Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

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Vips
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 10 Mar 2021 08:04

ISRO chairman flags off NISAR payload to Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The Indian Space Research Organsiation (ISRO) S-Band SAR Payload of NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) mission was flagged off on March 4.

The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission scheduled to be launched by the Indian Space Research Organsisation (Isro) in 2022 will measure the Earth’s changing ecosystems, dynamic surfaces, and ice masses providing information about biomass, natural hazards, sea level rise, and groundwater, and will support a host of other applications. NISAR is planned to be launched in 2022 from Satish Dhawan Space Center at Sriharikota in India, into a near-polar orbit. NASA requires a minimum of three years of global science operations with the L-band radar, and ISRO requires five years of operations with the S-band radar over specified target areas in India and the Southern Ocean.

ISRO’s S-Band NISAR mission was flagged off by ISRO chairman and secretary, Department of Space on March 4, 2021 through virtual mode. The S-Band SAR payload has been shipped from Space Applications Centre, Ahmedabad (SAC/ISRO) to Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena for integration with L-Band SAR Payload of JPL, NASA.

NISAR is a joint project between NASA and ISRO to measure Earth’s changing ecosystem. It is expected to be the world’s most expensive Earth-imaging satellite.

The total cost of the project includes Isro's work share cost of about Rs 788 crore and the cost of JPL's work share of about $808 million

NISAR would provide a means of disentangling highly spatial and temporally complex processes ranging from ecosystem disturbances to ice sheet collapses and natural hazards including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes and landslides.

On September 30, 2014, NASA and ISRO signed a partnership to collaborate on and launch NISAR. The mission is expected to be launched in early 2022. NASA is providing the mission’s L-band SAR, a high-rate communication subsystem for science data, GPS receivers, a solid-state recorder and payload data subsystem. ISRO is providing the spacecraft bus, the S-band radar, the launch vehicle and associated launch services.

NISAR is a joint Earth-observing mission between NASA and ISRO aimed at making global measurements of the causes and consequences of land surface changes using advanced radar imaging. This mission concept and the resulting partnership are in response to the National Academy of Science’s 2007 survey of Earth observational priorities for the next decade, known as the decadal survey. One of the top priorities identified in this survey was to gain data and insight in three Earth science domains: ecosystems, deformation of Earth's crust and cryospheric sciences.

NISAR is the first satellite mission that will collect radar data in two microwave bandwidth regions, called the L-band and the S-band, to measure changes of less than a centimeter across in our planet's surface. This allows the mission to observe a wide range of Earth processes, from the flow rates of glaciers and ice sheets to the dynamics of earthquakes and volcanoes.

NISAR uses a sophisticated information-processing technique known as SAR to produce extremely high-resolution images. Radar penetrates clouds and darkness, enabling NISAR to collect data day and night in any weather. The instrument's imaging swath — the width of the strip of data collected along the length of the orbit track — is greater than 150 miles (240 kilometers), which allows it to image the entire Earth in 12 days.

Over the course of multiple orbits, the radar images will allow users to track changes in croplands and hazard sites, as well as monitor ongoing crises such as volcanic eruptions. The images will be detailed enough to show local changes and broad enough to measure regional trends. As the mission continues for years, the data will allow for better understanding of the causes and consequences of land surface changes, increasing our ability to manage resources and prepare for and cope with global change.

The NISAR spacecraft will accommodate two fully capable SAR instruments (24 cm wavelength L-SAR and 10 cm wavelength S-SAR), each designed as array-fed reflectors to work as SweepSAR scan-on-receive wide swath mapping systems. The spacecraft will be launched on an ISRO GSLV-II launch vehicle into a polar sun-synchronous dawn dusk orbit.

NASA's contributions include the L-band SAR instrument, including the 12-m diameter deployable mesh reflector and 9-m deployable boom and the entire octagonal instrument structure. In addition, NASA is providing a high capacity solid-state recorder (approximately 9 Tbits at end of life), GPS, 3.5 Gbps Ka-band telecom system, and an engineering payload to coordinate command and data handling with the ISRO spacecraft control systems. ISRO is providing the spacecraft and launch vehicle, as well as the S-band SAR electronics to be mounted on the instrument structure.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Prem Kumar » 10 Mar 2021 10:12

Wow! That's some serious tech.

Being able to measure sub-centimeter changes is key, because a glacier receding by a cm over a few months is cause for concern.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby csaurabh » 10 Mar 2021 16:21

ernest wrote:That's great. Best wishes to you and your team. Please try to share more on what solutions you are working on. Will be helpful for a lot on nanha mujahids like me trying to come up with technology based startups for Indian needs.


Hi Ernest. I am unable to send private messages in this forum. If you want to discuss anything, you can email me at saurabhsaurc [at] gmail [dot] com

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 10 Mar 2021 21:41

Isro's commercial arm NSIL bags 4 more contracts, eyes satellite-building deals.

Isro's commercial arm New Space India Limited (NSIL) has bagged four more dedicated launch service contracts even as it plans to pursue satellite building deals.

NSIL launched its first dedicated commercial mission on February 28, orbiting Brazilian satellite Amazonia-1 from Sriharikota spaceport of the
Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro).

"We currently have four more dedicated launch service contracts, which will be executed in the coming two to three years," NSIL's Chairman and
Managing Director G Narayanan told in an interview.

Apart from launch services, NSIL is also actively pursuing the new policy change to provide space-based services on 'demand driven basis', a shift from the current supply driven model, he said. "Towards this we are in discussions with several users to ascertain their demands and shortly you will hear from us regarding firm agreements for building and launching of satellites through NSIL and providing services primarily in the communication sector for the end customer", he said.

Asked if NSIL has any plans to build satellites for other countries, in addition to providing launch services at present, Narayanan said on the basis of its new mandate obtained as part of the space reforms, the company will shortly enter into realising of satellites too. According to him, while the initial focus will be on driving the change nationally from supply-driven to demand driven model in the domestic market, NSIL is not averse to taking up these activities for other countries. "In the long run we will definitely embark on trying to capture market of other countries also in this field (satellite-building)", Narayanan said.

He also said that NSIL is in the process of identifying an Indian industry partner (which could be consortium of companies or a company) to undertake end-to-end production of Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), which is ISRO's workhorse rocket. "We expect to complete this complex process in about six to eight months. Once the Indian industry partner is identified, I am confident that they will be in a position to deliver an entirely built PSLV in about two to three years with appropriate hand holding from Isro", he said.

As part of this business initiative, NSIL has proposed to realise five PSLVs through identified Indian industry partner. "As of now, about 80 per cent of mechanical systems and 60 per cent of electronic systems of PSLV come from the industry. However, the remaining percentages in both the areas are highly complex", Narayanan said.

The NSIL, he said, is also proactively working to improve the potential of Indian industries by way of technology transfer in several identified areas from Isro to them. "This will definitely help them play an increasing role in the emerging space markets both nationally and globally. So far, we have entered into 14 such technology transfer agreements and you will see much more such transfers in the days to come", the official said. On the Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV), he said the compact launcher is being developed by the Isro as a newer launch-on-demand vehicle for meeting smaller satellite segment capacity globally.

According to sources in Bengaluru-headquartered Isro, the maiden flight of the SSLV is expected in April. SSLV is a three-stage all solid vehicle with a capability to launch up to 500 kg satellite mass into 500 km low earth orbit (LEO) and 300 kg to Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO).

On NSIL's positioning strategy in the global market in terms of pricing, reliability, and competitiveness, Narayanan said ISROs capabilities in space needs no explanation at this time. From innovative, and ingenious initiatives Isro could capture the appreciation of the world including that of premier space agencies for its capabilities to undertake the most complex missions with ease, he said.

"NSIL by virtue of having access to commercially exploit India's such capabilities in space is highly recognised globally in terms of competence, reliability and cost.

The just concluded launch contract(Amazonia-1) was won by NSIL through a competitive bidding process and this will speak for itself", Narayanan added

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby chetonzz » 11 Mar 2021 19:34

https://www.dqindia.com/isro-gaganyaan- ... mber-2021/

ISRO Gaganyaan mission astronauts, who have been undergoing training in Russia, have almost completed training activities

As of now, major modules such as survival training (snow, water and steppe), parabolic flights, theoretical classes on orbital mechanics, astro-navigation and some Soyuz systems have been completed

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Aldonkar » 12 Mar 2021 19:42

Mort Walker wrote:^^^
Off topic.

Maybe relations will improve as part of vaccine and space diplomacy. It is worth noting that slavery of Africans and indigenous people lasted from 1520-1888 in Brazil. The language spoken is Portuguese. The wealthy and ruling class are white Western Europeans, but there is a significant portion of mixed African-Native Indian-European people.


Since you mention race, I should mention that there is a significant (more than 2 million people) presence of Japanese in Sao Paulo State. Many of the coffee growers here are of Japanese descent and of course, in true Brazilian many more of part Japanese descent. Brazil was one of the few countries that allowed Japanese immigration in the nineteenth century when N. America and Australia were closed to the "yellow peril".

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 12 Mar 2021 21:54

NSIL to invest Rs 10,000 crore to own, operate satellites; in talks to acquire Isro satellite fleet.

NSIL the commercial space undertaking of the government, plans to invest Rs 10,000 crore over the next five years to own and operate satellites and rockets to launch them and is in talks with the country’s space agency to acquire its fleet of remote sensing and communication satellites, its top officials said.

“We will invest Rs 2,000 crore per year for the next five years,” D Radhakrishnan, Director, Technical & Strategy of NSIL told reporters on Friday.

NSIL is in talks with its parent Department of Space to own and operate two new communication satellites for which an Indian Indian telco as well as a DTH provider has signed up as customers. The company did not disclose customer names.

The company has also floated a request for proposal (RFP) to five Indian companies to build the workhorse polar satellite launch vehicle (PSLV) and expects to close the vendor in five months, he said. The initial order would be for five Pslv rockets.

NSIL is also drawing a requirement for new satellites in consultation with various users and start procuring, owning and launching and providing services, primarily in the communication sector, NSIL Chairman G Narayanan said.

NSIL has been formed as a government-run entity to offer commercial services to clients globally as well as local customers. It will also collaborate with Indian rocket startups to offer launch services to small satellite customers globally.

The government is setting up Indian National Space Promotion and Authorisation Centre (In-Space), as a regulator to ensure fair play for the private space technology firms in the country.

NSIL has won four contracts to launch remote sensing satellites on both the PSLV as well as the upcoming small satellite launch vehicle (SSLV). SSLV, a rocket that is designed to hurl satellites of less than 500 kg into low earth orbit is expected to make its first launch later this year. :roll:

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby venkat_kv » 13 Mar 2021 10:05

csaurabh wrote:I was pointing out that what PES university is doing is not really new or revolutionary. It is simply an extension of satellite building activites already present in ISRO.

In other news, our startup company has been awarded the ANIC grant ( Atma-nirbhar India challenge ) in the category of ISRO-Robotics/AR/VR .

responding late, but congrats Csaurabh, may you persevere and achieve greater heights which will also take India forward.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 13 Mar 2021 19:08

Isro aims for 7 more launches from India in 2021.

With the pandemic having enveloped 2020, Isro is targetting at least seven more launches, including the uncrewed Gaganyaan mission, from India this year, while PSU New Space India Limited (NSIL) plans to launch one satellite through a foreign launch provider.

Of the six other than Gaganyaan to be launched from the spaceport in Sriharikota, three will be earth observation, including one for ocean studies, one remote sensing satellite, a commercial launch, and one navigation satellite.

A science satellite to study the Sun (Aditya-L1) that was initially targeted for this year won’t happen. And, among the launch vehicles, other than the PSLV, Isro will launch three GSLV missions, including the mark-III as part of the uncrewed Gagnayaan mission. Two more will be SSLV (small satellite launch vehicles) class of rockets.

Image

Aside from this, as reported by TOI earlier, NSIL is planning to launch the GSAT-24, being acquired and launched for a private customer — Tata Sky’s DTH business — through Arianespace.

Isro chairman K Sivan said: “If you look at the number, then we consider it to be 14 more missions as each launch is two missions (one launch vehicle and one satellite). We are confident of achieving this target and top priority is for Gaganyaan.”

He said Aditya had to be pushed to next year as the next launch window — missions to Moon, Sun and other planets have specific windows during which launches can take place — is only available then.

5 Key Desi Techs
Stating that the human rating of GSLV is progressing as planned, Sivan said 2021 will see multiple indigenous technologies tested. “We will have two SSLV launch vehicles technology demonstration flights, we will be testing the revamped GSLV in terms of rockets. On the satellite technology front, we are looking to test the election propulsion on satellites, use two atomic clocks developed indigenously on the NVS-01 and also a key component called TWTA (Traveling Wave Tube Amplifiers) in a communication satellite,” Sivan said.

Isro is hoping to completely stop importing these technologies, in line with the Centre’s Atmanirbhar mission, and this year will prove key in deciding how quickly the space agency can shift to indigenous technology. “Apart from giving us the edge technologically, it will also save us a lot of foreign exchange,” Sivan said.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby A Nandy » 18 Mar 2021 22:48

https://www.isro.gov.in/update/18-mar-2 ... incubation

Dr. K. Sivan, Chairman ISRO / Secretary DOS inaugurated three Space Technology Incubation Centre and dedicated it to the Nation on March 18, 2021, in an online programme held amongst ISRO and the esteemed National Institute of Technology’s. ISRO signed bilateral Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur (for Western region), Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal (for Central region), and National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (for Eastern region). On this occasion, Chairman ISRO / Secretary DOS briefed about S-TIC programme and encouraged the students to explore their entrepreneurship skill in space domain.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby ranneel » 20 Mar 2021 12:40

SSLV payload configuratios from NSIL.
Image

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby sivab » 22 Mar 2021 21:10

https://www.isro.gov.in/update/22-mar-2 ... bution-qkd

ISRO makes breakthrough demonstration of free-space Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) over 300 m

For the first time in the country, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has successfully demonstrated free-space Quantum Communication over a distance of 300 m. A number of key technologies were developed indigenously to accomplish this major feat, which included the use of indigenously developed NAVIC receiver for time synchronization between the transmitter and receiver modules, and gimbal mechanism systems instead of bulky large-aperture telescopes for optical alignment.

The demonstration has included live videoconferencing using quantum-key-encrypted signals. This is a major milestone achievement for unconditionally secured satellite data communication using quantum technologies.


The Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) technology underpins Quantum Communication technology that ensures unconditional data security by virtue of the principles of quantum mechanics, which is not possible with the conventional encryption systems. The conventional cryptosystems used for data-encryption rely on the complexity of mathematical algorithms, whereas the security offered by quantum communication is based on the laws of Physics. Therefore, quantum cryptography is considered as ‘future-proof’, since no future advancements in the computational power can break quantum-cryptosystem.

The free-space QKD was demonstrated at Space Applications Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad, between two line-of-sight buildings within the campus. The experiment was performed at night, in order to ensure that there is no interference of the direct sunlight.

The experiment is a major breakthrough towards ISRO’s goal of demonstrating Satellite Based Quantum Communication (SBQC), where ISRO is gearing up to demonstrate the technology between two Indian ground stations.

Image

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 23 Mar 2021 19:46

Static test of rst stage solid motor of India's mini rocket SSLV unsuccessful.

The static test of first stage solid motor (SS1) of ISRO's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) -- a new-generation compact rocket -- was not successful, according to sources in ISRO. "Oscillation was noticed after 60 seconds into the test and nozzle was blown out near the bucket flange where it's attached with the motor at around 95 seconds", sources in the Bengaluru-headquartered space agency said.

It was supposed to be tested for a total duration of about 110 seconds, officials said.


The Indian Space Research Organisation had targeted to launch the first development flight of SSLV (D1) in April and may now in all probability have to revise this schedule.

"SSLV First stage is a new solid motornew design. New motor has to be static tested on the ground to prove its performance. If it is successful, one more of the same conguration is tested again for acceptance.

If both are successful, no more ground test is required and third motor of the same conguration will be accepted for flight", an ISRO oicial said.

SS2 and SS3 motors, igniters and SS2 flex nozzle assembly, liquid propulsion-based VTM (Velocity Trimming Module) thrusters, propellant tanks and propulsion components had already been realised by ISRO and made ready for the maiden orbital test flight.

"We have to identify the root cause of the failure and modify the design", the official said on the unsuccessful testing at Sriharikota spaceport in Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh, about 100 kms north of Chennai, last week.

Asked how long it may take for ISRO to complete the two static tests, the official said: "Maybe six months". (Meaning launch only in 2022)

SSLV is two metres in diameter and 34 meters in length with a lift-off weight of about 120 tons.

ISRO has over the years realised ve generations of launch vehicles -- SLV-3, ASLV, PSLV, GSLV and GSLV-MkIII. The space agency had earlier said the SSLV is going to be a new member of the launch vehicle family. It is intended to cater to emerging global small satellite launch service market.

"We are ying an earth observation satellite (EOS-02) on board the the rst development ight of SSLV", ISRO Chairman and Secretary in the Department of Space, K Sivan said last month.

SSLV has been designed to meet "launch on demand" requirements in a cost-eective manner for small satellites in a dedicated and ride share mode.
It is a three-stage all solid vehicle with a capability to launch up to 500 kg satellite mass into 500 km low earth orbit (LEO) and 300 kg to Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO).

By comparison, PSLV -- the workhorse of ISRO -- can take up to 1,750 kg payload into SSO of 600 km altitude. With lower per kg launch cost, the mini launcher will have multiple satellite mounting options for nano, micro and small satellites.

Sivan had earlier termed the SSLV an innovative vehicle, which can be assembled in just 72 hours."Instead of 60 days (for building a PSLV), it (SSLV) will be assembled in three days; instead of 600 people (needed to build a PSLV), it (SSLV) will be done by six people", he had said.

Chairman and Managing Director of ISRO's commercial arm, NewSpace India Limited (NSIL), G Narayanan, recently said: "the world over there is a big boom for small launch vehicles and that's why we are focusing on that".

The US-based satellite ride share and mission management provider, Spaceflight Inc., has already purchased the first commercial launch of the SSLV (SSLV-D2) from NSIL for launch from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota.

Spaceflight had said at the time that it has already sold out the entire manifest (launch) for this secured SSLV-D2 launch, with spacecraft from an undisclosed U.S.-based satellite constellation customer. This undisclosed customer is reportedly Seattle-based BlackSky Global, which will launch four earth observation satellites on board SSLV-D2 in the ride share mission arranged Spaceflight.

"Were taking advantage of the growth in the small satellite market to deliver more launch options with the minilauncher", a senior NSIL oicial said.
"The SSLV is the much-needed solution to ll the gap in the portfolio of small launch vehicles," Curt Blake, CEO and President of Spaceight, had said.

"SSLV is designed for the launch-on-demand concept with very quick turn-around capability in between launches. SSLV is perfectly suited for launching multiple micro satellites at a time and supports multiple orbital drop-os", Blake had said.

With Aditya mission and SSLV launch already not taking place this year and if the Unmanned Gaganyaan demonstrator launch scheduled for December also does not take place then 2022 will be a pretty dull year for ISRO with just some 'run of the mill' PSLV :D and a couple of GSLV missions taking off.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 23 Mar 2021 20:59

The SSLV delay is so disappointing. At least the GSLV Mk2 missions will not be run of the mill, they involve launching remote sensing satellites into a geosynchronous orbit. Speaking of which, very quiet on that front, considering there is a scheduled launch of GISAT-1 on Sunday!

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 24 Mar 2021 06:17

https://twitter.com/Amitraaz/status/137 ... 21857?s=20 --->

Indian officers, selected to become astronauts to crew the Gaganyaan into orbit, have completed their 1-year training course in Russia: Sputnik

The contract for the training of IAF officers was signed between the ISRO and Russian launch service provider Glavcosmos in June 2019.

Image

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby NRao » 04 Apr 2021 10:54

A very close friend of mine is intimately involved in this film. He pointed me to:

Rocketry: The Nambi Effect

English:


Am told they have the same movie in English. Hindi, and Tamil

Coming out in summer

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 13 Apr 2021 03:25

Further delay due to "voltage problem' in the launch of Gisat with no time window now being given. This is the 4th or 5th time its launch is being postponed.

ISRO is right now stuck with 2 programs - SSLV and Gisat which are overdue and proving a problem. :roll:

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 25 Apr 2021 23:56

ISRO to launch data relay satellite to track Gaganyaan.

The Indian Space Research Organisation will launch a data relay satellite that will help maintain contact with the Gagangyaan mission throughout after the launch, sources said.

The satellite will be launched before the nal leg of the Gaganyaan mission, which will send astronauts to the Lower Earth Orbit (LEO). The first leg -- the unmanned mission -- is to be launched in December.

"We're planning to launch our own satellite, which will act as a data relay satellite before going for the rst human space ight," the sources said.
The Rs 800-crore project has been approved and work has been going on, they added.

Satellites in orbit cannot pass along their information to the ground stations on Earth if the satellite does not have a clear view of the ground station. A data relay satellite serves as a way to pass along the satellite's information.

The NASA, with a robust human space mission programme, also has its own data relay satellite. Its Tracking and Data Relay Satellite allows it to have global coverage of all the satellites round the clock without having to build extra ground stations on Earth.

The ISRO uses several ground stations spread across the globe -- Mauritius, Brunei and Biak, Indonesia. Last month, ISRO Chairperson K Sivan had said the space agency was also in talks with the Australian counterpart to have a ground station at the Coco islands for the Gaganyaan mission. However, there are blind spots, due to which there is a possibility of not receiving signals, sources added. The data relay satellite will help address the issues.

Earlier this month, the ISRO signed an agreement with French space agency CNES for cooperation for the Gaganyaan, a move that will enable training of Indian flight physicians in French space agency's facilities. Under this agreement, CNES-developed French equipment, tested and still operating aboard the International Space Station, will be made available to Indian crews.

The CNES will also be supplying reproof carry bags made in France to shield equipment from shocks and radiation, it said.

Last month, four prospective astronauts also returned to India after spending nearly a year in Russia.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 27 Apr 2021 20:50

VIDEO in link below...

https://twitter.com/strategic_front/sta ... 23616?s=20 ---> Indian space start up Agnikul Cosmos recently showcased their electric powered Liquid Oxygen (LOX) pump assembly with >90% 3D printed components. The pump is a part of the Agnite engines which will be clustered for the 1st stage of the Agnibaan small satellite launch vehicle.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby jaysimha » 30 Apr 2021 16:04

Image Image
AstroSat is India’s first dedicated multi-wavelength space observatory.
After launch, the AstroSat Science Support Cell (ASSC) was set up as a joint venture of ISRO and the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) with the primary purpose of facilitating the use of AstroSat, both for making observing proposals and for utilising archival data.

http://astrosat-ssc.iucaa.in/

The ASSC arranges meetings, workshops and webinars...

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 04 May 2021 18:41

https://twitter.com/TheWolfpackIN/statu ... 22853?s=20 ---> India is expanding its use of space assets and is likely pursuing offensive space capabilities to boost the role space assets play in its military strategy, says US Defense Intelligence Agency's (DIA) chief.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Amber G. » 04 May 2021 22:16

I have not been posting/following brf for a while.. Allow me to share some pictures of a wonderful and inspiring journey!

From: Radhakrishnan K Koppillil

Golden Anniversary of my Tryst with ISRO!
I relive each moment of that day, Tuesday 4 May 1971 when I stepped into the portals of Space Science & Technology Centre of ISRO at Thumba. Five decades and counting- a satisfying professional odyssey from multiple platforms goes on...
My tributes and gratitude to several thousands of individuals who came across this journey as benefactors, mentors, guides, colleagues, family and friends,and the occasional challenges that prodded me to raise the bar.
Delighted to share my snapshots from the early-career, mid-career, and signing-off from Mission Control Centre (in 2014).

Image
Image
Image

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby sooraj » 09 May 2021 19:59

Nexoft Alam
@Nexoft034
·
45m
Presenting... ISRO'S Two Stage To Orbit (TSTO) or Fully Reusable Vehicle (FRV) that takes-off like a normal plane.

Except,

This 133 tons monster utilizes literally everything... From Turbojet to Ramjet to Scramjet to Rocket Propulsion for injecting payloads at 300km altitude!

Image

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby sanjaykumar » 10 May 2021 02:08

That’s the only way, turbojet and then ramjet, to get to scram jet speeds. Unless one uses a booster. The rocket for payload insertion may be orbit raising firings.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Prem » 13 May 2021 08:45

https://twitter.com/alpha_defense/statu ... 32483?s=20

Coupling of HSTDV 03 with its booster has begun. Indicates - Test "Soon"

Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 13 May 2021 18:47

"https://twitter.com/alpha_defense/statu ... 32483?s=20

Coupling of HSTDV 03 with its booster has begun. Indicates - Test "Soon" "

Is this an ISRO test or a DRDO one?

ernest
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion

Postby ernest » 13 May 2021 19:16

Varoon Shekhar wrote:"https://twitter.com/alpha_defense/statu ... 32483?s=20

Coupling of HSTDV 03 with its booster has begun. Indicates - Test "Soon" "

Is this an ISRO test or a DRDO one?


HSTDV is DRDO onlee. RLV and HAVA are ISRO


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