Radar - Specs & Discussions

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Postby JaiS » 23 Jun 2007 07:26

Northrop Grumman Receives First Delivery of Receiver Exciter Modules for F-35 Lightning II


Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) has taken delivery of the first two sets of receiver exciter
modules for the F-35 Lightning II aircraft program.

The common bus interface and slave synchronizer modules were produced by Terma A/S of Lystrup, Denmark, for the AN/APG-81 F-35radar. They are the first increment of hardware to be delivered during the System Development and Demonstration phase of the program. Terma A/S will deliver the radar system's core interface, analog IF receiver and drain power supply components later this year.


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Postby JaiS » 23 Jun 2007 08:01

Northrop ready to move against Raytheon in radars

Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems is set make to make a number of strategic moves against rival Raytheon in the growing worldwide market for active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars.

The two companies currently split the US market for airborne tactical fighter radars, with Northrop the supplier for Lockheed Martin's F-22 and F-35 and Raytheon the supplier for Boeing's F-15, F/A-18E/F and EA-18G. That roughly equitable balance is about to be challenged for the first time since the Joint Strike Fighter downselect in 2001.

The first step for Northrop will be an attempt in October to usurp Raytheon's position as sole supplier for radar technology on the Boeing F-15. The US Air Force has received proposals from both companies to upgrade about 200 F-15Es with AESA. A decision is expected in October.

AESA technology has fast become a key competitive discriminator for tactical aircraft, with countries such as India, Japan and Singapore seeking access to the technology as part of any future fighter purchase.

Northrop is basing its proposal for the F-15E radar upgrades contract on a derivation of the APG-81 developed for the F-35 Lightning II JSF. It was previously thought that Northrop would offer the Lockheed F-22's APG-77 radar, but its lack of anti-tampering software for export customers shifted Northrop to the JSF system, Pitts say.

Raytheon has equipped the F-15E fleet with the APG-63(V)1 radar. The company will offer the air force the APG-79 radar for the Block II F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler.

In India, Northrop is supporting Lockheed's campaign to tailor an F-16 for India's pending requirement for 126 fighters. The F-16 model could be all-new or largely based on the F-16 Block 60, which features Northrop's APG-80 AESA. A less-expensive option also could involve selling the F-16I sold to Israel, which includes Northrop's mechanically scanned radar, Pitts says. That option also may avoid export control issues, as the product has already been approved for export.

"My sense is the higher the technology the Indians go after, the more difficult it will be for export approval," Pitts says. "This all revolves around the India-US relationship, and if that solidifies a lot of good things can happen."


Another part of Northrop's long-term strategy is to focus on the air force's requirement for a next-generation long range strike aircraft by 2018 to introduce the next huge leaps in AESA technology: conformal load-bearing antennas and the use of radar as a directed energy weapon. The company has experimented with a technology called load-bearing structural arrays.

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Postby JaiS » 24 Jun 2007 00:27

Astor arrives at last

The UK Royal Air Force aims to have its new Airborne Standoff Radar System (ASTOR) undertaking operational tasks by the end of next year. This comes after further slippage in delivery of some of the five Sentinel R1 intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft at the heart of the contract.

Verification flights

On the plus side, he says that testing of the aircraft’s primary sensor, the combined synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) is going well. “The only development left is two verification flights for the SAR radar and two GMTI flight tests.â€

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Postby JaiS » 30 Jun 2007 08:13

Labtech receives radar order

UK based Labtech has received a major order to supply microwave circuit boards for new radar equipment, the contracts is worth £1.3m.

Two European radar manufacturers of AESA (Active Electronically Scanned Array) have placed the order. Labtech will manufacture, assemble and test the multi-layer antenna plates with embedded components.

Labtech has two manufacturing divisions in the UK, in Milton Keynes and Presteigne, and both will work on the radar equipment components. Labtech employs 75 people as it base in Presteigne, daily post reports.

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Postby JaiS » 30 Jun 2007 08:17

RLM Signs Long-Term Contract with DMO for Support of the Over the Horizon Radar


RLM has signed a five-year Support Services contract valued at over $240 Million (with two five-year options to extend) with the Over the Horizon Radar Systems Program Office.

This contract provides for the ongoing enhancement and support of the Jindalee Over the Horizon Radar Network (JORN) located in Laverton WA, Longreach Qld and the Coordination Centre in Adelaide, SA.

RLM, as the prime contractor for JP2025 (JORN), successfully delivered JORN into operation in May 2003. Since delivery, RLM has provided 48 months maintenance and support and has achieved better than 99% availability of the radar network for the RAAF.




BAE Systems wins extended Jindalee radar contract

British defence giant BAE Systems has had its contract to repair and maintain the Alice Springs 'Jindalee' radar extended for another five years.

The Department of Defence will hand over more than $130 million for the daily maintenance of the Alice Springs facility.

The radar supports Australia's Over the Horizon network, which monitors the air and surface up to 2,000 kilometres away from the northern coastline.

The Jindalee Radar Network gives Australia the capability to detect stealth bombers.
It has cost Australia about $1.8 billion so far.
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Some stuff on RBE-2 and Rafale's AESA

Postby JaiS » 01 Jul 2007 23:43

Jane's INTERNATIONAL DEFENCE REVIEW - JUNE 01, 2007

RAFALE AND TYPHOON IN SERVICE - Rafale F2 fighters on active duty as
France plans modifications



The RBE2 electronic scanning radar supplied by Thales is also highly praised. According to the pilots, the RBE2 is a giant leap forward compared to earlier, mechanical
scanning radars.


The French MoD recently awarded Dassault Aviation a contract to
develop and procure an enhanced variant of the Rafale over the next
few years, with major subsystems to be replaced or improved to boost
combat efficiency and survivability.

A radar upgrade that will replace the Rafale's original passive
antenna with an improved active electronic scanning array (AESA) has
been launched and the first prototype was flown in a Rafale in 2004,
with further increments on the way. Capitalising on the current radar
architecture, the AESA effort targets new levels of performance in
reliability, detection ranges and angular coverage in azimuth.

The AESA radar array will be made up of more than 1,000
transmitter/receiver modules so that several can fail with no
significant degradation in acuity.


The RBE2's open architecture will facilitate upgrading, and the new
AESA array is totally 'plug and play', with the switch from the
passive to the active array configuration taking less than two weeks.



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Postby JCage » 02 Jul 2007 14:51

For all those complaining about the MMR. Without the MMR experience, there would be none of this..

http://media.bharat-rakshak.com/aero/Ae ... 0.jpg.html

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Postby JaiS » 04 Jul 2007 00:14

APG-79 AESA Radar Enters Full-Rate Production

Following extensive review by the office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition), PMA-265 was granted authorization to enter into Full Rate Production for 437 next-generation APG-79 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radars.

The AESA program started in 1999 and the radar had its first flight in July 2003. The program completed an operational evaluation in December 2006 and will commence follow-on test and evaluation later this summer in preparation for first deployment in 2008.

“With more than 8200 flight hours on LRIP hardware in the past 2 years, AESA system hardware has been extremely reliable and maintainable,â€
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Postby JaiS » 06 Jul 2007 21:55

JSTARS Goes To Sea

July 5, 2007: The U.S. Air Force has successfully tested new software for its JSTARS ground surveillance aircraft, that enables it to spot ships, and small boats, at sea. The new software takes into account the wave movement, which created a lot of false hits, until new signal processing software was developed which, in effect, prevented moving water messing up JSTARS view of what was on the surface.

The JSTARS radar has two modes; wide area (showing a 25 by 20 kilometer area) and detailed (4,000 by 5,000 meters). The radar can see out to several hundred kilometers and each screen full of information could be saved and brought back later to compare to another view (to see what has moved). In this manner, operators can track the movement of ground vehicles, or ships. Operators can also use the detail mode to pick out specific details of what's going on down there, like tracking the movement of many small missile boats trying to rush an American warship. JSTARS can stay up there for over 12 hours at a time, and two or more JSTARS can operate in shifts to provide 24/7 coverage.

A radar, similar to what the JSTARS uses, is being installed in a Global Hawk UAV. The navy is planning to use UAVs for a lot of its future maritime patrol work.


Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar consists of thousands of tiny radars that can be independently aimed in different directions. A recent improvement in the JSTARS AESA radar enables them to spot smaller, man sized, objects. AESA type radars have been around a long time, popular mainly for their ability deal with lots of targets simultaneously, and produce a more accurate picture of what is out there. Production versions of the open water JSTARS radar software won't be installed in deployed aircraft until next year.

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Postby JaiS » 06 Jul 2007 21:57

Lockheed Martin-Led Team completes Integrated Baseline Review for Space Radar

The Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] Space Radar team has successfully completed on-schedule an Integrated Baseline Review (IBR) with the U.S. Air Force, an important program milestone that precedes the System Requirements Review. Space Radar is being developed to provide global intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) for the military and intelligence community.

The system will be comprised of a constellation of spacecraft that will provide responsive imagery world-wide. SR will enable Moving Target Indications to monitor patterns of adversary activity and to cue sensors and weapon systems in near real time; and High Resolution Terrain Information for precision targeting, humanitarian relief, and to prepare geospatial products for a broad range of intelligence operations.

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Postby JaiS » 06 Jul 2007 22:45

Additional capability for the AN/APG-79 AESA radar


McDonnell Douglas Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $90,242,460 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-04-C-0014) for the procurement of a newly developed, additional capability for the AN/APG-79 Active Electronically Scanned Array radar.

Work will be performed in El Segundo, Calif. (95 percent) and St. Louis, Mo. (5 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2011.
Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.


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Postby JaiS » 07 Jul 2007 06:42

JCage, I had missed a news item. Take a look at the bolded part. Does it imply NCTR'ing capabilities for the Zhuk-MEh ?

Contract for Upgrade of MiG-29 Fighters for India’s Air Force to Be Signed End of July

[quote]

Eight MiG-29UB and 56 other MiG-29 upgrades will extend service life from 25 to 40 years. [b]First two aircraft will be assembled in Russia and the rest in India by HAL. The “Zhuk-MEhâ€

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Postby JaiS » 07 Jul 2007 08:03

Link - Thanks to Roy FC

Russia’s New Fighter

[quote]
Moreover, the “Zhuk-AEhâ€

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Postby tsarkar » 07 Jul 2007 18:05

Jais – “The radar also can determine type and class of targetâ€

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Postby negi » 07 Jul 2007 21:06

[quote="tsarkar"]Jais – “The radar also can determine type and class of targetâ€

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Postby JaiS » 07 Jul 2007 23:54

[quote="tsarkar"]Jais – “The radar also can determine type and class of targetâ€

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Postby JCage » 08 Jul 2007 00:16

Jai

Great catch! Yes, thats the first public report of the Zhuk having NCTR...and the N001VE on the Chinese MKKs doesnt have it..

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Postby JaiS » 09 Jul 2007 03:26

Controlling the skies

[quote]

[b]Raytheon is also configuring the AESA radar for the Boeing F18, Lockheed Martin F16 and Swedish Gripen. “The F/A-18E/F Super Hornets in the fleet today are already equipped with many next-generation technologies and capabilities,â€

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Postby tsarkar » 09 Jul 2007 12:04

Jais - I was referring to what is known as Jet Engine Modulation rather than Non Cooperative Target Recognition. If you read what i've written, I'm referring only to engine returns

JEM analyses engine returns while NCTR maintains a library of full aircraft profiles. JEM does not use such comprehensive libraries, but by simply knowing the engine type the radar can guess the threat. JEM has been around longer than NCTR

NCTR is a more advanced concept than JEM. But most radars like 2032, Kopyo, Bars, Grifo & APG68(V)9 have JEM

Even older generation radars like RAWL & RAWS can use JEM, though this is not a standard feature

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Postby Omar » 11 Jul 2007 07:32


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Postby JaiS » 13 Jul 2007 23:54

Thales Successfully Installed SMART-S Mk2 on Danish HDMS Absalon

The first SMART-S Mk2 radar system was successfully installed end of June 2007 on board of the HDMS Absalon, the first of the two new Flexible Support Ships of the Royal Danish Navy to be equipped.

SMART-S Mk2 is Thales' new E/F-band 3D medium to long range Volume Search Radar, optimised for operation in littoral conditions. Its size and weight match Fast Attack Craft and larger and upwards vessel types. As SMART-S Mk2 fully matches the engagement envelope of the Evolved SeaSparrow Missile, the system is perfectly suited for AAW applications. SMART-S Mk2 has a coverage of 250 km in range and up to 70 degrees in elevation. The system is fully solid state guaranteeing very high availability. SMART-S Mk2's capabilities also include surface surveillance, surface gunfire support and helicopter guidance. Nine SMART-S Mk2 systems are already under contract today.

SMART-S Mk2 has been developed in three and a half years according to schedule, proving Thales' expertise in the development of naval radar systems.

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Postby JaiS » 14 Jul 2007 00:14

E-2D Hawkeye: The Navy's New AWACS

The $17.5 billion E-2D Advanced Hawkeye program aims to build 75 new aircraft with significant radar, engine, and electronics upgrades in order to deal with a world of stealthier cruise missiles, saturation attacks, and a growing need for ground surveillance as well as aerial scans.

The most important improvement to the E-2D AHE is the new APY-9 radar, which can detect and track smaller (or stealthier) targets, in larger numbers, and at greater ranges. The electronically scanned array offers improved in-service time and maintenance, allows simultaneous air/ground scans and extremely fast focusing on multiple targets, and features lower 'sidelobe' leakage as well as other improvements. Improved clutter & interference cancellation offers significant improvement in tracking small land and sea targets, as well as better performance against electronic jamming. The radar has been described as a 2-generation improvement over previous Hawkeye aircraft.

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Postby SaiK » 17 Jul 2007 22:13

http://www.gisdevelopment.net/magazine/ ... altm.shtml
Airborne Altimetric LiDAR Where does India stand?

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Postby JaiS » 18 Jul 2007 10:10

[url=http://www.royfc.com/acft_news_old_jul2.html#12jul]Operation of “Zhuk-AEhâ€

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Postby JaiS » 18 Jul 2007 11:07

This is what Vishnu had posted :


I anticipate a couple of questions from you guys …

1. The Zhuk radar … well, we did have it on for a short while and the resolution of the radar in the air to ground mode was considerably better than the F-16 Block 50 jet I had flown on.


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Postby Drevin » 18 Jul 2007 11:12

Hehe ... don't know man ... looks like the Zhuk-Ae is improving.
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Postby Cain Marko » 18 Jul 2007 22:13

JaiS,

I think there might be a couple of points here -
1) Vishnu might've only seen some A2G application of the radar and now they might show some a2a modes as well.
2) Vishnu might've posted on BR that which was shown to him privately, IOW - not in one of his press released articles.
JMT

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Postby Pit » 18 Jul 2007 22:31

JaiS wrote:This is what Vishnu had posted :


I anticipate a couple of questions from you guys …

1. The Zhuk radar … well, we did have it on for a short while and the resolution of the radar in the air to ground mode was considerably better than the F-16 Block 50 jet I had flown on.



What kind of F-16C Block 50 is that?

American (90 vintage) with AN/APG-68(v)5?

Mid 90 export variant with AN/APG-68(V)7/8?

Current export variant Block50M with AN/APG-68(v)9?

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Postby JaiS » 19 Jul 2007 10:02

Pit wrote:
What kind of F-16C Block 50 is that?

American (90 vintage) with AN/APG-68(v)5?

Mid 90 export variant with AN/APG-68(V)7/8?

Current export variant Block50M with AN/APG-68(v)9?


I guess the best person to answer that would be Vishnu, but he posts here once in a while. I went through that thread once again and saw what Vishnu had posted about his F-16 sortie.


Paul fired up the radar .. and put it into ground mapping mode ... the resolution on this Block 50 aircraft which had flown straight from the Iraq conflict ... was acceptable ... given the generation of the radar ... far inferior, though, to what I had seen on the F-18 F Super Hornet last year. There were (understandably) blindspots when we flew over a few hillocks. I was also shown the moving ground target attack mode ... where we locked on to what I was told were a few trucks ... the resolution of the radar was too poor for me to see what we had locked onto ...



I think Vishnu is referring to one of the earlier variants of the radar, namely APG-68(v)5.

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Postby Mort Walker » 20 Jul 2007 23:52

Raytheon has always spent much more money on radar R&D and electronic warfare in comparison to Northrop. This is true both on the civilian and military side.

Raytheon radars have also been much easier to maintain and keep operational for longer periods of time. The moral of the story is never buy a Northrop system.

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Postby JaiS » 23 Jul 2007 10:51

BAE Systems Wins More Work on Sea-Based Missile Warning Radar


BAE Systems has been awarded a second contract from Boeing for work on the Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX-1), a floating, self-propelled, mobile missile warning radar station.

The radar arrived at BAE Systems Hawaii Shipyards in Pearl Harbor from Alaska on June 26 and will remain there through February 2008. The company had previously performed maintenance work on the SBX-1 in 2006.


SBX-1 is part of the United States Missile Defense System, operated by the Missile Defense Agency. Designed to operate in high winds and heavy seas, the Missile Warning radar is mounted on a fifth generation Norwegian-designed, Russian-built CS-50 semi-submersible twin-hulled oil-drilling platform. It is based at Adak Island, Alaska and can roam over the Pacific Ocean to detect incoming ballistic missiles. It has the capability to identify baseball-size objects from thousands of miles away.

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Raytheon's new AESA radar for light fighters

Postby JaiS » 24 Jul 2007 23:13

Raytheon studies light fighter radar


Raytheon has disclosed plans to offer a new radar for single-engined fighters such as the Lockheed Martin F-16 - a move aimed at potential new fighter sales to foreign customers and, in the long term, retrofits for the US Air Force fleet.

The Raytheon Next Generation Radar (RANGR) is a repackaging of the dual-mode APG-79 active electronically scanned array for the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, with an aperture cut to fit within the radomes of the F-16, Saab Gripen and Korea Aerospace Industries/Lockheed A-50.

"While it currently has not been physically demonstrated on the F-16, we have conducted feasibility studies to determine this would be possible at an appropriate time," says Raytheon.


RANGR is a direct challenge to Northrop Grumman's four-decade grip on F-16 radar technology, with the APG-68 family of radars and the APG-80 agile beam radar for the Block 60 fleet delivered to the United Arab Emirates.

Lockheed welcomes the developing competition for F-16 radar sales - it already fosters competitive bidding by engine and avionics suppliers. Northrop's long experience with the F-16 radar may be no advantage if Raytheon can produce a viable alternative.

"Northrop has a pretty solid base here, but, frankly, that doesn't mean anything," says Bill McHenry, Lockheed's business development director for the F-16. McHenry says that Northrop, in response, has "a lot of innovative ideas as well, relative to a general improvement of their radar".

Northrop says: "We continue to extend the technology and capability of F-16 radars. This includes AESA radars for F-16 production and retrofits for both foreign and domestic users."

Foreign fighter buyers, such as India, are believed to be seeking AESA technology, and the USAF may develop a requirement to retrofit F-16s to extend their viability in operational service.

RANGR emerges amid growing upheaval in the AESA supplier market. As Raytheon targets a long-term Northrop customer with the F-16, the latter is seeking to unseat Raytheon's sole-source status on Boeing's F-15.

For a USAF requirement to retrofit F-15Es with AESA, Northrop plans to offer the APG-81 in development for the Lockheed F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Raytheon is offering a new version of the F-15's current APG-63 that combines a new active array with a radar processor developed for the Super Hornet's APG-79.


On 18 July, the US Navy approved full-rate production of the dual-mode APG-79, which is expected to make its debut deployment with F/A-18E/F squadrons in the second quarter of next year.


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Postby JaiS » 08 Aug 2007 21:12

Japan Chooses An Offense

A low-key, but so far uncompromising, campaign is underway in Japan to add stealth to the nation’s defense arsenal by acquiring the Lockheed Martin F-22. The rationale for buying the fighter—little talked about, but central to the debate—is missile defense.

There’s also an interesting angle to the radar upgrades of Japan’s F-15J fleet. Until now, the project has run at a snail’s pace. Only a few F-15Js have been updated with Raytheon’s APG-63(v)1 radar. It has a digital, fiber-optic avionics package, but a conventional, mechanically scanned antenna limits surveillance speed, range and the number of targets that can be tracked. The Japanese parliament funded the upgrade of just eight F-15s in fiscal years 2004-06, and there was no further request in the fiscal 2007 budget.

But officials now say the fiscal 2008 budget may provide money for more upgrades. The reason is that the technology is a path to the world of network-centric warfare that has already been used by the U.S. Air Force. USAF first adopted the (v)1 radar but then upgraded it with a 21st century emitter and antenna—the 1,000-element, active electronically scanned array (AESA). That improvement, designated the APG-63(v)3, produces a radar with the ability to see small targets, such as cruise missiles, or to identify tactical ballistic missile launchers in their radar-generated ground maps. The radar also can transmit large files of imagery, electronically attack enemy sensors through jamming and insertion of false targets, and provide two-way digital connectivity to other aircraft and sensors in the battlespace.

“The Japanese could make that shift to (v)3 at any time,â€

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Tejas MMR Info : FWIW from Force

Postby JaiS » 08 Aug 2007 23:37

admin note: no articles from force to be posted here on br.

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Postby JCage » 12 Aug 2007 14:57

It talks about the APL, not the cooling or the antenna/MMR features in detail.

Amazing report tho' for those interested. And there are people who claim the LCA program doesnt put out whatever information and its all imports, this, that. :roll:

LPI is a very broad term. Across the board LPI, ie all features- low sidelobes, freq hopping etc etc. without compromising on range, for fighter radars- is only possible for AESA.

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Postby parshu » 12 Aug 2007 15:17

[quote="tsarkar"]Jais – “The radar also can determine type and class of targetâ€

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Postby JCage » 12 Aug 2007 15:19

Probably. But NCTR or no NCTR, the opponents IFF query will mark the LCA as hostile, and its closing speed and performance characteristics will show it to be a fighter.

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Postby mandrake » 12 Aug 2007 19:45

JCage wrote:It talks about the APL, not the cooling or the antenna/MMR features in detail.

Amazing report tho' for those interested. And there are people who claim the LCA program doesnt put out whatever information and its all imports, this, that. :roll:

LPI is a very broad term. Across the board LPI, ie all features- low sidelobes, freq hopping etc etc. without compromising on range, for fighter radars- is only possible for AESA.


I have a feeling that They will end up developing quite a competent Radar, Can you tell me the scan rate of ECR 90 of EF? It is also a mechanically steerred aray right?

sunilUpa
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DRDO seeks Israeli cooperation to develop Radar

Postby sunilUpa » 13 Aug 2007 17:16

NEW DELHI: India has entered into a co-development agreement with Israel to speed up development of a Multi Mode Radar to equip country's indigenous Light Combat Aircraft (LCA).

"A co-development activity for development of Multi Mode Radar has been initiated with Israel's Elta systems for limited series production of such Radars," Defence Minister A K Antony told Lok Sabha in a written reply.

As Radars are needed for demonstration flights of fully developed and armed Light Combat Fighters scheduled within next four years, the Defence Ministry had asked the Hindustan Aeronautics limited to monitor the project, he said.

This is the second major venture of the Defence Research and Development Organisation in which foreign co-development had to sought at the critical final juncture.

Earlier, the Government had floated tenders asking for collaboration in DRDO's other major venture to develop country's first aero-engine.

Conceding that the technology for airborne Radar was "very complex," Antony said the project to develop such advanced Radars for fighters had started in June 1991 with a probable date of completion within six-and-a-half years.

"The MMR development is being done for the first time in the country. No prior expertise exists in this field in any organisation," he said.


Link

Looks like XYZ (whose name we shall not mention) in ABC magazine was partially correct (don't know about the AESA part). :shock:

mandrake
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Re: DRDO seeks Israeli cooperation to develop Radar

Postby mandrake » 13 Aug 2007 21:11

sunilUpa wrote:Looks like XYZ (whose name we shall not mention) in ABC magazine was partially correct (don't know about the AESA part). :shock:


Sorry I'm not going to take this rumour, It is hard how we eat the media reports so quickly, There are many o factual mistakes in the report. MMR developement started in 1991?

The report copies itself from Force, Reply in parliament? my foot swho me please! there were hundreds of rumours regarding this. Didnt we have had hundreds of misreporting like this blah blah blah said on parliament with no proof to substantiate it?

It talks about initial procurement of a MMR which is the ELTA 2032 from Israel till our one developement gets complete. The BARC newsletter clearly states they are developing the whole antennae platform et al with ECIL and serial production has commenced and rest other than the antennae platform is already done.
Last edited by mandrake on 13 Aug 2007 21:19, edited 1 time in total.


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