation analog and digital computers at their respective institutions, both Mahalanobis and Bhabha realized the need for more powerful, state-of the-art, computing machines to boost the fledgling scientific research taking place in the country. This requirement formed the basis for a third race between the two — a battle to win the tag of National Computer Centre for their respective institutes!

While simultaneously expanding the computing activity being carried out in their organisations, both Mahalanobis and Bhabha devoted their efforts towards importing powerful contemporary computers.

Since it was difficult for the Indian government to spare so much foreign exchange for one piece of computing equipment, they had to convince foreign governments and institutions to help them fulfill this target.

After a fortuitous turn of events, it was Bhabha who finally won this battle and took the lead in India’s electronics development policy. The head of TIFR had run into IBM’s Director of Research (ER Piore) aboard a flight to Zurich and mentioned his plan of acquiring a cutting edge computer for atomic energy research in India. Impressed by Bhabha’s vision and articulate arguments, Piore agreed to help.

This was the genesis of a long and fruitful association between a state-run Indian research project and an American computer biggie that would go on to pave the way for not just India’s atomic energy research, but also for its celebrated IT revolution.

As we come to the end of this fascinating story, here’s some interesting trivia about the world’s earliest analog computer.

In 1902, Greek archaeologist Valerious Stais was working at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens when he made a momentous discovery. Embedded in a piece of rock recovered from the Antikythera wreck (a shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera), he noticed a corroded yet perceivable gear wheel.

Nicknamed the Antikythera mechanism, the ancient mechanical device was designed to calculate astronomical positions. Today, the primitive tool is believed to be the mankind’s oldest analog computer!

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Vips » 26 Oct 2017 08:16

The Little Known Story of How India’s First Indigenous Supercomputer Amazed the World in 1991.

In India, the name C-DAC (Centre for Development of Advanced Computing) has become synonymous with supercomputers, a term that denotes any computing environment which makes use of advanced tools, high computational speeds and efficiency to help researchers in different fields such as scientific R & D, weather forecasting, missile simulation, space science, pharmaceutical research and much more.

For the uninitiated, what really makes a Supercomputer “super” is a concept called parallel computing. Basically, parallel processing involves the breaking up of tasks into smaller tasks that can be processed in parallel. The end result is obtained by combining outputs from each processor.

Here is the story of how India’s first-ever indigenous supercomputer was made, a major milestone in modern India’s technological odyssey.

The supercomputer effort in India began in the late 1980s, when the US stopped the export of a Cray supercomputer because of continuing technology embargoes. During the 80s, USA and some other European countries had developed super computers, which were critical for developing satellites and nuclear weapons. These countries refused to transfer the knowledge of creating super computers to India, fearing the developing nation might use it to design missiles and warplanes rather than forecast the weather.

Faced with a technology-denial regime that denied its scientific community access to supercomputers, India set up Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) in March 1988 with the clear mandate to develop an indigenous supercomputer to meet high-speed computational needs in solving scientific and other developmental problems where fast number crunching is a major component.

Following a specific recommendation of the Science Advisory Council to the Prime Minister (SAC-PM) to that effect, C-DAC was established as a scientific society of the then Department of Electronics (now the Department of Information Technology (DIT) under the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology).

To lead the project, PM Rajiv Gandhi turned to a man who hadn’t seen a ‘super’ all his life to build one in double-quick time. But Vijay Pandurang Bhatkar knew all about shortcuts: the country’s top number-cruncher had begun school directly in the 4th standard and still made it to the top. When Rajiv Gandhi met Bhatkar, he asked him three questions:

“Can we do it?”
Bhatkar answered, “I have not seen a supercomputer as we have no access to supercomputer, I have only seen a picture of the Cray! But, yes, we can.”

“How long will it take?”
Bhatkar promptly replied, “Less than it it will take us in trying to import Cray from US.

“How much money it would take?
Bhatkar replied, “The whole effort, including building an institution, developing the technology, commissioning and installing India’s first supercomputer will cost less than the cost of Cray.

Pleased, the Prime Minister gave the go-ahead for the project. Based in Pune, C-DAC summoned scientists from all over the country to work on one of India’s greatest technology projects.

Within three years, the extraordinary happened. With everyone involved working their socks off, C-DAC finally completed its work well within the proposed deadline. With components that could be bought off the shelves, in 1991, C-DAC rolled out India’s first indigenous supercomputer: PARAM 8000.

For the first time ever, a developing country had pulled off such a feat in advanced computer development. Needless to say, the world was shocked at this achievement. Many were doubtful about PARAM truly being a supercomputer. That’s when Bhatkar decided to take the PARAM prototype to a major international conference and exhibition of supercomputers. Here, it was demonstrated, benchmarked and formally declared a supercomputer. A US Newspapers published the news with headline, “Denied supercomputer, Angry India does it!”

A multiprocessor machine, PARAM 8000 was benchmarked at 5 Gflops, making it the second fastest supercomputer in the world at that time. It also costed a fraction of what the legendary US machine Cray did and performed just as well. So much so, that the US company which manufactured Cray had to slash prices to woo a nation it spurned just eight years ago!

PARAM 8000 also set the platform for a whole series of high-performance parallel computers, called the PARAM series. In 2002, PARAM 20000, or PARAM Padma, broke the teraflop (thousand billion flops) barrier with a peak speed of 1 Tflop. The latest machine in the series are the PARAM Ishan and the PARAM Kanchenjunga.

Installed at IIT Guwahati, PARAM Ishan can be used in the application areas like computational chemistry, computational fluid dynamics, computational electromagnetic, civil engineering structures, nano-block self assemble, climate modeling and seismic data processing. PARAM Kanchenjunga, stationed at NIT Sikkim’s Supercomputing Centre, is expected to be used for engineering research conducted by the faculty and students at the institute as well as researchers across the state. Interestingly, Param in Sanskrit means ‘supreme’!

Based on the Param series of supercomputers, Bhatkar has also built the National Param Supercomputing Facility (NPSF). This has been now made available as a grid computing facility through Garuda grid on the National Knowledge Network (NKN), providing nationwide access to High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructure. He also initiated moves to have supercomputing in Indian languages and succeeded in doing so.

In 2015, Bhatkar was honoured with Padma Bhushan for his immense contribution in the field of science and technology in India.

Vijay Bhatkar’s and C-DAC’s efforts in this strategically and economically important area have thus put India on the supercomputing map of the world along with select developed nations of the world. As of 2016, many PARAM systems have been deployed in the country and abroad. Today, India is designing Petascale supercomputers, next only to USA and Japan. The crowning glory of India’s advanced computing and IT capability, once achieved this computer will be a symbol of India’s undeniable position as an IT superpower.

However, while showing great promise in the field of supercomputing, it’s obvious that India needs to do better and it will. The government of India is working towards this and has initiated the Rs. 4,500-crore National Supercomputing Mission. Under the mission, the Government of India empowers an ambitious target of installing more than 70 high-performance computing facilities in the country. These computers will be connected by the National Knowledge Network. The first of these high-computing machines is being built by the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) and is expected to be ready by August 2017.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby vimal » 12 Nov 2017 21:59

Reposting here from the GST thread as it is relevant to IT thread.

chetak wrote:about time that someone asked for explanations from param poojiya narayana murty.

He considers himself the boss of infosys for all other purposes anyway, no?? especially when questioning a legally constituted board on the strength of his really tiny minority holding.



Infosys under scanner for GST glitches

Infosys under scanner for GST glitches

By NAVTAN KUMAR | New Delhi | 11 November, 2017



The role of Infosys, which was assigned the work of creating, updating and maintenance of the GST portal, is under scanner as traders are complaining about its poor performance.


The role of Infosys, which was assigned the work of creating, updating and maintenance of the GST portal, is under scanner as traders are complaining about its poor performance.

Traders have decided to raise the issue before Finance Minister Arun Jaitley. The move comes following the GST Council reducing to just 50 the number of items in the highest tax rate of 28%, at its 23rd meeting in Guwahati this week. The Council decided to reduce the tax rate on 178 of the 228 items from 28% to 18%, with effect from 15 November. It also took many decisions to simplify the return filing rules to ease compliance burden, providing much needed relief to the traders’ community.

Praveen Khandelwal, secretary general of the Confederation of All India Traders, told The Sunday Guardian: “Even after four months of GST implementation in the country, the GST portal which was supposed to function properly from 1 July, is still working like an experiment project, causing immense harassment to the traders, who are very much disgusted with the portal. It is like a nightmare for us. We will take up the issue with the Finance Minister.” Khandelwal is also a member of the Advisory Group to Law Review Committee of the GST Council.

Khandelwal even went on to say that Infosys and other companies concerned are responsible for the failure of the portal and therefore, the government should conduct a probe by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), as to why they failed to provide an efficient portal. “It is like betraying the nation,” he added.

The trade body has demanded a third party audit into technical and other issues related to the portal. It has also urged the government to release a White Paper on the status of the GST portal. It said there should be investigation on what conditions the work was awarded to Infosys and other companies and negligence on their party for non-performance of the contract.

“It should also be investigated whether it amounts to any scam in destabilising the GST taxation system. The poor functioning of the portal has given a bad name to a good taxation system,” Khandelwal said, adding “it is because of the malfunctioning of the portal that traders are unable to become GST compliant”.

Khandelwal said that in the last three years, over Rs 1,400 crore has been spent on the portal, but the results have been far from satisfactory. “The failure of the portal could be gauged from the fact that the date for filing of GST return for July month has been extended up to 30 November, besides several other compliances. he added



There should be a technical evaluation of what Infy delivered. I hope it was not used as a training project for the hordes of freshers they hire from everywhere. Also, at "1400 crore" it's over $200 million in investments over three years. It seems Infy is trying to match the margins on it's offshore projects and beat Obamacare website for cost overruns.
Last edited by vimal on 13 Nov 2017 06:15, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby rhytha » 12 Nov 2017 22:26

I am using that portal, it's complete garbage. Better it should have done by a product company, like zoho/ even NIC( their central gov websites are looking up). The UI is so un-friendly, right out of 1990's, and half the time, times-out when 20th deadLine approachs.

Infosys and its ex-boss are only fit to take orders from gora and work as code coolies and earn with cost arbitrage.infosys my ass.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby achit » 17 Nov 2017 01:31

Vips wrote:The Little Known Story of How India’s First Indigenous Supercomputer Amazed the World in 1991.

In India, the name C-DAC (Centre for Development of Advanced Computing) has become synonymous with supercomputers, a term that denotes any computing environment which makes use of advanced tools, high computational speeds and efficiency to help researchers in different fields such as scientific R & D, weather forecasting, missile simulation, space science, pharmaceutical research and much more.

For the uninitiated, what really makes a Supercomputer “super” is a concept called parallel computing. Basically, parallel processing involves the breaking up of tasks into smaller tasks that can be processed in parallel. The end result is obtained by combining outputs from each processor.

Here is the story of how India’s first-ever indigenous supercomputer was made, a major milestone in modern India’s technological odyssey.

The supercomputer effort in India began in the late 1980s, when the US stopped the export of a Cray supercomputer because of continuing technology embargoes. During the 80s, USA and some other European countries had developed super computers, which were critical for developing satellites and nuclear weapons. These countries refused to transfer the knowledge of creating super computers to India, fearing the developing nation might use it to design missiles and warplanes rather than forecast the weather.

Faced with a technology-denial regime that denied its scientific community access to supercomputers, India set up Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) in March 1988 with the clear mandate to develop an indigenous supercomputer to meet high-speed computational needs in solving scientific and other developmental problems where fast number crunching is a major component.

Following a specific recommendation of the Science Advisory Council to the Prime Minister (SAC-PM) to that effect, C-DAC was established as a scientific society of the then Department of Electronics (now the Department of Information Technology (DIT) under the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology).

To lead the project, PM Rajiv Gandhi turned to a man who hadn’t seen a ‘super’ all his life to build one in double-quick time. But Vijay Pandurang Bhatkar knew all about shortcuts: the country’s top number-cruncher had begun school directly in the 4th standard and still made it to the top. When Rajiv Gandhi met Bhatkar, he asked him three questions:

“Can we do it?”
Bhatkar answered, “I have not seen a supercomputer as we have no access to supercomputer, I have only seen a picture of the Cray! But, yes, we can.”

“How long will it take?”
Bhatkar promptly replied, “Less than it it will take us in trying to import Cray from US.

“How much money it would take?
Bhatkar replied, “The whole effort, including building an institution, developing the technology, commissioning and installing India’s first supercomputer will cost less than the cost of Cray.

Pleased, the Prime Minister gave the go-ahead for the project. Based in Pune, C-DAC summoned scientists from all over the country to work on one of India’s greatest technology projects.

Within three years, the extraordinary happened. With everyone involved working their socks off, C-DAC finally completed its work well within the proposed deadline. With components that could be bought off the shelves, in 1991, C-DAC rolled out India’s first indigenous supercomputer: PARAM 8000.

For the first time ever, a developing country had pulled off such a feat in advanced computer development. Needless to say, the world was shocked at this achievement. Many were doubtful about PARAM truly being a supercomputer. That’s when Bhatkar decided to take the PARAM prototype to a major international conference and exhibition of supercomputers. Here, it was demonstrated, benchmarked and formally declared a supercomputer. A US Newspapers published the news with headline, “Denied supercomputer, Angry India does it!”

A multiprocessor machine, PARAM 8000 was benchmarked at 5 Gflops, making it the second fastest supercomputer in the world at that time. It also costed a fraction of what the legendary US machine Cray did and performed just as well. So much so, that the US company which manufactured Cray had to slash prices to woo a nation it spurned just eight years ago!

PARAM 8000 also set the platform for a whole series of high-performance parallel computers, called the PARAM series. In 2002, PARAM 20000, or PARAM Padma, broke the teraflop (thousand billion flops) barrier with a peak speed of 1 Tflop. The latest machine in the series are the PARAM Ishan and the PARAM Kanchenjunga.

Installed at IIT Guwahati, PARAM Ishan can be used in the application areas like computational chemistry, computational fluid dynamics, computational electromagnetic, civil engineering structures, nano-block self assemble, climate modeling and seismic data processing. PARAM Kanchenjunga, stationed at NIT Sikkim’s Supercomputing Centre, is expected to be used for engineering research conducted by the faculty and students at the institute as well as researchers across the state. Interestingly, Param in Sanskrit means ‘supreme’!

Based on the Param series of supercomputers, Bhatkar has also built the National Param Supercomputing Facility (NPSF). This has been now made available as a grid computing facility through Garuda grid on the National Knowledge Network (NKN), providing nationwide access to High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructure. He also initiated moves to have supercomputing in Indian languages and succeeded in doing so.

In 2015, Bhatkar was honoured with Padma Bhushan for his immense contribution in the field of science and technology in India.

Vijay Bhatkar’s and C-DAC’s efforts in this strategically and economically important area have thus put India on the supercomputing map of the world along with select developed nations of the world. As of 2016, many PARAM systems have been deployed in the country and abroad. Today, India is designing Petascale supercomputers, next only to USA and Japan. The crowning glory of India’s advanced computing and IT capability, once achieved this computer will be a symbol of India’s undeniable position as an IT superpower.

However, while showing great promise in the field of supercomputing, it’s obvious that India needs to do better and it will. The government of India is working towards this and has initiated the Rs. 4,500-crore National Supercomputing Mission. Under the mission, the Government of India empowers an ambitious target of installing more than 70 high-performance computing facilities in the country. These computers will be connected by the National Knowledge Network. The first of these high-computing machines is being built by the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) and is expected to be ready by August 2017.

An alumnus of VRCE (now VNIT)

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby hanumadu » 17 Nov 2017 05:31

I couldn't find the "Denied supercomputer, Angry India does it!" article, but found another piece from 1993.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/business/1993/03/19/cray-deal-a-casualty-of-atomic-weapon-fears/24f11e87-effe-4a2c-8976-d3d844cb4275/?utm_term=.0baa8f773ec4

Within three years, Indian scientists succeeded in creating a supercomputer known as the Param. The latest model of the Param is 28 times more powerful than the Cray that India had agreed to buy, but far less powerful than the most advanced Cray models.

Among the 14 Param buyers are universities in Canada, Britain and Germany, as well as two research institutes in Russia that were attracted by Param's relatively low cost -- $350,000 compared with the $10 million price tag on a basic Cray model.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Philip » 07 Dec 2017 09:13

RG's tragic demise robbed India and esp. the Congress of a visionary leader.He wanted to take us into the top drawer of the developed nations as fast as possible and did not hesitate to use India's mil. power to stabilise the IOR, these factors to my mind the reasons why he was assassinated, not only by the LTTE hit team, but part of a larger intl. conspiracy.

The article shows that when given full backing by the GOI, we Indians can do the biz. and be world beaters.Even though BMos is a JV with Russia, we've taken their missile concept into becoming the world's best by refining it into a true tri-service weapon of choice.In the long term, with the digital revolution expanding into every sphere, the Desi IT industry will not only survive but thrive given our native intelligence that continues to astonish the world.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby jaysimha » 25 Dec 2017 15:58

Narayana Murthy Love letter to one and all here in BRF.
( bit old)
http://www.thehindu.com/business/articl ... ys%20Board

Manish_P
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Manish_P » 04 Jan 2018 17:38

Entire Aadhaar Database of 1 Billion Indians Now Available For Rs 500!

In a shocking sting operation, The Tribune newspaper has revealed how the entire Aadhaar database – which is 1 billion Indian citizens private data, is now available for mere Rs 500, and it takes just 10 minutes to get access to it.

But the worst is not over – By paying just Rs 300 more, you can also get a software, which can print out Aadhaar card of any Indian citizen you wish.


Tribune correspondent posed as Anamika, and contacted a Whatsapp number: 7610063464 to buy Aadhaar database. The person on the other end identified himself as Anil Kumar, and asked her to create an email id, and gave her a Paytm number to send Rs 500.

Exactly after 10 minutes, the Tribune correspondent received an email: “You have been enrolled as Enrolment Agency Administrator for ‘CSC SPV’. Your Enrolment Agency Administrator ID is ‘Anamika_6677’.”

After the password arrived in a separate email, she was able to access billions of Aadhaar database, from her computer.

After she gave another Rs 300, the guy called Anil Kumar accessed her computer via Team Viewer and installed the software which can print those Aadhaar cards as well.

So much for ‘complete security of Aadhaar database’!


How Did This Breach Happen?

No, this data breach wasn’t a hack and no data was stolen. The culprits here are exploiting access rights of over 3 lakh village-level enterprise (VLE) operators.

During initial days of Aadhaar enrollment, Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (ME&IT) had hired around 3 lakh VLEs under the Common Service Centres Scheme (CSCS) for enrolling citizens into Aadhaar.

Now, in the month of April last year, such initiatives were banned, and only post offices and bank premises were allowed to be used for Aadhaar enrollment.

These lakhs of VLEs suddenly became jobless, and in order to get some additional income, they started offering ‘Aadhaar services’ to edit or modify details of others. But, some of them crossed the line and started offering full access to Aadhaar database, using their IDs and passwords. The correspondent from Tribune received the ID and password of one such VLE from Rajasthan, as the URL in the software pointed to “aadhaar.rajasthan.gov.in” for printing the Aadhaar cards.

This is a major security lapse, as UIDAI should have terminated all such VLEs access from the UIDAI database.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby ManishC » 05 Jan 2018 07:01

^^ Expiring passwords is such a novel concept. Did NIC design this system or it was one and only IT shop in India?

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Singha » 05 Jan 2018 07:40

>>Now, in the month of April last year, such initiatives were banned

that was when all these accounts should have been deleted.

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Indian IT Industry

Postby Peregrine » 05 Jan 2018 19:31

US lawmakers oppose changes in H-1B visa rules

WASHINGTON: Some US lawmakers and advocacy groups have criticised the Trump administration's reported plan to curb H-1B visa extensions that could result in self- deportation of an estimated 5 to 7.5 lakh Indian Americans, saying the move would drain America of talent.

The proposal, which was part of President Donald Trump's "Buy American, Hire American" initiative that he vowed to launch on the campaign trail, is being drafted by Department of Homeland Security leaders, according to reports.

(Read here: Trump administration considers proposal that may send back more than 500,000 Indian tech workers)

The H-1B program offers temporary US visas that allow companies to hire highly skilled foreign professionals working in areas with shortages of qualified American workers. But since taking office last January, the Trump administration has been cracking down on the scheme.

Influential Democratic Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard said: "Imposing these draconian restrictions on H-1B visa holders will tear families apart, drain our society of talent and expertise, and damage our relationship with an important partner, India.

"This proposal could lead to the deportation of an estimated 500,000 to 750,000 Indian H-1B visa holders, many of whom are small business owners and job creators who are helping to build and strengthen our US economy. This brain drain will stifle innovation and decrease our ability to compete in the global 21st century economy," Gabbard said.

(Also Read: H-1B visa issue: Trump was for it before he became against it)

In a statement the Hindu American Foundation (HAF) sounded alarm over the Trump administration's proposal to deny extensions of H-1B visas to green card applicants and leaving them with no choice but to return to the country of origin or be deported.

"It's a baffling calculation. How would deporting hundreds of thousands of skilled workers, the very backbone of our STEM industries, in any way advance an 'America First' agenda?" Shukla asked.

Indian-American Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi said while priority must continue to be improving advanced training for domestic workforce, ending H-1B visa extensions would kneecap American economy and encourage companies to further offshore jobs, instead of making those investments here.

"I hope the administration immediately rejects this proposal," he said.

Congressman Ro Khanna said the proposal was "anti- immigrant".

"My parents came here on green cards. So did @sundarpichai, @elonmusk, @satyanadella. Trump is saying to immigrants and their kids we don't have a place in America. It's not just wrong. It's dumb. Mr President, would America really be greater without us?" he asked in a tweet.

According to Aman Kapoor of Immigration Voice, H-1B extension change would be just wrong at every level.

"It will be a catastrophe of epic proportion for Indian- American community leading to mass exodus of close to 1.5 million people (around 750,000 primary applicants on H-1B visa and another 750,000+ spouses and children)," he said.

Tsion Chudnovsky, an immigration and business lawyer in California said: "Given the dramatic effect this proposal could have on the Technology industry, it doesn't seem likely it could garner enough support to be enacted as stated."

Cheers Image

Gus
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Gus » 05 Jan 2018 19:57

the aadhaar tribune story is troubling on both ways.

that a fake outrage is created by clickbait headlines and 'sting' operations

and that an outrage is required to highlight and fix issues that should have been fixed already..

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby VinodTK » 08 Jan 2018 08:28

Indian IT gears up for $50 billion renewals
BENGALURU: About 196 IT deals worth more than $100 million each, and adding up to $51 billion, are coming up for renewal in 2018. Of these, some 12 are multi-billion-dollar deals, the largest of which is Siemens' $7.2-billion contract with French IT giant Atos, according to research firm Everest Group.
As in previous years, this is an opportunity for Indian IT firms that have been steadily increasing their share of global outsourcing contracts. Of the 196 deals, only four are currently led by Indian IT firms, though these firms may be present as secondary partners in some of the other deals.
Also, the opportunity for Indian IT sector is rising because many of the large deals today are being broken up into smaller contracts. Barring TCS, the others are typically not considered for billion-dollar deals, but if these same deals are broken up, the others get to pitch.
IT research firm ISG did a study in 2016 that analysed 180 deals to see what happened to incumbent vendors when a contract came up for renewal. It found that where clients choose to do competitive re-negotiations (and that's 66% of all contracts), the incumbents lost the entire contract in 47% of the cases. And in 32% of the cases, the incumbents witnessed a drop in scope with clients moving some part of the contract to new service providers.
ISG found that Indian service providers are also gaining through consortia deals that are led by large MNCs. "We found that large Indian providers managed to get around 30-35% of the share that the incumbents lost," said Rajesh Gupta, partner in ISG's India operations.
Jimit Arora, IT analyst in Everest Group, said the billion-dollar deals coming up for renewal have the following characteristics: Infrastructure transformation to cloud, government and defence contracts, integrated contracts (that combine application development & maintenance, analytics, etc), large, multiyear BPO or BPaaS (business process as a service) deals in relatively mature areas, and deals with asset/people transfer (such as the takeover of a global in-house centre of an MNC). "The vendors that will tend to continue to win will be the traditional global majors that can structure asset-intensive infrastructure deals (IBM, Atos, DXC, NTT Data). In the government and defence sector, you would not expect the Indian service providers to be as relevant. But you will likely see them succeed in categories like integrated deals, BPO/BPaas contracts or deals with huge asset or people transfer (think of TCS-Nielsen, Wipro-Atco)," Arora said.
However, the challenge for Indian IT service providers is the changing character of contracts, as clients move towards newer digital offerings where there are a number of newer players, and where some big players like Accenture are seen to have built greater expertise than the Indian providers.
London-based research firm Ovum's estimates for Indian IT's share of the global services market in 2017 suggests that there was at best a marginal growth from 2016. "A lot of the workload is being moved to cloud and that market is in the hands of vendors like AWS, Microsoft Azure, etc. The Indian providers and other systems integrators are doing the integration work and building things like analytics on top of these cloud-enabled workloads but the decline in traditional lines is eating up the double-digit growth rates they enjoyed during the last decade," said Hansa Iyengar, IT analyst with Ovum.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Ashokk » 09 Jan 2018 01:08

India unveils Pratyush, its fastest supercomputer yet
India’s supercomputing prowess moved up several notches Monday after it unveiled Pratyush, an array of computers that can deliver a peak power of 6.8 petaflops. One petaflop is a million billion floating point operations per second and is a reflection of the computing capacity of a system.

According to a statement by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pratyush is the fourth fastest supercomputer in the world dedicated for weather and climate research, and follows machines in Japan, USA and the United Kingdom. It will also move an Indian supercomputer from the 300s to the 30s in the Top500 list, a respected international tracker of the world’s fastest supercomputers.

The machines will be installed at two government institutes: 4.0 petaflops HPC facility at IITM, Pune; and 2.8 petaflops facility at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast, Noida.

The government had sanctioned ₹400 crore last year to put in place a 10-petaflop machine. A key function of the machine’s computing power would be monsoon forecasting using a dynamical model. This requires simulating the weather for a given month — say March — and letting a custom-built model calculate how the actual weather will play out over June, July, August and September.

With the new system, it would be possible to map regions in India at a resolution of 3 km and the globe at 12 km.

While inaugurating the facility at IITM, Pune, Union Science Minister Dr. Harsh Vardhan said Pratyush would be India’s “premier" HPC (high performance computing) and was a step up from India’s current peak capacity of 1.0 PF.

Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 09 Jan 2018 21:29

Nice, which institute built this. I'm pretty sure it's not CDAC, and it's not imported. So did the IITM( Indian institute of tropical meterology) develop the computer. If so, very impressive, I thought the IITM was only involved in climate analysis, not in building supercomputers. So they 'beat' CDAC to the PETA level!

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Indian IT Industry

Postby Peregrine » 09 Jan 2018 22:56

USCIS backs down on H-1B culling; minor relief for half million Indians

Guest worker H-1B visa holders in the US, including more than half million from India, can breathe easy -- at least for one year at a time.

US immigration officials have clarified they are not considering a regulatory change that would compel H1-B visa holders to leave the US after the six-year limit.

However, they left open the possibility that there would be rule changes that will allow H1-B visa holders who are having their green card processed to remain in US only one year at a time - instead of the current three-year extensions - making the whole process more tedious.

"Even if it were, such a change would not likely result in these H-1B visa holders having to leave the United States because employers could request extensions in one-year increments," under a different rule, an official of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) told McClatchy News, which first reported the proposed changes.

The official denied that USCIS was backing down because of pressure from US tech industry and Indian lobbying efforts. But following leak of news that the Trump administration was trying to make grounds for self-deportation of more than a million guest workers, at least two lawmaker wrote to the President urging him "not to deport H-1B holders awaiting permanent residency (Green Card) processing."

"We strongly believe this action would be harmful to the American economy, credibility, and relations with India and the Indian-American community," Democratic lawmaker Tulsi Gabbard and Republican lawmaker Kevin Yoder said in a letter to Trump last Friday. Both are members of the Congressional Caucus on India and Indian Americans.

Trump himself, according to one account in Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury, understands the needs of the US tech industry and is sympathetic their H1-B visa needs. But his White House minions from the conservative, nativist plank of the party have hyped up the threat of misuse of the visa to argue for killing the H1-b visa, or at least making the rules so tight and the costs so prohibitive that it becomes unviable for tech firms to hire H1-B.

Even migrating the whole process from the current three-year extension to a year-on-year renewal will mean addition paperwork and costs.

The two Trump administration boffins who are reported to have worked on changing the rules are Stephen Miller, Trump's senior advisor for policy and Francis Cissna, the current director of the USCIS. They were previously on the staff of Senators Jeff Sessions and Charles Grassley respectively, both lawmakers having made fervent legislative efforts to squish H-1B visas.

While the USCIS clarification today provides some relief to H-1B green card processees, the additional paperwork that will come with tightening the regulations, and knowing there are immigration hardliners who are always looking to shut down the door on foreign workers and immigration, will test their nerves and finances.

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shaun
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby shaun » 09 Jan 2018 23:58

Varoon Shekhar wrote:Nice, which institute built this. I'm pretty sure it's not CDAC, and it's not imported. So did the IITM( Indian institute of tropical meterology) develop the computer. If so, very impressive, I thought the IITM was only involved in climate analysis, not in building supercomputers. So they 'beat' CDAC to the PETA level!

CRAY

Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 10 Jan 2018 00:04

I see, then it's a total import, or is there some Indian configuring involved? None of those news outlets is using the name "Cray", for whatever reason.

shaun
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby shaun » 10 Jan 2018 00:22

Varoon Shekhar wrote:I see, then it's a total import, or is there some Indian configuring involved? None of those news outlets is using the name "Cray", for whatever reason.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-building-a-supercomputer-juggernaut/article17363153.ece
The as-yet-unnamed machine will be jointly hosted at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune and the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting at Noida in Uttar Pradesh.

For the first time, colleges and other research institutions can log in and harness its power to address problems, ranging from weather modelling to understanding how proteins fold. “The tender [to select the company that will build the machine] is ready and we hope to have it [the computer] by June” Madhavan Rajeevan, Secretary, Ministry of Earth Sciences, told The Hindu.

then this
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/613280/imd-come-up-block-level.html

Since the work involves a huge amount of computing, the IMD has ordered a 10-15 petaflop Cray supercomputer worth Rs 450 crore. The mammoth number cruncher will be installed at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, Noida, by November. The second unit of the supercomputer will be set up at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology in Pune. The supercomputer will be used to run the model twice daily.

may be you can read CRAY @ below pic :wink:

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Philip
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby Philip » 18 Jan 2018 13:01

Well,IT and Telecom are "cousins" so to speak,posting this here,why Huawei should be banned in India.
https://www.androidauthority.com/att-hu ... al-830545/
Report: AT&T under pressure to cut all ties with Huawei including 5G, Cricket Wireless deals
NEWSBY OLIVER CRAGG2 DAYS AGO 628

US lawmakers are reportedly encouraging AT&T to cut all commercial ties with Huawei over national security concerns.
A report citing two anonymous US congressional aides suggests any collaboration between the two for AT&T’s planned 5G network could be halted.
The sale of Huawei phones via AT&T subsidiary Cricket Wireless could also be impacted.
The bad news for Huawei keeps on rolling in. Amid allegations that its long-planned partnership with AT&T was scuppered by political pressure, a new report has now suggested that US lawmakers are pushing the US carrier to cut all commercial ties with the Chinese giant over national security concerns.

According to two congressional aides who spoke to Reuters, senators and House members are encouraging AT&T to ditch any potential plans to work with the Shenzhen-based firm on standards for its 5G network. AT&T is expected to roll out its 5G network by the end of 2018 and is competing with Verizon to become the first carrier to offer the high-speed service to US consumers.

The sale of Huawei devices via its subsidiary company, Cricket Wireless, is also mentioned as a point of contention for certain US lawmakers.

In addition, the report suggests that operator China Mobile’s FCC application for a US license, which has been pending since 2011, could be rejected amid similar fears of Chinese espionage.

The move would be another huge blow to Huawei should AT&T go through with the reported requests and would represent another hit to the firm’s public image. Huawei is no stranger to general accusations that it poses a threat to US security, but the past week has shown that those claims will be a huge barrier to the third largest smartphone manufacturer’s long-term plan to beat Apple and Samsung to the top spot.

CES 2018 was meant to herald a new beginning for the company in the US. Huawei had nailed down a deal with AT&T to launch devices in the region via a carrier for the first time, but it fell through at the last minute, forcing Huawei to announce that its latest flagship, the Mate 10 Pro, would only come to the US unlocked and without a carrier partner.

Reports began swirling that the agreement was abandoned by AT&T after Senate and House intelligence committees sent a letter to the FCC raising concerns over Huawei’s “alleged ties to the Communist Party as well as China’s intelligence and security services.”

Huawei’s CEO of consumer products division, Richard Yu, described the situation as “a big loss for consumers”, while also expressing disappointment that Huawei won’t be claiming any revenue via carrier channels – a market which amounts to 90 percent of smartphones sales in the US.

The new report also comes days after a U.S. Representative proposed a new bill that threatens to ban the U.S. government from working with any providers that use Huawei (or ZTE) equipment, again citing security concerns.

NEWS

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Indian IT Industry

Postby Peregrine » 08 Mar 2018 23:36

Japan to recruit 2 lakh Indian IT professionals

BENGALURU: Japan will open up its doors to about two lakh IT professionals from India, and issue green cards to settle down in Japan and support the country's rapidly expanding IT infrastructure, said Shigeki Maeda, Executive Vice President at Japan External Trade Organisation (JETRO), a government body, here on Thursday.

“Currently there are around 9,20,000 IT professionals in the country and there is an immediate demand for more than 2,00,000 IT professionals from India which is likely to further swell to 8,00,000 professionals by 2030," he said in his keynote address at the India-Japan Business Partnership Seminar, which was jointly organised by Bangalore Chamber of Industry and Commerce and Jetro.

This is being necessitated due to the advent of rapid technological innovations in the societal needs in country. Japan wants to fill in this yawning gap and is looking towards India’s assistance in the IT space. Many Japanese companies feel the limitations to conventional “in-house innovation” and hence moving towards “most-advanced IT Technology Capabilities” for which India is the most ideal partner to look out for,” he said.

Japan, he said, is on the road to adapt and adopt innovation and emerging technologies to revolutionise its manufacturing methodology.

"Due to this conscientious process, there is a dearth of well-qualified and trained IT professionals to enhance its competitiveness, particularly, in the areas of life-life-science, finance, services and agriculture.”

The Japanese government, Maeda said, will be issuing Green Cards for highly skilled professionals, the first of its kind in the world, thereby, providing people to get permanent resident status in as short as one year. This is one of the fastest granted right of residence in the world.

As far as visa issuance is concerned, Japan has eased the rules for Indian travellers with effect from January 1, 2018.

As per the new norms, the applicants do not require to submit their employment certificate and letters of explanation for multiple-entry visas. Also, the number of documents to be submitted has been considerably reduced to three. In case if a person has travelled to Japan twice in one year, the documents will be reduced further to two only – i.e. just your passport and the visa application form.

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hanumadu
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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby hanumadu » 09 Mar 2018 00:56

I guess they waited till the very last minute before they can no longer afford not to let in foreign professionals. :)
Aren't mixed race (Japanese with foreigners) frowned upon in Japan?
Japanese coaching centers will spring up everywhere in India I guess.

I am waiting for the chinese wicket to fall. Read some where that one the reason India tolerates the chinese imports are in the hope that one day we will be able to export our software services.

Indian govt would do well to improve the standards of our colleges so they graduate employable people.

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Re: Indian IT Industry

Postby rhytha » 09 Mar 2018 05:08

Peregrine wrote:
The Japanese government, Maeda said, will be issuing Green Cards for highly skilled professionals, the first of its kind in the world, thereby, providing people to get permanent resident status in as short as one year. This is one of the fastest granted right of residence in the world.

As far as visa issuance is concerned, Japan has eased the rules for Indian travellers with effect from January 1, 2018.

As per the new norms, the applicants do not require to submit their employment certificate and letters of explanation for multiple-entry visas. Also, the number of documents to be submitted has been considerably reduced to three. In case if a person has travelled to Japan twice in one year, the documents will be reduced further to two only – i.e. just your passport and the visa application form.

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The " highly skilled professionals " means PhD with lot of research papers, or as per their Unreasonable expectation someone who has been nominated to Nobel prize for any stem. :rotfl: :rotfl: . It's not for "highly skilled JavaScript professionals".

Anyway Indians have a big cultural gap to jump to work in Japanese Companies, IT or not.


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