India's Contribution to Science & Technology

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R Balasubramaniam
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Scientific Temper

Postby R Balasubramaniam » 28 Oct 2008 06:44

Dear Ramana

Sadly no!

The reason is obvious. Even if we go and study and propose something, it is usually NOT considered in the right spirit and it is more on paper than anything else. There are more considerations to these type of accidents and if this is fixed, then science can play a role.

As I see it, the country while doing economically well, is faring pretty badly on the scientific front. We basically suffer from lack of proper scientific temper. I can see this reflected in so many aspects of our present-day India. At all points in history, when we were doing well, we were confident of our science and doing things with a scientific spirit. Somehow that is lacking and the buzz word nowdays is money.

Well I am an optimist and things are sure to change. It is only with science, more science and still more science that India will scale the peak again. Let that be clear.

Well, coming back to your basic point, there is need to simply ensure that the safety rules for the fireworks industry that have been formlated must be strictly followed. I am sure that this must be all there. Then surely, such mishaps will not occur. The sytem is in place. What we lack is proper implementation. That has been the curse of modern India. Great ideas are trapped due to lack of proper implementation and follow up.

Well, let us talk about military history as the post is supposed to.

Someday I will tell the story of saltpetre to the members of this group. It is really fascinating story.

With warm regards
R Balasubramaniam
28 Oct 08

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Re: Scientific Temper

Postby ramana » 28 Oct 2008 07:55

Here is the post that led to above response.

Prof, is there any interest at your institute level to look at imporvements and safety aspects of Sivakasi type of fireworks enterprises? It would be beneficial for the industry and the people who work in it.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby putnanja » 13 Feb 2009 02:40

First cloned buffalo calf developed, but tragedy strikes

posting excerpt below...

Chennai, Feb.12 A week ago, Dr S.K. Singla and his team of scientists had everything to be happy about. They had succeeded in developing the country’s first cloned buffalo. The calf, born on February 6, was developed through a “cost-effective” technology — Handguided Cloning Technique. It is the first calf to be born in the world through this technique.
Cold weather

The happiness, however, was short-lived as the calf died on Wednesday. “It died because it was unable to bear the cold weather. There were no birth complications for it,” said Dr Singla, Principal Investigator of the project, at the Animal Biotechnology Centre of the National Dairy Research Institute in Karnal, Haryana.

“If a rocket falls it does not mean the technology is dead. We have achieved a breakthrough in getting a live progeny through cloning. It may be a personal setback but definitely, the experiment has given us a technology that we can carry forward for further experiments,” Dr Singla told Business Line.

True to his word, the scientists are now expecting the second cloned calf in May.

...

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Nitesh » 17 Feb 2009 19:49

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Glo ... 134025.cms


Indian experts find bacteria to beat global heat
16 Feb 2009, 0507 hrs IST, Rajiv Mani , TNN

ALLAHABAD: In a major breakthrough that could help in the fight against global warming, a team of five Indian scientists from four institutes of the country have discovered a naturally occurring bacteria which converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into a compound found in limestone and chalk.

When used as an enzyme — biomolecules that speed up a chemical reaction — the bacteria has been found to transform CO2 into calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which can fetch minerals of economic value, said Dr Anjana Sharma from the biosciences department of RD University, Jabalpur, who was part of the Rs 98.6 lakh project sponsored by the department of biotechnology (DBT) under the Union science and technology ministry.

CO2 is a greenhouse gas produced in the burning of fossil fuels and other industrial activities. The rising emissions of CO2 in the atmosphere is chiefly responsible for global warming. Reducing CO2 levels is the single most important strategy to fight global warming and the resulting effects of climate change.

"The enzyme can be put to work in any situation, like in a chamber fitted inside a factory chimney through which CO2 would pass before being emitted into the atmosphere, and it would convert the greenhouse gas into calcium carbonate,’’ Dr Sadhana Rayalu, the project coordinator who is from the National Environmental Engineering and Research Institute (NEERI), Nagpur, told TOI on phone from Nagpur.

This potentially means that the bacteria — extracted from a number of places including brick kilns in Satna, Madhya Pradesh — can be used to take out CO2 from its sources of emission itself.

Rayalu said the chemical reactions involved in the process have been successfully established while its economic viability, cloning, expression and single-step purification are under study. The team has published its findings in the Indian Journal of Microbiology and its paper has been accepted for publication in the World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.

Sharma said the breakthrough was the result of marathon research work spanning more than three years. Other members of the team are Dr K Krishnamurty from NEERI, Dr T Satyanarayana from Delhi University and Dr A K Tripathi from Banaras Hindu University.

"Interestingly, it is nature that has come to the rescue of the human race from harmful effects of global warming. Investigators of the team have discovered as many as seven such micro-organisms that have the tendency to convert carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate at different natural locations,’’ said Sharma, who was on a visit to Allahabad.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Raghav K » 18 Feb 2009 05:42

IISc-Nimhans scientists locate new brain disorder gene.
From Kalyan Ray,DH News Service,New Delhi:
Scientists at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have discovered a new gene that plays a dominant role in causing microcephaly, a brain disorder that leads to tiny brain and life-long reduced mental faculty, particularly in India.

The finding by the IISc scientists may help develop a regular clinical screening tool to detect this severe disorder at the foetal stage itself. Reputed US scientific journal, American Journal of Human Genetics, has reported the discovery of the gene, named STIL, last week.

Four genes were so far known to cause this disease, which is hereditary. The IISc team located a fifth gene, which plays a key role behind this disorder in India.

“ASPM (one of the four already known genes) and STIL are important for Indian microcephaly patients,” IISc geneticist Arun Kumar told Deccan Herald.

Another gene, MCPH2, has been also found in a handful of Indian patients but other three genes have never been reported from India. During the course of their investigation research, the IISc scientists and their colleagues from the National Institute on Mental Health and Neurosciences (Nimhans) had examined a large number of families in Bangalore, Mangalore, Mysore and places in Tamil Nadu. While doctors at the Nimhans collected the blood, the analysis was carried out at the IISc.

The incidence of microcephaly in Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh are attributed, among others, to the prevalence of consanguineous marriage.

Typically, the brain of a microcephaly patient weighs 430 gm, whereas that of a normal person is 1,459 gm. Because of a smaller brain, the intelligent quotient for microcephaly patients ranges from mild (IQ 50-70) to severely (IQ 20-35) low. Though it is not fatal, patients remain mentally-challenged throughout their lives. Interestingly, a large number of microcephaly patients are found in Pakistan where they are dubbed “rat people,” ostensibly due to their small brain.

Though there is no database, Kumar said the prevalence of the disorder could be one child per every 50,000 to 100,000 live births.

So far, though microcephaly can be diagnosed in the embryo, the results are not reliable until the third trimester. The problem is at such a late stage, even if a mother knows that her foetus is having microcephaly, she cannot abort because it is illegal and dangerous.

Besides its clinical significance, the discovery bears significance in the study of human brain evolution from the days of early hominids like Australopithecus.

Mutations in STIL (and in other four known genes) may help researchers understand evolution in the human brain. Primitive man like Australopithecus had small brain (450 gm), which is similar to the brains of microcephaly patients.

The genes could provide hints to how the cerebral cortex – the core of human brain – evolved faster to reach the present level, the geneticist said.


http://deccanherald.com/Content/Feb1820 ... updatenews

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Raghav K » 18 Feb 2009 06:42

A step in the right direction.
Infosys sets up science foundation.

Software major Infosys Technologies announced the launch of Infosys Science Foundation on Tuesday to encourage scientific research. The foundation will confer a prize of Rs 50 lakh each to five young Indian scientists in recognition of their contributions and achievements across various scientific streams.

The foundation has been set up with a corpus of Rs 21.5 crore contributed by the company’s eight board members. The company will also grant Rs 2 crore a year to supplement the prize money. The winners will be chosen by a jury of five members comprising renowned international experts in the respective fields.

The five streams are Physical Sciences (Physics and Chemistry), Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics and Statistics), Engineering Sciences, Life Sciences (Biology and Medicine) and Social Sciences.

Announcing the Foundation, NR Narayana Murthy, chairman and chief mentor of Infosys Technologies, said the prizes would be given to scientists of below 40 years. He said, “India needs bright minds across all areas of academics, government, business and society to strive for global excellence.”

Asked whether Infosys set up the Foundation as atonement of guilt for having weaned away the best and the brightest from Pure Science to Information Technology, Murthy said, “There is no sense of guilt.”

He said, “We are standing up and saying that we are creating the largest prize. More such efforts must take shape so that we can stand up and cheer them (young scientists) as they run the marathon, so that they feel better and we feel better too.”


http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage ... MatchID1=4
924&TeamID1=4&TeamID2=2&MatchType1=1&SeriesID1=1244&PrimaryID=4924&Headline=Infosys+sets+up+science+foundation

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Arya Sumantra » 19 Feb 2009 08:33

An invention coming out of trade imbalances between east-asia and west. originally posted in skyscrapercity forums.


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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby sanjaykumar » 19 Feb 2009 11:59

They are touting carbonic anhydrase as a panacea for global warming?

What are the equilibrium k for solubilisation of CO2 and the CO2 --->HCO3 steps?


OK: The most active enzymes, typified by human carbonic anhydrase II, hydrate CO2 at rates as high as kcat = 106 s-1

Presumably they are using a salt sink to remove the -HCO3 from solution. I see:as CaCO3.

Big deal, unless they have a stable enyme from a thermophile with perhaps kcat 2-3 orders of magnitude higher.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby ajay_ijn » 09 Mar 2009 08:33

Vellore research centre makes stem cell breakthrough
VELLORE: It's a breakthrough that may have the country's medical and scientific community sitting up and taking notice. The Centre for Stem Cell Research at Christian Medical College has succeeded in reprogramming cells drawn from adult mice and making them function like stem cells found in the human embryo.

It has opened a new chapter in stem cell therapy in the country, as the technology can now be applied to generate similar stem cells from adult human cells too. These can be used to study genetic disorders relating to blood, muscle, brain and even diseases like diabetes. The use of embryos to draw stem cells has been the subject of a controversy, and the latest discovery may mean that embryos need not necessarily be used in the process.

''This is an important milestone for India in stem cell research and signifies a paradigm shift in the way diseases can be treated. We will now begin work on human cells to generate disease-specific iPS cells to study hereditary diseases,'' Dr Alok Srivastava, who heads the research centre, said.

''For India, this means once we are able to take this on to human cells also; we will not have to rely on external help for generating models for studying and treating human diseases. With regard to clinical significance, as anywhere else in the world, we need to be very careful not to give an impression to people that this is going into human treatment anytime soon. It could be years before that happens and it will be only after the safety of use of such cells is clearly established,'' he said.

In February, the research centre, supported by the department of biotechnology, ministry of science and technology and CMC, was successful in generating in mice these ''induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells'' which are similar to embryonic stem cells. Researchers will soon move on to generating similar cells from normal and diseased human cells.

The centre looks primarily at translational research - research that has potential for clinical applications. Embryonic stem cells have great capacity for self-renewal and are used in regenerative medicine and tissue replacement. The induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated at the research centre may have the same potential, researchers say. India is the fifth country, after Japan, US, China and Britain, to achieve these results.

The iPS technology is relatively new and acknowledged worldwide as the ''ultimate manufacturing process''. Scientists can now use the human skin or other cells like an assembly line to roll off cells that have the ability to adapt themselves to any tissue in the body that requires healing or replenishment.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Sanjay M » 09 Mar 2009 10:22

Indians develop arc-discharge method for producing graphene:

http://pubs.acs.org/cen/news/87/i10/8710news1.html

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby James B » 11 Mar 2009 02:47

Biological Sciences in India

Clicky

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby dinakar » 17 Mar 2009 11:55

Celebrating an Indian’s breakthrough science
Some excerpts.....
Despite being free people for more than 60 years now, Indians are yet to develop the tradition of remembering and honouring their great savants of pre-Independence times. One example of such neglect relates to Jagadis Chandra Bose (1858-1937), arguably the first ‘modern’ scientist to have emerged from India.


Academic honours such as a D.Sc. by research from London University, a knighthood in 1917 and a membership of the Royal Society of London in 1920 that were conferred on Bose did little to affirm his pioneering status as the father of wireless. Ironically, in a book by Orrin Dunlap, which Marconi personally edited, a page and a half is devoted to Bose, who is acknowledged by Marconi to have provided crucial support at a critical juncture when he needed it most.

Partial amends were made in 1998 when the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), New York, a global professional academy in the field, announced: “Our investigative research into the origin and first major use of solid state diode detector devices led to the discovery that the first transatlantic wireless signal in Marconi’s world-famous experiment was received by Marconi using the iron-mercury-iron-coherer with a telephone detector invented by Sir J.C. Bose in 1898.”

With these revelations, belated though they are, we may safely say that Bose, and not Marconi, was the discoverer and demonstrator of wireless radio propagation through free space and thus the father of radio, television and all other forms of radio communication including the Internet. The IEEE inducted Bose into its Wireless Hall of Fame.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Raj » 08 Apr 2009 03:43

Wanted, Nano-like solutions for Indian farming!

Give us a Nano-like solution

Mr Manigandan puts his finger right on the problem when he says that unfortunately agricultural research has not travelled from the research labs to the farms.

“There is absolutely no connect between research and the field; if at all there is some connect, it might be for the huge farms.”

What is sorely required is research that can be applied to small and medium farms as their owners cannot invest in technology. “For instance, we need innovations and equipment that would suit 5-10 acre farms. Actually, we need a Nano-like solution in agriculture.”

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Yogi_G » 11 Apr 2009 17:14

Indian student develops sixth sense technology prototype, very interesting....


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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Vriksh » 16 Apr 2009 19:39

I am interested in a resource for ancient Iron artifacts of India. One of the prime example being the Iron pillar in Old Delhi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_pillar_of_Delhi

There appears to be atleast 2 other examples of Iron pillars from googling. One in Dhar (that I could not find an image or link for) and one in Kodachadri karnataka (link below).

http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/jun10/articles13.htm

I want to know if there exists a resource that documents iron artifacts in ancient buildings as structural elements. There may be many that may have been missed due to paucity of funds or ignorance.

I wonder if a magnetographic survey of the Sindhu-Ganga system has been done to unearth more such pillars etc. If the ancient bharatiyas were skilled ironworkers they could have used such pillars for buildings etc.


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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby SSridhar » 19 May 2009 19:37

India's Contribution to R&D Going Up: Study

The number of articles published in global science journals by Indians has increased from around 17,000 in 2001 to more than 27,000 in 2007, the study carried out by media house Thomson Reuters said.

The number stood at 12,500 in 1985, which went up to 17,000 in 2001 and it rose 20,000 in 2003, it pointed out.

India was ranked at 14th place, ahead of many European countries such as Switzerland, Russia, Sweden and Belgium, in terms of the contribution made in the field of engineering.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Sanjay M » 07 Jun 2009 12:21


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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby putnanja » 28 Jul 2009 05:27

Superhard, made in Bangalore

...
A team led by India’s leading materials scientist Chintamani Nagesa Ramacha- ndra Rao has increased the hardness of a polymer called polyvinyl alcohol fivefold by adding minuscule portions of two carbon materials.

The researchers at the Indian Institute of Science and the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research used two types of nanocarbons — materials so tiny that their sizes are measures in billionths of a metre — to create the hardest known polymer nanocomposite. They have described their work today in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
...

...
Researchers Urmimala Maitra and Barun Das at the JNCASR created the superhard polymer by adding nanodiamond and another nanocarbon material with a different molecular architecture into the raw material for the polymer.

At the IISc, doctoral student K. Eswar Prasad showed that less than 1 per cent of the two types of nanocarbons can increase hardness and stiffness by as much as 400 per cent.

“The polymer strength goes up with very little amounts of the nanocarbon,” said Upadrasta Ramamurty, associate professor at the IISc, and a team member. “This could make such polymers easy to process for different applications.”
...
...
The Bangalore study did not examine toughness and ductility — two other important mechanical properties of engineering materials. And the mechanism through which the nanocarbon pairs act on the polymer is still unclear.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby sanjaykumar » 11 Aug 2009 01:19

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... GyLctVu7Rs

Flying Frog, Tiniest Deer Among New Himalayan Species

Are Indian workers responsible for any of this?

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Purush » 16 Aug 2009 20:37

Sorry if it's a repost, but I came across this when I was looking for something else.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellapragada_Subbarao

http://www.hinduonnet.com/seta/2003/03/ ... 140300.htm

After his work on folic acid and with considerable inputs from Dr. Sidney Farber, he developed the important anti-cancer drug Methotrexate- one of the very first cancer chemotherapy agents and still in widespread clinical use.[2][3][4] He also discovered the drug Hetrazan which was used by the World health Organization against filariasis.[5] Under Subbarao, Benjamin Duggar made his discovery of the world's first tetracycline antibiotic, Aureomycin, in 1945.


Subbaro's memory has been obscured by the achievements of others and his failure to promote his own self-interest. Part of the reason for his obscurity was that Subbarao did not "market his work". A patent attorney was once astonished to find that he had not taken any of the steps that scientists everywhere consider routine for linking their name to their handiwork.[citation needed] He was invariably in the audience when a colleague or a collaborator, pushed by him to the limelight, took the bow as each fruit of research directed by Subbarao was revealed to the public. He never granted interviews to the press. He never made the rounds of the academies which apportion accolades among the achievers. He never went on lecture tours.

His colleague, George Hitchings, who shared the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Gertrude Elion, said, "Some of the nucleotides isolated by Subbarao had to be rediscovered years later by other workers because Fiske, apparently out of jealousy, did not let Subbarao's contributions see the light of the day."[8]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methotrexate

Methotrexate originated in the 1940s when Dr. Sidney Farber at Children's Hospital Boston was testing the effects of folic acid on acute leukemic (severe blood cancer) children.[1] Inspired, he asked Dr. Y. Subbarao, then Director of the Research Division of Lederle Labs (part of American Cyanamid), to synthesize the anti-folate (methotrexate). Dr. Subbarao, who also happened to be the head of the team which had earlier synthesized folic acid (1946) readily synthesized this anti-folate and handed it over to Dr. Farber, who in turn administered it to a small group of very ill leukemic children. The remarkable clinical improvement that was observed in these patients heralded the era of cancer chemotherapy in modern medicine. This was reported by Dr. S. Farber in the June 3rd, 1948 issue of NEJM. In 1950 Dr. Farber founded in Boston the world's first Cancer Research Center. Methotrexate gained Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as an oncology drug in 1953.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby sanjaykumar » 16 Aug 2009 23:28

Thanks for the info.Always wondered about Subbarao.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Bade » 06 Oct 2009 22:53

Astronomical prospects, challenges
On the observational side, we’ve become partners in a project called SALT, the Southern African Large Telescope. That’s an 11-metre telescope, which makes it the world’s biggest optical telescope. This is a joint venture involving about a dozen partners, mostly from America and Britain. South Africa is a major shareholder. IUCAA has taken 6 per cent share in the telescope. All the development hereafter will take place with our participation. That’s one of the big programmes. But this is only a process. It’s not active research. We’ll be carrying out a great deal of research using that telescope. Secondly, there is the Astrosat satellite, the first Indian satellite dedicated to astronomy. It has instruments that’ll observe at the X-ray wavelength and the ultraviolet wavelength. IUCAA is a major player in this project. Once the satellite is launched, there will be an overwhelming amount of data. Third, on the planning board, there are three extremely large optical telescopes. Two are from the U.S. and one from the Europe — GMT, TMT and ELT. The Indian astronomy community would like to acquire 10 per cent share in it. Four organisations including IUCAA, the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore; the Raman Research Institute, Bangalore and ARIES in Nainital are involved. We four are about to submit a proposal to the government to get funding to become 10 per cent partners in the project. If we get funding for it, that will be a very major effort. The government insists that our partnership should not consist of simply paying 10 per cent money, but most of the money should be spent on providing goods and services from India. We could even participate in building infrastructure for the observatory, as Indian companies are very good at developing infrastructure. The development of software for every aspect of the project will be a major activity. So this is a partnership between these research institutes, the universities and industry. Ten per cent acquisition will cost around Rs. 500 crore.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby kmkraoind » 07 Oct 2009 18:15

U.S., Israeli Scientists Win Nobel for Laying Ribosome Bare

Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, 57, who heads the Structural Studies Division at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England; Thomas A. Steitz , 69, Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale University in Connecticut, and Ada E. Yonath, a professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, will share the 10 million-krona ($1.4 million) award, the Nobel Assembly said at a press conference in Stockholm today.


Indeed its a proud moment for India and Indians.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby vina » 07 Oct 2009 21:35

kmkraoind wrote:U.S., Israeli Scientists Win Nobel for Laying Ribosome Bare

Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, 57,


Indeed its a proud moment for India and Indians.


Yes indeed. And especially so for Tam Brahms. In fact out of the 4 Nobels in hard sciences that went to Indian people (in the sense of Indian origin and not citizenship), 3 are Tam Brahms ( CV Raman, Chandrashekaran and Venkatraman Ramkrishnan), the 4th of course was Hargobind Khurana.

Not bad at all eh for such a miniscule community (at around 0.5% , okay at max around 1% of TN's population) actively hounded out of education, academia and professions in their home state by a draconian reservation system and the perverse ideology of the Dravidian parties .

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Bade » 07 Oct 2009 22:27

They may be TamBrahs, but they were educated elsewhere all three of them. :P So the TN policy of reservations had done a lot of good for them. If they had stayed in TN, then like all other non-TamBrahms they would have withered, no ?

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Singha » 07 Oct 2009 22:53

arent very good proportions of tambrahms emigrated to western countries and entered into sc/engg?
people from impoverished and ill connected parts like NE - its a dream to even go and work in dilli
or mumbai....atleast our coastal trading empires and settlements already had large and well connected/education minded cities to help people take the next step out.

I dare say if they had left for peshawar or urumqi we would not see this :mrgreen:

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Sridhar » 07 Oct 2009 23:32

Both CV Raman and Chandrashekhar were educated and had their careers in pre-reservations, pre-Dravidian politics days. But the general case can be made that the hounding out of the community from their home state has led to their excelling even more in academia and the professions. A strong tradition of emphasis on education within families was a big contributory factor. This was true (and continues to be true) amongst the poorest of families in the community.

Anyway, congratulations to Venky for this great honour!

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 08 Oct 2009 02:16

Last year, the Indian National Science Academy elected him as a foreign fellow, while the IISc convinced him to accept its G.N. Ramachandran chair a few years ago.

http://beta.thehindu.com/news/article30476.ece

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 08 Oct 2009 03:11

My god, this is funny....
Tamil Nadu has now caught up with Bengal in the Nobel stakes — with a little help from America. It has Ramakrishnan, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar and C.V. Raman to pit against Tagore, Sen and Mother Teresa. Bengal, though, can argue that J.C. Bose and Satyen Bose undoubtedly deserved the prize, that Raman did his pioneering work in Calcutta, and that Bangladeshi Peace Nobel winner Muhammad Yunus is a Bengali.

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091008/j ... 590289.jsp
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091008/j ... 590192.jsp
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091008/j ... 590297.jsp
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1091008/i ... elnbig.jpg

negi
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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby negi » 08 Oct 2009 03:52

I guess nothing wrong with a slight touch of Chauvinism on such occasions at least goes to show that Tambrahms and Bhadralok acknowledge the efforts of the gentlemen in question and do take pride in their roots.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby vina » 08 Oct 2009 05:50

I guess nothing wrong with a slight touch of Chauvinism on such occasions at least goes to show that Tambrahms and Bhadralok


Ah.. Bhadralok, lets see. Despite, the huge presence of Bhadralok in science and the snooty we do boor science onree, no piddly Yingeering onree, thank you, all the No-bells from that side has been in E-Con-o-mix and Littrachaw and Piss/Plospelity . Nothing in hard science yet (though I guess it is only a matter of time surely) .

As for TamBrahms, Venky was born in Chidambaram aye ?, it doesn't get much more Kaveri belt than that. Awesome temple , should visit it sometime if you haven't gone there. Many Tam Brahm Iyers tend to trace their roots to that part of the delta , with their Kul Devata being places like Vaitheeswaran Koil (like your's truly), Swami Malai , Thirvanaikaval etc and agraharams in places like Mayuvaram (now called Mayiladuthurai to make it very Pak Pure Tamil onree see, and represented off and on by Mani Shankar Aiyar), Kumbakonam, Chidambaram, Seerghazhi, Brahmadesham etc . Now of course, there are next to zero Tam Brahms in any of those places living there, possibly the only a handful remnants in their 70s/80s with one foot in the grave.

People do make "heritage visits" back to the old places (like my dad dragged me to Alancheri ,some 5 Kms off Kumbakonam, when I was going off to US long ago and he felt that there was no chance of me coming back and I think he was nearly reconciled to a furrin daughter in law to make sure I knew my "roots") and for religious ceremonies like mundan / temple visits etc.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby vina » 08 Oct 2009 05:57

Singha wrote:arent very good proportions of tambrahms emigrated to western countries and entered into sc/engg?

All that is a post 60s phenomenon. Until that time, there were hardly any Tam Brahms abroad in sizeable numbers. Yes, Tam Brahms tend to be in sizeable nos in all Sci Research institutes (it is not for no reason , India's bum is called the Vegetarian Bum), but then the Engg thingy is only after 60s, along with emigration.

people from impoverished and ill connected parts like NE - its a dream to even go and work in dilli
or mumbai....atleast our coastal trading empires and settlements already had large and well connected/education minded cities to help people take the next step out.


The places where TamBrahms were really dominant was govt esp petty bureaucracy (ie, clerk, typist and other assorted low level babus), historically the movement to Dilli/Mumbai was as stenos/ typists/ clerk/PA in Gubmint and private. So really the lowly babu onree saar. And to think that is what got the goat of the Dravidian types.. :rotfl: :rotfl:

I dare say if they had left for peshawar or urumqi we would not see this :mrgreen:

Chandrashekar was born in Peshawar, where his dad was well a gubmint babu (no suprise there) in british india!

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby John Snow » 08 Oct 2009 07:03

Subbaro's memory has been obscured by the achievements of others and his failure to promote his own self-interest.


Thats very typical of Telugus.

Lederle Labs (part of American Cyanamid) made billions of dollars by selling Falvaron Folic acid + Iron capuseles to millions in India (especially Pregnant women) and in third world countries which was Subbaraos formulation.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 08 Oct 2009 07:10

I am waiting to see how long it will take MK and his gang to say something about Venky and his TN connection. So far I have nt seen a single article. But the news came out much before yesterday night. Bah, it took them a week to recognize Anand had won the world championship and Anand is from TN.

For the record, just one article that says President has said congrats. I know he is Indian-american and all that, but still... lets see....

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Yayavar » 08 Oct 2009 07:13

vina wrote:
I guess nothing wrong with a slight touch of Chauvinism on such occasions at least goes to show that Tambrahms and Bhadralok


Ah.. Bhadralok, lets see. Despite, the huge presence of Bhadralok in science and the snooty we do boor science onree, no piddly Yingeering onree, thank you, all the No-bells from that side has been in E-Con-o-mix and Littrachaw and Piss/Plospelity . Nothing in hard science yet (though I guess it is only a matter of time surely) .



Vinaji, though the Tambrams you refer to did cut their teeth in the Bhardralok territory ..but for hard science and engineering - Jagadeesh Chandra Bose :) - he rang the bell wirelessly, doesn't need no no-bell. He probably falls in 'brahm' category though, to give company to Tambrahms.

(no, am not from Tamilnadu or Bengal...).
Last edited by Yayavar on 08 Oct 2009 07:34, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Rahul M » 08 Oct 2009 07:29

first of all congrats ! a desi is a desi wherever he/she may be unless he/she decides to go out of his/her way to shake off the roots.

stan, kolkata newspapers had this peculiar attachment to nobel prizes from India. the kolkata connection (which in fact was there for most of them) was almost declared to be a criterion for an Indian to get the nobel ! :D

regarding JC Bose, he probably deserved it more than many.
IMHO, given the biases that are apparent in selection policy, the nobel has lost much of its sheen in recent years. that's no slight on the winners in any way.

btw viv ji, bose is not a brahmin surname. it belongs to what is called kayastha community.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby SwamyG » 08 Oct 2009 07:32

Folks, touting about caste is best reserved for "India Forum" - where there is a thread running about Indian IQ.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Bade » 08 Oct 2009 07:40

Isn't it interesting to note the bhadralok and TamBrahm connection to Nobel. Both communities were tightly knit to the western narrative being Brit centers of commerce, culture and academics. The non-TamBrahms from TN are not part of this narrative compared to non-BongBrahms ?

The only other in the race recently but lost, perhaps was Sudarshan to the nominated list who actually has a Madras connection and is not a TamBrahm.

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Re: India's Contribution to Science & Technology

Postby Bade » 08 Oct 2009 07:43

SwamyG, it is not about caste but mainly about connections to the active centers and a network of active supporters what makes anyone successful. The only exception to this rule we know of is Ramanujam.


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