Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

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vila
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vila » 03 Jan 2013 11:15

With all due respect to Vivek. The last air-ware scenario is bit Toma Clancyish :(

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 03 Jan 2013 11:24

vila wrote: The last air-ware scenario is bit Toma Clancyish :(


Ouch. Compared to Clancy.

:(

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Misraji » 03 Jan 2013 11:34

vivek_ahuja wrote:
vila wrote: The last air-ware scenario is bit Toma Clancyish :(

Ouch. Compared to Clancy.
:(


Don't mind us, Vivek Saar.
Its every jingo's dream to see every single air-battle being played out in as grim details as you had done at the start of the scenario.
Since that can't be done every time, I bet thats why people are upset.

That said, its pretty cool to see that you are running numbers for scenario.
How is that done?
Could you give a few phrases to query using Google Chacha so that I may learn a bit more?

--Ashish
Last edited by Misraji on 03 Jan 2013 14:18, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby k prasad » 03 Jan 2013 14:13

Vivek,

Don't mind us at all... I'm sure your analysis about the attrition and loss ratios is far more accurate than our feelings about how many should be lost. Your detailed explanation at the top of this page was certainly quite a clear insight into it.

I think the cribs are really just expectations that come with any epic quest fairy-tale - the usual template is that a victory always feels more real when there is a sacrifice made, or a loss. I guess thats why the comments above.

Keep doing what you do best!!

Waiting for more posts... please put some up as soon as you can!! :-)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 04 Jan 2013 04:02

Had an interesting talk with a former Russian Air-Force Lieutenant (conscripted out of Moscow University into the PVO) from the Soviet days (mid 1980s). He was an operator of the S-300 battery in the Russian Far East opposite the Chinese border for two years. Had some interesting tales to tell about his experience there with the Chinese, the S-300 and the Russian anti-missile capabilities during the cold war. I will write a small article on it or something after I finish on the current work.

I did tell him about my work and the S-300 descriptions in the novel/scenario. He expressed surprise about why Russia sold Beijing the S-300s to begin with (tempered because of his own experience serving the Soviet army against the PLA) and has agreed to proofread the S-300 writeup in the novel for technical accuracy! :shock:

The shit just got real! :twisted:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Avarachan » 04 Jan 2013 05:52

Vivek,

Congratulations on speaking with the Russian S-300 operator! The level of technical knowledge you've put into your work is remarkable. It's unique in this genre, and you should be proud of that.

You've put a great deal of work into this scenario; that is evident by your detailed explanations whenever you're challenged about the plausibility of certain details. I would recommend that you put a sentence or two into the scenes that would fore-answer the questions of certain readers.

For instance, in the latest air battle, one of the Chinese commanders could mention something (perhaps in an internal muse) about the huge number of J-11s needed, because the pilots were inexperienced and the opposing MKI's were such superior aircraft. You've clearly thought through the details; you should communicate them to the reader so he knows the scene is realistic.

I thought the kill ratios were realistic. In a fight of J-11's vs. MKI's, the MKI's have far superior avionics, ECM, agility, and well-trained pilots. Regarding the J-11's vs. the Mirages, it's difficult to know what's realistic, as no one knows the true capabilities of the J-11. For reasons that I'll post in the "China Military Watch" thread, I'm skeptical of the J-11.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 05 Jan 2013 03:09

Vivek Bhai is active in all other Dhagas but not in his very own Dhaga :-o :(

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 05 Jan 2013 03:16

asbchakri wrote:Vivek Bhai is active in all other Dhagas but not in his very own Dhaga :-o :(


One of those days when the scenarios computer was left at home by mistake and me stuck in office. Hence spending scenario writing time on other dhagas. :oops:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 05 Jan 2013 03:24

vivek_ahuja wrote:
asbchakri wrote:Vivek Bhai is active in all other Dhagas but not in his very own Dhaga :-o :(


One of those days when the scenarios computer was left at home by mistake and me stuck in office. Hence spending scenario writing time on other dhagas. :oops:



So we can look forward to a huuuugeeee number of posts as soon as u get home :twisted: :D

So how is the editing of your novel comming along.

Also some time back you were saying that u are working on a book, so what is the status of that.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 05 Jan 2013 03:30

asbchakri wrote:So how is the editing of your novel comming along.


Next week its going to the publishers and to the three Military Advisers for the book who will review the technical authenticity among other things (apparently the publisher's editors do not know what an S-300 system is :) )

I guess it takes about two-three weeks after I submit it to go out on amazon etc. Let's see how that works out.

The book is on hold until I see what the response is to the book after its released. If the response is good and widespread, I will continue writing novels instead. On the other hand, if only the BRF community and other academia are interested in the novel, I will consider writing a technical analysis of air-warfare with the PLAAF based on all the simulations and analysis I did for it.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 05 Jan 2013 03:37

Misraji wrote:you are running numbers for scenario.
How is that done?
Could you give a few phrases to query using Google Chacha so that I may learn a bit more?


You might want to look up "Differential Equations of combat". It was originally used for analyzing infantry combat which I then expanded on to air-warfare and logistics interdiction by making the coefficients a weighted function of weapon effectiveness, fuel and airbase distance to target, training and special-mission support and then iterated the solutions versus time to give me loss statistics and combat results.

I also expanded the time to take place over days, not hours (originally from the infantry setup) and that allowed me to simulate the entire air-warfare for the scenario over the days I write about and have yet to be written about.

The effect on airbases is modeled differently when exposed to missile attacks. This is something Rahul_M and I talked about couple years back and which I encoded up into a software tool for the scenario work. This models the damage taken to airbases and which then is factored in the other model for air-warfare.

Infantry and tank combat models are less advanced in my scenario since that is not my area of specialty but I do model basic tank-vs-tank engagements similar to the air-warfare model. But its not as advanced and does not factor too many variables (So that part is utterly fiction! :wink: ). I guess some game simulators probably do a better modeling than I did given my limited resources and time.

Once I get these numbers out, I then flesh them out in the backdrop of the scenario characters and storyline and then post them here ( :mrgreen: ) or add them to the novel.

On a sidenote: I know that the RAND corporation has a similar tool for simulating realistic campaigns between nations. Its land-forces model is far more advanced than anything I had when writing this scenario. I sent them a few emails and got some replies but generally they don't want to talk about their coefficient models with me for some reason... :P

-Vivek
Last edited by vivek_ahuja on 05 Jan 2013 03:49, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 05 Jan 2013 03:43

vivek_ahuja wrote:
asbchakri wrote:So how is the editing of your novel comming along.


Next week its going to the publishers and to the three Military Advisers for the book who will review the technical authenticity among other things (apparently the publisher's editors do not know what an S-300 system is :) )

I guess it takes about two-three weeks after I submit it to go out on amazon etc. Let's see how that works out.

The book is on hold until I see what the response is to the book after its released. If the response is good and widespread, I will continue writing novels instead. On the other hand, if only the BRF community and other academia are interested in the novel, I will consider writing a technical analysis of air-warfare with the PLAAF based on all the simulations and analysis I did for it.



We'l keep our fingers crossed and dont worry the huge BRF community will certainly buy it. :D and i'm sure Wencang, Chen, Feng and Chairman Peng will certainly buy :lol:

But please do not stop writing on BRF whatever the matter. Your posts are a great relief to us all.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Misraji » 05 Jan 2013 06:43

vivek_ahuja wrote:You might want to look up "Differential Equations of combat".


Awesome!!! ... Thank you very much.
Now that is worth its weight in gold.

vivek_ahuja wrote:On a sidenote: I know that the RAND corporation has a similar tool for simulating realistic campaigns between nations. Its land-forces model is far more advanced than anything I had when writing this scenario. I sent them a few emails and got some replies but generally they don't want to talk about their coefficient models with me for some reason... :P

-Vivek


Would have loved to see their faces when they got your mail .... :rotfl:

--Ashish

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Singha » 05 Jan 2013 07:02

usaf pilots claim that though in 1:1 or 2:2 engagements a lot of AFs have pilot cadres that can match them, in larger 4:x or 8:x type of engagements supported by awacs they are better because they get a lot of such practice in exercises like red flag and so on...there is always some usaf exercise going on either alone or with some allies 365 days of the yr.

not sure how far its true, but likewise one has to train for unstructured furballs rather than just hope for best. he who trains these scenarios like loss of awacs and surprise furballs more intensively stands a better chance of improvising enough to make it out. "top gun" school happened due to lessons in vietnam war I believe....vietnam was fought by pilots fighting their first war and bred to think missiles were the winner....the earlier korean war was fought by veteran pilots of WW2 who were already well honed in every tactic.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby sarabpal.s » 05 Jan 2013 09:25

Singha wrote:usaf pilots claim that though in 1:1 or 2:2 engagements a lot of AFs have pilot cadres that can match them, in larger 4:x or 8:x type of engagements supported by awacs they are better because they get a lot of such practice in exercises like red flag and so on...there is always some usaf exercise going on either alone or with some allies 365 days of the yr.

not sure how far its true, but likewise one has to train for unstructured furballs rather than just hope for best. he who trains these scenarios like loss of awacs and surprise furballs more intensively stands a better chance of improvising enough to make it out. "top gun" school happened due to lessons in vietnam war I believe....vietnam was fought by pilots fighting their first war and bred to think missiles were the winner....the earlier korean war was fought by veteran pilots of WW2 who were already well honed in every tactic.


Dear vivek have you read the fake parts report in PLAAF.
it is eating J8II

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby disha » 05 Jan 2013 10:29

vivek_ahuja wrote:
asbchakri wrote:So how is the editing of your novel comming along.


Next week its going to the publishers and to the three Military Advisers for the book who will review the technical authenticity among other things (apparently the publisher's editors do not know what an S-300 system is :) )

I guess it takes about two-three weeks after I submit it to go out on amazon etc. Let's see how that works out.

The book is on hold until I see what the response is to the book after its released. If the response is good and widespread, I will continue writing novels instead. On the other hand, if only the BRF community and other academia are interested in the novel, I will consider writing a technical analysis of air-warfare with the PLAAF based on all the simulations and analysis I did for it.


Vivekji, please continue to write novels. The first one takes time and effort to get it out. After that, for it to gain traction, it requires tons of marketing. You can ask your publisher to create book signing events. Use the BRF network to your advantage. Ask if there is a BRF reader in a particular city/town and see if they can muster up some 100 jingoes who can come out for your book signing event and buy that book. At least 100 books will be off the shelf in that city. You may have to cover some 10 cities and 1000 books are off the shelf. Some of them will blog, some will do analysis, others will tweet, some others will loan it to their friends - ask each of them to spread the message. Ask publishers if they have a PR person who you can contact and they can get you in touch with events. For example, the US Armed forces (AF, Navy, Marines, Army and their suppliers hold conferences in Washington - 2years back it was in the Gaylord convention center)., show up there with some 2 dozen books, sign them and give them away as gifts or discount price - it will get the word going .... Same for Indian forces. In colleges across US/Australia there are desis - ask their Indian student union if they can host you to give a speech followed by book signing event. After you do that, sign up with a taiwaneese, chineese, japaneese student union and see if they are interested.

The point is out reach to as many as you can. There should be a sustained outreach, your goal should be to make it at least 5000 sales in a year. Soft copy, hard copy, amazon copy or any android copy - all included. I will be ready to buy a book from amazon at the first instance. If you can ask your publisher that there are fans who would like a hard copy with your signature for extra charge, that should be included to. The point is sell, sell and sell.

If Arundhoti could wrangle a hooker prize with just 8000 copies initially, you can do a lot more. Once it is published, do let us know - we should create a separate page where we track which BRF member has bought it. It should be mandatory reading (quizes should be asked :ROFL:) and if they have failed to buy, they lose posting privileges.

Some of the suggestions above may be superfluous., the intention is to make your book a success. Let us know what it takes to get this marketed. If it involves you to travel to a city and put up for two days - ask if somebody can sponsor you for that city. They can team up and sponsor you. Never miss a chance to market your book.

Also retain the rights to make a play out of the book and a movie or a radio story out of the book. See if local radio stations will be interested in converting your book into a play over radio. This are some ideas and again may be superfluous - but do not give up. Market it. Get the audience know about this. First one is tough, second one will be hard, third one will be with an effort and after that some 3 books to your credit, a pull will be generated. I have seen this happen with books that are barely readable and yours is way beyond in quality.

You are writing real thrillers. Please keep it up.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby chaanakya » 05 Jan 2013 10:41

vivek_ahuja wrote:
asbchakri wrote:So how is the editing of your novel comming along.


Next week its going to the publishers and to the three Military Advisers for the book who will review the technical authenticity among other things (apparently the publisher's editors do not know what an S-300 system is :) )

I guess it takes about two-three weeks after I submit it to go out on amazon etc. Let's see how that works out.

The book is on hold until I see what the response is to the book after its released. If the response is good and widespread, I will continue writing novels instead. On the other hand, if only the BRF community and other academia are interested in the novel, I will consider writing a technical analysis of air-warfare with the PLAAF based on all the simulations and analysis I did for it.

Great work Vivek. I guess you need to put a glossary of terms used with definitions and some common explanations system specifications , range etc for laymen to enjoy the book more.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Akshay Kapoor » 05 Jan 2013 23:48

Dear Vivek,

May I first congratulate you on a superlative effort over the years to highlight the risks we face vis a vis our Northern/Eastern neighbour and writing such authentic scenarios. I know one of my friends from the MO directorate who read some of your posts a while ago was very impressed. You have rendered a very valuable service and I would like to add my huge thanks to everyone elses for that.

Just to ensure that your great work is even more authentic, I have a few comments if I may.

Though the technical, tactical and especially strategic aspects of your postings are absolutely top class, I find that the narrative and language is very Americanised. I only mention this as you are writing a novel and it maybe useful in that context to get a better reception.

We simply do not use certain language and terms in the Indian Military (I can vouch for the Army and to a large extent the Navy, not so sure about the IAF as I have not had too much first hand experience of their culture and SOPs). For example we do not have medics or corpsmen, we have nursing assistants ( ORs and NCOs) and RMOs (Regimental Medical Officers who are typically captains or majors) attached to units. For a long time now Indian Lt Cols or even Lt Gens for that matter do not smoke cigars...we cannot afford it. Officers used to sometimes smoke pipes but I must say I have'nt seen that since the early 90s. Cigarettes are what we smoke I'm afraid.

A Lt Col will not call a Squadron Leader 'son' because these days a Lt Col is a company commander (not a good thing but that is a discussion for another time and place) aged say 35-40. A Squadron Leader would be between 28 and 35 I presume so you can see why 'son' does not work. When Lt Cols were COs then calling a subaltern 'son' worked but even then company commanders (Majors) were not called 'sons'. So you can have Gens and above saying 'son' to majors/ squadron leaders but never above that. We don't use 'red' or 'commie' for the Chinese. We just refer to them as the chinese and during hostilities we will refer to them as the enemy or dushman. This is how we do things at all levels right from section to command. Troops don't call their officers boss and neither do officers. One caveat here an officer might tell a third person that X is his boss but would never say boss to X. Its always 'sir' or sahab or sahabji as the case maybe. In the Navy sahab and sahabji are not used AFAIK and they stick to sir. I don't even think they use 'skipper'. We also tend to use surnames a lot ie 'Chow (Chaudhry) will take command if something happens to me' . COs are referred to as TIGER.

Officers at all levels (including Army Commanders) use a lot of hindi these days; and jawans of course use it almost exclusively. We also refer to 'airmen' or 'air warriors' instead of 'air force boys' to denote IAF PBOR. I have heard a fair bit of hindi used in the Navy too but obviously less than the army.

We also use a lot of MC, BC in the army at junior levels especially in ops. Never in front of seniors of course. So at a junior level conversations between officers maybe like 'Vikas sir we are out of ammo, jaldi behj do sir' or 'Bakshi yaar aaj throttle ki ma chud gayi' (I have heard this from a IAF fighter pilot first hand). Also officers use 'yaar' a lot and 'partner' sometimes. 'Buddy' is quite rare. We never say 'fighter jock'. There are lots of other things like this.

Just my two bits Vivek to help you make it more Indian and help the Indian fighting soul come out. It is so very rich and it would be great if your novel feels more Indian;-) I know we don't have a rich military fiction universe so we get our military techno diet from American authors and naturally their language and culture seeps in. But the great news is people like you are developing our own military techno genre and that is great.

Btw you must have heard of Mukul Deva perhaps? He is a well known writer in the genre and was in 6 Sikh LI (I think) and took a very important peak in Siachen. Then became a businessman and military fiction writer. Very interesting guy. Or Airavat Singh ofcourse? He brings out the 'Indianess' well.

Sorry for the long post. If any of this is helpful then it will have served its purpose. Best of luck with the publishing Vivek. Regardless of these minor points I am sure it will a great read.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 06 Jan 2013 00:16

Akshay Kapoor wrote:Sorry for the long post. If any of this is helpful then it will have served its purpose.


By all means, Akshay. I am always looking for critique and improvements. If you notice the read of the scenario from 2007 till now, you will notice gradually incorporated nuances/improvements/suggestions as the story has progressed. So I am always open to input from the folks here and elsewhere.

I do understand your notion about the amercanized feeling of the read for the army side of things. I realized this too but my own experience has been restricted to interacting with the air-force personnel and their lingo/chatter (which is somewhat more americanized than the army, I admit). So in that context your inputs are valued greatly.

As far as specific characters and their traits are concerned, I have built up more depth in the novel to explain and give the reader a feel for where and what the origins of those personal traits are, so I hope you and the readers will indulge me a bit on it. :) They are my no means extended generally to everybody, of course. Case in point being Lt-Col Fernnandes and his love of cigars! By all means most of the other army officers in the scenario stick to cigarettes (in accordance with reality, as you pointed out)! Or the other example of the Spear team members in Bhutan and their love of the word "boss" for their team leader. Notice that they are meant purely within the context of those specific characters and not extended to the army! :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Akshay Kapoor » 06 Jan 2013 05:13

Thank you Vivek,

glad that was of some use and looking forward to reading about Fernanndes' character. Actually I can picture him with a cigar pay omissions (meant to say commissions but hey freudan slip!) notwithstanding. You are the author so have the license and looking forward to indulge in the novel ;-)

One more thing I would point out is that there is no Operations Commander as such at formations like Div or corps. Dy GOC of Div a Brig is supposed to take care of all staff roles - A, G and Q branch functions. G branch is ops and intelligence and is looked after by Col GS (Ops) ie Col General Staff (Operations). Similarly at Corps level you have Chief of Staff a Maj Gen, a BGS (Brigadier General Staff) and Col GS (Ops) and Col (Q). For most of your purposes these are the important guys. Even at battalion/ regiment (for arty, armd and engr regts) level we do don't have an operations officer or C3I staff or anything...the role is done by the 2IC and Adjudant. Also we use the term 2IC only at battalion/regt level. At Brigade level we say Dy Commander, at Div level Dy GOC and at Corps or Command level Chief of Staff. Just like in the IAF you have a SASO (Senior Air Staff Officer) who is the deputy to AOCnC. Last point (and I promise to shut up after this;-)) the term CO is used only for battalion/regt commanders. All other units like independent company or field workshop etc or even companies, batteries and squadrons the term is OC (Officer Commanding).

Sorry yaar don't mean to be pedantic!!

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 06 Jan 2013 05:24

Akshay,

Thanks for making these notes. Certainly good for me to know since a lot of my scenario posts go down to small unit levels while talking about some combat situation or the other. I will edit the novel to take these changes into account in the final draft.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 06 Jan 2013 05:26

JUNWEI KONGJUN
BEIJING
DAY 10 + 1530 HRS


“What happened out there?” Chen thundered as he slammed open the door of the observation room in the operations center. Chen, Li and the junior officers turned away from the discussions they were having. Chen looked at Li and the other officers:
“Get out!” he ordered.

As the men walked out sheepishly, leaving the papers and other documents on the table, Chen stared at Feng until he heard the door close behind him.
Well, Senior-Colonel?” Chen asked pointedly, choosing to stay formal with his protégé.

“We delivered as asked for,” Feng replied calmly and removed his reading glasses as he continued. “The 55TH Fighter Regiment died doing what they were ordered to do. The Indian AWACS over southern Tibet is dead and so are their fighter patrols. The Indians have withdrawn all of their fighters and patrols south of the border while they consolidate their forces and lick their wounds. Punitive-Dragon did all it was supposed to do! It pushed them back and made the skies neutral once again for our land-forces.”

“At the cost of thirty-five frontline fighters!” Chen shouted back, causing Feng to flinch under the force of the General’s voice. “Only fifteen of our pilots have been recovered alive! The regiment commander is dead and so is that unit! What are you doing to my air-force?”

Feng frowned at the insinuation. He put his glasses into his shirt pocket after folding them as he considered his words:
“I am doing my duty! Nothing more! Nothing less! The 19TH Division was untested in combat and the Indians had their battle-hardened crews over southern Tibet. Had the times been different, I would have committed them to battle in smaller groups under controlled conditions so that combat experience could seep in to the rest of the group gradually. But understand this, General. We are out of time! The Indians were aggressively patrolling the skies over southern Tibet and venturing north after their attack and we showed them that the PLAAF is not to be taken lightly! I had to order the regiment in as one force. There was no other way to break through to the AWACS!”

Chen was seething with anger and Feng saw his fingers rolled into his palm as a fist with whitened knuckles. He was struggling against his inner anger at Feng and using every bit of self-control as an officer and senior commander to restrain himself…

Chen sighed and unclenched his fists, taking a deep breath. He wasn’t the only one doing so in the room.
“What now?” Chen asked as he rubbed his eyes and looked through the glass to see the operations staff busy at work. Feng removed his glasses from his pocket again and walked over to pick up some satellite imagery from the table. He realized his heart was pounding in his chest because of the past few seconds of talk.
“Well, I…”

Feng was interrupted midsentence as the doors slammed open once again and this time Generals Liu and Wencang walked in followed behind by Colonel Dianrong. Chen turned around to see the group entering the room.

“What is this?” Chen asked in surprise.
“This,” Liu said menacingly, “is what I am forced to do when I am told that we lost over thirty fighters in a single air battle against the Indians! When I heard it, I thought I needed to talk a stroll into your little paradise over here and figure out if you have decided to turn over this war to the Indians intentionally!”

“General! That’s quite enough!” Wencang shouted from where he stood, next to Liu. “I will not have you insult my command in this manner!”
Wencang turned to Chen and Feng: “Where is the commander of the 55TH Fighter Regiment? I will have him shot for failing to keep his unit’s training and motivations up to the standards of this air-force!”

“He’s dead, sir,” Feng said blandly.
“Is he now?” Liu observed, almost disappointedly. Feng clenched his hands into a fist behind his back but checked his reply:
“Yes sir! He died fighting the Indians. By all accounts he fought courageously and with determination. Our airborne-radar crews confirm that he was the one who took the shot that brought down the Indian airborne-radar aircraft over northern Bhutan. He was shot down as they attempted to disengage from battle.”

“You mean when he turned and ran!” Liu observed menacingly. Wencang and Chen gave him an ugly look. Feng was more composed.

“Not at all, sir,” he said after a couple of seconds. “His force was decimated by the time the enemy airborne-radar went down. He had no choice. But the Indians were determined to kill him after what he had done! They pursed and eliminated his aircraft and that of his wingman over Shigatse.”

“The man should be given a medal!” Wencang said finally. It was an order and was not open to discussion. Even Liu mumbled some expletive but otherwise nodded slightly to Feng.
“And he will be. See to it, Feng,” Chen ordered calmly as he stood away from the table.

“So what now?” Liu grunted.
“We pushed the Indians back across the border,” Wencang observed. “They know now what we will not tolerate. Maybe it’s time to end this war while we still retain the tools to make that assertion!”

“End the war on India’s terms?” Liu noted with fatalism. “Not a chance! You have other Fighter Divisions in Jining and Beijing MRAFs. I will get the CMC to authorize their release to the Lanzhou-Chengdu unified-MRAF to help replace your losses. Do not commit these units to battle! But make sure the Indians know we have them and are deploying them to Tibet. That will keep them on their toes while we make arrangements to force an end to this war on our terms.”

“The Indians cannot win a battle of attrition with us,” Feng noted in approval of Liu. That caused both Chen and Wencang to give the Senior-Colonel a sharp silent look.
“Neither can we, based on your loss statistics!” Wencang retorted.

“It won’t come to that,” Liu speculated confidently. “Punitive-Dragon was a massive lash from our side on the Indian air forces to remind them what our strengths are. In that it has achieved its goals psychologically and materially. We now have to show them the same boundaries on the ground. Once these lines are drawn, they will be forced to admit that conventional land offensives into Tibet will get them nowhere. And it will force them to the negotiating table. Keep the pressure on while I get our land forces to draw the line in the sand for the Indians!”

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Akshay Kapoor » 06 Jan 2013 05:32

Cool, and if you need any more info at any level do let me know.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Akshay Kapoor » 06 Jan 2013 06:31

Vivek,

I have posted some comments on your blog.

Akshay

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 06 Jan 2013 07:03

Akshay, I did not see the comment posted on the blog. I wonder if you could email me at vivek_ahuja123 at yahoo dot com and we can take it from there?

Thanks

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 06 Jan 2013 07:05

WEST OF BARSHONG
NORTHWESTERN BHUTAN
DAY 10 + 1540 HRS


The first sounds he heard above the ringing in his ears were the desperate screams of the soldiers running by. He coughed and spat out blood along with the dirt. After a few seconds staring at the blood seeping into the mud in front of him, he got up on his knees using his hands. Dirt and dust fell off his digital-camo uniform as he sat straight and stared above. The cold winds were still whipping his body, but he felt this immense heat from around him. He turned around to see the trees on fire and uprooted from the ground further down the slope. That was where a column of smoke was rising into the darkening sky above. He did turn his head up to see a blue sky there with white puffy clouds…

And his body became weak again. He fell down on his hands and used them to prevent himself falling forward. He took deep breaths to fill out his lungs after the air in them had been sucked out by the pressure waves that had rippled through his body. His hearing started coming back to him as he realized that he was beginning to hear the howl of the cold winds and the rumble of the raging fire in the trees near what was his Division Headquarters down the slope, a few hundred yards from him.
Used to be anyway… he corrected himself as he saw other soldiers further down writhing in pain and screaming for help while others staggered around looking for their rifles and comrades. He could now hear the distant screams of his men as his hearing restored.

He was lucky and he knew it. Had he not been away inspecting the ridges to the east of the village when the Indian rockets had rained down on his headquarters, he might not even be in one piece anymore.

How did they locate it so efficiently?

He did not have time to answer that one. He heard the distant rumble of whipping noises that seemed very familiar to him. Of course it did. They were made by Mi-17s approaching. He looked around and saw his men running around and grabbing their weapons as his mind raced through the analysis.

Approaching Mi-17s! Friendly? The Indians used them too…

He looked to the west towards the silhouetted and dark eastern slopes of the Chomolhari Mountain and realized that the whipping noises did not emanate from the west, where his friendly forces were. And that meant only one thing…

It was too late for that now. He saw the first Indian Mi-17 to the east as it cleared the ridgeline behind and above him and flared for a landing a few hundred meters away. Followed by more…a lot more!

He looked around for his personal sidearm and didn’t find it anywhere in the snow. He did see the dead body of his radioman lying in a pool of red blood soaked into the powdery white snow a few meters away. He dived for in the snow and took the QBZ-95 assault-rifle and checked the magazine and the weapon to make sure it was still operational. By this time the first sounds of gunfire from the east were filling the air. He saw soldiers and surviving officers from his headquarters grabbing their rifles and ordering men to head east and create a line of defense against the attacking Indian paratroopers.

He ensured the rifle was in one piece and turned the body of his radioman over to see a horrid scene. The man’s chest was ripped open by rocket shrapnel and still smoldering. He winced at the sight of the dead youngster and checked his harness for magazine rounds. He found two.

That will have to do!

He forced himself to his feet just as the Indian Mi-17s began lifting off after dropping off the Indian soldiers and were climbing back up the slope. They were trying to get out of the line of fire as quickly as they could. And sure enough, they were taking fire as yellow flashes of tracers were flying around them, some hitting the gray painted fuselages with distinct snags. He threw out an expletive and brought up his rifle to shoulder level, tugged it in and aimed down the sight, firing three-round bursts at the closest of the departing Indian helicopters. He aimed for the cockpit and kept firing bursts until he saw the starboard cockpit glass of the helicopter shatter into pieces and his rifle chamber clacking on metal, out of ammo…

To his satisfaction he saw the helicopter veering westwards, towards him and the sunlight from the west shined across the cockpit glass, now smattered red with blood from one of the crew members slumped in his seat. The PLA Major-General realized he must have hit the co-pilot and perhaps even the pilot. The helicopter leapt above his head a few seconds later amidst a roar of its blades and its shadow went over him as the pilot struggled to maintain attitude and fly the helicopter to safety.

It was not to be. As the General slapped a second magazine into his rifle and dropped the first in the snow near his feet, keeping his eyes fixed on the Indian helicopter to his west now, he flinched from the flash of light as a surface-to-air missile streaked across from bottom of the slope and slammed into the port engine of the Mi-17. The jarring explosion ripped the engine section apart and the main rotors immediately lost power, their RPM reducing as the front of the helicopter slammed into the snow covered rocks and settled down on the slope with a thud. It oscillated in its position violently and then flipped over as it rolled down the slope, shedding bits and pieces of the fuselage and the crushed cockpit glass. The General smiled as he saw the helicopter wreck rolling down the slope towards the village of Barshong in the valley below.

A small victory in all this mess!

Two of his soldiers ran up to him and knelt beside him, covering him with their rifles. He looked around and tried to make sense of the ground battle now taking place on the slope to his east between the survivors of his Highland Division headquarters and the Indian paratroopers. But it was a lost battle and he realized it. His experienced ears picked up the course of the battle from the gunfire noises. He ordered his men to move out towards where his ears told him were his men, fighting off the Indians…
They ran down the slope towards the blazing tree trunks and smoldering black craters dug out of the snow by the Indian rockets. He saw about two dozen or so scattered PLA soldiers from his unit fighting in twos and threes behind rocks and what remained of their bunkers within the rocky terrain. To the east he saw dozens of Indian paratroopers advancing tactically as they eliminated the still-dazed PLA opposition on the hilltop.

He was about to shout his first orders of this battle when one of the soldiers next to him shrieked and fell down forward into the snow, the General looked and saw a bullet ripped into his back as blood poured out. He turned around and saw about ten men moving down the top slope from his west, silhouetted by the setting sun behind them. One of the men’s optics glinted in the light and the General realized they were taking sniper fire and under attack from behind.

He brought up his rifle to aim but a bullet ripped through his arm a split second later while other rifle sounds from the nine men filled the air and threw up snow all around the two men. He turned and saw his arm bleeding profusely as the pain shot up to his head. He cursed and that turned out to be his last breath as another bullet caught him in the neck and exited from the back, slumping his dead body back into snow with a thud, followed soon thereafter by the other Chinese soldier…



…Tarun lowered his Dragunov rifle and looked over his optics to see the two bodies in the snow, a few hundred meters eats of them near the Chinese positions.
“Looks like I got myself somebody important!” he exclaimed over the rifle fire noises as Spear team got into the assault on Barshong.

“No shit! You want to keep firing though!” Vikram shouted from a half-dozen meters away as he slumped behind a boulder and removed another magazine from his harness belt pocket and dropped the first one from his Tavor rifle.

“Spear! Keep up the advance! Go! Go!” Pathanya shouted over the team’s comms and ran a few dozen feet down the slope to another cover position as the handful of PLA survivors on this slope started returning fire and bullets began ricocheting around nearby rocks.

The Indian paratroopers of the 11TH Para-SF Battalion had landed behind enemy ridgeline defenses east of Barshong on board air-force Mi-17s. They had followed just behind the rocket barrage fire from Lieutenant-Colonel Fernandez that had eliminated a good portion of the PLA Highland Division headquarters just seconds before the assault. But they had to move fast and secure Barshong before the three other PLA companies on the ridgelines east of here realized they had been bypassed and began arriving in force to the village below…

Pathanya looked up and saw the sunlight from the west glinting off the Searcher-II UAV overhead in the blue sky. He removed the SATCOM speaker from his chest harness and pushed it under his boonie-hat.
“Warlord-central, this is Spear-One! Do you copy? Over?”

“Roger, Spear-One. We copy all.” The line chimed a few seconds later from Joint-Force-Bhutan HQ.
“Spear has successfully bypassed Barshong defenses and is eliminating the objective at Bravo! Main Para force has arrived and is rolling to the objective as well. We confirm loss of one of our birds to enemy fire but the others egressed safely. We need you to initiate bombardment of eastern ridgelines and suppress enemy positions while we terminate enemy command and control at Barshong! Over!”

“Roger. We confirm your arrival at objective as well. Hotel-Six will suppress. Out!”
Pathanya put the speaker back into its slot in the harness and looked around. Vikram, Tarun, Sarvanan, Ravi and the others were already past his position and advancing under rapidly reducing fire from the PLA positions below them on the slope. He saw the 11TH Battalion paratroopers under Colonel Misra also overrunning the former PLA Highland Divisional headquarters and taking no prisoners. They shot and they killed as the few surviving Chinese soldiers began panicking under the sustained and brutal assault. Soon the sounds of QBZ-95 rifles were subsiding in his ears…

He jerked up as the sky above filled with the screech of diving supersonic shells and the PLA positions east of Barshong disappeared in a line of smoke filled explosions. A cloud of brown dust rose into the sky for hundreds of feet. The rumble from the explosions passed through his feet several seconds later.

Pathanya got on his feet and advanced down the slope to catch up with his men further down. He saw Vikram and Tarun walking cautiously towards the three dead bodies lying just above the Chinese positions on the slope. Vikram slung his rifle on the chest and pulled out his thigh-holstered sidearm as they slowly approached the three bodies. Tarun looked over to Vikram who nodded. So he lowered his Dragunov rifle and knelt beside the center body and turned him over. It was an old man with white hair and a black star on his digital-camo uniform. Tarun whistled and stood up on his feet.

“What is it?” Pathanya said as he jogged over the snow to their position.
“The Chinese Division commander,” Vikram said soberly.

Pathanya looked over the body and sighed. He looked around as the hills to the east rumbled again as a second salvo from Hotel-Six ripped the PLA positions there to shreds while more Mi-17 noises began rumbling from the south…

“Okay, you two,” Pathanya ordered, “make sure to check all of his pockets for papers and anything else you can find. The intelligence boys will be very interested in knowing what this man carried with him. If possible, we will get his body out on one of the outgoing birds. I am taking the rest of the team and meeting up with the Paras in the village below so that the Colonel knows we are in one piece. Understood?”

Pathanya trudged off in the snow leaving the two men to their new job. He walked past the smoking tree trunks and bodies of the PLA soldiers. He saw Indian soldiers in the ruins of the village as they pursued the last Chinese survivors retreating to the west towards Mount Chomolhari, leaving their Division staging area in northern Bhutan to the Indian paratroopers…

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby RamaY » 06 Jan 2013 07:28

Vivek ji,

Thank you. This is the only thread that shows some hope in these depressing times.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 06 Jan 2013 08:04

EAST OF DA-NANG
THE SOUTH CHINA SEA
DAY 10 + 1600 HRS


“Tally ho!”
The two air-to-air armed Su-30s in the strike force of six banked away in unison as they spotted the two patrolling PLAAF Su-27s fifty kilometers to their north seconds after lighting up their radars. The two Chinese pilots were surprised at the sudden radar emissions south of them that showed Indian Su-30s. The PLAAF and the PLAN had not been expecting anything to happen so far to the east near their home waters between Vietnam and Hainan. At least not from the Indians! The PLAAF 2ND Fighter Division was tasked with the defense of Hainan island airbases from any threat and they had spent the last ten days doing nothing but patrols other than sending a gaggle of their brethren on a deep strike mission against the Indian Navy ASW aircraft several days ago. Two of those fighters had not returned, but they had shot down an Indian Il-38 anti-submarine aircraft before they had lost their lives to Indian fighters.

Since then operations had been very straightforward for the 2ND Division pilots and commanders. No country within Southeast Asia had openly sided with India in this war and that had greatly reduced the burden on the Hainan based PLAAF and PLAN units. Almost to the point of complacency with their airborne patrols…

The two Su-27s broke formation and dived as they saw the two Indian Su-30s getting into position for a missile shot. They threw off chaff clouds and pulled up at lower altitude before spreading out and heading south for their own shots. Their on-board RWRs were screeching now as they lined up and understood that the Indian pilots had seized on their element of surprise and pickled off two R-77s before them. It was only a matter of seconds before the two Su-27s fired off a volley of four PJ-12s in reply and broke formation again to evade the incoming missiles.

On the other side, the Indians did the same and deployed effective ECMs and chaff clouds to spoof the PJ-12s. Three of those missiles flew off erratically as they lost radar contact from their parent aircraft and the Indian ECMs cluttered up their onboard radar picture. The Indian R-77s had similar trouble, but one of them connected and exploded above the cockpit of one Su-27, detonating in a fireball that shredded the cockpit of the Su-27 and killed the pilot while severing the two vertical stabilizers at their roots. The aircraft yawed and spiraled into the blue waters below.

As the other Su-27 closed within visual range, the two Su-30s dived in after him and ensured he stayed away and unable to interfere with the real purpose of this mission…

The four other Su-30s from the No. 18 ‘Flying Bullets’ Squadron were still at high altitude and began spreading out in a line abreast formation just east of Vietnamese waters below. They carried only two R-77s each for air-to-air self-defense. On their centerline they carried the last few of the Brahmos ALCMs in the Indian arsenals. All four aircraft dropped their deadly cargo two hundred kilometers south of the southern coast of Hainan island and banked away as the missiles sped off and dropped to lower altitudes. Several hundred kilometers south of them, the two Indian Il-78 tankers were orbiting over the sea east of the Vietnamese coast and well within their long range radar detection. On this latter issue the Vietnamese air-force personnel had been briefed by their command to observe and ignore whatever they saw the Indians doing. But each of them could speculate amongst themselves as to what might be happening further north on Hainan and to that they shared smiles in silence. They all shared a common special love for China alongside the Indians…



On the southern coast of Hainan sat Sanya and Lingshui airbases. Both were home to the PLAN 9TH Fighter Division which operated the J-8s and JH-7s in a naval support role alongside the PLAAF 2ND Fighter Division forces. Both airbases were close to the coastline and much more open and exposed than the super-hardened airbase at Ledong in central Hainan. This latter airbase was not on the target listing because of the small number of ALCMs available and the hardened nature of the base. But Sanya and Lingshui were very much on that list…

Chinese long range surveillance radar on the mountain tops of central Hainan spotted the four supersonic blips on their screens as they split into a group of three heading somewhat east and the other blip moving north on the original path. The warning went out quickly to all airbases in Hainan and on Sanya and Lingshui, personnel abandoned their parked J-8s and JH-7s on the tarmac as the blip appeared over the horizon and the blue seas to the south.

Sanya was the first to be hit with the single Brahmos missile aimed for it. It flew over the waves of the beach and dived into open tarmac at Sanya amidst the parked JH-7s. It penetrated a dozen feet into the concrete and then exploded, ripping out the concrete in a hundred meter radius behind the pressure wave and demolished the line of parked JH-7s in split-seconds. The expanding pressure waves also ripped into the airbase facilities and shredded the terminal buildings at Sanya along with two parked airliner aircraft further down. The thunder from the explosion was heard all the way in villages in central Hainan while people in Sanya could plainly see the black column of smoke rising into the sky from the airbase there.

And then they heard three more distant rumbles form the direction of Lingshui…

By the time the six ‘Flying Bullets’ Su-30s began topping off their tanks from the Il-78s on their way south, the 2ND Fighter Division and the 9TH PLAN Fighter Divisions were scrambling fighters all over Hainan, but the Indians had a clear lead of more than a thousand kilometers on them and increasing. There was no hope of intercept with such kinetics. So as their aircraft began orbiting over Hainan on defensive patrols, they could see the columns of smoke and dust rising into the sky from the two airbases on the southern coast…

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Indrajit » 06 Jan 2013 08:07

Great stuff! very refreshing in the early morning.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Misraji » 06 Jan 2013 08:30

Oooh. The war is coming home, isn't it?

--Ashish

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby chaanakya » 06 Jan 2013 23:14

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4287&p=1386507&hilit=hainan#p1386507

chaanakya wrote:

Do they have range to go to mainland ( most probably hainan) and comeback? Or is it one way mission?
May be there is another refueling en-route courtesy Vietnam and on return they may take rest at Hanoi?

Lets see which side of dragon a$4 these Flying bullets kick.

.


Well Hainan is it then. And Tankers waiting off Viet

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby chaanakya » 06 Jan 2013 23:35

Here are the images of latest brahmos target in Hainan ( Sanya and Lingshui)
Sanya
Image



Lingshui

Image

Now JunWei Kongjun would have to think before Fighter Divisions are retasked to Lanzhou-Chengdu Unified MRAF.
Suddenly the war is at Home. beijing need to think if some others might get hit as well.

Few Brahmos on the Navy Docks would have been useful as well.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Avarachan » 07 Jan 2013 03:16

Vivek,

This latest air battle is one of your best. I think what you wrote is realistic. The MKI's will get the first look and the first shot; through superior ECM, they'll survive the Chinese BVR counter-shot; and then, through superior agility and pilot training, they'll dominate the WVR knife-fight. In every exercise with 4 and 4+ generation fighters, the MKI's have dominated (with kill ratios of 10-0 being common). This is why I have never understood this "dhoti-shivering" with regards to Communist China.

By the way, is there a reason that Harop killer drones have not featured in this scenario? I agree with you: India's BrahMos ALCM stock will be running low at this point. That's why I found it strange that the IAF used up so many BrahMos's against the S-300's rather than using the Harop's. Another factor: India's Harop's will be operational by the end of 2013. BrahMos ALCM's will probably only be operational around 2015 or 2016 (and only in small numbers, initially).

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 Jan 2013 09:08

KOLKATA
INDIA
DAY 10 + 1700 HRS


“Time to move to the final phase here,” Yadav said as he threw back the satellite images back to Lieutenant-General Suman’s table. The latter was still in his seat behind the desk. Suman nodded but remained in thought as he picked up one of the images on the table…

Operation Chimera had been a qualified success. His eastern army’s XXXIII Corps had moved against the two PLA Divisions in the Chumbi valley with all three of its organic Divisions and Suman had also added the 23RD Infantry Division to that list. With this last Division, the 2ND, 5TH and 71ST Mountain Divisions had rolled into the Chumbi valley with enough force that they had heavily depleted the Chinese 55TH and 11TH Divisions as well as all of the Border Guards Regiments there.
The satellite images showed both Suman and Yadav what they had wanted to see. Both Chinese Divisions were now slowly pulling back north, leaving terrain behind as their rear guard units were either pushed back further or were decimated by the advancing Indian troops. The lines of convoys pulling back across the valley were currently being subjected to heavy bombardment by the air-force ground support aircraft. Suman was not sure why they were pulling out, but it might have to do with the fact that their logistics would be drying up under incessant Indian air and artillery attacks.

Maybe…It was one theory.

Suman leaned back in his chair lost in thought.
“What’s the matter?” Yadav said finally as he gazed at his army commander lost in thought.
“Nothing,” Suman said after much deliberation.

“You look like you are almost disappointed in seeing the Chinese pulling back!” Yadav noted soberly.
“It was what Chimera was set up for. But why would they withdraw? Why now?” Suman added.
“Because we pushed them back, Suman,” Yadav added in surprise. “What’s bothering you?”
Suman shook his head and let out a deep breath.

“Not sure,” he said after several seconds, “just that I expected the Chinese to put up a longer fight in the valley. Maybe the fact that Potgam and his Joint-Force-Bhutan forces pushed the Highland Division out of northern Bhutan has something to do with this. They know now that their left flank in the valley is gone and we have them by the balls on the right flank and center.”

“They are giving up the Chumbi valley to us. And that bothers you why?” Yadav quizzed.
“You know what they say about an attack that is progressing too well, right?”
Yadav thought about Suman’s words and picked up the images again from the table.

“You think they are luring us north?” he said as he checked the map. “But they have no units there to attack us with. And these two Divisions are in no condition to fight us anymore.”

Yadav turned away from the map board and looked back at Suman:
“Don’t overthink it. It’s time we took the initiative for once. Your other forces north of Tawang got hung up on their offensive into Tibet on account of that attack on Tawang by Chinese missiles. So let’s take this opportunity here while it exists. It’s time to kill those two Divisions before they escape Chumbi valley and reach Gyantse to the north!”

“Roger, sir.” Suman said and then leaned forward to pick up the phone.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Anand K » 07 Jan 2013 09:26

Cruise Missile/BM delivered multiple CEM and FAE warheads on our massed forces in the valley killzones? :shock: :cry: :cry:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 Jan 2013 10:07

OVER GURUCUN
NORTH OF THE CHUMBI VALLEY
DAY 10 + 1800 HRS


The constant rumble of the aircraft engines outside, the vibrations of the air buffeting the fuselage and the smell of bare aircraft metal were all familiar to him. He had done this his entire life. He sighed and took a deep breath as he removed the maps from his chest pocket and unfolded them on his lap. He removed a small flashlight and lit up the portion of it he wanted to see one final time. He held the flashlight in his mouth as he pored over the maps and all the red and blue markings he had done on them a few hours before.

It all looked good. As it should, since he had done them a dozen times since.

He folded the map back together into neat square folds then stuffed them back in his pocket and sealed the zipper on the pocket tight before removing the flashlight from his mouth and flicking it off. He looked up and saw the other paratroopers sitting across from him looking at him in silence, their faces covered with streaks of brown and white face-paint and their rifles tucked into their heavy chest and back harnesses. He smiled back knowing that they were probably wondering whether he had his shit together or not. He did, so he had no worries.

He looked to his side and saw the hundred other paratroopers also in their seats further up the fuselage cabin. He was sitting very close to the rear ramp and saw the two air-force jumpmasters standing by in their green overalls and their earphones covering their ears as they spoke something inaudible into the mouthpieces…
Colonel Thomas looked at the closed doors of the ramp a few feet away from him and wondered whether he was leading his men to disaster as the time for drop-off approached.

Certainly it was a valid question.

Outside, in the skies above southern Tibet, the IAF was renewing its presence after the deadly battle in the morning. It was by no means being as aggressive as it had been before, but just as the PLAAF had wanted to remind the IAF that it was far from defeated, the IAF wanted to do the same to remind the PLAAF that it was very much in the fight as well…

Ten Su-30s from the Hashimara based No. 222 “Tigersharks” Squadron were deploying themselves over northern Chumbi valley on an offensive fighter sweep that had already nailed two J-7s on patrol over Lhasa and were establishing their dominance in the skies. Further south over Sikkim, the Phalcon AWACS aircraft from Kalaikunda had replaced the lost CABS AEW aircraft and was providing airborne command and control for the IAF operations. A flight of six Mirage-2000s from No. 7 Squadron were on security for this aircraft over northern Sikkim.

But the real operation was ongoing over Chumbi valley.

As the sun was setting to the west, casting a reddish-pink glow to the skies all around, nine Il-76s in three groups of three had entered northern Sikkim followed by three of the newly delivered C-17s making for a total of twelve heavy transport aircraft. These vulnerable aircraft were being escorted by flights of Mirage-2000s from No. 7 Squadron to the north under guidance and information from both the Phalcon as well as the Tigersharks Su-30s…

Thomas felt the aircraft fuselage tilt a bit and saw the sunlight coming into the dark fuselage from the port side windows vanish, leaving the fuselage utterly dark except for the glow of the dim orange-yellow lights inside. The drop warning light to his side and above his head went red and he saw the air-force jumpmasters nodding as they spoke something into their speakers. The chief-warrant-officer in charge of the drop glanced at Thomas and caught his look. He nodded.

It was time…

Thomas got up from his seat using the support of the fuselage and with him stood up the mass of troopers inside. He heard everybody checking equipment and the jumpmasters shouting orders which he knew even in his sleep. He had done this before many times in his career. This, however, was no normal jump but something they had always dreamed of doing.

There was a large shudder and humming noise and the darkness of the cabin disappeared as the two large sections of the ramp door opened up and immediately lit up the interiors with the reddish evening glow outside. The freezing winds rushed up the cabin and many of the paratroopers shivered under the instant chill. Thomas patted his pocket to ensure he had his boonie-hat stacked away carefully. From where he stood, at the rear of the cabin, he could see the other nine aircraft flying some distance away behind him and the Himalayan peaks falling away behind to be replaced with the Tibetan plateau below.

The jumpmaster patted Thomas on the back and held up five fingers.

Five minutes.

Thomas nodded back and then took a deep breath as his heart started pounding heavily in his chest. He had done this so many times that the jump did not bother him anymore. But here the jump was only the beginning of this particular ordeal, not its end…

He saw a large frozen lake pass below on the brown desert-like plains of Tibet and realized from memory that they were now very near the drop-zone. Sure enough, the light next to him flashed green within moments and the jumpmasters started shouting “Go! Go! Go!” to all of the men and started giving them the push they needed.
The three men before Thomas jumped and their chutes deployed after the cord connecting them to the aircraft pulled it open. Thomas did not hesitate. He took the dive instantly and felt the massive slap of the freezing winds on his body as he flipped over. He saw the chute deploy above his head and instantly pulled him back by his harness as his body went through another jolt. But within seconds he was stabilized and saw the white chute above deployed cleanly and under his control. He saw the long line of chutes deploying behind and above him from all twelve transports. To his west he saw the six Mirage-2000s fully armed with weapons streaking by as they were silhouetted by the setting sunlight.

He fully expected to take weapons fire from below but was surprised to see none of that. Of course they had picked the location because it fell north of the two PLA Divisions in the valley and was surprisingly sparsely occupied. Still, the hundreds of open white canopies were not hard to miss nor were the massed transport aircraft overhead. He had been told that the IAF Mig-27s had suppressed all Chinese anti-air missile capabilities in the valley, but he had taken that with a grain of salt until now.

Maybe our luck will hold. It just has to hold long enough…

The ground below approached quickly and Thomas flared his chutes just before his feet touched on the gravel of Tibet and he skidded on it and fell as the chute settled behind him, pulling him along the gravel against the howling winds that the section of the plateau north of Chumbi was known for. He reached for his harness straps and snapped them open, releasing the chute as it drifted away along with all the cords. He saw he had been dragged for about two dozen meters in the gravel and was lucky that only a couple of his pockets had been ripped. He instantly checked his backpack and found it was all there. So were his rifle and the ammo. Most importantly, he felt his maps inside the chest pocket as he patted them and nodded with satisfaction.

Several of his soldiers ran over after having landed and had drawn out their rifles. They helped the Colonel to his feet and he looked around as he dusted off his uniform. Hundreds of other chutes were still landing all around the territory while the Il-76s and the C-17s were already making their way south, visible as small black specks against the reddish sky. The Mirage-2000s thundered overhead as well and banked above the men on the ground as a salute before flying off.

Thomas grunted as he unpacked his boonie hat and put it over his head, already covered with a small woolen cap. He unslung his Tavor rifle and patted his men to move out as they heard the first sounds of rifle fire and explosions to the north. Some PLA forces had found them and were engaging. As the ran through the rocky terrain towards the ever darkening night sky, Thomas removed his binoculars and spotted the S-204 highway to his west, easily visible from where he was. He also saw a line of trucks that had been moving along the convoy that had been engaged by his paratroopers and one of the trucks burst into flames from a grenade impact.

As the PLA soldiers began jumping out and returning fire, his men began taking positions west of the road with the Himalayan Mountains to their south. As night fell, the paratroopers were pushing for control of the highway using extensive air-support from Hashimara based Mig-27s and LGB equipped Mirage-2000s. Within hours, deployed elements the Indian 5TH and 6TH Para (Airborne) Battalions had now cut off PLA control of the highway leading out of the Chumbi valley, effectively cutting off the two battered PLA Divisions south of there…

Aaryan
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Aaryan » 07 Jan 2013 10:32

Bravo... I just hope that this is not a trap ( Is there a smilie thru which i can show that am praying???) :roll: :?:

Akshay Kapoor
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Akshay Kapoor » 07 Jan 2013 15:49

Vivek I have sent you an email on vivek_ahuja123 at yahoo. Let me know if you don't get it.

RamaY
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby RamaY » 07 Jan 2013 16:30

Awesome.

I am looking forward for a free nuclear armed Tibet :twisted: between India and China.

nits
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby nits » 07 Jan 2013 17:14

Vivek Sir - Its just getting thrilling by every post... Keep it coming sir on a good pace :)


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