India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

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Postby JCage » 07 Feb 2008 02:54

Indias SOSUS! :)

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Postby A Sharma » 09 Feb 2008 06:23

NAL looking for industrial partnership for Saras

The third prototype, which will be the production standard aircraft is in an advanced stage of manufacturing. This prototype will have a significantly larger percentage of composite components (upto 50 percent by weight) consisting of wing, horizontal tail, vertical tail and other fairings in addition to the control surfaces.
Availability of production standard aircraft : End 2008
Certification by DGCA : End 2009

Indian Air Force is likely to be the launch customer for this aircraft. They have indicated a requirement of 35 aircraft initially but this is likely to go upto 50 aircraft subsequently.

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Postby K Mehta » 09 Feb 2008 11:54

Defence PSUs can export
The Defence Ministry has cleared the decks for the export of various indigenous state-of-the art defence products manufactured by the Defence Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs).

The Defence Ministry’s directive includes clearance for the surface-to-air Akash Missiles, anti-tank Nag missiles, the Arjun heavy and medium weight tanks and sophisticated radar and survillence systems, Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Chief Controller, Dr Prahalada told reporters in Bangalore on Friday. “ More than 30 countries have evinced interest in various products and have approached us and these countries have asked for details regarding the export procedures and time taken for delivery,â€

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Postby JaiS » 11 Feb 2008 04:52

Indian Navy developing new generation UAV

New Delhi (PTI): The Indian Navy is working on a 'path breaking' project to develop a new generation and longer-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to have deeper penetration in data collection and reconnaissance mechanism. The rotary wing UAV, designed like a helicopter and to be built jointly by Navy and the state-run aerospace major Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), is expected to transform naval warfare.

"We are working with HAL to develop a new generation UAV on a helicopter platform. It will be a path breaking initiative and transform naval warfare," Navy Chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta said on the sidelines of a function here.

He said the UAV's payload bay will carry sophisticated art reconnaissance equipment, maritime patrol sensors and data transmitters to enable it to record images in enemy territory and transmit them back to naval bases.

HAL Chairman and Managing Director Ashok Baweja said funding and sanction for the project are already getting into place and it will be started soon. "We have finalised the concept. The project clearance is on the way. We will start it shortly," he told PTI after the function on Wednesday.

Asked about involvement of any foreign company in the project, Baweja said the HAL has already identified the foreign partner for the project but did not divulge further details.

"We have already identified the foreign partner. We will require their help in the project as there are certain inputs that we will need," he said. He said the payloads of the UAV, apart from surveillance equipment, will include larger fuel packs for longer endurance.


{ Israel is the foreign partner ?}

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Postby JCage » 12 Feb 2008 09:44

AK to visit DRDO labs in Bangalore
http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=35307

The Defence Minister Shri A K Antony will visit Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) and Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) during his day long visit to Bangalore tomorrow.

At the ADA, Shri Antony will hold discussions with senior officials and is expected to take a look at the System Design and Evaluation Facility, Weapons Rig and an exhibition. The ADA is the nodal agency for the design and development of Light Combat Aircraft – Tejas for Air Force and Navy with Hindustan Aeronautical Limited as principal partner. Eight limited series production aircrafts are being manufactured by ADA. During his visit of the Aircraft Research and Development Centre, the minister will be taken to the Iron Bird and the Hanger of the Light Combat Aircraft – ‘Tejas’. This will be followed by his witnessing a Flight Demonstration of the Tejas at the National Flight Test Centre.

At ADE, scientists will brief the minister on products and exhibits on display there as well as simulation activities at the centre. Established in 1959, the thrust areas of ADE are Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, flight simulation, combat aircraft systems and air weapons. The major projects executed by ADE are Lakshya, Nishant UAV, LCA Simulator and Sudarshan Laser Guided Gun. A visit to the Kaveri Engine Assembly Bay and Test House at GTRE and display of Radars at LRDE, as well as an exhibition on the activities of ADE have also been lined up for the Defence Minister.

LRDE is one of the premier R&D establishments set up under the DRDO to address the Services needs in the field of Radar, communication systems and related technologies. The laboratory has on its hand two major active phased array radar projects, - a radar for an airborne platform dedicated for early warning, surveillance and control (AEW&C) and a ‘Medium Power Radar’ for the Indian Air Force with 300 km range.

Samir / HS


MFCR Spin Off # 1.

IMHO, even the 2248 for the Navy is a stop gap. We are going to see the Programme Air Defence MFCR derivatives take that role up as well.

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Postby bala » 12 Feb 2008 11:22

A Sharma wrote:NAL looking for industrial partnership for Saras

The third prototype, which will be the production standard aircraft is in an advanced stage of manufacturing. This prototype will have a significantly larger percentage of composite components (upto 50 percent by weight) consisting of wing, horizontal tail, vertical tail and other fairings in addition to the control surfaces.
Availability of production standard aircraft : End 2008
Certification by DGCA : End 2009

Indian Air Force is likely to be the launch customer for this aircraft. They have indicated a requirement of 35 aircraft initially but this is likely to go upto 50 aircraft subsequently.


29 Jan 2008 09:47 pm on Civil Aviation Thread in Technology & Econ Forum I had said the following:
I was talking to chap connected with Saras. He says the craft is just 150 kg overweight, in the scheme of things not to worry about. However the cost structure for HAL is mighty high, bloated labor cannot produce the craft at economical prices, that is what he contends. Now what happened to the 15-20 seater Saras, how far are we.


Turns out this guy was right, HAL will not make Saras and weight reduction is accomplished by more composites. All in all a good thing to get a hold on civil aircraft production. Next project for NAL is to scale up and go for 50+ passengers craft with jet engines. Slow and steady progress from a small 2 seater to 15 seater to 50 seater and beyond.

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Postby A Sharma » 12 Feb 2008 20:06

Work on Saras aircraft moving as per schedule

Work on the multi-purpose aircraft, Saras, was progressing significantly and was "moving as per schedule," a senior Saras was in operation, Air Commodore M Matheswaran, Commandant, ATSE, told reporters here.

Speaking on the progress on the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) front, P S Subramanayam, Director, Aeronautical Development Agency, said the development of LCA was progressing and about 15 to 20 per cent of the work remains.

"Performance wise we have been able to convince the users and should be able to push for the initial operation clearance which we target for 2010", he said.

Work on Saras, the first Indian multipurpose civilian aircraft in the Light Transport Aircraft category and designed by National Aerospace Laboratory (NAC) in cooperation with the Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), began in 1991.

Saras first prototype completed its maiden flight at HAL airport on May 2004 with a flight duration of 20 minutes and an altitude of 2000 metres. However, the prototype was overweight by around 900 kgs.

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Postby Vipul » 12 Feb 2008 21:19

BAE Systems and Mahindra Defence to discuss co-development of Indian Mine Protected Vehicle news.

BAE Systems and Mahindra Defence are in talks to jointly develop an Indian mine protected vehicle based on BAE Systems' highly successful RG-31 mine protected vehicle.

BAE Systems has already supplied 165 mine protected vehicles known as Casspir to the Indian Army since 1999.

The all-steel, welded armor, monocoque hull of the RG-31 protects occupants from anti-tank mine detonations and is proven to have saved the lives of countless crews from mines and roadside bomb attacks. With a modular interior layout the vehicle can be configured as an APC, command vehicle, ambulance, surveillance vehicle and for many other uses. In standard APC configuration, this air-conditioned vehicle carries a crew of 8-10.

At this year's 5th Defence and Naval Exhibition (DEFEXPO), a BAE Systems RG-31 will be on display on the Mahindra Defence stand.

Nearly 600 RG-31s are in service with the United States, Canada, and other forces, including the United Nations. Under the U.S. Department of Defense's Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) programme, 624 RG-31s have been ordered.

''Mahindra is an enormously capable world class company with the skills to become a strong partner for BAE Systems on the development of a mine protected vehicle for India,'' said Mike Mendoza, BAE Systems' managing director India.

BAE Systems is the premier global defence and aerospace company delivering a full range of products and services for air, land and naval forces, as well as advanced electronics, information technology solutions and customer support services.

Mahindra Defence Systems is a division of the Mahindra Group. The company today is a leading provider of high mobility and light bullet proof vehicles to the Indian armed forces, paramilitary and police forces. There are over 500 Rakshaks and up-armoured Scorpios in service in the Indian Army and security/police forces in India and abroad.

''Mahindra Defence Systems is in the business of providing vehicle protection to defence forces,'' said Brigadier Khutub Hai, Chief Executive of Mahindra Defence Systems. ''Our cooperation with BAE Systems, who are leaders in this field, for joint production of mine protected vehicles is a strategic fit for our vehicle armouring business."

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Postby JaiS » 13 Feb 2008 11:44

Defence market to touch US$700mn by 2010: ASSOCHAM

The current defence market for private sector firms in India is estimated to cross over US$ 700mn and expected to register a growth of 30% by 2010, according to the study brought out by The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM) and Ernst & Young.

The highlights of the study released by ASSOCHAM President, Venugopal N. Dhoot today says there are more than 5,000 companies supplying around 20% to 25% of components and sub-assemblies to state owned companies.


Currently about 70% of the procurement in value terms, is from foreign sources because the Indian public sector cannot deliver in terms of quality or speed on either research or production. And only about 30% of the orders placed in India - or 9% of the total - goes to the private sector.

The study observed that barring the Air Force, there is an equal distribution of procurement towards imports & indigenisation. Navy has increased its share of imports over the years whereas the Air Force has started focussing on indigenisation as well. As far as the spending pattern of the Army is concerned, the focus has shifted between imports & indigenisation over the period 2001 to 2005 and the government has set a 70% target for procuring its defence requirements from indigenous sources by 2010.

The public-private partnership PPP enables the MoD to exploit industrys comparative advantage and expertise where the generation of in house military capability is less cost effective, thereby ensuring value-for money, through life defence support. PPP reduces incentives for ex post supplier opportunism because contracts are configured to create forms of gainshare or incentivisation that provide value-added benefits for both MoD and industry. Through mutual trust, the combining of complementary assets and the identification of shared objectives.

Dhoot says, the survey of the various advantages of increasing public private participation and its leading to indigenisation shows that it is definitely one of the favourable measures of defence production prevalent in the global defence industry. One of the most distinguished advantages of indigenisation of defence production was witnessed in the case of Germany wherein more than 50% of money spent on equipment inside Germany came back to the state in one form of tax or another.

Since the mid-1990s, the arms industry has been characterized by increasing concentration through mergers and acquisitions (M&As). As a result of the merger and acquisition activity since the end of the cold war, there has been a clear change in the structure of the industry. At the end of the cold war the international arms industry was not very concentrated, with the top 5 companies accounting for 22 per cent of the total arms sales of the SIPRI Top 100. By 2005, the study observed arm industry this had changed significantly, with the top 5 firms accounting for 43 per cent of total arms sales.

Globally, companies based in Europe are looking to capture market share from US firms. Airbus and Boeing have a long-standing rivalry; the satellite launch industry is becoming dominated by European firms, with other space opportunities migrating there; and European defence contractors are becoming more aggressive in bidding for Pentagon contracts. In defence, the European incursions have included acquisitions of US companies as well as strategic partnerships.

The IT sector which has in the recent times become a major partner for the defence forces across the world has also seen active transaction activity in its midst. Cisco Systems acquisition of BroadWare Technologies, while small in dollars, highlights the rising demand for companies that make video surveillance gear. Driving that trend is the confluence of US homeland security concerns and the spread of sophisticated security networks based on Internet technologies.

In 2006, venture capitalists and other investors poured $100 million into late-stage video surveillance technology companies. Experts think the market is ready for consolidation. To date, most of the buyers have ranged from companies that offer security and building infrastructure services, such as GE and Honeywell, to defence companies such as L-3 Communications, Inc.

Defence contractors are expected to seek out opportunities for growth beyond traditional defence businesses, especially in civilian government technology services and homeland security. A number of companies have strong balance sheets, which give the companies the means to acquire the right deal. High multiples for acquired companies, however, may make it difficult for companies to make acquisitions pay off.

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Postby Vipul » 15 Feb 2008 19:39

Tatas announce deal with Sikorsky to build helicopter cabins.

In yet another milestone in its entry into the defence sector, the Tatas on Friday announced a tie-up with US helicopter firm Sikorsky to manufacture chopper cabins in India.

The Sikorsky Aircraft Corp signed an MoU with Tata Advanced Systems (TAS) to manufacture S-92 helicopter cabins in India.

"India represents an expansive rotorcraft market with enormous potential and opportunity," Sikorsky President Jeffrey P Pino said in a statement here.

The companies, however, refused to divulge details regarding the value of the deal.

It said the Tata Industries believed that this manufacturing facility for S-92 chopper cabins would offer productivity gains to the US firm while bringing new manufacturing technology to India.

The announcement came a day after Tata Industries Limited and Boeing Company announced their decision to form a joint venture company that will initially have over USD 500 million of defence-related aerospace component work in India for export to Boeing and its global customers.

Sikorsky, based in Stratford, Connecticut, is one of the world leaders in helicopter design, manufacturing and service.

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Small is the new big

Postby sunilUpa » 16 Feb 2008 15:06

Small is the new big

A good read, by Sandeep Unninathan.

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Postby JCage » 17 Feb 2008 02:06

From Indian defence forum and poster sayareakd

DRDOs INS-GPS for cruise missiles.

http://img263.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... 041iz5.jpg

S wrote:DRDO guys was very nice enough to give complete detail of this product, this is one of the three brain of the missile, it give feed back to the guidance computer, which in turn control the fins.

Working miniature model of fins was also on display.

This system can be used with GPS or without GPS, it is very accurate and he give lot more details, I wish I had voice recorder.


Wonder if it is the new RLG-INS one.

2.

BFSR-SR with an optronics imager on top.

http://img84.imageshack.us/my.php?image ... 013gf4.jpg

3.

Brahmos Land Based Units
http://img89.imageshack.us/my.php?image ... 016sg8.jpg

All this has been done by ECIL & partners. Check out the variety of comms options available.

4.

Prithvi Submunitions dispenser?!
http://img504.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... 035ti1.jpg

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Ordnance units seek foreign tie-ups

Postby sunilUpa » 18 Feb 2008 06:39

Ordnance units seek foreign tie-ups

NEW DELHI: Even as international arms companies are tying up with Indian private sector companies, the country’s oldest defence undertaking, the Ordnance Factory Board (OFB), is planning to take the same route to beat competition. The tie-ups include, perhaps for the first time, those with Israeli and U.S. companies besides the old ally Russia.

OFB chairman Sadipta Ghosh said 32 projects were at various stages of induction, testing and development and he was confident of increasing the turnover beyond Rs. 10,000 crore in the next 3-4 years. This would mean an increase of 40 per cent over the expected turnover of Rs. 6,942 crore this fiscal.


The OFB has submitted proposals to the government to undertake upgrading of 155 mm (Bofors) and 105 mm artillery guns with tie-ups with Israel’s Elbit and Tata. Following the blacklisting of the South African company Denel, the OFB has managed to produce shells for the Bofors gun. It has already supplied 10,000 rounds this year and import substitution of this item will be 50,000 rounds in the next fiscal. Ammunition for the 130 mm gun has been produced in a tie-up with IMI at $200 less than its cost in Israel. An order of 10,000 shells for the Army has been executed.

The OFB also took up the production of anti-material rifles (bunker busters) which was also hit due to the ban on Denel. A contract for the bulk production of these rifles for the Border Security Force will be signed next week. It has also developed the next generation of ‘Kalantak’ 5.56 micro light range of assault rifles, currently being tested by the Army, while the Indian Air Force and the Ministry of Home Affairs have already placed indents.


The phase of manufacturing T-90 tanks with completely and semi-knocked down kits is over with the OFB making five tanks this year and planning a rollout of 100 next year. The U.S. company Holicon is collaborating for the manufacture of the future generation anti-aircraft gun, the 35 mm Skyshield, according to the OFB chairman


Good news about Kalantak.

Any one knows which is this US based Hlicon comany is? Never heard of them..
.
.
.
Don't bother Googling it, it rhymes with Oerlikon, and I am sure, that's what DDM meant. Oerlicon Contraves is a part of Rhinemetal and I hope we are also getting AHEAD munition with it.

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Postby Vipul » 18 Feb 2008 20:40

M&M ties up with Italian firm for underwater weapon systems.

NEW DELHI: Homegrown farm equipment-to- software group Mahindra & Mahindra on Monday signed an agreement for a joint venture with Italy's Whitehead Alenia Sistemi Subacquei (WASS) for developing underwater weapon systems.

The agreement was signed between M&M's defence arm Mahindra Defence Systems (MDS) and WASS, the maritime underwater subsidiary of $12-billion Finmeccanica Group.

The two firms would jointly explore the possibility of developing underwater weapon systems for Indian and foreign markets.

"The JV would initially develop underwater weapon systems for the Indian market, but in the long run we have our eyes set on the global market as well," M&M Vice Chairman and Managing Director Anand Mahindra said at the Defence Expo.

He said presently, the Indian market for underwater weapon systems stands at around 500 million dollars.

MDS, which is primarily into land defence systems like bulletproof vehicles, is aggressively looking at diversifying into other peripheries, Mahindra added.

"The total Indian market for land systems stands at $5 billion, in which we intend to have a share of around 60 per cent or $3 billion," Mahindra said.

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Postby Vipul » 18 Feb 2008 20:58

Tatas, Israel Aerospace tie up for missiles.

JV will also help other firms develop technology as suppliers.

Tata Advanced Systems and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), Israel’s largest defence and aerospace company, agreed to establish a joint venture to make missiles, pilotless drones, electronic warfare systems and other defence equipment.

Ratan Tata, chairman, Tata Sons, and and Itzhak Nissan, president and chief executive officer of state-owned IAI, today signed a memorandum of understanding forming the joint venture, on the sidelines of the DefExpo 2008 in New Delhi. The JV will also help other Indian companies to develop technology as suppliers to IAI.

“We believe that the coming together of Tatas and IAI will positively impact the growth of the defence industry in India and complement the efforts of our Defence labs, Ordnance factory board and defence public sector undertakings,â€

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Postby Sanjay M » 18 Feb 2008 21:01


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Postby Tilak » 19 Feb 2008 06:10

Latest Kalashnikovs to be made in India
19 Feb 2008, 0227 hrs IST,Pradeep Thakur,TNN

NEW DELHI: With the 61st anniversary of the famed Kalashnikov AK-47 series around the corner, the Russian manufacturer of the world's best-known assault rifle announced that the latest AK-100 series will be manufactured in India.

The Russian arms company, Izhmash, will shortly issue a licence to an Indian private arms manufacturer with whom negotiations are at an advanced stage. Company spokesperson Alexander Xavarzin said assembling of the AK-103 will begin in a year's time and full-scale manufacturing would start once the technology transfer takes place.

The company hopes to sell the gun to various police and paramilitary forces in the country as well as the army. It will not be exported.

The popularity of the assault rifle can be gauged from the fact that originals account for only 8-12% of the total world sales of the Kalashnikov series - the rest are all Kalashnikov clones being manufactured in several countries, according to the Izhmash spokesperson.

Unlike the AK-47 rifle which has a wooden base, the new generation AK-100 series is much lighter and has a body made of plastic. Xavarzin said the plastic component makes it an all-weather rifle, well suited to Indian conditions where soldiers have to trek at high altitudes for a number of days at a stretch.

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Postby Rudranathh » 19 Feb 2008 21:17

Looks like an follow on order for the previous order given to drdo.

India to buy NBC equipment worth Rs 2000 crore

New Delhi, Feb 19 (UNI) Amid increased threats of weapons of mass destruction falling into the hands of non-state actors, India has decided to buy sophisticated equipment worth Rs 2000 crore to counter nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) terrorism and covert attacks.

Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Chief Controller (Research and Development) Dr W Selvamurthy said the equipment would enable troops to operate in an NBC battlefield.

Addressing a news conference here, he said the Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) of the Defence Ministry had cleared the purchase.

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Postby Vipul » 20 Feb 2008 01:10

BEML signs MoUs with foreign companies.

Defence PSU BEML Ltd has signed a number of agreements including one with Canada's General Dynamics to manufacture four-wheeled armored patrol vehicle for use by security forces in difficult terrains along the border.

"The vehicle is small arms and mine protected and will be manufactured in India for domestic and global market," BEML chairman and managing director V R S Natarajan told reporters at the DefExpo here.

He said the company has also signed an MoU with Britain's WFEL group to produce 46 m of dry support bridges for the Indian Army.

The company has also signed an agreement with SAS group, a 100 per cent subsidiary of France's Thales Group for supply and manufacture of Self Propelled Mine Burrier, he said.

Besides these, BEML has extended its MoU with Britain's TATRA SIPOX for Technology transfer, production and marketing of 20 tonne to 25 tonne capacity Tippers to Indian Metal, Mining and Coal Market.

Natarajan said the company would pay an interim dividend of 55 per cent on the paid-up share capital of the company for 2007-08. The board of directors approved the proposal during their meeting held yesterday.

During the last fiscal, BEML has paid 40 per cent interim dividend, Natarajan said, adding the company has an MoU target of Rs 2,756 crore for 2007-08.

BEML is a premier ISO 9001-2000 Company in India and the second largest manufacturer of earthmoving equipment in Asia. It has emerged as a major base for manufacture and supply of various land and ground support equipment to defence forces.

In the expo, the company unveiled a combat vehicle with high-tech communication and surveillance systems.

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Postby JCage » 20 Feb 2008 01:15

BEML is doing a lot of SKD bashing with foreign collab. My question is- why should BEML vehicles w/these foreign partners be given any preference unless BEML can show that their contribution is significant, and they fill a niche which the local pvt/other public industry doesnt fill?
BEMLs work with DRDO etc is laudable, but then even so, PSUs (or pvt firms) shouldnt just tie up with foreign firms for the margins and do SKD/CKD bashing- same holds for Tata as well, with their recent announcements. I wish there was an transparent way to audit each of these firms and claims, as there is for the public sector which is at least beholden to GOI and audit reports are public.

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Postby A Sharma » 20 Feb 2008 18:22

'Lakshya' flight tested successfully

India's indigenously developed pilotless target aircraft 'Lakshya' was successfully flight tested from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur, about 15 km from here today.

PTA Lakshya, fitted with a digitally controlled improved engine, was developed by the aeronautics development establishment, Bangalore, to perform discreet aerial reconnaissance of battlefield and target acquisition.

Usually the flight duration of the six-feet-long micro light aircraft is 30-35 minutes and after covering three to four laps in the sky it drops to the ground with the help of a parachute.

'Lakshya' had been tested several times earlier and to further check its engine viability and duration enhancement, today's test was undertaken from the launch complex-2 of the ITR, defence sources said adding "it is a routine trial."

'Lakshya', a sub-sonic, re-usable aerial target system, is remote controlled from the ground and designed to impart training to both air-borne and air defence pilots.

It has already been inducted into Indian Air Force since 2000, the sources said.

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Postby A Sharma » 20 Feb 2008 19:13

BEL joins hands with Israel's Rafael to produce missile components

India's radar and communication major Bharat Electronics Ltd (BEL) will become the second defence PSU to make missile components in collaboration with leading Israeli armament firm Rafael.

The Israeli company, which has bagged three major missile contracts -- anti-naval Barak missile and spider air-to-ground short reaction missiles -- will outsource the work of making components of its short-range missiles to Bangalore-based BEL.

"We have signed a preliminary agreement with Bharat Electronics to produce parts of missiles, missile electronics and optronics," Rafael's communication manager Gila Harel told PTI here.

The pact envisages BEL producing the missile components in India with technical collaboration of Rafael for the Army, Air Force and Navy.

The BEL might get a larger slice and technology knowhow transfer at a later stage.

The product range being offloaded would include air-to- air missile, surface-to-air missile, anti-tank missile. The agreement to this effect was signed during the just concluded Defence Expo.

"Details of the agreement are yet to be worked out. But we will transfer the knowledge and provide BEL all necessary technical help to produce the missile components," she said.

Harel said if the agreement and partnership goes well in future, then there is every possibility of Rafael joining hands with BEL to produce entire range of missiles in India itself.

Hyderabad-based Bharat Dynamics was the first PSU to make missile components in collaboration with Rafael.

According to reports, the Israelis are also collaborating in India's maiden attempt to make a beyond visual range air-to-air Astra missile.

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Postby sunilUpa » 20 Feb 2008 19:37

DRDO has brand new webpage! Check it out.

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Postby Raj Malhotra » 20 Feb 2008 19:38

Let me also tell you as to why this term "MoU" is used instead of agreement. Any agreement would require scrutiny of Govt at various levels so the relevant head of concerned PSU/Department is approached to sign a "MoU"which is worded in a manner to make it binding agreement. Thus largely all MoU are personal whims and fancies without any major picture

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Postby Anabhaya » 20 Feb 2008 19:38

A Sharma wrote:'Lakshya' flight tested successfully

India's indigenously developed pilotless target aircraft 'Lakshya' was successfully flight tested from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur, about 15 km from here today.


Damn. Not another Lakshya. 8)

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Postby sunilUpa » 20 Feb 2008 20:04

Look what I found..(disclaimer- sorry if posted earlier)

DRDO, golden saga of success

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Postby Rudranathh » 20 Feb 2008 20:24

sunilUpa wrote:Look what I found..(disclaimer- sorry if posted earlier)

DRDO, golden saga of success

Super work sunil.

Win-Win Solution for Army’s High Altitude Light Helicopter

The Indian Army has been endeavouring to purchase a large number of high-altitude high-performance helicopters since the Kargil conlict. Early attempts to import the helicopter from Eurocopter were thwarted by HAL. They could prove that although of an older design, Cheetah, made by them, could have comparable performance with the Ecuriel Eurocopter. Actual light trials conducted in the high-altitude Himalayan region by
both Cheetah and Ecuriel testiied in HAL’s favour and the import proposal was scrapped.


Subsequently HAL undertook to upgrade the Cheetah with a more powerful engine to provide the Army with a high-altitude high-performance helicopter. This has been accomplished since then. However, the Foreign Lobby pressure for import continued, and based on a tender the Eurocopter military variant AS550 Fennec and a Bell 407 were short-listed and finally the Eurocopter AS550 Fennec was selected. Recently the Defence Ministry scrapped the contract for import citing some procedural lapse. :D

Whatever be the reasons for this scrapping of the contract, it is an opportunity for all concerned to work together to meet the Army’s need. It is a fact to be noted that neither the AS550 Fennec nor the Bell 407 helicopter is designed for our requirements in the high altitude border area.
HAL’s re-engined Cheetah, which already holds a world record, will be an ideal immediate solution. This helicopter is now upgraded with a more powerful engine and HAL has already supplied a few helicopters and everyone seems to be agreeing on their better performance. It would be desirable for the Army to place orders with HAL for the Cheetal (upgraded Cheetah) to meet their immediate requirements for the next two-three years and persuade HAL to take up the development of high-altitude high-performance helicopters in collaboration with a risk sharing partner.

In fact HAL had already made the conceptual design of a very high altitude helicopter, the LOH, and the speciications of the same are far superior to what is proposed to be imported. With the technologies developed, such a helicopter can become a reality in four-five years. This period could perhaps be further reduce by outsourcing considerable amount of work to private sector industries in India with considerable capabilities and IT-enabled design and manufacturing facilities in aerospace.

Partnership with established helicopter design and manufacturing firms from overseas on a cost and work sharing basis could also be beneicial.
For this, HAL and Indian private sector industries must be proactive and play a vital role. They should urge the Government not to re-tender for a sub-standard imported helicopter.

The design and development of a really superior high-performance high-altitude indigenous helicopter with the HAL in the lead and in partnership with Indian and overseas industries is the most desired option.

It is in the interest of building on our competence, emerging as a leader in helicopter design and development and being in a position to continue to meet the needs of the armed forces. This option will also be beneicial to partners including the user. Growth through partnership and synergizing our strength for better performance to make a superior product will benefit all.

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Postby Ananth » 20 Feb 2008 21:23

http://ia.rediff.com/money/2008/feb/20nasscom.htm

We designed a board for defence applications: The V8TS Board (VME based 8-TigerSHARC and PowerPC board). The board is ideal for usage in radar, sonar and naval applications. The V8TS will revolutionise the development of defence, medical and communication applications like electronic and network centric warfare systems, infra-red search and tracking systems, mobile surveillance systems and airborne systems.

The V8TS is an extremely powerful dual sub-system product consisting of digital signal processing and control processing on a single 6U VME platform. This is one of the first designs that combine the power of PowerPC and Multi-DSPs on a single platform. It took about an year to develop this product.


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Postby A Sharma » 21 Feb 2008 01:08

India gears up for wars of future

NEW DELHI: India is launching a futuristic programme to develop sophisticated NBC (nuclear-biological-chemical) defence technology to counter the threats posed by hostile armies or terrorists resorting to such warfare.

The new programme, being spearheaded by Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), comes after the Army has already inducted Rs 700 crore worth of NBC defence equipment, with another Rs 2,000 crore worth of it in the pipeline after being approved by the defence ministry recently.

''The new programme, initially pegged at Rs 300 crore, will include unmanned aerial and ground vehicles fitted with NBC detection sensors. The first prototypes are already being developed," DRDO chief controller Dr W Selvamurthy told TOI . Other thrust areas include nanotechnology-based biosensors, laser-based detection for chemical clouds, self-contained inflatable NBC shelters and a 'model' hospital to handle NBC victims.

''We are also developing smart vests, impregnated with silver nano particles, for decontamination of biological agents and monitoring of vital signs. Also in the pipeline are more sophisticated NBC suits, with thermo-electric cooling," said Selvamurthy. With early detection and protection being of critical importance when faced with NBC attacks, DRDO, Atomic Energy Commission and Department of Biotechnology have also developed 'standard operating protocols' to handle such emergencies.

The 1.13-million Army, on its part, says NBC protection equipment is being given 'in the desired numbers' to troops to counter any eventuality, even though NBC weapons are 'not war-fighting weapons' and only 'mad persons' would even think of using them. ''Lot of our equipment like T-72 tanks and BMP infantry combat vehicles are being equipped with advanced NBC protection suites," an officer said.

The Army, in fact, has evolved a long-term perspective plan designed to address NBC threats to India's national security. ''In consonance with it, formations and units are being trained and equipped to protect themselves and fight successfully in an NBC environment," he added. The broad areas on which DRDO is working are early detection, personal and collective protection, decontamination and medical management to equip soldiers to fight in all kinds of battlefield scenarios. While both Pakistan and China possess the entire spectrum of NBC warfare capabilities, the threat from non-state actors is more in the field of chemical or biological agents as of now.

The NBC equipment already developed by DRDO includes as many as 60 products, which have been handed over to either the ordnance factories or the private sector for bulk production.

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Postby sunilUpa » 22 Feb 2008 06:35

HYDERABAD: After delivering a wide range of Electronic Warfare (EW) systems to all the three services, the Defence Electronics and Research Laboratory (DLRL) has embarked upon a project to develop the next generation intelligence-gathering equipment for deploying on board a satellite, aerostats and the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs).


[quote]Describing it as a “comprehensive technology development project,â€

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Postby A Sharma » 22 Feb 2008 22:30

BEL joins hands with Israel's Rafael to produce missile components

India's radar and communication major Bharat Electronics Ltd (BEL) will become the second defence PSU to make missile components in collaboration with leading Israeli armament firm Rafael.

The Israeli company, which has bagged three major missile contracts -- anti-naval Barak missile and spider air-to-ground short reaction missiles -- will outsource the work of making components of its short-range missiles to Bangalore-based BEL.

"We have signed a preliminary agreement with Bharat Electronics to produce parts of missiles, missile electronics and optronics," Rafael's communication manager Gila Harel told PTI here.

The pact envisages BEL producing the missile components in India with technical collaboration of Rafael for the Army, Air Force and Navy.

The BEL might get a larger slice and technology knowhow transfer at a later stage.

The product range being offloaded would include air-to- air missile, surface-to-air missile, anti-tank missile. The agreement to this effect was signed during the just concluded Defence Expo.

"Details of the agreement are yet to be worked out. But we will transfer the knowledge and provide BEL all necessary technical help to produce the missile components," she said.

Harel said if the agreement and partnership goes well in future, then there is every possibility of Rafael joining hands with BEL to produce entire range of missiles in India itself.

Hyderabad-based Bharat Dynamics was the first PSU to make missile components in collaboration with Rafael.

According to reports, the Israelis are also collaborating in India's maiden attempt to make a beyond visual range air-to-air Astra missile.

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Postby JCage » 22 Feb 2008 23:05

sunilUpa wrote:
HYDERABAD: After delivering a wide range of Electronic Warfare (EW) systems to all the three services, the Defence Electronics and Research Laboratory (DLRL) has embarked upon a project to develop the next generation intelligence-gathering equipment for deploying on board a satellite, aerostats and the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs).


[quote]Describing it as a “comprehensive technology development project,â€
Last edited by JCage on 22 Feb 2008 23:10, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Katare » 22 Feb 2008 23:08


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Postby JCage » 23 Feb 2008 00:27

Gents, might as well add: 13 Aerostats are required by the IAF. Two are in service, upto 4 more are to be ordered. Seven remaining. Why? Add all the recent statements about aerostats, LRDEs advances in radars - and its plausible that an Indian made system is being contemplated. Just a thought.

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Postby Arun_S » 23 Feb 2008 01:51

JCage wrote:... . .. Once Divya Drishti is operational, India would have a traffic analysis of all Pak AFB near the border (most of which fall in this category) each time they even operate Radars or even via IFF pings. And purely passive, so they have no clue of whats going on and where these systems are.

Add the database of information to a centralized targeting list, couple with the inventory of PGMs we are acquiring and the Airbase denial Prithvis, and thats the PAF plans turned to....scrap.

It had also delivered five types of EW systems under Sangraha for the Navy for use by airborne platforms, submarine and large ships. Following the success, the Navy had sought an advanced version of SANGRAHA.


He he, had predicted this on BRF quite some time back. :wink:

Cool.
And to below cross post I would add radars and communication systems as the targets for Submunition target of Prithvi. (I recall there was DDM report that mentioned Prithvi with MIRV, is many ways its true).

Arun_S wrote:
Katare wrote:
Arun_S wrote:Prithvi is designed for many types of payload, including bomblets. Pls see BR's Prithvi page. Runway denial requires damaging teh enemy runway and dispersal area, AND preventing repair of the damage by having the bomblets explode at randomly delayed interval.

So one big bum to rip a part of runway is no enough (specially with fast setting cement now easily available.


Arun,

I forgot to insert the link of the article I was talking about. For Prithvi et al we have multiple munitions and war heads but this seems like some thing new and different. These PGMs would have RF/IR seekers for finding their own targets. Its too early and too little information is available so I was trying to extrapolate/speculate

DRDO set to launch initiative on precision guided munitions


Well I just saw pic by Raj Malhotra of this system on DefExpo:

Image

Notice the layout (orientation of the submunition, to allow safe egress separation). and a big bulbous tip to create the necessary aerodynamic regime downstream for safe supersonic separation.


Arun_S wrote:
Katare wrote:Arun,

How would this work, sepration of these munition at certain height and they glide and home on to their independent targets?

Like couple of these may go look for radars, a few might seek heat coming from vehicles etc?

Any comparable foreign sys?

Yes IMHO relased at ~ 2-3 km altitude.
For SEAD, this will not go to runway but go precisely to enemy aircrafts sitting inside their protective pens or hangers.

As for runway damage these will go to the intecection of apron and that feed the main runway, and of course at precise locations on runway (every 1000 ft) and apron.

The other purpose of Prithvi is destroy enemy troop concentration (typical of attack formation), whereby each submunition will take out a tank/command vehicle/POL/Food/water vehicle..


Enemy radar and radio antenna are in for a mass yagya.
Radar ooo Swaa-haa.....
Radio ooo Swaa-haa.....
eff-solah ooo Swaa-haa.....
Mush's musharraf ooo Swaa-haa.....
Bush's ... .. . . errr, mishtake onlee

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Postby Vick » 23 Feb 2008 03:52

JCage wrote:Gents, might as well add: 13 Aerostats are required by the IAF. Two are in service, upto 4 more are to be ordered. Seven remaining. Why? Add all the recent statements about aerostats, LRDEs advances in radars - and its plausible that an Indian made system is being contemplated. Just a thought.

NAL has been working on an aerostat balloon design for a while.
DRDO seems to have definitely gone past the knee in the learning curve. Will Mayawi be integrated into the Tejas? In the LCA thread, I had made a comment that the dorsal hump on the Tejas, will be the SPJ housing. Akin to the avionics spine on the latter day F-16s.

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Postby JCage » 23 Feb 2008 04:08

Intro: Dr. D.Vishwanathan (Vice Chancellor, Anna University, Chennai)

http://www.chennaionline.com/Personality/art009.asp

H Rama Krishnan interacted with him for Chennaionline

Rama: Good morning, Professor.

D Vishwanathan: Good morning

Rama: Can you tell us something about your early life?

D V: I was born in Gonur, a small village near Mettur Dam in Salem District. My parents were agriculturists. I had my schooling at Mettur Dam, about eight kilometers from home. I had to walk the distance every day as there was no bus facility. Electricity came to my village only after I completed my ME in the Engineering College, Guindy.

Rama: Your father Mr C Doraisamy and your mother Mrs Bakkiyam Doraisamy were both agriculturists. How did you manage to join the BE Course in Annamalai university?

D V: After my schooling, my father managed to get me admission for PUC in the Sacred Hearts College in Tirupathur in the North Arcot District. That was the turning point in my career and in my life. The teachers in that College gave me further career guidance. As per their guidance, I applied for B E in various institutions. At that point of time, there were only two options – either the Government Colleges or the Annamalai University. I got admission in the latter.

Rama: How did you choose Mechanical Engineering?

D V: It was my basic interest.

Rama: And then you joined ME in this very Engineering College.

D V: After I passed the BE (Mechanical Engineering), I received job offers from about fifteen industries. However, I wanted to study further.

Rama: And why?

D V: Because I wanted to go into the subject as much as I can. Though I was basically from a village, I had a passion for education. Thus, though my parents wanted me to take up a job, I decided to do higher education. I did my ME in Production Engineering in the College of Engineering, Guindy. At that time it was with the Madras University. After completing the fourth semester of ME, I joined as a lecturer in this College itself. After three years, I got selected for my PhD in Metallurgy in IIT here in Chennai. At that time, the Quality Improvement Programme for teachers was on and there was a stipend given by the Government of India. During my PhD, our University gave me full salary.

Fortunately, Dr APJ Abdul Kalam was the Director of the DRDO, in charge of the Trishul Missile Project. That project was sponsored by DRDO in the Metallurgy Department of IIT. The project was completed under the leadership of Professor K A Padmanabhan. My field of specialization was the Superplastic Forming, which was a relatively new technology. In India. That was the first time this was developed indigenously and this was implemented for the production of missile, rocket and aircraft components.

Rama: What is Superplastic Forming?

D V: If you want to, say convert a titanium plate into semi spherical shape, it is not possible in the conventional methods. So, we heat the metal to such a level where plasticity of forming is very high and very low gas pressure is applied. This is done till it starts bending. The same stretching that takes place when you blow a balloon takes place in the titanium metal without any fracture or crack. It was a highly successful mission.

Rama: If I am not mistaken, you got three patents for developing missile and rocket components at that time. How did you accomplish this?

D V: I owe it to hard work under the able guidance of my Guide, Professor K A Padmanabhan. We knew that such a technology was not available in India. It was being used abroad. And they would not transfer the technology to us. We needed the material development for rockets. We developed them for the first time in India.


Rama: What influence did Dr Kalam create in you?
D V: He is a great personality. We have seen him working hard at DRDO. He was totally dedicated to Technology development. He was sincere, willing to guide others. After Dr.Kalam successfully demonstrated the rocket technology in 1978, the Government decided that his expertise could be used in missile technology. In four years, he completed the project. He knew how to bring technologies together. Besides, he had distributed the assignment of technology development among various laboratories in the country. He integrated them at the DRDO. He inspired me a lot.

Rama: How did you come to teaching?

D V: It has been my passion and it is considered a noble profession in our country. The Vedas speak of Matha-Pitha-Guru-Daivam. It has placed the Guru just after one’s parents. It is a profession in which we help others gain knowledge. I wanted to be a part of transforming knowledge. When I had completed my project, I attended an international conference organized by the Washington State University. I presented a paper and told the delegates that India is in the seventh place in the Superplastic forming technology. At that time I was offered a job in California as a Process Engineer in an Ancillary Missile manufacturing Unit. I, however declined the offer, since I wanted to work in India.

Rama: And, your interest in research?

D V: One can enjoy research, because you always try to invent something new. Everyday, you face problems, which you solve. At the end of the day, you feel satisfied. Whether or not you succeed, you see the result. I had an urge for invention. In my chosen field, I wanted to learn more, to identify new concepts and to reduce cost in the manufacturing systems.

Rama: You started from a very modest career as a lecturer in this College and you have risen to the highest present position as Vice-Chancellor. What do you owe this to?

D V: Even while I was a lecturer, I had the ambition of one day becoming the Vice Chancellor. And I was determined to work hard to reach that level.

Rama: You have been the Director of the Audio Visual Research Centre in this University. How was that experience?

D V: It was a satisfying experience. Initially, when I got that appointment, I was wondering as to what contribution I could make there, since my field of specialization was Mechanical Engineering. The then Vice Chancellor told me I had the capability to man, manage and run the Centre. From the day I took charge as Director of the Centre, I started to learn the media and visual communication concepts. I received very good response from the UGC, which granted 65 lakh Rupees for construction of the buildings and fifty lakhs for equipment. The UGC also allowed me to start media courses, the type of which was not available anywhere else at that time. I enjoyed my stay there thoroughly. I was the first to start the Electronic Media courses in the country. My idea was to develop media technology. The result was encouraging and the student response was excellent. Those who have completed the course are employed internationally.

Rama: You started the Centre for Educational Media Technology. How did this idea occur to you?

D V: This was from a concept I got from the AVRC, which produce documentary programs in subjects common to all the students in the country. This was telecast by the UGC. I thought every University should have the Centre for Educational Media Technology. This media Centre should cater to every department of the University. Every department should come forward to develop the audio visual programme to explain the subject to the students. If this method is followed, every student would understand the subject.

Rama: You have also guided PhD students. How was the experience?

D V: In fact, I could learn a lot while guiding the PhD scholars, both in Mechanical Engineering and the Electronic Media.

Rama: What are the UG programmes you have started as the Vice Chancellor?

D V: I was instrumental in starting the B E degree courses in Material Science and Engineering; Agriculture and Irrigation Engineering: ME in Manufacturing Systems Management; Apparel Technology; M Tech in Nano Technology and ME in Coastal management and Bio Medical Engineering.

Rama: You have received the most prestigious International Socrates Award.

D V: I was delighted and thrilled at receiving a mail in July, from the European Business assembly, Oxford conveying the news that I am the recipient of the award for my contribution to the inleectual development in the 21st Century. I was very proud and happy. I do not know how they selected me for this award.

Rama: Are you happy with the present education system in our country?

D V: It needs to be improved, needs to be transformed. But, it cannot be done all of a sudden. The learning methodologies, the evaluation systems, the teaching methodologies...all these need to be changed, in a phased manner.

Rama: You are just 53 now and you are holding a very high position in the world of education. What do youy want to do henceforth?

D V: My only objective in my life is education. A teacher is always a teacher. He has no retirement. Similarly, there is no end to learning. Educating the rural youth has been my ambition. The greatest challenge is the shortage of quality teachers. And the quality of teachers is another problem. I am confident, this issue can be sorted out. Similarly, in addition to books, video lessons can be made available in the libraries.

Rama: Thank you very much Professor

D V: Thank you.

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Postby bala » 23 Feb 2008 06:00

This article DLRL firms up projects for airborne intelligence has more details..
Image
Electronic Warfare (EW) systems to be fitted on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Aerostats and Satellites, to gather critical information that would be important in future wars, is the focus area for the Defence Electronics Research Laboratory (DLRL).

Hyderabad-based DLRL — the country’s top electronics facility supporting the defence research sector — has firmed up projects to be implemented over the next three years, according to its Director, Dr R. Sreehari Rao.

With a combination of radars, receivers and jammers in miniaturised mode, the EW system would be on board these platforms. The UAVs — Rustam and Gagan — which can fly a medium altitude, and being developed by the Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) at Bangalore, would be fitted with these systems. Similarly, Aerostats, which are typically balloons, offer a cost effective platform and fly in low ranges, while satellites would be the high altitude platforms, which the EW systems could be deployed on, Dr Sreehari Rao told Business Line in an interview.
Delivery data

The DLRL, which has drawn the support of several public and private sector industries in the recent past, has delivered over a 100 systems to the defence forces. These include antennas, receivers, jammers, radar fingerprinting identification systems etc, he said.

One of the major contributions of the DLRL, a constituent lab under the Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO), is project ‘Sangraha’, under which EW systems for deployment on helicopters, aircraft and submarines has been developed, Dr Sreehari Rao said. The Navy, which is the main user and also co-developer, has placed a repeat and bigger order for these EW systems, after being satisfied by the development and first-phase products.

While DRDO has spent Rs 56.87 crore for the development through DLRL, it has generated a production value of Rs 1,695 crore, he explained.

The main production agency, BEL, Hyderabad has manufactured and supplied about 38 systems. Five types of EW systems, namely Kite, Eagle and Home for airborne platforms and Porpoise for submarine and Ellora for large ships of the Indian Navy have been developed and inducted under the project ‘Sangraha’, Dr Rao said.
For VVIP protection

In the civilian applications, a major spin-off has been the jamming system for VVIP protection. The vehicle-mounted system can effectively neutralise cell phones, Improvised Explosive Devicesetc, for up to 100 metres, and are being sought by various agencies.

It is an offshoot of the Convoy Protection system that DLRL developed for the army and paramilitary forces for use in insurgency and terrorist prone areas.

The Army has taken 360 systems — manufactured by BEL — and has fitted them into Tata Sumo vehicles.

A miniaturised version of the system, which can be fitted into a large suitcase, has also been developed recently and is currently undergoing trials.

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Postby Vick » 23 Feb 2008 07:26

Dr. Kalam is a rare gem, perhaps once in a generation type of person.

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Postby mdhoat » 23 Feb 2008 07:27

Arun_S wrote:
Katare wrote:Arun,

How would this work, sepration of these munition at certain height and they glide and home on to their independent targets?

Like couple of these may go look for radars, a few might seek heat coming from vehicles etc?

Any comparable foreign sys?

Yes IMHO relased at ~ 2-3 km altitude.
For SEAD, this will not go to runway but go precisely to enemy aircrafts sitting inside their protective pens or hangers.

As for runway damage these will go to the intecection of apron and that feed the main runway, and of course at precise locations on runway (every 1000 ft) and apron.

The other purpose of Prithvi is destroy enemy troop concentration (typical of attack formation), whereby each submunition will take out a tank/command vehicle/POL/Food/water vehicle..



Arun Saar whats the current accuracy of Prithvi-2. Its listed as 75 meters on the BR prithvi page. And how accurate will these MIRV going to be if the accuracy of the carrier vehicles is not good enough to attack individual hangers, control towers or specific sections of the runways.


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