BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

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Kakkaji
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Postby Kakkaji » 22 Mar 2006 07:55


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Composition of Central Police/Paramilitary Organizations

Postby member_7746 » 09 Jun 2006 15:23

Do the Central Police/ Paramilitary forces have any particular recruitment structure?

For instance just as certain regiments of the Indian Army recruit from particular communities/ areas (the Maratha Light Infantry from Maharashtra) do the Central Police Organizations organize in a similar manner.

Two CPO’s do recruit in a similar fashion.

The Assam Rifles recruits from Gorkhas & Hill tribes, which between them comprise the majority of the force.
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/MONITOR/I ... harma.html

Similarly the SFF recruits mainly ethnic Tibetans.
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/LAND-FORC ... s/SFF.html

In this manner do the other CPO’s like the BSF, CRPF, and ITBP etc also have any particular recruitment patterns? The organizations recruit from all over India, but at the battalion lever do they have any particular recruitment ratios (like the Maratha Light Infantry) or do any classes/communities go into any battalion (as in the Brigade of Guards)

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Postby Kakkaji » 11 Sep 2006 18:39

Winter jitters for ITBP as airwing plan yet to take off

New Delhi, Sept. 11 (PTI): As winter approches, the Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) is worried about providing emergency supplies to its high altitude forward posts as its plan to set up an airwing is yet to get the green signal from the Home Ministry. :x

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Re: Composition of Central Police/Paramilitary Organizations

Postby Aditya G » 30 Sep 2006 21:08

AFAIK, each Bn has its own 'Regimental Centre' which is responsible for recruiting jawans from its area. Hence by default a battalion will have a uniform class composition similar to its location. So for example XYZ Bn BSF will be raised out of BSF Regimental Centre Ghaziabad District etc

To ensure that the force is representative of India's people, a force like BSF and CRPF would place centres all around the country. As you have mentioned forces like AR have their own patterns.

Mani K wrote:In this manner do the other CPO’s like the BSF, CRPF, and ITBP etc also have any particular recruitment patterns? The organizations recruit from all over India, but at the battalion lever do they have any particular recruitment ratios (like the Maratha Light Infantry) or do any classes/communities go into any battalion (as in the Brigade of Guards)

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Postby Aditya G » 30 Sep 2006 21:22

Me thinks that the need of the hour is to resurrect the Auxillary Air Force on lines of TA or US ANG. This armed force should be placed under the MoD and be equipped with tpt and heptr aircraft.

While obviously the Terretorial Air Force could be tasked with roles tasked to the regular air force, it main purpose would be to build a cadre of military-civilian pilots that could serve the nation should the need arise.

Right now the BSF AW is manned by air force officers on deputation. Still arming it with offensive capability is unnecessary, as the level of insurgencies does not warrant it, IMHO. Its a sarakari VIP airline anyways.

Victor wrote:This paramil air fauj is way overdue (JAG is nice :twisted: ). Although the Citation and Falcon business jets sound like some babu's/minister's expensive wet dream, aircraft like the Tucano, the HTT-34 and the Kiran can be used. Chetaks and Cessnas will soon become easy targets for ground fire as the situation escalates and heavier weapons show up in the commie arsenal.

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Postby Anabhaya » 17 Dec 2006 14:32

More BSF forces in J&K to withdraw

Jammu: At least 15 Border Security Force battalions have been replaced by the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) and by the end of January 2007, ten more battalions will be withdrawn from the Valley, Director General Border Security Force A.K. Mitra told reporters here on Saturday.

The Union Government had given a directive to withdraw the BSF from the counter-insurgency grid in the valley and replace it with the CRPF. According to Mr. Mitra the security situation in the State was better than last year and there was also a fall in infiltration.

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Postby Kakkaji » 04 Jan 2007 00:48

CRPF to replace BSF in valley for counter-insurgency role

Srinagar, Jan. 3 (PTI): Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) will replace Border Security Force (BSF) in the hinterland of Kashmir Valley for counter-insurgency operations by March.

Ten new units of the CRPF would be deployed in the valley by March replacing BSF units, CRPF sources said here today. With the induction of the ten units, the total number of CRPF units in Jammu and Kashmir would go up to 72. While 14 units are deployed in Jammu region, the remaining are posted in Kashmir Valley.

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Postby Kakkaji » 09 Jan 2007 21:18

Army raises force of 12,000 dogs for counter-insurgency

New Delhi, Jan. 9 (PTI): Sniffing virtually a success in deploying specialised dogs in anti-militancy operations, the Army has over a period of months raised a unit of dogs, which now lead all counter-insurgency missions.

"A dog army of 12,000 specialised canine breeds, mostly Labradors, German Shepherds and Belgian Shepherd dogs, is in place in the Indian Army," said Lt Col S S Kashyap, a top Remount and Veterinary officer of the corp who breeds them.

"Our success rate against the militants has shot up with the use of these dogs and now virtually every unit deployed in counter insurgency operations has a unit of these dogs," he told PTI

"Labradors, who have an uncanny sense of sniffing out militants now lead all anti-militancy and road opening mission in Jammu and Kashmir," Kashyap said.

"The German Shepherd and Belgian Shepherd dogs are not far behind and form the bulwark of army mine and explosive hunting missions,
" he said.

Dogs have proved life savers for the forces in many instances as they have led patrols to deeply dug in explosives and mines in North-East as well as in Jammu and Kashmir.

"It is this success that there is virtually a clamour from para-military forces for such trained dogs in carrying out anti-Naxal operations in the country's heartland," Kashyap said.


Stupid question for dog-experts on BRF: Aren't Desi dogs capable of such roles?

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Postby Lalmohan » 09 Jan 2007 21:26

these breeds have been specially engineered over generations to become specialised in using their noses and tracking and are the most capable. dog breeding per se is not that historically strong in bharatland so there are few if any desi breeds; except for the mongrel/pie dog - and they aren't particularly ameanable to following instructions

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Postby Kakkaji » 09 Jan 2007 21:51

Lalmohan wrote:these breeds have been specially engineered over generations to become specialised in using their noses and tracking and are the most capable. dog breeding per se is not that historically strong in bharatland so there are few if any desi breeds; except for the mongrel/pie dog - and they aren't particularly ameanable to following instructions


Thanks for your reply Lalmohan.

Looks like TOT and License Production is the only way to go in this field. :wink:

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Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2007 22:03

Most desi breeds of dogs belong to the Hound family and should be capable of this job. You can tell by the snout of the desi breeds and compare to Western pedigreed breeds.

The use of sniffers might be useful for explosive detection but another thing to consider is the effect of dogs and the 'pure' Islamists. This could be a factor in J&K and might not replicate in other areas.

Also note the Golden Retrevier breed is only 150 years old and was created in UK. So cant be too difficult to isolate and create new desi breeds.

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Postby Kakkaji » 25 Jan 2007 08:12

Interesting, short article dealing with bread and butter issues in COIN ops. Hence posting in full.

Relief call for martyr families

[quote]New Delhi, Jan. 24: With more and more jawans falling to militant bullets, the Central Reserve Police Force has asked the Union home ministry to hike compensation for families of those killed in action to Rs 30 lakh.

Under the existing system, families of personnel who die on duty get an insurance amount of Rs 5 lakh while those who die facing bullets get Rs 7.5 lakh besides other benefits like gratuity. The scheme, however, is voluntary and the premium is deducted from a jawan’s salary.

However, under the new pension scheme, which covers those who joined the paramilitary force after January 1, 2004, the jawans are not entitled to gratuity, ex-gratia payment or insurance.

The number of families who have lost young jawans but have not got any benefits has crossed 150 :( and is expected to increase with time, while the number of personnel without any insurance cover has crossed 70,000, said a senior CRPF officer.


So it is only natural that jawans look for adequate compensation schemes in terrains where death can strike any moment. “Lack of any insurance schemeâ€

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Postby AshishN » 25 Jan 2007 17:31

Finally! Someone who has spent years researching dogs (esp the working breeds) and Islamism..has come full crescent. Dogs (apart from the olfactory thing) will scare the bajeejus out of the pomegranate scum...Go IA!

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Postby Tilak » 18 Feb 2007 23:08

Army Signals introducing secure mobile network in J&K

Jammu, Feb 18 (PTI) Army Signal Corps is replacing walkie -talkies with a "secure" mobile phone communication system, having different number codes from BSNL and other networks, in Jammu and Kashmir.
The network codenamed 'Mercury Blaze' would replace old wireless communication systems in a phased manner to enhance "battlefield transparency", speed up troop mobility and improve their coordination in counter-insurgency operations, ASC officials said here.

The system has been under trial for a year in the Nagrota -based 16 Corps operational area and mobile towers and other infrastructure have been set up in Jammu, Rajouri, Doda, Udhampur and Poonch districts.

"The system is, however, not fully functional yet. It has different numbers from that of the BSNL network numbers and is working on a different frequency," they said.

They said it would provide "secure mobile communication" to all formations and field units and data communication directly to the operational areas.

The Army has also launched escon-node phase-III, V-sat and other communication systems to keep pace with technology, they added. PTI

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Postby Kati » 19 Feb 2007 00:32

Lalmohan wrote:these breeds have been specially engineered over generations to become specialised in using their noses and tracking and are the most capable. dog breeding per se is not that historically strong in bharatland so there are few if any desi breeds; except for the mongrel/pie dog - and they aren't particularly ameanable to following instructions



1. You'll be surprised to know how well our desi "kutta"s can perform if trained well from their puppyhood. Moreover, these doggies have some upperhands in sniffing important things from mixed materials (say trash) where the videshi kuttas can fail. During the WWII some of these desi 'best frind of man' performed very well in the Arakan-Burma front deployed by the british. A (late) relative of mine, who fought in Netaji's Azad Hind Fauz (Gandhi Brigade) documented this in his personal diary. But they were used to sniff out ambushes, small petrol boats used them to see approaching airplanes, etc.

2. In the north-east, there is one vulnerability that has dogged the COIN forces dearly. Be it Assam Rifles, BSF , CRPF, or the regular army units. That is - many personnel who are from mainland India don't understand (or don't care to understand) the cultural differences, and/or the tribal rules and customs. In the NE tribal societies, it is the women who often weild the sticks in the society. It is very common for a teenaged naga or meiti or kuki girl to trek a few miles alone to go from one village to another village to see relatives. No one would mess with her. But for a patrolling COIN platoon such a girl is often a "good pick". Sorry for talking this bluntly. But a single such case has disastrous PR effects. I said in the past, for the NE COIN operations, we have to recruit from the tribal societies in large numbers. And then deploy Chakma's in Manipur, or Kukis in Tripura, or Nagas in Assam, etc. (Not such an oversimplified form, but one can get the idea.) Also, for the NE, a significant part of the COIN personnel should be women. You can see now many female CISF personnel at the airports are from NE (especially from Sikkim).

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Postby Victor » 19 Feb 2007 01:16

Good post, Kati. Unfortunately, it is quite accurate to state that a large part of the anti-India feelings in the NE region are directly attributable to idiotic actions of uneducated (and indisciplined) jawans. It is amazing that we are not making even minimal effort to educate the troops about the ground rules and thereby losing public support from stupid little mistakes. All it takes is a small local team to lay down the rules and the NCOs to enforce strictly.

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Postby Kati » 19 Feb 2007 01:35

Victor:
initially, with my green eyes, I also idealized such things - like how simple actions can improve the situation. But later I slowly found that things are like noodles in a bowl. Every group has some interest in continuing the simmering unrest. Let me tell you bluntly, which I have experienced first hand:
1. The newspaper people will get restless if things get smoothly. They'll create problems where there were none.
2. The NGOs will get restless if things get normal. Their appeal goes down the tube of they can't provide an alternative center of attraction.
3. The political leaders need the chaos to make them important. They do thrive on such chaos. Heavy appearance in the media, frequent trips to New Delhi, Meeting with the babus, make them bery very important.
4. Top army brass, who don't get a scratch on their back feel important. Get more funds - unaccounted - to combat terrorism. Poor jawans feel the pinch. These poor jawans also want to have some fun under the emotional stress from their bosses. They let out their frustation in the huts of some vulnerable women and girls.
5. Some intel officials mismanage the funds meant for psy-ops against the militants.
6. The militants use the chaos to recruit for their ranks This gives them a golden opportunity to come and threaten the nontribal traders and demand protection money. (A relative of mine, who was a PWD engineer in lower Assam had to fort out Rs. 20,000 every month. And to recover that money, he pilfered the public exchequer, or vice-versa.) This protection money goes to Dhaka or Bangkok to get prime realestate for the militant leaders.
7. The minorities raise their own militant group or political platform to save their skin, and become power brokers.
8. ISI and Bangladeshi DGFI get involved to fish in troubled waters.
9. A few sincere ones - be political or apolitical, who understand the problem and come forward, get killed as roadblocks in perpetuating the chaos.
10. Babus from home ministry come and go before retirement. They also want to fish without touching water.

It is amazing that we still live and life goes on. Or, may be that is the resilience of the great Indian Democracy.

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Postby Vishy_mulay » 19 Feb 2007 09:50

http://www.hal-india.com/MinskSquareMatters-Issue25.pdf
good use of Dogs for security by HAL

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Postby Johann » 19 Feb 2007 12:20

Victor wrote:Good post, Kati. Unfortunately, it is quite accurate to state that a large part of the anti-India feelings in the NE region are directly attributable to idiotic actions of uneducated (and indisciplined) jawans. It is amazing that we are not making even minimal effort to educate the troops about the ground rules and thereby losing public support from stupid little mistakes. All it takes is a small local team to lay down the rules and the NCOs to enforce strictly.


When I was a cadet I was told something I have seen to be true - in any body of men, however well-trained and screened there's probably at least 10% who are bad apples - men who will do the wrong thing if they think they can get away with it - whether its theft, rape or even murder.

These men sometimes get to be sergeants and even sometimes officers.
In other words, in positions of responsibility and trust where they can order those below them to obey them and cover for them.

In a professional force they are eventually caught, but not before theyve done damage.

Insurgencies offer many more opportunities than either peace or conventional war to operate without oversight and supervision, and where the truth is blurred.

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Postby Kakkaji » 26 Mar 2007 04:02

SSB plugs gaps in Bhutan border 8)

[quote]New Delhi, March 25: The Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) is setting up as many as 132 border outposts along the 699-km-long Indo-Bhutan border to prevent Ulfa militants and Maoists from sneaking into the country.

“We are ready with 60 border outposts. The rest will be completed by March 2008. Similarly, 450 border outposts are being constructed along the 1,750-km-long Indo-Nepal border to stop smuggling and infiltration attempts by terrorists,â€

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Postby Aditya G » 02 Apr 2007 21:57

Questions:

- What is the level of violence in J&K today?

- How many terrorists in J&K today

- How many troops in J&K today

- What is the composition of the "security forces" in J&K?

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Postby shyamd » 02 Apr 2007 23:15

Go through Internal security thread.

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Re: Composition of Central Police/Paramilitary Organizations

Postby ParGha » 04 May 2007 06:21

Mani K wrote:Do the Central Police/ Paramilitary forces have any particular recruitment structure?

For instance just as certain regiments of the Indian Army recruit from particular communities/ areas (the Maratha Light Infantry from Maharashtra) do the Central Police Organizations organize in a similar manner.

Two CPO’s do recruit in a similar fashion.

The Assam Rifles recruits from Gorkhas & Hill tribes, which between them comprise the majority of the force.
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/MONITOR/I ... harma.html
...


You may be correct in saying the two groups comprise the majority of the Assam Rifles, but it has also been known to recruit from Maharashtra and Northern Karnataka areas as just one instance. There may be more such incidences.

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Postby ParGha » 04 May 2007 06:24

Aditya G wrote:Me thinks that the need of the hour is to resurrect the Auxillary Air Force on lines of TA or US ANG. This armed force should be placed under the MoD and be equipped with tpt and heptr aircraft.


Get some P-51 Mustangs for CAS, bend the sight rules a bit and I will join for no pay :twisted:

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Postby ParGha » 04 May 2007 06:30

AshishN wrote:Finally! Someone who has spent years researching dogs (esp the working breeds) and Islamism..has come full crescent. Dogs (apart from the olfactory thing) will scare the bajeejus out of the pomegranate scum...Go IA!


Pakjabis seem perfectly okay with their collection of bully-kuttas and gull-terrs... but then again the may be more of the Lahori Mafia than hardcore fundoos. Anyway I envy that one thing about Paks - being savages, they have preserved some of the fun things in life that political correctness removes from ours - real dogs being one of them.

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Postby Kakkaji » 24 May 2007 02:24

Tangentially Related:

Settle jawans along border: Plan panel

Santanu Banerjee | New Delhi

The Planning Commission has recommended a special agriculture development model for border and coastal districts under retired defence and para-military personnel programme.

The model should be linked with national security to address both security and development aspects, it has suggested.

Sources said designing special models for these areas was necessary in view of increasing cross-border terrorism through India's borders and coastal areas. This would help farmers in the border and coastal areas, who have to bear the brunt of these activities, they pointed out.

The commission's recommendations will be placed before the National Development Council meeting on May 29. The special NDC meet on agriculture is expected to work out a national strategy for improving the ailing agriculture sector.

Sources said special policy initiatives were required for the areas affected by cross border terrorism and Maoist menace to ensure both vigilance and development.

In its draft report, the NDC sub-committee on 'Agriculture and Related Issues' said that "Such a task of development of the wasteland/degraded land/common property resources, particularly in border/coastal districts may be assigned to the retired defence or para-military personnel.'"

"This will not only enable development of these lands but will also provide vigilance to the border through such special incentive,'" the recommendations emphasised.

The Chief Ministers of States affected by Maoist problem as well as cross-border terrorism would be asked to design special models to suit the requirements of these areas keeping both the interests of the farmers as well as national security in mind.

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Postby Aditya G » 13 Nov 2007 22:10

Some facts from MHA annual report:

NEW RAISINGS AND MODERNISATION OF
CENTRAL PARA-MILITARY FORCES (CPMFs)
• The scheme of modernisation of CPMFs i.e. BSF, CRPF, ITBP, Assam Rifles,
CISF, NSG with an outlay of Rs. 3740 crores under implementation since 2002-
03, came to an end on 31.3.2007. For utilization of the unspent amount of
around Rs 1500 crores :evil:, a proposal for seeking approval of CCS for extension of
the modernization plan for another 2 years is under consideration.


CRPF
• 15 Bns raised in 2005-06 and 10 Bns are under raising in 2007-08. After raising
of these 10 Bns, raising process of 209 Bns including 50 India Reserve (IR) Bns
approved by the Government in 2001 will be completed.


ITBP
• 20 Additional Bns alongwith 2 Zonal Hqrs and 6 Sector Hqrs have been
sanctioned for ITBP. Out of these, 13 Bns, 2 Zonal Hqrs and 4 Sector Hqrs are
to be raised during 2006-07 and 2007-08. The remaining Bns and Sector Hqrs
are to be raised in 2008-09.


NEW RAISINGS AND MODERNISATION OF
CENTRAL PARA-MILITARY FORCES (CPMFs)

SSB
• 20 additional battalions sanctioned for guarding India-Nepal and India-
Bhutan borders. Out of which 13 Bns have been raised and the raising
process of remaining Bns has also been completed. Training is being
provided to the new recruits.

India Reserve (IR) Bns
• In 2005-06, 25 IR Bns were approved for J&K, North-Eastern and naxal
affected States. Sanction orders for these Bns have been issued.

CISF
• Strength of CISF raised to 1,03,101 as on 30.6.2007 as against 96,057 as
on 1.4.2006

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Postby ssmitra » 16 Nov 2007 23:28

So a question for the informed..
Do we still need so many para-military units. Why not combine them to make logistics easier. I am not talking about disbanding them but rather combine them. for example ITBP and SSB with BSF.
Assam rifles with either the army or CRPF. Indian reserve battalion with the CRPF. and keeping CISF and NSG independent as they are. Keep training the same. and give them their individual status. for example the ITBP can be a commando wing within the BSF etc..

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Postby Kati » 17 Nov 2007 00:01

ssmitra wrote:So a question for the informed..
Do we still need so many para-military units. Why not combine them to make logistics easier. I am not talking about disbanding them but rather combine them. for example ITBP and SSB with BSF.
Assam rifles with either the army or CRPF. Indian reserve battalion with the CRPF. and keeping CISF and NSG independent as they are. Keep training the same. and give them their individual status. for example the ITBP can be a commando wing within the BSF etc..


Trivial Watson! :D

There are many instances where army can't be called in so easily, but paramilitary forces can be deployed easily. Numerous issues are involved - budget is one of them. Paramilitary forces are under MHA, whereas big guns are under MoD. An important aspect is that army is the last resort, and you don't want to spend that currency in every medium size unrest. Also, army has to have a psychological effect in the sense that it MUST prevail, no matter what. Otherwise, the psyc advantage will be lost, and the breakdown would start.

There are many other aspects that are very unique to India due to tremendous diversity. For example, AR is specifically raised for the NE region, and it's very competent in jungle warfare. AFAIK, two battalions of BSF stationed in Nagaland have personnel solely from that state only for specific reasons. Similarly, ITBP, apart from high altitude warfare, is the host of crack commando training center. These specializations might get diluted if they are all merged under a single org. True they often get deployed under a unified command, but that is based on necessity.

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Postby Aditya G » 18 Nov 2007 11:26

Thats a good question to ask at this juncture ssmitra. In reality, what we see today is much much more simplified structure compared to 10 years back:

MoD: IA, AR, RR, TA
Misc: BRO, DSC, SFF
MHA: BSF, CISF, NSG, CRPF,
State: IRB, STF/Armed police
Others: SPOs, VDC, DDC, Ikhwanis,

The tasking has been rationalised as follows, though on ground it may yet ot be realised:

1. Indian Army: To guard the LOC, LAC, IB and engage in CT ops in Tier 1 and 2. In recent years, Ladakh Scouts and J&K Light Infantry have been recognised as Army regiments.

2. RR and AR can be thought of as the COIN forces of the army. Funding is by MHA, command is by Army.

3. BSF to guard the west from LoC, IB to Gujarat swamps. Operates its own air, artillery and water wings. Ideally for CT only in border areas

4. ITBP to guard LAC and China border. + CT duties in J&K hinterland

5. SSB to guard Bhutan and Nepal borders. Note its renamed to Sashastra Seema Bal which means "Armed Border Guard". It no longer has the anti-china Mission which the Special Service Bureau had.

6. CRPF is now the prime central agency to take on 'law and order' situations across the entire country. Has special riot police wing. It is a police force in character. IRB from states have equivalent mission and can be deployed across the country.

7. CISF though greatly expanded in size, continues with a broadened mandate of securing key installations. Having taken control over the airports they have formed a commando unit as well. There was a proposal to rename to Central Internal Security Force reflecting its expanded role.

8. NSG remains underutilised. They should consider forming QRTs from NSG in J&K. Recent gunbattles, fought by regular CRPF have lasted days and attracted too much attention from media imho.

9. TA is actively engaged in these operations apart from fulfilling its vision of being a reserve.

10. SFF continues to remain a mystery and is scope as "Vikas Regiment" is not clear.

11. Militia comprised of counter insurgents, SPOs and VDCs. I believe there were proposals to form TA Bns from the counter insurgents and SPOs which was dropped.

In today's scenario the SSB and ITBP are the only forces that merit a merger IMHO. Merging SSB into ITBP, and thus creating a larger ITBP will give much more flexibility and force levels to plan.

Kati wrote:
ssmitra wrote:So a question for the informed..
Do we still need so many para-military units. Why not combine them to make logistics easier. I am not talking about disbanding them but rather combine them. for example ITBP and SSB with BSF.
Assam rifles with either the army or CRPF. Indian reserve battalion with the CRPF. and keeping CISF and NSG independent as they are. Keep training the same. and give them their individual status. for example the ITBP can be a commando wing within the BSF etc..


Trivial Watson! :D

There are many instances where army can't be called in so easily, but paramilitary forces can be deployed easily. Numerous issues are involved - budget is one of them. Paramilitary forces are under MHA, whereas big guns are under MoD. An important aspect is that army is the last resort, and you don't want to spend that currency in every medium size unrest. Also, army has to have a psychological effect in the sense that it MUST prevail, no matter what. Otherwise, the psyc advantage will be lost, and the breakdown would start.

There are many other aspects that are very unique to India due to tremendous diversity. For example, AR is specifically raised for the NE region, and it's very competent in jungle warfare. AFAIK, two battalions of BSF stationed in Nagaland have personnel solely from that state only for specific reasons. Similarly, ITBP, apart from high altitude warfare, is the host of crack commando training center. These specializations might get diluted if they are all merged under a single org. True they often get deployed under a unified command, but that is based on necessity.

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Postby Aditya G » 18 Nov 2007 11:34

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Elit ... 547310.cms

Elite force ready to combat disasters
17 Nov 2007, 0141 hrs IST,Kounteya Sinha,TNN
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NEW DELHI: An elite National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) will now combat possible chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear casualties and pandemics in the country.

Eight battalions, each consisting of 1,158 personnel on deputation for five years from CRPF, ITBP, BSF and CISF have been trained to counter any emergency, be it a poisonous gas leak or damage due to radiation, in any part of the country.

While one battalion each has already been put in position at Guwahati, Kolkata, Bhubaneswar, Anakonam (Chennai), Pune, Baroda and Chandigarh, the eighth battalion will soon be stationed at Greater Noida.

K M Singh, member of the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) and a former IPS officer, said on Wednesday that while all the eight battalions specialize in disaster management like rescuing civilians during floods, earthquakes, tsunami, landslides and avalanches, four of them have been especially trained to combat nuclear and gas leak emergencies.

These four, which are being posted close to the metros -- Kolkata, Pune, Chennai and Greater Noida -- have been trained at various defence and other specialised establishments.

Twenty officers from these battalions have also been chosen for being sent to the Singapore Civil Defence Academy this month for a three-week specialized course on how to combat a nuclear or chemical threat.

On their return, these master trainers will teach both fellow officers and civilians on how to react and act in time of such an emergency in order to both detect the leak and then decontaminate people and the affected area in the shortest possible time.

Speaking to TOI , Singh said each NDRF battalion would have 18 teams of 45 men each. "They are now prepared to face any natural or man-made calamity, especially dangerous gas leaks from the rising number of petrochemical units. Gradually, they will be better equipped to face serious nuclear threats," he said.

He added: "Training is most important factor for NDRF as their work is of specialized response. That's why those officers specializing in water rescue and deep sea diving have been trained at Life Saving Society and Sea Explorers Institute in Kolkata.

Training in helipad slithering has been done at Nahan in Himachal Pradesh while training for search and rescue of earthquake victims has been conducted at the National Industrial Security Academy in Hyderabad."

Releasing the National Disaster Management guidelines drafted by NDMA, health minister A Ramadoss said: "India is increasingly getting vulnerable to man-made disasters associated with industrialization, transportation and environmental degradation.

Added to this is the new facet of terrorist attacks using nuclear, biological, chemical materials. These disasters have the potential of causing mass casualties and we need to adopt multi-disciplinary and multi-sectoral approach for prevention/mitigation strategies so as to develop capacities to improve response."

( kounteya.sinha@timesgroup.com )

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Postby Aditya G » 21 Nov 2007 08:38

http://www.kanglaonline.com/index.php?t ... &typeid=1&

BSF not more to fight counter insurgency operations in northeast and Jammu and Kashmir

North East Press Service

Shillong, April 24 (NEPS): The Border Security Force (BSF) would no more be engaged in counter insurgency operations in the insurgency affected States of region as well as Jammu and Kashmir because the Union Home Ministry wanted them to be in the international borders for performing their basic responsibilities.
Disclosing this to the press persons here this afternoon, the Inspector General of BSF in charge of Assam, Meghalaya, Manipur and Nagaland, Bijoy Dey Sawian said the Union Home Ministry through a recent order decided to pull out crack frontier guards from combating insurgents and placing them at the international borders for performing their basic responsibility. He said the hard decision of pulling out the BSF personnel from engaging counter insurgency operations in Northeastern States and Jammu and Kashmir was necessitated for keeping up the identity and image of the force which was raised primarily for managing and guarding the international borders.
Welcoming the Center�s decision to pull out the forces from Manipur and parts of Jammu and Kashmir, Sawian said such move would help them in doing the job they were paid for. �For many years now we have been forced to perform duties for which we have never been trained,� he stated.
The Inspector General of BSF said they had decided to pull out their six battalions from Manipur and one battalion from Jammu and Kashmir following Center�s order. He said these battalions would be redeployed along the extreme porous Indo-Bangla border. As a first step, four battalions of BSF deployed in Manipur would be withdrawn and redeployed along the Indo-Bangla border within a month time.
The BSF official also disclosed that those BSF personnel stationed currently in Manipur were imparting training to the CRPF personnel who would now take over from the BSF battalions for counter insurgency operations in the State.
The Inspector General also stated that the addition of six more battalions from Manipur and one from Kashmir, the patrolling areas of each battalion along the Indo-Bangla international border would reduced to approximately forty kilometers. �At present, each battalion has to manage eighty six kilometers along the Indo-Bangla border which is far beyond the ideal distance of twenty seven kilometers in the Punjab-Pakistan border�, said Sawian. The Inspector General however said that while CRPF will now take charge of counter insurgency operations in Manipur and other parts of the country, two battalions of BSF will be stationed for some more time until the CRPF is acquainted with the ground realities.
�We have tackled counter insurgency operations in Manipur for a long time and therefore until the CRPF battalions are fully trained, a couple of our battalions shall remain for counter insurgency operations�, the Inspector General said.
The BSF official also said the BSF battalion deployed at Moreh in Manipur along the Indo-Myanmar border shall also be removed and further added that as per the new Central Government decisions, the Indo-Myanmar border will henceforth be fully managed by the Assam Rifles.

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Postby Aditya G » 01 Feb 2008 12:29

Looks like a long standing grievances of counter insurgents is being redressed though recruitment in the terretorial army. The status, pay and benefits will be much better than the SPO scheme.

Note the high number of awards and kills for such a newly raised unit - that too just 3 company strengh.

x-post:

[quote="A Sharma"]Ex-militants turn heroes for army

It was at age 19 that Shahid Sheikh (not his real name) first fell in love with a Kalashnikov assault rifle. And soon after finishing college in Anantnag, he found a new address — a terrorist training camp in Pakistan.

Armed with deadly skills, he organised a series of bloody terror strikes in Jammu and Kashmir in the 1990s, and became a high-value target for the security forces. But they never could get him — until he decided to lay down his gun eight years ago.

The surrender marked a turning point in Sheikh’s life. Some years later, he had donned the battle fatigues of the Indian army, stalking the jungles in a hunt for the same extremists he had once led.

“I understand the psyche of terrorists. I know their mind. I have that advantage,â€

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Postby Aditya G » 01 Feb 2008 20:07

Google reveals 11 such units:

Code: Select all

156 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) PUNJAB Rajouri
157 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) SIKH BD Bari
158 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) SIKH LI Janglot
159 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) DOGRA Thalela
160 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) JAK RIF Kupwara
161 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) JAK LI Baramula
162 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) JAK LI Srinagar
163 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) SIKH LI Srinagar (15 Corps)
164 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) NAGA J&K (16 Corps)
165 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) ASSAMI Nagaland/Manipur
166 Inf Bn (TA) (H&H) ASSAMI Assam & Tripura

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Postby A Sharma » 13 Feb 2008 19:12

MHA signs MoU with Defence Ministry to revamp BSF Air Wing

To tide over the shortage of pilots leading to virtual grounding of the BSF Air Wing, the Union Home Ministry has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Defence Ministry.

"The MoU is basically to get pilots, ground support and maintenance facilities," BSF Director General A K Mitra told PTI today.

He said BSF will get six MI-17 helicopters from the Indian Air Force to add strength to its existing fleet of one Embraer, two King Air and two Avro aircraft. "The IAF agreed to provide the helicopters to us," Mitra said.

The BSF has been hiring choppers from time-to-time for the naxal affected areas in Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand. The choppers are used mainly to evacuate injured security personnel and rush them to nearest hospital and the Centre foots the bill of air operations under Security Related Expenditure (SRE) scheme.

The choppers are also used for transportation and supply of combat materials and replenishments for the central para-military forces.

Asked how long it would take to get the MI-17 helicopters and 12 pilots -- two for each chopper -- the BSF chief said "it would take around a fortnight".

The BSF would also get six engineers from the IAF for maintenance of its aircraft, he said.

Soureces in the Home Ministry said that BSF needed additional air power to help the central security forces combat the Maoist menace.

Nearly half of BSF's 157 battalions are engaged in counter-insurgency operations and internal security duties and the air wing is tasked with communication duties as well as airlift of personnel and equipment.

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Postby Aditya G » 17 Feb 2008 22:42

Whatever happened to the BSF Heptrs? They were already flying long time back :-? :roll:

A Sharma wrote:He said BSF will get six MI-17 helicopters from the Indian Air Force to add strength to its existing fleet of one Embraer, two King Air and two Avro aircraft. "The IAF agreed to provide the helicopters to us," Mitra said.

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Postby Gaurav_S » 18 Feb 2008 09:00

Breakfast in Nepal, lunch in India, daily

Manish Tiwari, Hindustan Times
New Delhi, February 17, 2008

Part I

[quote]The border between India and Nepal is more than 1,750 kilometres long. For most of its length, you can walk across for dinner, and go back for the night and breakfast — completely unchallenged by anybody.

Last December, a clutch of young Maoists from Nepal crossed over into India in Bihar and planted their party flags, staking a claim to the area. Again, they were not challenged — on either side of the border. That’s how easy it is to cross this border.

But a breakfast or dinner is the last thing on the minds of millions of people who cross this border every day. And many of them are criminals like the kidney racket kingpin Amit Kumar. Or terrorists.

India has 7,000 km of seacoast, and shares 14,000 km of land borders with six countries. Portions of the land frontiers are fenced and impossible to breach. But the rest are invitingly porous for those who want to cross over.

Terrorists use Nepal to stage operations in India. Northeast militants are headquartered across the border in Bangladesh. Many evade arrest in India by simply slipping into Myanmar. Smugglers, of course, thrive.

And then there is the border with Pakistan which could be anything from porous to ant-proof depending on where you are. While the border in Punjab is fenced and electrified, it’s open in Rajasthan and in parts of Jammu & Kashmir.

Hindustan Times reporters take a fresh look at these borders, at the people on either side, the security arrangement — or the lack of it, in a series of reports from the frontier towns and villages.

In the first of this series, Manish Tiwari writes about how the security forces are fighting a losing battle on the Indo-Nepal border in Bihar. “It has become a dangerous place to live in,â€

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby enqyoob » 08 Nov 2008 06:27

IB4TL? Anyone want this thread around? Anyone willing to write up the info here for BRM/SRR? The Mahdi-e-Thread-Deleti is here.

An article on Indian COIN & Border Mgmt Forces with your name on it! Imagine the GLORY! The FAME!

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Rahul M » 08 Nov 2008 09:00

this should go to archives.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 09 Nov 2008 19:25

Archive please!!! :((


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