India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

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uddu
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby uddu » 13 Jan 2014 07:37

We all know that the economy of scale is the main reason for many of the systems importing foreign stuff, even technology is available for the same.
Expecting the IA to place a huge order (in the range of around 500+) for the Arjun MKII after which the indigenous content can go up substantially.
DRDO chief has mentioned that the indigenous content in the Tejas will go up to 80% which is the target now. That's a very good move. In Joint ventures one is not expected to think about indigenous production of more than 50%. The other party may not agree for the same. A combination of Agni and Prithvi missiles do have 15 percent, which taken in terms of the latest missiles will be less than five percent of import content. Over a period this will also disappear.
Peoples expectations of DRDO to invent even nuts and bolts exists. Hope the private sector is mature enough to provide components rather than doing the screw driver technology that HAL was doing with regard to Sukhoi.
"Arjun's missile firing control system, laser target designator, engine transmission, suspension unit and running gear (track) are all foreign," said an Army officer.
{Sirji, rather than crying, let army order 500+ tanks and see the indigenous content go up. Even the engine itself can be indigenous. No one will set up huge manufacturing units for just 124 tanks}. Since the MK-II trials are concluded. Let's hope for some good news on this front from the army. :)

One more thing that i observed is that the private sector today have little experience in developing and manufacturing on their own. Many of the systems that they build today are designed and developed by DRDO. Some odd ones out like Mahindra and Tata. In many of the contracts what's being seen is that they are just importing foreign designs to be build here in India and indirectly acting as agents for supplying foreign content for armed forces in the name of indigenous activity. In some areas where we don't have expertise like in the area of Large Amphibious vessels, its a positive move. In other areas where we have expertise but still trying to import patrol vessel designs and trying to make it here, is just not acceptable. Hope the Private shipyards will not only learn in building stuff but also start to export whatever expertise they gain from such joint ventures.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby govardhanks » 13 Jan 2014 13:10


A Sharma
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby A Sharma » 14 Jan 2014 19:34

Walchand Industries
Jan 2014 edition of Manufacturing Today has article on Walchand industries

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Aditya_V » 14 Jan 2014 20:23

There has not been much public news, any idea about the status of Shaurya missile, one feels with a multiple launch vehicle it can take out many high value targets.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vipul » 15 Jan 2014 05:50

Goa Shipyard Ltd delivers offshore patrol vessel to Navy.

The state-owned Goa Shipyard Limited today joined the elite club of ship manufacturers to have built 200 warships with the delivery of INS Sumedha offshore patrol vessel to the Navy.

"GSL today joined the elite class with the delivery of the 200th vessel. The delivery of the 200th vessel for the nation, synchronises with the handing over of the third of the Offshore Patrol Vessel (NOPV) 'INS SUMEDHA' - built and designed indigenously," a GSL release said.

The vessel was handed over to the Navy by GSL Chairman and Managing Director Rear Admiral Vineet Bakshi at a function at the shipyard, the release said.

The ship was received by Commanding Officer-designate of the vessel Commander Anand E Kulkarni.

The vessel is the largest Offshore Patrol Vessel of the Navy and the largest constructed by Goa Shipyard Limited. It is expected to help the force to meet its requirements for undertaking surveillance and prevent infiltration and transgression of maritime sovereignty.

"This vessel is suitable for monitoring sea lines of communication, defence of offshore oil installations and other critical offshore national assets and can be deployed for escorting high value ships and fleet support operations," the release said.

The first and second of the series of new 105m-class of OPVCs 'INS SARYU' and 'INS SUNAYANA' were handed over to the Navy by GSL in December 2012 and September 2013 respectively.

GSL is also building Torpedo Recovery Vessels, Fast Patrol Vessels, Extra Fast Attack Crafts, Offshore Patrol Vessels, Advanced Offshore Patrol Vessels and Naval Offshore Patrol Vessels and 126 GRP interceptor boats.

GSL is one of the few Indian shipyards equipped with an in-house design capability and most of its new shipbuilding projects are based on our own in-house design.

It is implementing a major expansion plan that is expected to significantly boost its capacity of shipbuilding facilities.


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby tushar_m » 15 Jan 2014 17:07

Finally DRDO taking its project marketing seriously

Indranil
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 15 Jan 2014 21:24

Yes, they are even rebuilding their website professionally.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vasu » 17 Jan 2014 10:11

indranilroy wrote:Yes, they are even rebuilding their website professionally.


Can we please forward the memo to HAL?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby chackojoseph » 17 Jan 2014 14:56

For this who (including me) think that HAL is inefficient

PSU HAL Bags Award for Organizational Excellence


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 25 Jan 2014 01:06

http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 763_1.html

A high performance computing system would be inaugurated at DRDO's laboratory Advanced Numerical Research and Analysis Group (ANURAG) here tomorrow.

The system, "Dhruva-3", will be inaugurated by Avinash Chander, Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister and Director General of DRDO.

"Dhruva-3" will be extremely useful in design for aircraft and air-borne systems, simulation of complex systems and stress analysis of materials," DRDO said in a statement here today.

Since its inception in 1988, ANURAG has been extensively involved in the design and development of indigenised systems and products to solve and compute complex mission related applications, it said.

The DRDO's laboratory's contribution in the field of high performance computing, trusted computing and VLSI design has always been commendable.

It has also ventured into the development of cutting edge technologies such as silicon photonics, indigenisation of various System-on-Chip (SoC) configurations and microprocessors.

Over the years, the lab has established state-of-art facilities for challenges entrusted for mission specific activities, the release added.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby vaibhav.n » 31 Jan 2014 19:26

Are the Tata's now manufacturing C-130 body structure also?

Leading OEMs have forged strategic relationships with us. The TASL – Sikorsky JV has established a world-class end-to-end detailed part manufacturing facility, and the TASL - Lockheed Martin JV is assembling structures for the famous C-130J aircraft.

Lockheed Martin C-130J Empennage & Center Wing-Box Assembly
1. TASL -Lockheed Martin JV established as First program for US Defence.
2. Managing complex assemblies for critical control-surfaces.





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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby pragnya » 31 Jan 2014 20:12

vaibhav.n wrote:Are the Tata's now manufacturing C-130 body structure also?


yes. the empennage and the cental wing box.

in this interview the India CEO of LM 'wishes' to build an India specific C 130J in hyderabad.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vipul » 03 Feb 2014 02:24

Samtel, General Dynamics sign Rs 500-cr agreement.

General Dynamics Canada, has signed a cooperation agreement with Samtel Avionics Ltd, to co-produce digital displays in India for a range of military and non-military vehicles worldwide.

For General Dynamics, buffeted like most western suppliers by sharp budget cuts, manufacturing in India cuts costs. For Samtel Avionics, struggling to sell in an Indian procurement market where sales have not matched expectations, a strong international customer like General Dynamics provides a welcome hedge.

The partnership will produce multi-function displays (MFDs) for armoured and reconnaissance vehicles, and for civilian use in utility vehicles like those used for garbage collection. The displays give the vehicle crew 360-degree situational awareness, sitting inside the vehicle. Computing systems built into the displays convert the signals from externally mounted sensors onto easy-to-see visual displays on digital screens inside.

Both firms say the tie-up targets a range of prospective orders from the Indian ministry of defence (MoD). This includes 7,800 displays for some 2,600 future infantry combat vehicles (FICVs); 2,800 displays for 1,400 light armoured multi-purpose vehicles (LAMVs); 1,500 displays for the upgrading of the BMP-2 infantry combat vehicle (ICV); and 2,400 displays for upgrading the T-72 tank.

"We will have displays designed and ready for these contracts, as and when they come up," Craig Jansen, Vice President, General Dynamics, told Business Standard. He also hopes to offer Samtel-built displays for artillery guns being developed in India, and for the M777 ultralight howitzer being procured from BAE Systems.

Industry sources estimate the potential foreseeable orders are worth at least Rs 500 crore. Samtel Avionics hopes to build Rs 100 crore worth of displays each year for General Dynamics' domestic and international markets by 2015-16.

Puneet Kaura, Executive Director, Samtel Avionics, describes the cooperation agreement as part of a "push-and-pull strategy". By building products in India for General Dynamics' global programmes, the company will position itself for Indian requirements as they arise.

Says Kaura: "There is a mutuality of interests - we help General Dynamics win in India, while they help us win global markets."

Samtel Avionics, one of the private sector's most dynamic defence firms, has emerged from the ruins of Samtel Display Systems, once a successful builder of cathode ray tubes for television sets, but technologically bypassed with the advent of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Leveraging its core strength of building displays, Samtel set up an avionics subsidiary that made its first major breakthrough in building cockpit displays for the Sukhoi-30MKI fighter. Those, and a planned Sukhoi upgrade, remain staples for Samtel Avionics.

The parent company, Samtel Display Systems, has closed down but Samtel Avionics now has an annual turnover of Rs 100 crore. Puneet Kaura expects annual sales of Rs 500 crore by 2015-16.

In 2010, Samtel set up a JV with French avionics giant, Thales, hoping to build displays for the Mirage 2000 upgrade and the medium fighter (MMRCA) contract. However, business has been slow - the Mirage 2000 upgrade would generate orders for Samtel only once Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) begins upgrading the fighter.

Uncertainty also dogs the $16-20 billion contract for 126 Rafale fighters. With the French contractors - primarily Dassault, Rafale and Snecma - required to generate some $8-10 billion worth of offset-related production in India, Samtel-Thales is hoping to build MFDs for the Rafale's cockpit; helmet mounted sight displays that let the pilot cue and fire his weapons merely by turning his head towards the target. Samtel might also build an infrared search and track (IRST) system that lets the Rafale detect enemy aircraft through their heat radiations, without emitting give-away radar signals.

Samtel, however, is diversifying fast. Kaura says Honeywell is a prospective partner for up to 700-800 displays and line replacement units for commercial aviation aircraft built in the US. Separately, Samtel is competing with Zen Technologies, another emerging private company, to supply avionics for the light combat helicopters that HAL is developing for the army and IAF.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby chackojoseph » 03 Feb 2014 16:31

Missile scientists Avinash Chander & G. Satheesh Reddy get contributions to Science and Technology awards

Avinash Chander, a Padama Shri Awardee, is an accomplished missile scientist who has led the indigenous design, development and production of India’s ballistic missiles. These missiles, capable of delivering strategic payloads in excess of 5000 km provide credible deterrence against misadventures by any adversary.

Mr Satheesh Reddy spearheads the RCI-Missile Avionics Laboratory of DRDO responsible for design and delivery of advanced Avionics for various Defence applications in the country, particularly the Indian Missile Programmes and Projects.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Prem Kumar » 04 Feb 2014 02:41

A nice development by DRDO: 3 classes of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (Surveillance, NBC & Mine-detection) named Muntra

1 of them (Muntra-S for Surveillance) has already cleared summer trials in 2012. The other 2 (Muntra-N & Muntra-M) are slated for trials this year. Hope Army inducts them in numbers!

DRDO seems to be making quiet but steady progress in the unmanned ground vehicles area. Daksh was a very good product. The day isnt far off when we will have Muntra-A (Armed with CLGM) in a Recce role

http://tarmak007.blogspot.in/2014/02/drdo-all-set-for-summer-trials-of.html

Article has a picture of a truck, tracked via an electro-optical viewfinder

"In 2012, during the field trials, Muntra-S operated at very high temperatures in Rajasthan deserts. We tele-operated Muntra-S from a distance of 5 km and it tracked a tank further at a distance of 12 km. The radar has an instrumented range of 18 km. During the trials, we undertook day and night surveillance and tele-operated the vehicle back to the base as well," Dr Sivakumar said.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 04 Feb 2014 15:37

Excellent work by Saurav Jha:

First pics of a 25kw GD laser model from Lastec packaged for mobility, the Rustom airframe (check out the size) and the MICWS (INSAS replacement).

http://ibnlive.in.com/blogs/sauravjha/2 ... -drdo.html

The electronic warfare realm will be further bolstered in 2014 when India's first dedicated electronic intelligence satellite, CCI-SAT will be lofted into space by a PSLV. CCI-SAT could well augment the joint Signal Intelligence Directorate - DRDO program 'Divya Dhrishti' which is an extensive electronic support measures (ESM) network consisting of some 12 ground stations connected via satellite along India's borders and has the capability to detect otherwise difficult to detect aircraft. Of course CCI-SAT is more oriented towards picking up signals from enemy communication networks. Incidentally, developments in the field of multi-static radars are on the anvil as well.

------

Image

2014 may also see forward movement in the area of directed energy weapons with Indian efforts in the arena of solid state lasers being unveiled. Much work has already been done in the field of gas dynamic laser(GDL) and chemical oxygen iodine lasers (COIL). For instance enclosed below(see Fig I) is the 'solid model' of a 25 kilowatt (KW) vehicle mounted GDL developed by DRDO's Laser Science and Technology Centre (LASTEC) that has been successfully tested against airborne in the past. The auto laser pointing system used on this 'transportable' GDL originally belongs to a 100 KW GDL. Solid state systems with 20 per cent laser efficiency have also been developed.


Image

Rustom-2 UAV (see fig 2 below) which will soon take to the skies for the first time. A future post at 'Geek at large' will detail some of the engine options for this UAV which has been designed to fly at 30,000 feet with an endurance of up to 35 hours putting it in the medium altitude long endurance (MALE) category.


Image

Image

DRDO is set to unveil the multi-caliber individual weapon system (MCIWS) being develped by the Armaments Research and Development Establishment (ARDE), Pune, which will allow operators to alternatively fire 7.62mm, 5.56mm and 6.8 mm rounds by changing the barrel group, breech block & magazine. Provision has also been made to mount an indigenous 40 mm Under Barrel grenade Launcher (UBGL) (pictured above) capable of firing programmable air-burst rounds. CCD camera day sight and thermal imaging night sight can also be mounted on its picatinny rail system to engage targets in day & night conditions. The weapon body is machined with Aluminium alloy and a metal insert based 30 Round engineering plastic magazine and adjustable butt are also featured. Ambidextrous features for cocking, lever change and magazine change have also been incorporated.

DRDO believes that MCIWS is a contemporary assault rifle and will help put an end to a recurring critique focused on the vintage of the existing INSAS family.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby vic » 04 Feb 2014 20:46

A super duper great and splendid design of Assault rifle. Seems like a combination of principles of HK-416, ARX-160 and FNSCAR.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby RoyG » 04 Feb 2014 20:55

[use of crude and uncalled for language deleted by admin] Why can't they just make the rail monolithic? Just privatize the r&d and production of small arms and it will be done right.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 04 Feb 2014 21:07

vic wrote:A super duper great and splendid design of Assault rifle. Seems like a combination of principles of HK-416, ARX-160 and FNSCAR.


Vic, can you point out what seems to be influenced/have the same principles from the pic above? Woudl make for a good discussion - we can continue in the small arms thread.

Added: Also, we could look at INSAS/Kalantak, and the Trichy Assault Rifle. Some principles may have been picked up from there as well.
Last edited by Karan M on 04 Feb 2014 21:11, edited 1 time in total.

Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 04 Feb 2014 21:09

RoyG wrote:Looks like sh*t. Why can't they just make the rail monolithic? Just privatize the r&d and production of small arms and it will be done right.


Unfortunately, the general quality of your posts leaves a lot to be desired. There is nothing remotely informative in it apart from useless venting.

Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 04 Feb 2014 21:21

These are my initial thoughts on some of the points mentioned for the MICWS. Overall, this seems to be a positive step for small arms in India.

DRDO is set to unveil the multi-caliber individual weapon system (MCIWS) being develped by the Armaments Research and Development Establishment (ARDE), Pune, which will allow operators to alternatively fire 7.62mm, 5.56mm and 6.8 mm rounds by changing the barrel group, breech block & magazine.


This is probably the biggest step forward - will address the repeated concerns of lack of stopping power of 5.56 mm. Having a 6.8mm provides another alternative to just having a 7.62mm.

Provision has also been made to mount an indigenous 40 mm Under Barrel grenade Launcher (UBGL) (pictured above) capable of firing programmable air-burst rounds.


This will be a radical advance over all small arms in the INSAS and any family present in current IA inventory. This will allow IA troops to engage enemy behind cover as well.

CCD camera day sight and thermal imaging night sight can also be mounted on its picatinny rail system to engage targets in day & night conditions.


A CCD camera should provide higher resolution long range capability and should improve troop accuracy, whereas the TI sight can be used for both day & night and will radically improve average unit capability especially at night (lack of TI sights in plenty is a grouse heard across CPMFs and line units of IA which are not in COIN). This sight is also likely tied to the F-INSAS program.

The weapon body is machined with Aluminium alloy


Lighter weight than steel

and a metal insert based 30 Round engineering plastic magazine


Should address complaints of brittle INSAS magazine in cold weather, damaged when dropped etc

and adjustable butt are also featured.


Shorter length than standard INSAS

Ambidextrous features for cocking, lever change and magazine change have also been incorporated.


Something the IA would have wanted for left handed soldiers; also that the weapon can be operated if the soldier is wounded in one hand.

DRDO believes that MCIWS is a contemporary assault rifle and will help put an end to a recurring critique focused on the vintage of the existing INSAS family.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby nash » 04 Feb 2014 21:41

DEW will probably become another layer of our BMD system and is there are any chances if we put this laser as CIWS or as long range aero-defence on future warship.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby vic » 04 Feb 2014 21:47

Karan you have covered most of things. It seems they have adopted lower receiver break open also which means problem of loosing zero will be reduced.

Straight line design to reduce muzzle climb. Machined aluminum body means better stiffness and good heat sink as well as being lighter.

So I will say it is HK-417 with ARX type barrel Change and caliber change features. Having said this, it would be very costly rifle, something like 1-2 lakh rupees each.

More importantly they avoided the pitfall of using composites, stamped metal sheet etc. The metal square housing the magzine well which seems detachable is a very nice design to provide caliber change for magazines. All in all, super well thought out design. Splendid.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby abhik » 04 Feb 2014 22:12

^^^
But what exactly id the Army looking for? Apart from being imported that is?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 04 Feb 2014 22:31

vic wrote:Karan you have covered most of things. It seems they have adopted lower receiver break open also which means problem of loosing zero will be reduced.

Straight line design to reduce muzzle climb. Machined aluminum body means better stiffness and good heat sink as well as being lighter.

So I will say it is HK-417 with ARX type barrel Change and caliber change features. Having said this, it would be very costly rifle, something like 1-2 lakh rupees each.

More importantly they avoided the pitfall of using composites, stamped metal sheet etc. The metal square housing the magzine well which seems detachable is a very nice design to provide caliber change for magazines. All in all, super well thought out design. Splendid.


Vic, can you take the pics and say MS Paint and point out all the features in the small arms thread? The INSAS was ~80s in design, this (and MSMC) are recent designs so would be good to analyze whats been done.
Also, why do you say HK-416? Is it per design of receiver or something else?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Sagar G » 04 Feb 2014 22:55

That rifle looks badass and three types of UGV's being worked in parallel 8)

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 04 Feb 2014 23:25

Karan M wrote:Excellent work by Saurav Jha:

http://ibnlive.in.com/blogs/sauravjha/2 ... -drdo.html

Image

Looks like props are moving, most probably undergoing Engine Ground Runs. Meanwhile Ghatak (AURA) has gone underground again. All references on the ADA website have been removed.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby vic » 05 Feb 2014 07:31

Karan M wrote:
vic wrote:Karan you have covered most of things. It seems they have adopted lower receiver break open also which means problem of loosing zero will be reduced.

Straight line design to reduce muzzle climb. Machined aluminum body means better stiffness and good heat sink as well as being lighter.

So I will say it is HK-417 with ARX type barrel Change and caliber change features. Having said this, it would be very costly rifle, something like 1-2 lakh rupees each.

More importantly they avoided the pitfall of using composites, stamped metal sheet etc. The metal square housing the magzine well which seems detachable is a very nice design to provide caliber change for magazines. All in all, super well thought out design. Splendid.


Vic, can you take the pics and say MS Paint and point out all the features in the small arms thread? The INSAS was ~80s in design, this (and MSMC) are recent designs so would be good to analyze whats been done.
Also, why do you say HK-416? Is it per design of receiver or something else?


Karan, will try to do it later on the weekend. At this point, only have access to tablet for surfing.


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby gnair » 06 Feb 2014 22:07

Sagar G wrote:Looks like props are moving, most probably undergoing Engine Ground Runs.

Would anyone have an inkling as to what engines they are, (2 X Pistons or turbines) ? Unable to verify from pic. if this is an Avgas or Jet-A beast. Thanks in advance.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 07 Feb 2014 00:05

They are piston driven. I think Saurav Jha's next piece is on the engines for Rustom. I am waiting for it :-)

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Victor » 07 Feb 2014 01:24

Rustom-2 is looking good. It looks capable of being armed and hopefully it will be at some point. What's left besides Saturn, Lycoming and Rotax for engines though. DRDO piston engines, including the Wankel rotary were shown off sometime back though they were much smaller.

About the rifles, multiple caliber must be difficult to execute in bullpup configuration hence the traditional layout in the interests of getting something out quickly.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vipul » 07 Feb 2014 08:11

BEL, Textron Systems sign MoU for unattended ground sensor system.

Navratna defence public sector undertaking Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Textron Systems Corporation, as a first step toward providing an unattended ground sensor (UGS) system to the Indian security agencies.

“The MicroObserver UGS system brings a new level of covertness, ease of use and performance for border security, surveillance and critical infrastructure protection missions. Textron Systems reports that its MicroObserver system has been fielded around the world in support of these applications,” the company said on the sidelines of the DefExpo 2014 land and naval systems exhibition that opened here Thursday.

“We’re looking forward to working with BEL to bring this critical surveillance system to Indian government agencies that will benefit from its wide range of proven capabilities,” explained Ian Walsh, Textron Defense Systems’ senior vice president and general manager.

“Bharat Electronics Limited expects the benefits of this system to filter down to various agencies responsible for the management of the Indian borders, thus fulfilling our overall objective of bringing in cutting-edge technologies to India,” said BEL director of marketing P.C. Jain.

Rather than showing just a single detection alarm, the MicroObserver UGS system provides actionable intelligence by displaying the position, direction and speed of personnel and vehicle threats, making it easier for border management agencies to locate, identify and intercept them.

Identification of targets is possible with imaging sensors that are triggered by sensor detections. These utilize proven target detection algorithms, and generate multiple images that appear as video. It also utilizes advanced tracking and seismic detection technology to significantly reduce false alarms over existing ground sensors.

With a self-forming, self-healing network, the MicroObserver UGS system automatically self-locates, using its embedded GPS capability, and can be deployed in a matter of minutes, even in cover of darkness.

This, along with sensor nodes that deliver a long mission life, significantly reduces the amount of time that border security forces need to spend deploying and maintaining the network, creating a cost-effective solution that requires minimal pre-deployment training.

Set up in Bangalore in 1954 under the defence ministry, BEL has grown into India’s foremost defence electronics company. BEL is a multi-product, multi-technology, multi-unit conglomerate with over 350 products in the areas of military communication, radars, naval systems, C4I systems, weapon systems, homeland security, telecom & broadcast systems, electronic warfare, tank electronics, electro-optics, professional electronic components and solar photovoltaic systems.BEL also provides turnkey system solutions like campus network and coastal surveillance. BEL has a pan-India presence with factories in Bangalore, Ghaziabad, Panchkula, Kotdwara, Navi Mumbai, Pune, Hyderabad, Machilipatnam and Chennai.

SanjayC
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby SanjayC » 07 Feb 2014 19:47

DRDO developing UAVs to track down Maoists
The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO)is developing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for the Central Reserve Police Force for use in the Naxal-hit areas of Chattisgarh and Jharkhand and would demonstrate the operational capability of the first such vehicle, Nishant, in a couple of months in Jagdalpur.

Giving details of the UAV project during a media interaction at Defexpo 2014 here, DRDO chief Avinash Chander said the vehicles being developed for CRPF would be able to help the forces trace and track down the ultra Left operatives in even thick forests.

To begin with, he said, CRPF had expressed the desire to procure 16 such UAVs for its operations. The force was earlier using the UAVs of National Technical Research Organisation and Indian Air Force, which were, however, not as effective in operations in thick forests.

Mr. Chander said the scientists of DRDO have worked closely with CRPF in developing the UAVs. "The two have worked closely on the configuration required for operation in such difficult areas.”

He said for UAVs meant to work in thick Indian forests, the organization was working on “lower frequency radars”.

The DRDO chief said the Army is also procuring Nishant for operations but its requirement was much different.

Sagar G
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Sagar G » 08 Feb 2014 13:42

Nation faces major cyber threat from imported defence systems, DRDO Chief

India faces a major cyber security challenge from imported Defence products which can come laden with snooping virus or malwares and should thus get involved with the production of weapon systems from their nascent stage, chief of Defence Research and Development Organisation Avinash Chander said on Friday.

Addressing the media at Defexpo 2014 here, Mr. Chander, who is also the Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister, said cyber security can be enhanced by getting involved with the software of the projects from the time they are developed so that “cocoons” could be built around them.

“For real security, the answer lies being involved with it from the design stage," he said, adding that similar control cannot be possessed over a system that is procured from outside.

Responding to a question on India’s ability to check for malware or snooping devices in advanced systems like the C-17 and C-130J Super Hercules aircraft procured from the United States, Mr. Chander said “when an equipment is bought from outside, you have no control.”

Stressing the need to protect the country’s military equipment from hacking, he said there was a need to ensure that hackers are not able to target the “critical or core systems”.

Noting that a major reason for the threat posed by malwares or snooping virus was that it was difficult to assess them in an “integrated system”, Mr. Chander said the problem was compounded by the fact that most foreign countries do not provide the source code for the equipment sold by them.

The DRDO chief said the problem behind unsecured procurements also had its genesis in the fact that many agencies took their own decisions concerning foreign purchases of equipment. He called for having guidelines to protect systems against subversion. "Cyber security is our biggest security challenge and requires a new paradigm in purchase processes. When we buy, we must buy with security in mind," he said.


The Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister said DRDO has also undertaken in a big way the development of cyber technology tools. It has also taken to installation of controlled networks and securing the local are networks.

Besides, it was working on its own security mobile systems, development of Avdhani processors, and developing its own routers, operating systems and analysis systems.”


Sonia/MMS combo not only damaged India economically but also did good in doing so militarily. Now keep guessing when will the sanctions and trojans strike.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby partha » 08 Feb 2014 14:16

Please read this article in full. Author Bharat Verma makes strong arguments for opening up defence sector.

http://www.indiandefencereview.com/news/defence-industry-reach-for-the-sky-2/

Nearly sixty-seven years of Independence and not a single combat aircraft has been produced by India! Despite the word ‘indigenisation’ featuring repeatedly in political rhetoric, one of the reasons is because of the vested interests within the government of the huge kickbacks associated with imports of military hardware. The perception that in every armament deal massive amounts of taxpayers’ money is siphoned off is largely correct. Blacklisting vendors is merely theatrics to divert public attention from this crass truth. The long, convoluted and tedious process of procurement of military hardware has been created deliberately by the politico-bureaucratic red-tape to extract larger kickbacks which eventually is the taxpayers’ liability!

Worse, it appears that the primary national objective is not to add military capabilities to ensure the nation’s security but to find ways to guarantee maximum kickbacks.

Worse, it appears that the primary national objective is not to add military capabilities to ensure the nation’s security but to find ways to guarantee maximum kickbacks. Frankly, nobody involved in the decision-making process is really concerned about the MMRCA being inducted on time to shore up the rapidly declining firepower of the Indian Air Force; or about the Indian Navy receiving submarines in time; or with the tremendous collateral damage the nation suffers on its borders with Pakistan because the infantry is ill-equipped. Despite similar levels of corruption, China never overlooks the primary objective of building military muscle. Frankly, no other country does except India!

It is amazing that the Indian genius that has successfully launched technologically advanced and sophisticated spacecraft to Mars or has finally mastered ‘cryogenic’ engine technology is unable to produce small arms such as a modern rifle, carbine or a pistol.

India’s increasing dependence on import of arms up to almost 80 per cent is attributable to multiple reasons. Instead of creating competition between the Defence Public Sector Units (DPSUs) and the private sector, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and the entrenched vested political interests continue to ignore colossal wastage of resources in the public sector. Elements in the government appear to have huge personal stakes in resources being funneled from the meagre defence budget under the guise of secrecy. The case of the Tatra trucks being re-invoiced at higher price by the Indian public sector unit clearly revealed the modus operandi of siphoning public funds.

The truth, however, is that substantial foreign assistance by way of technology was obtained in developing spacecraft, cryogenic engine, Light Combat Aircraft, the Arjun tank or missile systems. While one may take pride in naming the indigenous tank as ‘Arjun’, the fact is that the tank boasts of foreign components up to 55 per cent. In all fairness, even critics will agree there is nothing to be ashamed of in using imported technology till the capability for indigenous design is developed in-house. All modern hospitals in India today rely largely on imported equipment but at the same time, they earn millions in foreign exchange through medical tourism.

…it makes no sense for New Delhi to keep struggling with modernising the bullock cart!

The key to creating a modern defence industrial complex in India is by leapfrogging through the induction of latest defence technologies. Even as the world is awestruck with US ability to control drone attacks against targets in Afghanistan and Pakistan with the operator located in Texas, the Americans themselves moved on and introduced awesome drones underwater. Imagine the tactical havoc it can unleash on the navies of the world. The speed with which defence technologies are rapidly advancing is mind boggling. Therefore, it makes no sense for New Delhi to keep struggling with modernising the bullock cart!

Due to the positive and favourable geo-political environment prevailing, it is possible for India to leapfrog to a higher technological threshold through the induction of advanced defence technologies from the West. To contain the rising threat from China and Islamic fundamentalism, there is a synergy of purpose in the twenty-first century between India and the West. However, India will have to set its house in order by making the business environment friendly and enticing enough to attract massive Foreign Direct Investment and creation of joint ventures.

The key question for India, which in recent times, has flawlessly endeavored to reach Mars, therefore, is how to develop and manufacture a modern rifle, carbine or a pistol?

The answer lies in the promotion of joint ventures in the private sector with foreign companies which boast of know-how in this field. The foreign companies will be willing to bring in sunrise technologies in case they are provided attractive share holding of at least 49 per cent in the joint ventures. If India can encourage its private sector to set up at least two such joint ventures, a fair amount of self-sufficiency to supply small arms to the military, para-military as well as the state police forces will be ensured. This will also create competition for the DPSUs.

Furthermore, if these joint ventures with the help of the Government of India are provided adequate incentives and funds for further research to continuously upgrade technologies and weapons, a time will come when India will manufacture and export small arms to friendly countries. This is possible because of India’s young, technically-savvy demographic profile, which the international companies would like to exploit. New Delhi must intelligently learn to leverage this win-win situation.

The key to creating a modern defence industrial complex in India is by leapfrogging through the induction of latest defence technologies.

The Infantry soldier fights with a World War II carbine while the terrorist is equipped with AK-47; whilst the DRDO has been kept in business by funneling taxpayer’s resources, the INSAS rifles and LMG have not proven successful. The Future Infantry Soldier As A System (FINSAS) project is yet to take off. The DRDO continues to copy ideas from the brochures of the western firms, guzzling huge budgetary allocations yet is unable to produce a simple CQB weapon such as a carbine!

The reason India does produce and launch technology intensive satellites is primarily due to the pragmatic functional approach adopted by ISRO. The fact that it does not produce a modern rifle or a carbine is due to the wrong model adopted by the public sector defence units, which are extremely inefficient, wasteful and unwise. The ordnance factories and other DPSUs are not only mired in corruption but also outdated and antediluvian in their management practices. The entry of the private sector is therefore vital. A good example is the Pipavav Defence and Offshore Engineering Company Limited with ultramodern shipbuilding facilities.

The delay in production of the Scorpene submarine in Mazagon docks in Mumbai was primarily due to the time it took for DCNS France to upgrade and modernise its management practices. Or for that matter to ensure the smooth production of Rafale in India by HAL, Dassault Aviation needs to conduct a gaps analysis to plug the quality loopholes. Unless HAL facilities are brought up to international standards, a modern fourth generation combat aircraft such as the Rafale cannot be built.

Another issue of concern is that HAL itself is overburdened with the production of diverse types of aircraft. With the facilities at HAL fully committed to production of the Su-30 MKI, it is unable to provide product support to the IAF for the Su-30 fleet. It would be prudent for New Delhi to create, back and fund two private sector aviation companies not only as a competitor to HAL but also to allow the creation of an Indian equivalent of ‘Boeing’ or ‘Lockheed’, or ‘Airbus’ group.

New Delhi must learn to walk before it runs. It will be prudent to identify initial and basic areas in aerospace, land, sea and underwater regimes where the energies of the private sector should be encouraged to form joint-ventures with foreign companies.

New Delhi, however, must learn to walk before it runs. It will be prudent to identify initial and basic areas in aerospace, land, sea and underwater regimes where the energies of the private sector should be encouraged to form joint-ventures with foreign companies. For example, the American company that will supply 4,000 LMGs to India also has the technologies to make small arms such as rifles, carbines, pistols, grenades and rocket-launchers. Since small arms like rifles, carbines and pistols are required not only for the military but also for the para-military and the state-police forces, if a company like this sets up a joint-venture in the private sector, this can help meet the huge long-term Indian requirements. There are two aspects involved. First, rapid Transfer of Technology and second, from thereon, the ability of this joint venture to continuously research, develop and upgrade technologies for newer versions and models in the future.

Similarly, blacklisting foreign vendors is counter-productive due to three reasons. First, there are only a few companies that manufacture 155mm guns and if 60 per cent of these are blacklisted by India on charges of corruption, we are axing the very branch we sit on. Second, the blacklisted companies belong to large defence groups of companies. For example, AgustaWestland is part of Finmeccanica group, which is involved in various fruitful activities in India. Third and a vital fact, that it is the Indians sitting in seats of power who are demanding bribes and not the foreign vendor. But no action is ever initiated against Indians who are siphoning off taxpayers’ money through kickbacks. They should be taken to task first.

The primary objective of creating a modern defence industry is to enhance the war fighting capabilities of the armed forces. It will not be possible to overnight produce modern weapons, as these processes will require an initial gestation period. Major imports of weaponry at the initial stage, therefore, would be necessary to keep the military machine lean and mean. Hence New Delhi must resist the temptation to cancel, delay on flimsy pretexts and re-order tenders. India’s inconsistent behavior not only makes her a laughing stock but also increases huge costs subsequently to the taxpayer.

Similarly, as India learns to walk before it runs, it must be farsighted enough to join the global factory hub and supply chain. This is important because no country today is capable of manufacturing armaments in all fields by itself. Leading European aerospace majors manufacture components for military hardware in a number of countries. Similarly, US companies import components from Europe. This is due to the rapidly changing defence technologies and extraordinary costs involved. We must learn to pool in our resources with like-minded countries. Our options are vast – ranging from the West to Israel, Russia and Japan; with our threat perceptions being similar, democracies must stand together.

New Delhi must resist the temptation to cancel, delay on flimsy pretexts and re-order tenders.

With their advanced technologies, defence companies in the West are attracted to the vast Indian market. Similarly, India should aspire to achieve the best defence technologies available in the world to upgrade the military capabilities of its armed forces. Whilst the synergy of interests between both exists, New Delhi has failed to leverage these.

India has a young demographic profile with an extraordinary reservoir of brainpower to make this a distinct possibility. However, with rapid advancement in defence technologies this is only possible if India stops ‘reinventing the wheel’ and enters into mutually profitable joint ventures with international partners with the aim to leapfrog the technological gap by kick-starting the defence sector at a higher threshold.

Sagar G
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Sagar G » 08 Feb 2014 14:27

^^^ What a truckload of BS the article is, promotes western maal and actively disses indigenous programs. Fat foreign lifafa arrived it seems.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 08 Feb 2014 18:11

Bharat Verma represents a section of the so called strategic analysts who have their mind made up, reality be darned.

>>>The Infantry soldier fights with a World War II carbine while the terrorist is equipped with AK-47; whilst the DRDO has been kept in business by funneling taxpayer’s resources, the INSAS rifles and LMG have not proven successful. The Future Infantry Soldier As A System (FINSAS) project is yet to take off. The DRDO continues to copy ideas from the brochures of the western firms, guzzling huge budgetary allocations yet is unable to produce a simple CQB weapon such as a carbine!

Yeah sure.


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