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BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Vipul
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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 28 Oct 2011 21:51

CRPF to open jungle warfare training school in Karnataka.

The Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) will soon open an institute in Karnataka which will train the paramilitary force in jungle warfare to better deal with Naxals.

Besides, there are also plans to set up institutes to impart trainings related to intelligence gathering and on anti-riots measures.

"We have asked for land from Karnataka. They are offering us land near Khanapur in Belgaum. This land is coming to us soon and we will have jungle traits and counter insurgency school there," CRPF Director General K Vijay Kumar told reporters here today. CRPF has two counter insurgency and terrorism schools -- one in Silchar (Assam) and the other at Shivpuri (Madhya Pradesh).

About three lakh CRPF jawans are entrusted with anti-Naxal, counter-insurgency, anti-riots and other internal security related duties across the country.

Six training schools will come up in different parts of the country to bring in professionalism in the men on the ground. These include CRPF intelligence institute in Gurgaon (Haryana), RAF training school in Meerut (UP) and Indian institute of IED management in Pune (Maharashtra), Kumar said.

On attrition rates in the force, he said, "We have studied attrition level very carefully. It is of not much serious concern now."

According to an official data, about 164 officers (from both junior and senior levels) have left the force in the last five years.

On possible increase or decrease in forces in Naxal-hit areas, Kumar said, "It is under active consideration and discussion...Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh are the priority belts."



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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby jagbani » 02 Dec 2011 12:32

BSF to recruit Women officer

Punjab frontier Inspector General A. mishra said that women selected in last recruitment has been sent Pakistan border and new women officers recruitment will be implemented soon.

http://www.punjabkesari.in/punjab/news/02122011/page/2$

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby sum » 15 Dec 2011 17:28

The CRPF goes to adventure school

The country's largest paramilitary force -- the Central Reserve Police Force -- is literally going to 'school' as the force has recently created six new institutions to hone the operational and intelligence gathering skills of its troops.
The about 3-lakh personnel force, heavily deployed for anti-Naxal operations, has started six new schools in various parts of the country -- Indian Institute of IED Management in Pune, dogs breeding and training centre in Karnataka's Taralu, intelligence school in Gurgaon's Kadarpur, Rapid Action Force training school and training of trainers school in Uttar Pradesh's Meerut and college of insurgency and jungle craft in Belgaum.


"All these schools have been sanctioned to the force in the last six months and are aimed to enhance and sharpen the operational and tactical skills of the CRPF personnel. Better training will ensure better results and less casualty in this large force," a senior official said.

The force, which is now in the process of deploying its much-awaited intelligence wing in anti-Naxal operations, will train its personnel in techniques of snooping at the CRPF academy near in Kadarpur.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby aniket » 15 Dec 2011 17:33

Who is the IG of CRPF in Srinagar ?


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Sachin » 15 Dec 2011 21:22

Austin wrote:Dodge Me if You Can - Kishenji killing: CRPF chief turns around the force's fortunes

Vijayakumar IPS again :). It is once in a blue moon we hear and read about such IPS officers. Have some good "feathers on his cap" :). He as the Com. of Police Chennai, hunted and killed very many notorious rowdy. One fellow was finished off right on the beaches of Marina. Then there was the Veerappan hunt. For quite some time there were no reports what so ever, and the police once again were blamed or ridiculed. But Vijayakumar and his men worked silently and one fine day news paper flashed that Veerappan is no more. One thing I noticed was that he always gives credit where it is due, and seem to recognise the talent especially among the lower rungs of the police force.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 16 Dec 2011 00:09

Central police forces to be boosted with ex-servicemen.

10 per cent of Group ‘B’ posts in Central paramilitary forces to be filled soon.

Bowing to years of pressure from the armed forces, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA) has agreed that retired military personnel will make up 10 per cent of the combat strength of all central armed police forces.

According to a defence ministry (MoD) press release on Thursday, Defence Minister A K Antony informed the Parliamentary Consultative Committee for Defence that “The MoHA has agreed to fill 10 per cent of the Group ‘B’ posts in Central Paramilitary Forces from among Ex-Servicemen.” Group ‘B’ consists mainly of combatants.

Antony also stated “efforts are now being made to persuade public sector undertakings and the private sector to tap this invaluable reservoir of talented and disciplined Ex-Servicemen.”

The “Central Paramilitary Forces” that Antony mentions include the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF); the Border Security Force (BSF); the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF); the Indo-Tibet Border Police (ITBP); the Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB); and other smaller forces.

Going by the government’s own definition that was formalised in March 2011, Antony erred in terming these “Central Paramilitary Forces”; the correct term is “Central Armed Police Forces (CAPFs).” A “paramilitary force” is an armed force that is officered by serving military officers. India’s only “Central Paramilitary Forces” are the Assam Rifles; the Special Frontier Force; and the Coast Guard.

The MoHA’s acceptance of ex-servicemen comes as a double relief for the MoD. The defence services have a growing pension bill (Rs 34,000 crore this fiscal) for soldiers, sailors and airmen who retire as young as 35, after 15 years in uniform, and draw pensions for the rest of their lives. Post-retirement employment with a CAPF would postpone their entitlement of pension. It would also free the MoD of responsibility for rehabilitating them.

The military has pushed this case since 1997-98, when army chief, General VP Malik, suggested that CAPFs re-enlist half of the 50,000 soldiers who retire from the army each year. The army’s suggestion was to reduce colour service — the period for which an individual is recruited into the army — to just seven years. After that the fully trained soldier would join a CAPF. This would make the army younger; and also stiffen the CAPFs’ combat capabilities with trained soldiers.

“This win-win proposal was strongly backed by the 5th and the 6th Pay Commissions; but the MoHA resisted it. The army will welcome the 10 per cent opening given to ex-servicemen. It is a good beginning,” says Brigadier (Retd) Gurmeet Kanwal, who framed the original proposal in 1997-98 and now heads the army’s think tank, Centre for Land Warfare Studies.

The MoHA’s objections are detailed in the 29th report of Parliament’s Standing Comm-ittee on Defence. North Block objected that absorbing soldiers who had served seven years in the military would make the CAPFs older and greyer. The parliamentary committee rebutted that, pointing out that the average soldier is recruited at 19 years and would be just 26 years old after seven years of military service. Since the age limit for recruitment into CAPFs is 26 years, ex-servicemen would qualify even as fully trained soldiers.

The MoHA then protested that soldiers have a proclivity for excessive force, whereas the CAPFs must function with a softer touch. The Standing Committee responded that soldiers, who are extensively employed in counter-insurgency operations in J&K and the northeast, have conclusively demonstrated the restraint that such situations demand. In a sarcastic aside, the Standing Committee noted that CAPF restraint emerges mainly when face-to-face with Naxals and militants.

The biggest sticking point, however, was the seven years of seniority that soldiers would carry, giving them a promotion advantage over direct recruits into the CAPFs. The MoD has agreed that direct inductees’ promotion vacancies and salaries would be suitably protected.

There are more than 7,50,000 personnel in the CAPFs, which have a combined budget of more than Rs 25,000 crore in the current financial year.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby ASPuar » 16 Dec 2011 01:43

The MoHA then protested that soldiers have a proclivity for excessive force, whereas the CAPFs must function with a softer touch. The Standing Committee responded that soldiers, who are extensively employed in counter-insurgency operations in J&K and the northeast, have conclusively demonstrated the restraint that such situations demand. In a sarcastic aside, the Standing Committee noted that CAPF restraint emerges mainly when face-to-face with Naxals and militants.



:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

LOL! MHA curtain torn!! (pardafaash!)

A slap in the face of those bureaucrats who like to spread canards about our troops...

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 17 Dec 2011 20:57

Vipul wrote:Central police forces to be boosted with ex-servicemen.

...Going by the government’s own definition that was formalised in March 2011, Antony erred in terming these “Central Paramilitary Forces”; the correct term is “Central Armed Police Forces (CAPFs).” A “paramilitary force” is an armed force that is officered by serving military officers. India’s only “Central Paramilitary Forces” are the Assam Rifles; the Special Frontier Force; and the Coast Guard...


How is the NSG classified? :-?

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 22 Dec 2011 20:35

CRPF to be armed with sniper rifles to target Maoists, tests soon.

Trials to import around 900 bolt-action sniper rifles for the Central Reserve Police Force for an estimated Rs 20 crores are scheduled to be held early in the new year to bolster its insurgency-fighting capability.

Official sources said at least five vendors -- including Germany's [ Images ] Walther, Switzerland's [ Images ] Brugger and Thomet, South Africa's [ Images ] Truvelo, Italy's [ Images ] Sako/Baretta and a Czech manufacturer -- are vying for the tender dispatched a year ago.

Security officials said competitive trials where all five models would be test-fired to a range of 800-1000 metres would take place at the CRPF's Kaderpur firing range in Haryana on the Delhi-Sohna road.

The acquisition is being re-tendered after an earlier attempt by the CRPF to acquire 807 sniper rifles -- 433 bolt-action and 374 semi-automatic models -- was summarily rejected last year after the Qualitative Requirements for the weapon system were rejected on operational grounds.

Brugger & Thomett, Russia's [ Images ] Rosoboronexport, Germany's Heckler & Koch and Truvelo were competing for this contract, the QRs for which were drawn up by the paramilitary's forces' ill-informed and amateurish planners.

The QRs for the re-tendered sniper rifles, however, have been finalised by sharp-shooters from the National Security Guard who regularly practise their marksmanship and related disciplines on their 180-odd H&K PSG1A1 weapons inducted into service shortly after their raising in 1986.

After the November 2008 Mumbai [ Images ] terrorist strike by Pakistan-launched gunmen, the operational efficacy of sniping has gained credence among India's security and law enforcement agencies as they endlessly battle foreign terrorists, unrelenting insurgencies and armed separatist movements.

The failure of the administrations' tentative and inchoate strategy of large-scale paramilitary and police deployment against wily Naxalite cadres was gradually shifting tactical thinking in the direction of developing a surgical killing capacity via snipers.

Security planners said the CRPF in the vanguard of the fight against the Naxalite-spawned "Red Terror" needed these sophisticated rifles in this seemingly unending and proliferating guerilla war.

The Naxal-favoured forest terrain of areas like Chhattisgarh, where their top leadership was reportedly secreted, was a conflict zone ideally suited to snipers.

"If adequately trained and equipped and judiciously employed, CRPF sharpshooters could effectively depreciate the Maoist hierarchy," a senior federal security official said.

Meanwhile, the ministry of defence and army were plagued by inordinate delays in procuring sniper rifles which were to have been acquired via the special fast track procurement route over a year ago.

The deadline under the FTP -- specially introduced by the MoD to short-cut cumbersome procurement procedures -- to finalise the import of 900-1000 sniper rifles for the Special Forces concluded last December with Finland's bolt-action SAKO TRG-22/24, Israel Weapon Industries semi-automatic Galil 7.62x54mm sniper model and Sig Sauer of USA's SSG 3000 bolt-action, magazine-fed rifle, competing for the $ 10-12 million contract.

Comparative trials were conducted in late 2009 in the respective countries by an Indian army [ Images ] team led by a two-star officer and additional orders were anticipated to augment India's anti-insurgency operations.

Sig Sauer, however, under a special albeit inexplicable waiver granted by Defence Minister AK Antony was permitted to conduct firing trials at the Infantry School in Mhow in April.

But defence industry sources said even then its SSG 3000 model was not tested to the optimum range of 800-1000 metres in both day and night conditions and was reportedly wrangling to secure yet another MoD waiver in this regard, resulting in delays in confirming the sniper rifle purchase.

Military sources said the army's QRs drawn up in support of the sniper rifle requirement in its tender issued in August 2009 appear to have been by framed by ill-informed officers with seemingly little or no field experience.

Surprisingly, the QR mandated no accuracy standard for the sniper rifles at a minimum strike range of 800 mt -- the fundamental requirement for such a weapon system -- but absurdly requires them to be fitted with a bayonet.

It is incomprehensible as to why the QR, that requires the rifle for employment at a distance of over 800 mt, needs a bayonet which is a close quarter combat weapon.

It seems the Infantry Directorate anticipates a comic situation in which a sniper actually bayonet-charges the enemy.

Additionally, the sniper rifles tender also does not differentiate between a bolt action or semi-automatic model.

Instead, it demands a vague capability, requiring the rifle to fire either one or five rounds, a facility open to interpretation by vendors producing either of the two versions to suit their individual commercial interests.

Alongside, the purchase of 1200-1300 9mm submachine guns for select "Ghatak" infantry commando platoons and 1.3 million rounds of accompanying ammunition initiated two years ago also under FTP procedures, too awaits closure.

Switzerland's Brugger & Thomet, Israel Weapon Industries and H&K were vying for the contract estimated at around $ 4.44 million, trials for which were conducted months ago in all three countries.

The MoD has also recently initiated emergency measures to import some 66,000 125 mm armour piercing fin-stabilised discarding sabot (APFSDS) rounds from Russia for its T-72M1 main battle tanks on grounds of 'operational necessity'.

This followed the recent intimation by the army that its war wastage reserves of 125mm rounds for its T72M1s that form the backbone of its 60-odd armour regiments had fallen below 'critical levels'.

MoD sources said the emergency procurement reportedly at 'inflated prices' also obliged it to waive the offset obligation of 30 per cent mandated for all Indian military purchases over Rs 3 crores.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 22 Dec 2011 22:00

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes ... ment-works

Special India Reserve Battalion in Naxal areas
Soumittra S Bose, TNN Dec 7, 2011, 02.36AM IST
Tags:
naxal|Deepak Atram|CRPF|BRO
NAGPUR: In order to give a push to development works in Naxal affected areas, including those in Vidarbha, the central government is raising a civilian force capable of working in hostile terrain. This was necessitated by withdrawal of Border Roads Organisation (BRO) of the army that used to carry out works of roads and bridges in these areas.

...


http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/a ... 726344.ece

Posting in full...

overnment has decided to phase out a non-uniformed cadre comprising 4,000 personnel which was created to work in border areas in the wake of Chinese aggression in 1963 and worked under Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) till 2001.

The cadre is at present part of the paramilitary Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) which guards Indian borders with Nepal and Bhutan.

The personnel in these units help the force gather intelligence and earn public goodwill, an essential necessity for operational purposes in and around border villages and towns.

“Yes I agree it’s a dying cadre because in certain places the progression of their careers has been slightly stunted... It (complete phase out) will take some time. There are about 4,000 people in this cadre,” SSB chief Pranay Sahay told PTI when asked if the cadre would be abolished.

Mr. Sahay said according to government policy these personnel can get enrolled into “combat ranks” after they pass the mandatory rules of physical fitness and ability but not many people have opted for it.

“There will be no combatisation (of the civilian cadre).... as it is a laid down policy of the government that it will not be done without the consent of the individual,” the SSB Director General said.

The cadre, for the last 48 years, has been working in insurgency hit areas along the border and recently in Naxal-hit states, undertaking civic welfare programmes like teaching children in schools, conducting medical camps and organising vocational training courses.

“They won sympathy and praise for the force wherever they worked. They worked on the policy that welfare and police action should go hand-in-hand so that locals have a sense of belonging for the country,” a senior SSB officer said.

The cadre worked under the command of RAW in the Cabinet Secretariat till 2001 after which SSB became a new armed force under the Union Home Ministry.

According to senior SSB officials, the cadre is fast losing its sheen as the personnel are not getting timely promotions and they cannot opt for combat posts as their physical fitness does not permit them do arduous tasks.

“They will also have to serve under much junior officers who have been directly recruited by the UPSC, leading to fears of demoralisation among them,” sources said.

“The cadre will be silently phased out in the next ten years. The legacy of this civilian cadre, unique in any armed force, will soon be history,” a senior official said.

SSB DG Sahay acknowledged the quality of work done by the cadre along the border areas of the porous Nepal and Bhutan frontiers.

“The quality and quantity of intelligence generated by this cadre along both the borders we guard is better than any other agency.... I can say this,” he said.

The SSB, with 37 battalions (about 40,000 personnel), is now training its combatants in snooping skills required for operational purposes as they are designated as the ‘lead intelligence agency’ on both the borders.


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 26 Dec 2011 03:54

Country's first field firing range for BSF ready in Jaisalmer.

A new firing range of the Border Security Force (BSF) is ready in Kishangarh area of Jaisalmer district. The world's largest paramilitary force deployed at international borders adjoining Pakistan and Bangladesh could now check their weapons and improve their skills at the new range to tackle the challenges they get every day from across the border.

This new range, the first field firing range in the country for BSF, will be operational soon. BSF director general U K Bansal is expected to inaugurate the range by this month end.

BSF deputy inspector general B L Meghwal said in the process of modernization, the force had to depend on other field firing range to check its weapons and other resources. So far, BSF had to keep changing its training programme for testing weapons and ammunition which were required due to the new challenges the force gets daily from across the borders. The need for its own field firing range was felt for quite some time. At present, the BSF has a small firing range at Hajari bagh in Bihar and Dharang in Sikkim, where its personnel practice firing.

Meghwal said this would be the first field firing range of the BSF which is seven km long and five km wide. It has been constructed on 9,500 acres. BSF jawans and officers deployed in Jammu, Srinagar, Punjab, Gujarat and Rajasthan can come here for firing practice. The new range has facilities for testing 81mm mortars, 51mm mortars, rocket launchers and other ammunition.

The deputy inspector general also said modern facilities have been provided in this range, including targets for firing, electricity, water and visitors' gallery among others.


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby sum » 04 Feb 2012 13:34

X-post:
sum wrote:Govt to buy Russian choppers for BSF

In the light of the crashes of Dhruv helicopters operated by the Border Security force (BSF), the Ministry of Home Affairs is purchasing six MI-17 cargo choppers from Russia.

“The government will also acquire more fixed-wing aircrafts for para-military forces,” sources told Deccan Herald.

Union Home Minister P Chidambaram said this week that indigenous Dhruv fleet has been grounded after repeat accidents.

The Ministry of Defence which is acquiring 59 MI-17 helicopters will help it out in buying the choppers, according to home ministry officials.

Chidambaram said he had aut­horised wet leasing of some helicopters and was also looki­ng for buying some more choppers for the security forces.

Besides choppers, MHA is also to acquire more fixed-wing craft for para-military forces in border management and de­a­ling with Left-wing extremism in different parts of the co­untry.

The additional aircraft ord­ered are Embraer EMB 135 (Brazil make-VIP transport) and Beechcraft Super King Air (US make-turbo prop aircraft) and Hawker Siddeley (UK-turbo prop aircraft). BSF largely op­erates most of these aircraft.

The Indo-Tibetan Border Police has asked for Udhyog helicopters and Embraer transp­ort air crafts, sources said.


The logistics for the expansion of the MHA’s air wing , including hangers and pilots training , are being put in place.

The expanded air-wing of the MHA will also have UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) to monitor Naxal-affected districts to detect mined roads.

Wow, a whole zoo of aircrafts are being raised by even the para-mils now. EMB-135, Mi-17s, Dhruv's, Beechcrafts etc.

What is a Udhyog helicopter which is mentioned as what ITBP has asked for? :?:

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Dmurphy » 05 Feb 2012 14:35

Waiting for someone to come up with the idea of buying F-35s for the BSF :evil:

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya Watts » 19 Feb 2012 18:52

Dmurphy wrote:Waiting for someone to come up with the idea of buying F-35s for the BSF :evil:
:rotfl:
It seems that over time the BSF will be transformed in a unit which is in line with the US national guards/ air national guards :wink:

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 08 May 2012 22:40

So where does this new scouts regiment fit in the scheme viz-a-viz the ITBP?

http://zeenews.india.com/news/north-eas ... 72836.html

Itanagar: The Indian Army’s 1st Arunachal Scouts battalion, two years after its formation, has taken charge of providing security to the unmanned, inhospitable and porous international border in the land-locked Himalayan state.

The battalion will help to maintain peace and tranquility in the border areas, and will not only be eyes and ears, but also act as a force multiplier.

Arunachal Scouts is an infantry regiment with specialization in mountain warfare and was raised to defend India's border with Tibet in Arunachal Pradesh.


Arunachal has the longest international boundary among the states in the country with 1,680 km – 160 km with Bhutan, 1,080 with China and 440 km with Myanmar.

Led by commanding officer in the rank of a colonel, the battalion reached its headquarters at Riyang on Sunday, 30 km from Pasighat, to do the most onerous duty – assisting Arunchalees, who have been serving as sentinels of the eastern frontier of the nation since the army suffered a humiliating defeat at the hands of the Chinese in 1962.

The new battalion is born out of the Assam Regiment and will continue to be a part of the living symbol of martial strength and traditions of the Northeast. <facepalm>

Local recruits of the new force having inborn qualities will go a long way in ensuring the national integrity and will take the mantle of the other jawans to maintain vigilance in places that have varying altitudes from 1,500 feet to 2,400 feet of altitude from the sea level.

The proposal to raise the Arunachal Scouts along the lines of the illustrious Ladakh Scouts for defending the border with China was proposed by Governor J.J. Singh, a former army chief in 2008, who had pushed the proposal through Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. The Union Cabinet approved the proposal in 2009 and the 1st battalion was raised in 2010.

Chief Minister Nabam Tuki, who has been putting his weight behind the sanction of 2nd Arunachal Scouts Battalion, was the happiest man, when Defence Minister A.K. Antony announced its sanction in his address during the statehood Day celebration at Indira Gandhi Park here on February 20.

In fact, Antony had assured Arunachal Pradesh about raising three additional Arunachal Scouts Battalions with full preference to local youths.

He had given this assurance when a delegation comprising of late Chief Minister Dorjee Khandu, Member of Parliament Takam Sanjoy along with high-ranking officials had called on him at his New Delhi office on July 9, 2010.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby ASPuar » 08 May 2012 23:52

Nothing to do with ITBP. The Indian Army is the prime defender of the border areas, with all other agencies coming under its operational control during times of war. Lots of regiments have scouts batallions, whose task is to specialise in particular areas. Eg, Ladakh Scouts, Garhwal Scouts, and now, Arunachal Scouts.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 10 May 2012 19:29

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1120510/j ... 6u-dOuMo2t

CRPF for Parliament security

IMRAN AHMED SIDDIQUI
New Delhi, May 9: An elite unit of the CRPF will take over the security of Parliament, now protected by the central force and other agencies under Delhi police’s command.

The Parliament Duty Group (PDG), which will comprise 1,540 personnel of the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), is likely to take charge in the last week of July. The Union home ministry cleared the proposal on April 24...

...

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya Watts » 11 May 2012 14:57

Aditya G wrote:http://www.telegraphindia.com/1120510/jsp/nation/story_15473003.jsp#.T6u-dOuMo2t

CRPF for Parliament security

IMRAN AHMED SIDDIQUI
New Delhi, May 9: An elite unit of the CRPF will take over the security of Parliament, now protected by the central force and other agencies under Delhi police’s command.

The Parliament Duty Group (PDG), which will comprise 1,540 personnel of the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), is likely to take charge in the last week of July. The Union home ministry cleared the proposal on April 24...

...

I hope this is a step in the right direction for all stakeholders. I hope the staff from the existing forces that protect the area now will find a suitable allocation and can transfer their skills to their peers.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 17 Jun 2012 16:38

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/ ... d=11596555

..

Insiders also say Pakistan is not technically prepared yet to argue its case on Sir Creek, which has been considered “doable”, not as complicated as Siachen.
A spot visit, however, shows the challenge before both the countries because of the ‘wild' state of nature here. Whoever thinks Sir Creek is an easier dispute to resolve, say security officials, should visit the creeks themselves to realise that the waters here are perhaps as vexing as the Siachen ice ....


Field report with technicalities explained.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 18 Jun 2012 20:48

Another detailed story worth a read:

http://www.tehelka.com/story_main52.asp ... 2Ready.asp

...

IN RECENT years, two other key developments have taken place with regard to Sir Creek. In 2007, naval hydrography units from India and Pakistan together tested the channel for navigability. They found it was entirely navigable. Admirals from both sides initialled the findings.

This evidence of navigability bolstered India’s case. It confirmed the Sindh chief commissioner’s declaration of 1914 that Sir Creek was navigable most of the year. It brought into application the Thalweg principle, which is used to draw up international water boundaries and holds that a navigable waterway must be divided midchannel. For instance, this is the principle used to identify American and Canadian interests in the Saint Lawrence river.

In 2008, Pakistan reneged on the findings, denied the initials of their admiral and said navigability had not been established. This rejection of an agreed benchmark and empirical evidence has led to sections of the Indian military and the foreign ministry wondering if there is any value to a Pakistani signature, and to any final agreement that country may sign.

The second development was a critical concession by India. The navigable channel of the Creek comes down (southwards) from the head and then veers sharply westwards, towards Sindhi land. If the navigable channel is divided equally, it will move the Indian boundary much closer to Sindh than Pakistan may be comfortable with.

As such, India proposed ignoring the westward lunge of the channel — and notionally accepting that the channel actually descended straight, north to south. At this point, at the mouth of the Creek, India and Pakistan would accept a principle of equidistance and divide the waterway.

This was a reasonable offer, officials say, and meant both nations would climb down from their maximalist positions. When India suggests Sir Creek is “doable”, it essentially means Pakistan should accept this Indian formula. “This is the most we can do,” says a negotiator, “it’s our bottom line.”

...

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby sum » 19 Jun 2012 08:23


In 2008, Pakistan reneged on the findings, denied the initials of their admiral and said navigability had not been established. This rejection of an agreed benchmark and empirical evidence has led to sections of the Indian military and the foreign ministry wondering if there is any value to a Pakistani signature, and to any final agreement that country may sign.

And then same Tehelka will say that big,bad Indian army isnt allowing a CBM deal on Siachen with poor TSP!! :roll: :roll:


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 14 Aug 2012 08:11


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 31 Dec 2012 23:39

Gujarat BSF gets MoD nod for women battalion.

The Ministry of Defence has given its go-ahead to the Gujarat Frontier of Border Security Force (BSF) to raise a battalion of women personnel to guard the Munabao railway station on the India-Pakistan border in Rajasthan. This will be the second such battalion of the BSF after Punjab.
The Gujarat Frontier had written to the Ministry a few months ago requesting to form a women battalion for the Munabao railway station in Barmer district where New Thar Express halts.

“The MoD has given a go-ahead for the battalion and the process to recruit women personnel is on. Munabao being the biggest connecting point between the two countries, all types of passengers come, so the security concerns are high. The battalion is required to control the crowd and check women when they enter India,” said BSF IG Arun Sinha.

There will be 100 constable-rank women in the battalion who will be stationed at all BSF outposts of the Frontier for a small period before being permanently stationed at Munabao.

BSF officials said the battalion would be of great help to the jawans manning the station for a long time. They said vigilance and security checks have to be increased from the night before the train arrives. Immigration clearance, security checks and frisking take more than 30 hours. The train comes from Khakropar in Pakistan every Saturday. About 550 kilometres from Ahmedabad, Munabao receives around 250 to 300 passengers.

According to the BSF, if need be, the battalion would work with Gujarat Frontier (including Barmer) jawans in combating terrorism and infiltration.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 03 Jan 2013 07:41

In BSF of the future, balloons with cameras, unmanned aircraft.

Balloons floating above the Sunderbans marshes on the Bangladesh border, unmanned aerial vehicles scanning the land border with Pakistan. These are part of the BSF’s vision for the future, each fitted with a camera to relay images back to the paramilitary force, which hopes to use new technology that will vary from border to border, depending on what best suits the area’s features.

At Sir Creek in Gujarat, for instance, the plan is to use what is known as SOPs, or stabilised observation platforms, rather than the balloons planned for the Sunderbans in west Bengal.

The shift from a “one size fits all” concept, which marks a “paradigm shift” according to BSF officers, comes after a visit by a team to Israel last month to study the border management systems there. The team met officials of the Israel defence forces, Shabak (Israel’s internal security wing) and its border security wing. Its vision includes not only technologies in use in Israel but also some in use by the US Army in Afghanistan.

“We are taking a quantum jump from just fencing and putting floodlights along the border areas,” said a senior BSF officer. “We have around 400 kilometres of a challenging border on the west and around 1,100 km on the east. We are looking at emerging technology.”

The BSF has submitted a report to the home ministry, which has floated a global expression of interest asking companies to come up with border management solutions. At least 39 companies have bid so far, including some from Israel.

“There is no plan for any integrated centre yet,” said an officer. “We don’t want to control everything from our Delhi headquarters. The company headquarters near the respective borders will be the nodal centres for all activities. The data is too huge to be controlled from Delhi.”

The BSF guards borders of 2,289 km with Pakistan and 4,096 km with Bangladesh. Officers said the Bangladesh border alone has 875 gaps that require urgent attention, but fencing is not possible everywhere.

Apart from the camera-fitted aerostat balloons and unmanned aerial vehicles, the BSF's futuristic vision includes electro-optical imaging cameras, and special platforms for observation as well as reconnaissance.


WISH-LIST

Aerostat balloons

Each fitted with a high-resolution camera, these would float around five to seven kilometres above the water surface. The BSF is looking at introducing them in the Sunderbans, where the areas around the border are too marshy to allow fencing. Currently, speedboats man the rivers along the Bangladesh border. If aersostat balloons are introduced, the cameras will send out live feeds to the BSF control room so that the nearest team can, whenever necessary, foil an infiltration or smuggling attempt.

Electro-optical cameras

These will be for manning the land borders. The BSF was looking for a technology that could capture any movement from a distance of at least five to seven kilometres. “Currently we have thermal imagers, which are not effective enough. Our observations are limited to what the human eye can detect,” said an officer. “Electro-optical cameras can detect any threat moving in the area.” The hand-held thermal imagers in use have a limited capacity, and images are not clear beyond 500-700 metres.

Unmanned aircraft UAVs, or unmanned aerial vehicles, are a possibility for for the Pakistan border. Primarily aircraft without a pilot, these will be of help in detecting suspicious activity and relaying the pictures.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Shrinivasan » 05 Jan 2013 04:01

Vipul wrote:The Ministry of Defence has given its go-ahead to the Gujarat Frontier of Border Security Force (BSF) to raise a battalion of women personnel to guard the Munabao railway station on the India-Pakistan border in Rajasthan. This will be the second such battalion of the BSF after Punjab.
The Gujarat Frontier had written to the Ministry a few months ago requesting to form a women battalion for the Munabao railway station in Barmer district where New Thar Express halts.
What confuses me is why the "Gujarat Frontier" wants to raise a Women battallion to police a Railway Station in Rajastan on the border with Pukistan? is the GF force responsible for the IB in Rajastan too? why local police force perform this security role? I am seeing large increases in manpower and firepower in all Central police forces / para military like BSF, CRPF etc. good hunting?

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby anirban_aim » 08 Jan 2013 13:01

CRPF officer in Chattisgarh


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 26 Jan 2013 07:10

Finally, CRPF bravehearts honoured.

After ignoring them for three years, the government has decided to confer the Police Medal for Gallantry on six Cobra commandos of the CRPF who died while fighting Maoist guerrillas in September 2009.]

N Manoranjan Singh and five others had died while trying to save their colleagues caught in an ambush in Chhattisgarh’s Dantewada district in 2009.

An army major, Anup Joseph Manjali, who shot dead three foreign terrorists during a counter-insurgency operation in Jammu and Kashmir last October has been awarded the Kirti Chakra, the country’s second highest peacetime gallantry award.

Krishan Kumar, a naik who gave up his life to save scores of civilians caught in crossfire between government forces and rebels in the Congo last July, has been awarded the Shaurya Chakra. It is for the first time in recent years that a soldier killed in a UN mission has been given the award.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby vipins » 24 Apr 2013 23:22

BSF plans to have floating BOPs in Bengal and Gujarat
"We have six floating BOPs in our mind for Sunderbans area and another six for the Gujarat area. Six have already been sanctioned. The ministry is in the process of identifying the government undertaking which will produce these floating BOPs," Director General of BSF Subhash Joshi said.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 04 May 2013 03:28

Rs 11,000 crore modernisation plan for paramilitary forces.

Government on Wednesday approved a Rs. 11,000-crore project for modernisation of central paramilitary forces, including ITBP which guards the now tense Sino-Indian border.The high-powered Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS), headed by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, cleared the much awaited projected which will be implemented in five years beginning this fiscal.

The Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), Border Security Force (BSF), Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP), Central Industrial Security Force (CISF), Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB), National Security Guard (NSG) and Assam Rifles will benefit under the plan which was awaiting approval from CCS.

Sources said the standoff along the Sino-Indian border in Ladakh, which is being guarded by the ITBP, is believed to have prompted the CCS to clear the project which is already delayed by a year.

The modernisation will ensure that the forces have better arms, ammunition, night vision devices, patrolling equipment, vehicles and other infrastructural upgrade.

The CRPF is primarily deployed for internal security, law and order maintenance and anti-Naxal operations. The BSF guards the Indo-Pakistan and Indo-Bangladesh borders besides helping in internal security duties.The SSB protects the Indo-Nepal and Indo-Bhutan frontiers. The CISF primarily guards country’s civil airports and major installations, including in nuclear and aero space domain.The NSG is a specialist counter-terror force while Assam Rifles guards the Indo-Myanmar border and is deployed in counter-insurgency operations in the Northeast.

The combined strength of all central paramilitary forces is around eight lakh personnel.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Vipul » 21 May 2013 18:38

2nd phase of sand scooter trial held in Jaisalmer.

Winds of change across the border were felt when the second phase of scooter trial to man the borders started in the sand dunes of Jaisalmer. Last year, the first phase was held.

Besides camel, sand scooters will also be utilised to man the border terrain.

In a bid to strengthen the security arrangement and also to chase smugglers, intruders along with border guarding, the Union home ministry had planned to provide all terrain vehicle (ATV), a foreign four-wheel scooter to the security forces.

The second phase of trial began recently. Although compared to first phase, the sand scooters that been brought by companies in the second phase could not succeed in climbing the sand dunes. The trial will continue for another 2-3 days.

The report of the two trials will be sent to BSF headquarters. These sand scooters will be used along with camels. BSF slowly would be phasing out camels at the border areas.

Source said last year, Chinese company NEBULA EXPURTS' Nebula Jaguar 500cc ATV scooter trial was held between May 17 and 19 last year.

Later trial of American company Polaris field vehicles took place between May 21 and 23 in which ranger 800, ranger RZR 4-800, Ranger RZW SW and sportsman were utilised. Later trial of M/s Auto IOI took place. In these trials sand scooter of Polaris was successful.

Sources said this year in the second phase, various models of Maini Group from Bangalore was held from May 12. The trials were not successful. The vehicles got trapped in the sand and could not climb smartly.

Sources said a committee led by BSF DIG BS Rajpurohit has been made by the BSF headquarters at Delhi for the trials of these ATVs, which would give its report about the trials of the ATVs and based on the report, recommendation would be sent to the union government.

Sources said that trials are being conducted in these intense heat conditions and jawans are operating the vehicles with requisite arms and ammunition.

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby nits » 21 May 2013 18:46

^^ wow; Chinese company participating in Defense Tenders... i though they were banned

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby RamaY » 22 May 2013 03:47

^ this is one area Indian companies can quickly get a product out. Perhaps it can be offered in both military and civilian varieties.

Let's see

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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby Surya » 29 May 2013 07:49


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Re: BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

Postby vasu raya » 29 May 2013 08:53

Hmmm CRPF/MHA come across Nishant at the Bangalore airshow in 2013? after spending 6 months searching for UAVs. Anyways, not-needing-a-runway feature works for them the most while having no foliage penetration radar is still an issue.

Hopefully DRDO-HAL combine can rev up Nishant production for Afg. too and foliage is not a problem there.


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