UAVs, Drones, Remote Surveillance Tech

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uavindia
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thanks for appreciation

Postby uavindia » 31 May 2007 02:15

Hello

I am a team member of the DCE quad rotor UAV discussed here.

However, i would like to let you know that the development on that project has come to a standstill as there was no funding available to the project.

Regards
AK
ankur@coe.dce.edu

uavindia
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swarm robots

Postby uavindia » 31 May 2007 02:18

as there were some discussions on swarm robots..

theres a project going on in GMU by the name of Flockbots.

have a look at it. Its good..

AK

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Re: thanks for appreciation

Postby mandrake » 31 May 2007 02:23

uavindia wrote:Hello

I am a team member of the DCE quad rotor UAV discussed here.

However, i would like to let you know that the development on that project has come to a standstill as there was no funding available to the project.

Regards
AK
ankur@coe.dce.edu


This sucks mate, literally.
It gets me mad, that how bad management and government is doing in our country when it comes to proper funding.

Have you approached Navy/IAF/DRDO for any sort of funding?

Seriously, The very major issue we are facing today is like this, tomorrow talents like you guys will leave India and we will be back to square one.

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HI-MEMS

Postby Sanjay M » 31 May 2007 08:12


uavindia
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we tried

Postby uavindia » 31 May 2007 19:02

we contacted indian army and drdo.

drdo was interested in the start, however, when it was coming to actually giving out money, nothing happened.

even the UAV made in 2006 was partially financially supported by the students. In total, we pitched in with somthin close to Rs 5 lakhs from our pockets.
Last edited by uavindia on 31 May 2007 19:05, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: we tried

Postby Kartman » 31 May 2007 19:04

uavindia wrote:we contacted indian army and drdo.

drdo was interested in the start, however, when it was coming to actually giving out money, nothing happened.


First of all, congratulations of your good work :)

If you can share it here, what is your budget estimate ?

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Postby uavindia » 31 May 2007 19:10

sorry... I dont think declaring figues in financial matters is a great idea.

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Postby Kartman » 31 May 2007 19:29

uavindia wrote:sorry... I dont think declaring figues in financial matters is a great idea.


Depending on how much you need, perhaps you could try touching some millionaire alumni... such as Vinod Dham, Pramod Haque, etc :P

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Re: we tried

Postby mandrake » 31 May 2007 19:36

uavindia wrote:we contacted indian army and drdo.

drdo was interested in the start, however, when it was coming to actually giving out money, nothing happened.

even the UAV made in 2006 was partially financially supported by the students. In total, we pitched in with somthin close to Rs 5 lakhs from our pockets.


Have you tried the Navy? If its good enough and can be launched from ship you can try the Navy, can be handy for over the horizon surveillance with proper sensors, and when it can pick up some incoming, Naval guys can initiate better scan around that area.

Why dont you try contacting DRDO once again?

Or simply contact Kalam and see if DRDO really needs it or not?

It was really a nice UAV with a 2 body design.

Just dont give up mate... :) There are lots of peoples to contact if you want to, Check DRDO's website there they have a Naval research beureau which works with academic institutions, the navy guys are better of lot, so if it works they might chip in.

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Postby rakall » 01 Jun 2007 09:16

uavindia wrote:sorry... I dont think declaring figues in financial matters is a great idea.


Besides DRDO, probably you could also try CSIR and ARDB..

but... probably the best (though a little outrageous) idea is to write to the most appropriate person in India for this -- Dr.Abdul Kalam.. if you can make a nice powerpoint presentation and send it to him -- he might actually leverage something for you bcoz he is excited by students doing innovative things..

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Postby Jaylal » 01 Jun 2007 09:42

I have a better solution. Contact the big private sector defense companies in India, especially Tata, Mahindra and the like... They are currently trying to break into the defense industry, with the government giving overt support, and they would probably be willing to put up the capital for such a project... or at least for further R&D.

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Postby shetty » 01 Jun 2007 16:26

I like Jaylal's suggestion better. We need to break the cycle of just selling it to our armed forces especially the products that will not have major implications. If we can do that and the products turn out to be world class I can't see how anyone can turn a blind eye to it among our forces. It won't be easy but I truly believe that the chances of success and progession will be higher with this choice.

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Postby skher » 07 Jun 2007 00:40

What's the feasibility of converting Mig 21 into an unmanned aerial combat vehicle?

The PRC is already going ahead with converting its copy J-7 into a UCAV TD.
http://www.sinodefence.com/airforce/uav/ucav.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UCAV

Current Concepts
* Alenia Aeronautica Sky-X (TD)
* Flag of European Union Dassault nEUROn stealth UCAV (TD)
* Flag of South Africa Denel Aerospace Systems UCAV-TD (TD)
* Flag of Israel Israel Aircraft Industries Eitan
* Flag of Germany EADS Germany EADS Barracuda stealth UAV/UCAV (TD)
* Flag of People's Republic of China UCAV Version of J-5 , J-6 and J-7

Note: Some of these are not aircraft prototypes but technology demonstrators (TD) that are not expected to enter service.


The GNAT/Ajeet, LCA and HF-24 Marut can also be be good technology platforms for developing UCAVs.


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Postby Sanjay M » 19 Jun 2007 08:38

A160T Hummingbird tested:

http://www.gizmag.com/go/7456/

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Postby skher » 26 Jun 2007 02:10

A 68 year old American has re-applied some technologies and design features common to the DCE team's UAV to prototype a helicopter/hovercraft hybrid.
http://blog.scifi.com/tech/archives/200 ... hover.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/a ... _id=447317
http://www.engadget.com/2007/04/19/hydr ... es-flight/

Wonder when DRDO will realize the tactical adv. offered by the DCE design?

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Postby Kartman » 26 Jun 2007 15:01

SonarDeshi wrote:Wonder when DRDO will realize the tactical adv. offered by the DCE design?


Is it even in the DRDO's mandate to "realize" the tactical advantage, etc, etc ?
What DRDO does/"realizes" is strictly dictated by what the services wish... if there is a QR for a UAV in this class, that is when they would even begin to consider design alternatives.

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Postby JaiS » 04 Jul 2007 07:22

France and Germany to launch formal talks on Advanced UAV

France and Germany are to begin formal government and industry talks on a common combined medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) and high-speed deep penetration unmanned air vehicle development programme based on the EADS "Advanced UAV" concept.

EADS officials at the Paris air show said the programme was no longer focused on demonstration of technical capabilities, but rather achievement of a production standard system available for delivery within five years.

The technical talks are to focus on co-ordination of requirements between the three founding nations, including timings and specific capability matching. Industrial opportunities will also be explored, with preliminary concepts based on a three-way split of work co-ordinated around EADS's existing presence in each country.

Talks are also continuing with other European nations. Finland received its first formal technical briefings on the project late in 2006 with Insta and Patria already co-operating with EADS on datalinks for the new aircraft.

Advanced UAV is based on a common core 10.3m (34ft)-long fuselage with modular mission packages allowing the air vehicle to be adapted for different roles. The aircraft would be powered by twin turbofan engines.

In its MALE configuration the fuselage would be mated with a 25.25m-span wing with a Ku-band satellite terminal mounted on the upper nose.

The same airframe could be turned into a deep reconnaissance version by fitting a 9.05m-span wing and removing the satellite housing. A modular payload bay would support different sensor packages selected on the basis of mission requirements.

Selectable software tuning would be used to optimise the propulsion system to match the airframe configuration.

Data released by EADS at the Paris air show says the MALE version would cruise at 46,000ft and have an endurance of 17h on station at a deployment range of 925km (500nm). It would be capable of 5.3h endurance at a range of 4,620km. The deep penetration version would be capable of flying at altitudes down to 1,000ftAGL.

The Advanced UAV programme would build on initial development work conducted by EADS on its Barracuda technology demonstrator, superseding any further efforts on that platform. The sole Barracuda was lost off the coast of Spain in September last year.

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Postby JaiS » 06 Jul 2007 22:04

Lockheed Martin Selects Battery Tech Partner For Unmanned Vehicle

July 5, 2007 -- Battery and associated systems provider Electro Energy Inc. recently announced a new contract award from A&D manufacturer Lockheed Martin the development of Very High Specific Energy Battery Cells for use in the High Altitude Airship (HAA) program.

"Very high specific energy rechargeable storage technology is a key to enabling stratospheric airships like HAA to stay aloft for many months at a time," said Stavros Androulakakis, Lockheed Martin's HAA program and technical manager. "Electro Energy's advanced rechargeable lithium-ion battery is an example of what is possible with recent developments in the practical application of nanotechnology."

The EEEI proprietary bipolar wafer cell lithium ion design provides high energy capability with reduced volume and weight. The benefit of the bipolar wafer cell design compared with conventional batteries is lower cost, increased energy density, longer life and improved reliability. In addition, the unique bipolar wafer cell design allows the battery to be configured in multiple geometries to fit into small areas and conform to other specialized design requirements.

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Re: airship long-duration UAV

Postby shetty » 06 Jul 2007 22:19

Sanjay M wrote:http://www.pressebox.de/pressemeldungen/united-solar-ovonic-europe-gmbh/boxid-111069.html

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/20 ... years.html

aka VULTURE


Here's one more from DARPA called "Rapid Eye".

http://blogs.govexec.com/techinsider/ar ... d_eart.php

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Postby negi » 07 Jul 2007 00:52

SonarDeshi wrote:Wonder when DRDO will realize the tactical adv. offered by the DCE design?



I dont know what makes people think that DRDO is totally oblivious to technology and the challenges in the new era,heck Autonomous Underwater Vehicle being pursued in NIO couple of years back,they were already in advanced hydrodynamic testing of the hull and superstructure.

Btw you call it coincidence or whatever I have seen flying UAV toys here in massa land which look exactly like the one designed by the DCE guys (me talking about four co-planar ducted fan layout design).

PS: I am not trying to demean the effort put in by those guys at uavIndia ,I know its a commendable task for engg grads to have made a flying machine but then many colleges are coming up with similar things and it is good for eventually some one with an extra ordinary design/concept might catch attention from right party.

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Nice article on UAV ops

Postby JaiS » 13 Jul 2007 23:22

UAVs Replacing F-16s


July 12, 2007: The U.S. Air Force is sending its new MQ-9 Reaper UAVs to
Afghanistan and Iraq, not as reconnaissance aircraft, but as replacements
for F-16 and F-15 fighter-bombers.

While the manned aircraft can carry five
or six times as many bombs as a Reaper, this does not matter. The reaper can
carry up to four 500 pound JDAM smart bombs. While over 300 JDAMs were
dropped per day during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, in the last few years, the
average number dropped per day is, at most, 3-4 bombs. More JDAMs are
dropped in Afghanistan, but even there, half a dozen a day, over the entire
country, is a lot. Thus a half a dozen Reapers can easily replace half a
dozen F-16s or F-15s. This saves a lot of money, as the two man crews for
the Reaper (pilot and sensor operator) are back in the United States, and
operate the UAVs via a satellite link.



The UAVs have a major advantage over
manned fighter-bombers, in that they can stay over the target area longer,
and do so with relief crews, so that there are always alert eyes using the
powerful sensors (similar to the targeting pods on fighters) carried by the
Reaper.

The major disadvantage of the Reaper is its slow speed (about 500
kilometers an hour). Speed is a factor if you have a situation develop on
the ground somewhere, and warplanes have to be rushed in. For that reason,
some "fast movers" (jet fighters) will remain in Iraq and Afghanistan, ready
to rush to an emergency at twice the speed of a UAV.


Earlier this year, the U.S. Air Force formed the first UAV Wing. The 432nd
Wing contains eight squadrons (six Predator, one Reaper and one
maintenance). Each UAV squadron has at least twelve UAVs, and sometimes as
many as 24. Squadrons have 400-500 personnel. Only about two thirds of those
troops go overseas with the UAVs. The rest stay behind in the United States,
and fly the Predators via a satellite link. The 432nd has at least 60 MQ-1
Predators and six MQ-9 Reapers (also called Predator B) UAVs. When in a
combat zone, each UAV averages about 110 hours in the air each month.
Each
aircraft flies 6-7 sorties a month, each one lasting 17-18 hours on average.

In three years, the air force expects to have fifteen UAV squadrons, and at
least one more UAV Wing. During that period it is buying 170 MQ-1 Predators,
and up to 70 MQ-9 Reapers (or Predator B). While the Predator was a
reconnaissance aircraft that could carry weapons (two Hellfire missiles,
each weighing a hundred pounds), the Reaper was designed as a combat
aircraft that also does reconnaissance. The Reaper can carry over a ton of
GPS or laser guided 500 pound bombs, as well as the 250 pound SDB, or
hundred pound Hellfire missiles.


The Predators cost about $4.5 million each, while the Reaper goes for about
$8.5 million, for the basic aircraft, but nearly twice as much once you add
high grade sensors. The Reaper can only stay in the air for up to 24 hours,
versus 40 hours for the Predator. But experience has shown that few missions
require even 24 hours endurance.
For that reason, the air force decided not
to give the Reaper an inflight refueling capability.

The Reaper also carries
sensors equal to those found in targeting pods like the Sniper XL or
Litening, and flies at the same 20,000 foot altitude of most fighters using
those pods. This makes the Reaper immune to most ground fire, and capable of
seeing, and attacking, anything down there. All at one tenth of the price of
a manned fighter aircraft.

The air force expects to stop buying the Predator until 2011, and then
switch over to the Reaper, and new designs still in development

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Postby srai » 14 Jul 2007 01:08

Predator B - MQ-9 REAPER HUNTER/KILLER
...

Capable of carrying maximum internal payload of 800 lbs, it will carry more advanced sensors at weight almost twice as the MQ-1. Furthermore, The Reaper can carry much more external stores, up to 3,000 pounds total – 1,500 on each of its two inboard weapons stations, or 500-600 lb. on the two middle stations and 150-200 lbs. on the outboard stations. In total, the aircraft can carry up to 14 Hellfire missiles, compared with two carried on the Predator. The Reaper can stay airborne for up to 14 hours fully loaded. The MQ-9 will also be able to deploy the GBU-12 and EGBU-12 bombs and 500lb GBU-38 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition).

...
AFT

The USAF has also ordered two versions of Predator B with turbofan jet engines, to be known as Predator C. First flight of the Predator C is expected in 2009.

...

Image

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Postby JaiS » 15 Jul 2007 07:28

Boeing demonstrates control of multiple UAVs

Boeing has demonstrated a capability to provide targeting via cellphone and control of a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from a single station, using ScanEagle UAVs, a console from an Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft and autonomous control software. The demonstration was held at Boeing's Boardman test facility, adjacent to the US Navy's Boardman Range#

[first posted to http://idr.janes.com - 04 July 2007]

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Postby Philip » 17 Jul 2007 19:31

Sonar Deshi,I proposed the same over a year ago! That our mothballed,retired MIG-21s,etc. could be used as UAvs and also for "suicide" missions.No positive response at all.Theer seems to be a mental block for many to accept the fact that UCAVs will take aa greater share of aero-warfare in the future,especially when it come to HALE versions.Pilot endurance cannot match that of a long range UCAV( 24-48hrs.).In fact,with refuelling,a UCAV could (theoretically) stay up for a far greater time.UCAVs will also be stealthier and should come cheaper due to their smaller size and the absence of avionics and eqpt. found in a manned aircraft.A combination of manned and unmanned aircraft is just around the corner and we should not delay our won devlopment,which seems to be at a pause becasue of the acquisitions of Israeli UAVs.

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Postby Kartman » 17 Jul 2007 20:16

Philip wrote:Sonar Deshi,I proposed the same over a year ago! That our mothballed,retired MIG-21s,etc. could be used as UAvs and also for "suicide" missions.No positive response at all.Theer seems to be a mental block for many to accept the fact that UCAVs will take aa greater share of aero-warfare in the future,especially when it come to HALE versions.Pilot endurance cannot match that of a long range UCAV( 24-48hrs.).In fact,with refuelling,a UCAV could (theoretically) stay up for a far greater time.UCAVs will also be stealthier and should come cheaper due to their smaller size and the absence of avionics and eqpt. found in a manned aircraft.A combination of manned and unmanned aircraft is just around the corner and we should not delay our won devlopment,which seems to be at a pause becasue of the acquisitions of Israeli UAVs.


And who, pray, in India would carry out your far-sighted proposal ? Assuming for a moment that it is "accepted", and there is a "positive response" onlee...

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Postby Philip » 17 Jul 2007 20:18

Kartman,you've proved my point!

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Postby Kartman » 17 Jul 2007 20:27

Philip wrote:Kartman,you've proved my point!


Which was what exactly ?
Please to explain in a simple way for simple people like me onlee...

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Postby abhischekcc » 17 Jul 2007 20:31

Jaylal wrote:I have a better solution. Contact the big private sector defense companies in India, especially Tata, Mahindra and the like... They are currently trying to break into the defense industry, with the government giving overt support, and they would probably be willing to put up the capital for such a project... or at least for further R&D.


ld be careful doing that. Please protect your IP - especially when dealing with a lala company like Reliance (ver unreliable :P ).

Tata is more moral in these matters, I suppose. But every business man would first want to see money coming in.

1. Try to figure out the various applications for your machine.
2. Determine the worldwide market for all those applications.
3. Add them up, and call it market size :)
4. Say to the businessman, if you capture a small x% of the market size, it would make yoo a big Y% of monei in ROI.

This was basic market research. :D

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Postby JaiS » 17 Jul 2007 23:12

SELEX S&AS Mini UAVs take to the skies at ParcAberporth Unmanned Systems Event 2007

The new mini UAVs incorporate some of the most advanced technology on the market. They are man portable, electrically powered and can be operated in automatic or semi automatic modes. Programmed from a common ground station these platforms fly automatically to designated waypoints and with automatic take off and landing, require no piloting skills to operate. They can be used stand alone or as a critical node in a fully integrated networked surveillance system with payloads that can be controlled manually at any time during the flight.

These latest mini UAVs complete the SELEX S&AS ISTAR capability that also features the MALE and reconnaissance systems known as FALCO and NIBBIO, a proven ground control station capability and a full range of cutting edge payloads, many of which are produced in-house, providing customers with a powerful array of sensor systems. Key payloads include:-

PicoSAR, an Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar which is designed to be a compact, lightweight airborne ground surveillance radar.

PALS, an Electronic Support Measure (ESM) system which examines the radar emissions from ships and, by using a library of contact information, can passively identify and track vessels of interest.

Gabbiano Radar, the latest Galileo Avionica airborne multi-mode surveillance radar. Gabbiano is a family of radar operating in X band and suitable to perform surveillance over ground, along coast and over sea in all weather conditions.

The multisensor hyperspectral camera is as modular airborne hyperspectral camera developed by Galileo Avionica. It is composed by two electro-optical heads operating from the VNIR to the SWIR bands (0.4 to 2.5 micron), and a Digital Data Acquisition System. Creating a distinctive spectral fingerprint for every observed object including vegetation, minerals, gases and liquids, the camera can assess the difference even if it is invisible to the naked eye.

EOST 45, based on a three sensors E/O payload it is suitable for light platforms (UAS, short range aircraft and light helicopters) and uses, both during day and night, a thermal Imager operating in the Medium wavelength spectrum.

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Postby JaiS » 20 Jul 2007 21:37

Boeing flies multiple UAVs

Boeing has demonstrated the simultaneous command and control of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) by a single operator. This was achieved using autonomous control software, three ScanEagle aircraft and an Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) console.

During the exercises at Boeing's Boardman, Oregon, test facility, a single operator used the Boeing-developed Distributed Information-Centralized Decision (DI-CD) autonomous mission control software to manage three ScanEagles simultaneously. The operator also used Stalker target-tracking software to command one UAV to follow a moving vehicle without constant oversight and Open Mission Management (OMM) software to ensure NATO standard 4586 interoperability.

While the mission operator used the DI-CD software to control the surveillance activities of three ScanEagles, an "observer" in the field sent the location of a time-critical target via a cell phone to an AWACS Block 40/45 operator console. The AWACS operator successfully requested video of the target through the primary AWACS display.

The DI-CD software automatically generated updated ScanEagle task and mission plans, which were shown to the mission operator using the OMM software and sent to the UAVs using standard protocols. The UAVs beamed video back to the mission operator and the AWACS operator, who coordinated a simulated F/A-18 strike on the target. The same target video was relayed to the observer's cell phone.

In another test, a UAV operator used the Stalker software to order one of the ScanEagles to automatically follow and monitor a simulated terrorist truck. The software continually monitored the truck's movements even as it made several abrupt turns, stops and starts trying to evade detection. The system automatically adjusted the ScanEagle's flight path to stay undetected and in an optimal position to image the vehicle.

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Postby NRao » 26 Jul 2007 21:30

AWST:

[quote]
Unmanned Combat Aircraft

Boeing Reveals Details of X-45N Recon/Bomber Design
Aviation Week & Space Technology
06/04/2007, page 47

David A. Fulghum & Douglas Barrie
Washington & London

Boeing reveals details of its X-45N unmanned recon/bomber design for U.S. Navy

Printed headline: Striking Advantage

The U.S. Navy is considering how it might defeat a foe that fields an arsenal of submarines, advanced strike aircraft and conventional ballistic and cruise missiles that could keep American carrier strike forces at bay—perhaps 600-1,000 naut. mi. from a critical area such as the Taiwan Strait.

Boeing is working on the Navy’s problem with a concept that could put a long-range, unmanned combat aircraft on aircraft carrier decks by 2025. Visually, it will look much like a larger version of the X-45C, which was built for attack missions in heavily defended areas. Internally it has been redesigned to survive carrier operations as well as carry larger weapons and a battery of forward-looking sensors for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR).

Image
Next-generation aircraft carrier deck handlers may be able to move manned and unmanned aircraft around the ship with a wrist-mounted joy stick.Credit: BOEING

The concept is one of two contenders, along with Northrop Grumman, for the Navy’s Unmanned Combat Air System-Demonstrator (UCAS-D). It’s expected that Boeing’s design would expand the stealth capability to cover low-frequency radars as well as the classic high-frequency ranges used by advanced air defense systems such as the SA-10, SA-20 (300-km., or 162-naut.-mi., range) and SA-22 (probably 450-km. range), say U.S. Air Force officials who prepare threat briefings for the Asia-Pacific region (AW&ST Apr. 30, p. 26). The SA-21 is thought to be the 400-km. version.

Concerns about sophisticated military capabilities include a Chinese plan to buy (possibly license-build) Tu-22M Backfires, large-payload naval strike aircraft. Another worrisome item is development of an anti-ship version of the Dongfeng D-21 ballistic missile with both infrared and radar guidance and a maneuvering warhead. Gen. T. Michael Moseley, Air Force chief of staff, has also confirmed China’s development of a new air-to-air dogfight missile and a new cruise missile that could be carried by its advanced Su-30MKK strike aircraft. However, specialists say the new cruise missile’s size would make the Tu-22M a perfect launch platform. Improved versions of the older H-6 bomber could also carry the cruise missile.

The X-45N demonstrator (its dimensions and design are still being closely held) is significantly larger than the 49.5-ft.-wingspan X-45C designed for the Air Force. It retains the C-model’s shape except for a reconfigured mold line on the fuselage underside, which is bulged downward to hold forward-looking sensors.

“The Navy’s requirement is to do penetrating, persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance,â€

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Postby JaiS » 03 Aug 2007 21:48

Spain signs up for EADS-led Advanced UAV study

Spain has given the green light to formal participation in the EADS-led "Advanced Unmanned Air Vehicle" programme, joining France and Germany in a funded risk mitigation stage that will see an initial contract award within the next two months.

EADS Defence and Security initiated the Advanced UAV concept two years ago as an evolution of its Barracuda project. The proposed new-generation UAV would use a modular fuselage and propulsion system with interchangeable wing and mission kits to allow it to operate in long endurance and high speed, deep penetration roles.

Raj Malhotra
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Postby Raj Malhotra » 04 Aug 2007 18:24

This is something that India should try to join if allowed to! If Indian can contribute funds to GLASSNOSS and Galilio then it should try to get its foot in the door here also!


JaiS wrote:Spain signs up for EADS-led Advanced UAV study

Spain has given the green light to formal participation in the EADS-led "Advanced Unmanned Air Vehicle" programme, joining France and Germany in a funded risk mitigation stage that will see an initial contract award within the next two months.

EADS Defence and Security initiated the Advanced UAV concept two years ago as an evolution of its Barracuda project. The proposed new-generation UAV would use a modular fuselage and propulsion system with interchangeable wing and mission kits to allow it to operate in long endurance and high speed, deep penetration roles.

Sanjay M
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Postby Sanjay M » 09 Aug 2007 02:45

The mega-blimp is coming:

http://blog.wired.com/defense/2007/08/i ... blimp.html

India should have gone in for research on this. They are like the Poor Man's satellite. Even the first telecom "satellite" -- Telstar1 -- was just a high-altitude balloon.

They are useful for border surveillance, for airborn early warning, for telecom relay, etc. And India has the cheap manpower for constructing such large things. Hell, we even have the rubber.

Philip
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Postby Philip » 09 Aug 2007 15:32

The latest issue of Flight Intl. features UAVs as the main topic,with a "Directory" of all major programmes.It sensibly first classifies the various types (micro-UAVs,etc.) by weight,size,task-LALE,MALE,HALE,etc.According to the mag,there are 450+ major UAV programmes.Astonishingly,there is not a single Indian programme featured (no Nishant),while several smaller states like Singapore,Korea,etc. and their projects are mentioned.

Here is the introduction to,
http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2007/08/06/

UAVs come of age - Flight's UAV directory
By Peter La Franchi

Low entry costs have led to rapid growth in numbers of unmanned air vehicles in development or available to buy – for military and civil use. Here is our guide to 100 leading programmes on the market.

The four years since Flight International launched its annual unmanned air vehicle directory have seen extraordinary growth in the variety of platform concepts being developed around the world. There are, even from a conservative analysis, something like 450 individual platform types at meaningful stages of development by industrial, research and scientific development organisations inter--nationally.


That 450 number excludes target drones, as well as the vast numbers of platforms in development by the education sector as part of training programmes for new generations of engineers and technical personnel.


The primary driver for this growth boom is a unique combination of low market entry barriers, readily available technologies, perceived marketplace potential, and the gradual development of favourable regulatory arrangements permitting flight.


Balancing that growth in platform types, however, is a relatively cautious, if not restrained purchasing community, apart from where clearly definable needs allow acquisition of systems or services in the near to medium term. The military community, particularly NATO member states, dominate current buyers, given the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, outside the USA most military UAV fleet development is proceeding at only a moderate pace.


In parallel there is a trend that once a system enters service, there is a tendency for users to operate it for extended periods with regular technology refreshes instead of buying new aircraft. This is particularly true of larger tactical class types in military use and means that any broad examination of the UAV sector needs to deal with timeframes that sometimes extend back across two decades.


This edition of the UAV directory has sought to balance these disparate patterns by limiting numbers to a core 100 platform types. That number has been selected to provide a meaningful level of guidance to readers on trends within the sector, while continuing to make it possible for its inclusion within the magazine. A larger directory is to be released later this year electronically.


Selection of the 100 types included here have been based on four primary criteria. Precedence has been given in the first instance to systems in operational service with a customer of record – in most cases military organisations. Then come types that are under development on behalf of a customer or under the sponsorship of a major corporate or other funding entity, so the likelihood of their proceeding into full-rate production and operational service is high.


Third is a broad spectrum of new conceptual air vehicle types, to illustrate the breadth and depth of innovation being applied across the sector.


Lastly, we have sought to apply an extended geographical spread, incorporating platforms that reflect the differing economic and political factors at work in shaping the directions of the market.


UAV classifications in this directory are aligned with developing practice for the sector, but there is not yet a commonly agreed international nomenclature. As such terminology used may in some cases differ from those used by manufacturers and operators.


Mini-UAVs are defined as having a wingspan or maximum airframe of 0.5m (1.6ft) and below, and a range of around 2km (1nm). Close-range systems are those used to support surveillance and reconnaissance operations in flight profiles of less than 5km with a payload of below 5kg (11lb). Short-range UAVs are those platforms used in surveillance and reconnaissance operations in a flight profile of 5-20km with payloads of up to 10kg.


Tactical is used to denote a broad range of UAVs that operate at ranges of 20-200km with an endurance of at least 6h, with 12h commonplace. That range is dictated by requirements for line-of-sight radio communications. TUAV is an accepted acron-ym for tactical UAV, similarly VTUAV represents a vertical take-off and landing tactical UAV.


The terms “advanced tacticalâ€

NRao
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Postby NRao » 09 Aug 2007 17:46

Latest AWST has a ton of articles on UAVs.

Arun_J
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Re: thanks for appreciation

Postby Arun_J » 24 Aug 2007 23:11

uavindia wrote:Hello

I am a team member of the DCE quad rotor UAV discussed here.

However, i would like to let you know that the development on that project has come to a standstill as there was no funding available to the project.

Regards
AK
ankur@coe.dce.edu


Do not intend to belittle your efforts, but toys similar to the UAV prototype that you have built are generally available in US. Check this out..

http://www.skymall.com/shopping/detail.htm?pid=102130660&c=

Sanjay M
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Postby Sanjay M » 29 Aug 2007 00:43

Fear the Reaper

Predator on steroids


Since the Israelis already make the Heron, a Predator clone, will they then be building something like this, and would it be worth it for India to get it?

Image

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Postby Rudranath » 09 Sep 2007 20:40

DRDO, private hand in building aerial survey machine
Statesman News Service

BANGALORE, Aug. 25: India’s defence establishment and premier research body, Defence Research and Development Organisation, has decided to partner private enterprise for building Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for the surveillance needs of the Indian Army.

The DRDO hopes to firm up the arrangement with the private sector within the next three months for manufacturing nearly 100 UAVs or the medium or short altitude long endurance vehicles, as they are known. According to Dr D Bannerjee, chief controller, DRDO, there is a marked shift in doing things in the organisation with the emphasis now on integrating with the industry.

He told The Statesman here that the industry would now become a partner in building frames and manufacturing the UAVs, highlighting the scope for public-private partnership.

Expression of interest for the partnership had already been sent to leading players and the response has been very good. While he did not name the companies, it is believed these include the Tatas, Larsen and Toubro, among others.

The formal request for proposal would be sent after the evaluation is completed which could take three to four months.

This type of interaction was different in that before the corporate sector was merely a vendor. Now the DRDO would work with it as a partner to manufacture the UAV equipped with sensors, radars and communication support systems.

The partnership would be based on investment, design, and manufacture against committed orders. Asked whether the association would be in the form of a joint venture, the DRDO official explained that it would not be a separate legal entity as it involved financial, legal and related complications.

Instead the DRDO and the partner or partners would work on equal sharing basis through joint management and work sharing.

The new approach, he added, was significant in that till now the transfer of prototype to production was taking time. The industry, however, understood the production practices in the areas of concern and would participate in the design effort, configure the vehicle to suit the production patterns with trained engineers.

All this would only bring value addition besides helping to understand the production processes.




India joins select group to develop technology for UCAV

[quote]
Bangalore: India has joined a select group of countries that have launched programmes to develop the technology for an Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV).

The UCAVs or ‘combat drones,’ which are the latest class in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), differ from the latter in that they are specifically designed to deliver weapons and attack targets, possibly with an even higher degree of autonomy.

The Indian programme, which is an internal effort from the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), will involve developing the know-how for a swept wing, stealth design and composite construction technical demonstrator that will demonstrate “the technical feasibility, military utility and operational value for a networked system of high performanceâ€


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