Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby sunny_s » 07 Sep 2008 11:26

:evil: VICTOR the package has till not been delivered...confirm ur status..OVER

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 07 Sep 2008 11:40

:cry: It seems Vivek is compromised.

Might be MSS operative work.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 Sep 2008 12:59

AIRSPACE OVER SOUTHWESTERN TIBET
TIBET
DAY 1 + 2028 HRS

Ten thousand feet above the snow clad mountains of Tibet, and three hundred and fifty kilometres away from its Indian counterpart, a ‘red’ IL-76 tore through the cold rarefied air on its way south. The dorsal airborne radar was fully active, and inside the aircraft fifteen Chinese officers were now waiting for the first contacts to appear on their screens. It didn’t take long. The lone J-10 near the border with India was soon picked up on active systems, though the passive ones were suggesting there were Indian aircraft also in the skies, most notably the powerful emissions of the Phalcon. The small airframe of the escaping Heron UAV was not picked up at this range, however. The Chinese commander on board rubbed his eyes as he walked over to the lead radar officer. Contact was imminent now...

AIRSPACE SOUTH OF THE L.A.C
LADDAKH, INDIA
DAY 1 + 2030 HRS

The three Fulcrums under the command of S/L Khurana were flying just over the peaks in the region as they dashed to the southeast to intercept the lone Chinese J-10 just over the border. Rough geographical features and the curving nature of the horizon prevented their detection by enemy radar. But that was about to change. They were approaching the border now, and it was time to show themselves to the other side...

“Okay people, look sharp.” Khurana spoke to the other two pilots over the radio before gently pulling on the control stick. The aircraft lifted effortlessly into the higher air, and almost immediately the threat picture lit up...

The RWR audio warning was heard in the ears of the three pilots as the emissions from the Chinese AWACS saturated the skies around the three Indian aircraft. Khurana looked instinctively to his left as to ‘see’ the threat far to the north, but of course the skies were as dark as ever with only stars above and the rocky peaks below. There were SU-27s out there somewhere, and potentially flanking his flight of three, but his job was to keep his eyes peeled for the single J-10 doing mud work in the hills to the east and leave the SU-27s for the Indian SU-30s somewhere behind him at the moment. As for that J-10, the Phalcon had lost contact when the Chinese pilot had gone at low level within the hills. But he would be poking his nose out of the hills after completing his strike, and Khurana wanted that Chinese pilot to be greeted properly...

AIRSPACE OVER SOUTHWESTERN TIBET
TIBET
DAY 1 + 2032 HRS

The three Indian Fulcrums were now in full view of the Chinese KJ-2000, and the SU-27s were vectored to ‘engage’. The PLAAF Commander on board the radar aircraft was Senior Air Force Colonel Feng. He reported directly to the Commander of the 33RD Fighter Division and had been deputed to this region for this operation. This was China’s first real deployment of their AWACS aircraft in a potentially hostile aerial situation, and so he was here. The PLAAF Commanders in Beijing were under serious pressure from the politburo to re-assert aerial supremacy over a region where the Indians possessed supreme advantage in assets, geography and thanks to these two factors, even a level of numerical superiority. This level of superiority was more virtual than real, and had a lot to do with the ‘density’ of air operations rather than absolute numbers.

But now he was here, and was under clear cut orders to be aggressive. The problem wasn’t his aggressiveness, but that of his men under him. Aggressiveness without discipline can lead to mistakes. And mistakes can lead to war. He was worried about his pilots. They had been taught to listen and obey, not to think. And yet it was the latter that was most needed for this unusual situation. They needed to think on their feet, and know when to be aggressive and when to fall back to discipline. The balancing act between the two was not as easy as appeared, especially under the circumstances.

It was because of this that he had personally chosen the pilots of the SU-27s. These were men known to be thinkers, and despite the superficial suspicion that the party demanded that others shower on these kinds of men, they were actually well liked by the core of the PLAAF who saw them as the future. With such men Colonel Feng was sure that he could be aggressive and yet prevent mistakes. The problem was, the rug had been taken from under his feet.

The PLA had gotten itself into a mess around the village of Shiquanhe for the past day and were having a rough time. And as a result, Feng’s carefully choreographed plan had been trashed when the first bomb laden J-10 took off from Kashgar airbase without his permission. In fact, he had been notified about the strike only after it had actually taken off the ground! Even then he was told that the concerned aircraft was without CAP protection and that its target was sixty kilometres from the Indian border and that his SU-27s were to provide cover. But he was here now, and was relieved to see the situation still under control. He couldn’t back off now. It was no longer in his hands and he knew it. Beijing wanted aggressive, so he would give them aggressive...

“Order the SU-27s to activate their radars.” Feng ordered to his airborne controllers inside the KJ-2000. A minute later the four SU-27 pilots switched on their radars...


AIRSPACE SOUTH OF THE L.A.C
LADDAKH, INDIA
DAY 1 + 2035 HRS

“Active radar signatures! We are being painted!” Khurana’s wingman shouted over the radio as a screeching noise from the RWR filled his ears.

“Must be those SU-27s. Hold it together people: they are testing us!” Khurana shouted back before switching the frequencies: “Eagle-Eye-One, this is Claw-One. We are being painted by commie fighters to out north. Request permission to return the favour, over”

“Claw-One, copy. November-two-four is climbing out of the muck. Light up the bugger. over” the radio squawked in Khurana’s ears. He smiled underneath the oxygen mask and changed frequencies once again:

“Claw-One to all Claw elements. November-two-four is climbing to meet us. Time to light up the sky!”


AIRSPACE OVER SOUTHWESTERN TIBET
TIBET
DAY 1 + 2037 HRS

The three fulcrum radars activated nearly simultaneously, but were looking eastwards and not back at the SU-27s to the north, as Colonel Feng had expected. A dozen kilometres east of the LAC, the lone J-10 was now climbing out of the hills to head home. The pilot inside the aircraft was still inspecting the fuel gauge and wondering if he would need to refuel with a tanker on the way. As he cleared the peaks, his worries changed. The threat board lit up immediately to show the southern skies swarming with Indian Sukhois and a single Phalcon. To his west there were three contacts that were now activating their missile guidance radars...

AIRSPACE SOUTH OF THE L.A.C
LADDAKH, INDIA
DAY 1 + 2041 HRS


“Missile launch! Missile launch! November-two-four has pickled off his radar guided missiles!” Khurana’s wingman shouted over the radio frequencies before Khurana’s voice overrode it:

“All Claw elements: break! Break! Break!”

The three Fulcrums immediately dived out of the sky and broke formation. They also dropped chaff as they headed face down into the hills below to force the two inbound PJ-12s to break radar contact and miss their targets. There were three fighters and two missiles. One of the three was therefore already out of danger. He was the first one to dive and level out just above the peaks before engaging afterburners and heading north, rather than south. The pilot was already switching to R-77s and selecting the active round. A few seconds later he flipped the control stick to the right and headed into banking climb to the northeast. The threat board was once again active and the lone J-10 was acquired as it escaped to the northwest, low on fuel.

A few seconds and he would fall within the range of the armed R-77 hanging from the left wing of Claw-Three...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby jamwal » 07 Sep 2008 13:37

Thanks for explaining concept of IASO/OASO and the new post.
I think I held my breath while reading that. :mrgreen:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vardhank » 07 Sep 2008 14:19

Dear Vivek/ Shankar,
Could either of you come up with a scenario where India takes on Zimbabwe?
I could see this happening: India will want to test her transoceanic strike ability, and bolster her image as an emerging superpower, and getting rid of Robert Mugabe would be a great PR exercise. We'd probably go to war in coalition with South Africa, and possibly Botswana. I can also see Mugabe being supplied by China: A) He's Commie, B) China would love to see India humiliated or frustrated by a third-grade African country.
I'd set this sometime in 2013-2015, with the LCA being fully operational, and field trials being given to the Arjun, and good use of special forces. China may send its own pilots/ tankers.
What do you think?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby p_saggu » 07 Sep 2008 15:51

Wonderful Vivek ji,

But I have to agree with what the others have said about the team carrying the INSAS. There would be a likelihood that firearms would be used, and in such a situation the chinese "will" know almost immediately that there is an indian team around, simply by looking at the ammo / cartridges used. Within no time there will be a manhunt sounded for them.
As opposed to a tibetian group creating mischief, with more deniable AK's, will keep the chinese guessing and suspicious, but there will be no conclusive proof, no tearing hurry for a manhunt - gives the team the time to melt away to their next target.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby chandrabhan » 08 Sep 2008 08:42

I am enjoying these scenarios too much. However, I would suggest a future scenario in Indo- China or the far east. It is a possibility for a lot of reasons. What if Islamic rebels manage a foothold in Philipines, Thailand has it's own problems. Malaysia is almost killing rights of us Kafirs.
China with its centralised structure is very similar what radical islam yearns for - Central authority. Throw china with them covert and overt and it is a recipe for disaster for Hindistic religions(Sanatan,Budhism..).How would a India respond , being the neighbor. What if Thailand calls for Indian help against this backdrop? Thai people are not Han Chinese. How would the world react to it?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 10 Sep 2008 11:56

AIRSPACE OVER SOUTHWESTERN TIBET
TIBET
DAY 1 + 2048 HRS


Come on...Come on...okay, that peak looks good enough. Time to eject off another round...

The peak swept by a moment later and Khurana flipped the control stick to the right even as the aircraft released off another round of chaff behind it. Then he pulled back on the stick and the aircraft swept around the top half of the peak and streaked back towards the eastern border. The PJ-12 missile however continued towards the chaff and detonated in a massive flash that illuminated the darkened cockpit of the fulcrum a second later. Khurana’s night vision disappeared and he pulled up instinctively to gain altitude while his vision restored. In but a few seconds he was above the peaks and the aircraft was soaring into the cold skies above.

It took a second for Khurana to find his bearings. He had lost situational awareness in the time he had been flying between the peaks below to evade the Chinese air-to-air missile. That was not good and he knew it. He had lost sight of his teammates and right now there was no one to his left or right. And the skies were still dangerous. His RWR was still tracking the radar emissions from the four SU-27s to the north while friendly airborne radar was detected to the south. But there were no friendly fighters around...

To some extent that was not unexpected. Unlike the Chinese SU-27s acting aggressive with active radars, the Indian sukhois were running in an EW blackout mode to the south, and somehow that seemed more deadly to Khurana despite the opinion of his RWR. But at the moment his first priority was to find out where his teammates were and what had happened to them. Then the radio jerked back to life with dozens of different voices simultaneously filling the skies:

“Claw-One, this is two! Declaring emergency! I have taken a hit!”
“This is Claw-Three. I have a lock on November-two-four. Engaging!”
“This is Eagle-Eye-One to Claw-Flight. What the hell is going on over there? Over!”

This is getting out of control...Khurana thought as he began to orient himself in the skies around him. A single Chinese pilot had misread the tense situation had bungled up, but now it was going downhill. One Indian fulcrum had taken a hit from a Chinese missile while another was about to take down the Chinese J-10. Four more SU-27s were bearing down while a dozen more Indian fighters were now being vectored to the area. It was time for him to bring things under control again:

“Claw-Three, this is One. Do not engage! Repeat, do not engage!”
“Claw-One, this is Three. We have been engaged! I have the bugger locked on a single R-77 over here.”

That’s tempting...Khurana thought. But he also knew that if that Fulcrum took down the J-10 then the four SU-27s would return the favour with a volley of their own BVR missiles against that lone Indian aircraft. And it would be for nothing. The two countries were not at war yet, and Khurana knew it was all a huge mistake. There have been enough mistakes tonight...

“Negative, Three. Do not engage! Return to formation, Two is hit and needs assistance back to base. Standby...” he changed frequencies: “Eagle-Eye-One, this is Claw-One. Claw-Three has taken a hit from a Chinese missile but is still aloft. Barely. What are your orders?”

On board the Phalcon to the south, the Flight-Controller looked back at the MC who in turn clenched his fists in anger at what had happened but was also professional enough to realize the huge mistake it all was:

“Copy, Claw-One. Assist the crippled bird back to base. We have SU-30s entering the airspace now and will take position between you and the SU-27s. Over and out”

By this time the third Fulcrum was above the peaks and Khurana took up position alongside as they made way to Leh. Khurana turned his head to see the damage and came away with mixed feelings. The port side of the aircraft had been shredded. The port wing trailing edge control surfaces had been destroyed. The port side dorsal ventral fuselage area panels had been blown away but luckily the engine was still apparently running. The port side vertical stabilizer was also two-third the size it should have been. and one weapon pylon with its R-77 payload on the port side had fallen off. It was not pretty, but the damage was repairable.

In a few months perhaps...Khurana thought to himself as he realized that this aircraft was going to go off his squadron ORBAT as soon as it came to a stop on the runway. But for all that the pilot was still alive and kicking. Khurana radioed to him the results of his visual inspection of the aircraft even as Leh airbase ATC finally checked in. Khurana was equally relieved to see his third aircraft return from the north a few minutes later and line up alongside with all his R-77s still attached...


AIRSPACE OVER SOUTHWESTERN TIBET
TIBET
DAY 1 + 2100 HRS

As the Indian Phalcon crew to the south were bringing the situation under control on their side, to the north PLAAF Colonel Feng was also in full action.

“Order all SU-27s to shut down their radars and order them to pull back to the north right away.” Feng ordered his chief airborne control officer.

Feng walked over to the single porthole to see the dark starlit skies overhead. He knew he would have to answer for this. Pushing the situation was all right when done within limits. Out here, the situation had deteriorated severely and always the thinking officer, Feng had adapted. He knew that the J-10 pilot had panicked and bungled. He knew the Indians had evaded the missiles and were making their way back to base. But for all that they had restrained themselves. He was obliged to do the same. This was not a time to push the Indians. Not with just four SU-27s on hand...

One of the things that had alarmed him was the speed of the Indian response. Within minutes of the missiles being fired, his radar controllers had detected multiple flights of SU-30s entering the airspace against his four lone fighters. The Indians had laid claim to these skies, and it worried Feng that those sitting at PLAAF headquarters did not realize the level of the threat this kind of force posed to the PLAAF units in the region. He realized that the only way he was going to be able to accomplish the task of reasserting the PLAAF presence in these skies would be when he had a much larger force at his disposal. But that was unlikely given the other plans.

The only way this problem in this particular region could be solved involved a process that was as much a political storm back in Beijing as it was a military risk. But then again, what plans of the last few weeks had not been? Feng asked himself. If it buys even a week for the PLA Commanders to get the job done in the region then it would have served its purpose. After that the skies would be back in Indian hands.

But by then it would be too late for them...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 10 Sep 2008 12:02

vivek sir welcome back after long time, but don't stop at only one pl

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rupesh » 10 Sep 2008 12:23

Vivek saar,

waiting for some fireworks.. :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby p_saggu » 10 Sep 2008 15:13

But by then it would be too late for them...


" :!: "

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 13 Sep 2008 03:09

DAY-2
BEIJING
CHINA
DAY 2 + 0900 HRS


The walk through the corridors of power was not a relaxed one for Colonel Feng. Neither was the thought of standing in front of some of the most powerful men in the Chinese military. He had been having a very busy month, and this visit was just another in a series of visits to this very building and to meet the very same people. And despite that he had not gotten used to it. He was more at home at his base on the fringes of China rather than at the heart of it. But it had not been his doing.

But one thing was clear: he was not here to be punished for the happenings of last night. That much had been made clear by his CO, Air Force Lt-General Chen back at Chengdu yesterday night. He was here to report on the air situation in the extreme west of China to the top PLAAF commanders, as also to present remedies to the same...

Feng walked down the long empty corridor with his files in one hand and his suitcase in another even as the only sounds to reach his ears were those of his own boots hitting the floor. At the end of the corridor were two armed guards standing outside the door which had a small label to the side: Commander Department

All right...here we go...Feng thought as took a deep breath and nodded to the guard to open the door before walking in...


LEH AIRBASE
INDIA
DAY 2 + 0800 HRS (L)


The three official vehicles pulled over in front of the entrance for the Hardened Aircraft Shelter (HAS) at one isolated corner of the airbase. A flurry of officers got out of the cars a moment before the Air Officer Commanding, Western Air Command (AOC-WAC) got out of his car. He was a busy man and snapped off the salutes to the young pilots standing in flight-suits even as he walked by towards what he had come to see along with the airbase commander. A minute later he and his entourage were inside the hardened shelters and staring at the shredded remains of the port wing of the Fulcrums from the previous night.
There were several groups of airmen working to examine the extent of the damage even before they could think about repairs. It had been a miracle that the aircraft undercarriage had opened properly, allowing the pilot to make an emergency landing that saved the aircraft from total loss. A minute later S/O Khurana walked over and saluted. The Air-Marshal returned the salute before speaking:

“Hell of a night son. Nice work out there preventing the thing from snowballing out of control. You and your men all right?”
“Yes sir. Some minor injuries to Verma from shrapnel to the cockpit glass. Nothing serious though. He will make it.”
The Air-Marshal nodded as we walked around the crippled Mig-29 with the base commander in tow before speaking again: “So what do you make of our Chinese buddies and their intentions?”

“Bottom-line: they are testing our response times, endurance limits and overall threat to themselves...” Khurana reported after receiving the nod from his CO. But the Air-Marshal completed the statement for him:

“Which is of course in stark contrast to their heavy activity in the east. We know they cannot threaten us in this region from the air. Their ground batteries are a different matter though.” The Air-Marshal continued as he walked near the damaged port engine exhaust and checked the deepness of the slash that a shrapnel piece had made into the panelling. It brought a frown to his face as he continued:

“You did good work out there to control the situation. I know how easy it must have been to let go and take down the bugger who did this. But as it happens, we are operating under a policy of restraint from New-Delhi. The idea is to not provoke a war we don’t want. Unfortunately, the politicians are not the ones sitting inside the cockpit as you guys are. But this event has changed the rules...” the Air-Marshal finally turned and nodded to Khurana as he walked away from the hanger with the base commander and his entourage. Once outside and seeing the brown mountains of Leh and a sunny blue sky above, the Air-Marshal turned to the base commander even as he entered the car: “The gloves are coming off, Samik. Get your boys ready...”


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE
MINISTRY OF DEFENCE (MOD)
NEW-DELHI
DAY 2 + 0830 HRS


“This is a mess!” one of the men in the room remarked.
“That about sums it up. Was that a regular PLA Battalion?” another asked even as the video rolled on main screen in the room.

“Not the first one. That was a paramilitary unit. They got ambushed and mauled during the day’s fighting. That’s when they called in their PLA buddies who, in all their genius, rolled in with armour and heavy guns and neutralized the whole damn village. No question of civilian losses. You see that...there on the left: that’s a complete block of civilian houses demolished by heavy artillery. Those guys fight insurgency with a heavy hand. And bottomline is that it works. Out Tibetan friends lost a good chunk of their men in this region in just one day’s fighting.”

“So much for our chances of coordination and control. Their poor tactics are taking them towards self destruction. This insurgency is going to be over before we even get to make first damn contact!” the man behind the desk finally spoke, causing the others to turn and face him again despite the dramatic UAV video from last night playing out in the same room.
“What about Team-Three?”

“They were in these hills you see on the top-left corner of the screen. The UAV was to the south of the village while the team was northeast of the village. They made good their escape. All intercepts of Chinese comms revealed no suspicion on their part of the team’s existence. But for all intents and purposes their mission was over before it began.”

“True. Damn idiots, those Tibetans. Now what?”

“We wait until we hear from the Tibetan resistance again on a new contact place.”
“If they haven’t been compromised by the Chinese already! We could just evac the teams out entirely given the haphazard and uncoordinated way the Tibetans are running this thing. We don’t want to get caught between a rock and a hard place.”

“No. Let’s give it one more shot. Only this time we pick some place less likely to turn into an instant battlefield.” The man behind the desk said. One of the others walked over and shut down the video on the screen before saying what everybody in the room was already thinking:

“As if such a place exists any more in Tibet...”

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby JimmyJ » 13 Sep 2008 03:52

Hey Vivek thanks a lot you made my end of work much worth with a new post :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby andy B » 13 Sep 2008 05:57

Guys I have "REPEATEDLY" asked if some could please tell me how can i get Vivek's book, now PLEASE can someone direct me....anyone???

Oh btw Vivek awesome posts mate luv em....keep going thank you

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 13 Sep 2008 08:25

Anand Barve wrote:Guys I have "REPEATEDLY" asked if some could please tell me how can i get Vivek's book, now PLEASE can someone direct me....anyone???


You have to wait for the book to come out first! :oops: :D Expect that in November/December

Don't worry, I will be giving more details out here as and when I keep getting them from the publishers.

Thanks for showing so much enthusiasm for the book! :)

-Vivek

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby andy B » 13 Sep 2008 08:45

vivek_ahuja wrote:
Anand Barve wrote:Guys I have "REPEATEDLY" asked if some could please tell me how can i get Vivek's book, now PLEASE can someone direct me....anyone???


You have to wait for the book to come out first! :oops: :D Expect that in November/December

Don't worry, I will be giving more details out here as and when I keep getting them from the publishers.

Thanks for showing so much enthusiasm for the book! :)

-Vivek


Wooopsssieeee :oops: I jumped the gun as usual...haha

Thank you Vivek for clearing that up I was under the impression that its already out. I wanted to know the exact release date because I am coming to India during late dec to late jan and wanted to get my hands on it.

Cheers mate.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby ashdivay » 14 Sep 2008 18:29

Why is Shankars scenario on the first page with rapid share link incomplete ? where can i get the complete sce. ?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 16 Sep 2008 08:16

The more important question here is :)

Why vivek is taking too long to come back?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby jamwal » 16 Sep 2008 09:55

ashdivay wrote:Why is Shankars scenario on the first page with rapid share link incomplete ? where can i get the complete sce. ?



Shankar Da posted more scenarios after these were uploaded. So some of his posts are missing.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 16 Sep 2008 10:03

jamwal wrote:
ashdivay wrote:Why is Shankars scenario on the first page with rapid share link incomplete ? where can i get the complete sce. ?



Shankar Da posted more scenarios after these were uploaded. So some of his posts are missing.


Well i have the doc upto date of his scenarios. Send me your ID i'l send u the doc this weekend or when i get time before.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 16 Sep 2008 10:08

Sudhanshu wrote:The more important question here is :)

Why vivek is taking too long to come back?


Vivek u said in the begenning that you have dozens of pages of scenarios written already


I can.

But if possible, I would like to begin a scenario from the beginning. Clear out the mess left behind from my first scenario and start fresh. This is not just for the folks here but for the writer as well since its been a long time and its close to impossible to try and tie up loose ends or keep giving explanations and/or correcting issues when the astute readers point them out.

It is my belief that I can contribute better with a clean slate to start from. I love to create these scenarios, but my work does not allow too much time to try and go over every line of every post I had made for the previous scenario to try and pick up the trails left over from months ago, and you know the nitty-gritty details that can exist in such scenarios.

If the above is all right with everybody, I can start immediately given that I have been penning down this new scenario and that dozens of pages are already written and waiting...

-Vivek



Now where are all those pages. If u dont post soon i'l order a Bredator Jinni to u'r place :evil:

:mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rahul M » 16 Sep 2008 10:11

guys, whoever has the scenario kindly host it at someplace like mihd.net
I'm suggesting this one rather than rapidshare et al because it is hassle free (no timers,IP block etc even for free users).
otherwise we would have pages upon pages of email ID's and requests ! :P

regards,
Rahul.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 16 Sep 2008 14:46

HILLS NORTH OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
INDIA
DAY 2 + 1030 HRS


The sound of the boots trampling the grass and bushes was now louder than the sounds of the water gushing down the rivulet had been a few minutes ago. The fifteen heavily armed Indian soldiers moving through the thick bushes however, couldn’t have cared less at the moment. Their job was to get on a dominant peak on the other side of the east-west running rivulet that controlled the region around the main stream coming down the north-south axis further to the west. A few minutes later they were at the edge of the shallow rivulet and looking at the trees and bushes on the other side down the barrels of their assault rifles as the sought to clear out any possibility of ambush. A few seconds later the Major gave the all clear with a hand wave and the group moved out from the bushes and ran over the rocks that formed the floor of the stream of ice cold water flowing down from the hills. A few seconds later they were within the bushes on the other side and now conducting an upward climb to the northwest from where they could control the western stream.

Half a kilometre to their west a small armed Chinese patrol was moving down the edge of the main stream on foot. This was neither the first time nor the last time this had happened. And in the last few weeks it had been a daily story. They would come down from the actual border to reassert their claim on the region and inevitably bump into some Indian unit or the other where the tension would ensue between the commanders on the two sides. This time, however, a Nishant UAV had picked up the Chinese even before they had crossed the border. Thirty minutes after the Lt-Colonel at the Battalion C3I Centre had received the call a patrolling unit of soldiers had been diverted into action. And now they were about to take the high ground above the Chinese...

Major Kongara was leading the group of Indian soldiers. Carrying an INSAS rifle of his own and a twenty kilo backpack hanging on his back, he was at the head of the team as they slashed through the bushes on their way to the top of the peak from where they could look down at the approaching Chinese soldiers. Time was of the essence.

The clearing was reached a few minutes later as the bushes fell behind and a clean blue sky and a chilling cold wind swept through the air. And sure enough, the stream was on the other side. No one spoke a word as each member of the team spread out into the rocks overlooking the stream below and dropped on their stomachs to conceal themselves. Kongara removed a pair of binoculars from his backpack and took position behind some rocks. It was an agonizing wait, but fifteen minutes later he detected movement at the edge of the peak to the north where the stream took a bend. Twenty odd Chinese troops were moving down the stream...

Kongara took the SATCOM radio phone-like speaker from his radioman who was beside him. His direct superior was the Battalion commander a few kilometres to the south.
“Okay sir, we are in position and I have them in sight. What are my orders?”
“Standby...” was the reply.

Even as Kongara waited for the reply he continued to stare silently at the Chinese coming south on Indian Territory before him. It should have been quite simple really, but it was not. They couldn’t just open fire without authorization from above, and at the same time they couldn’t let them walk in the front door either. To Kongara in represented the failure of his country to understand nation security matters that he was sitting and waiting for orders from his superiors who were being indecisive on one end of the phone even as he could see the Chinese on Indian soil on the other end of the phone. His hand tightened around the speaker in silent anger before the static on the radio was replaced by a voice:

“Okay Kongara. Fire warning shots. If they return fire, take them out.”

Now we are talking...Kongara thought as he handed back the speaker to his radioman and signalled his men to fire warning shots. A second later three of the men raised their rifles and fired single shots into the water of the stream near where the Chinese soldiers were walking. The Chinese soldiers were caught completely by surprise and it please Kongara to see the confusion and fear on the faces of the Chinese as they tried to determine where they were being shot from. He was almost hoping that they would return fire so that he and his men to cut them all down in under a minute...

That was when the Chinese obliged. A bullet slammed into some rocks near where Kongara was taking cover. It was all the provocation he needed...

“Open fire!”

Now fifteen INSAS rifles opened up almost simultaneously in burst fire mode that immediately sent five Chinese soldiers crashing down under the impact of the bullets. The others began to take cover as their leader began to rally them. But the situation was hopeless. The Chinese had been caught by a coherent force on high ground overlooking their position with complete surprise. Another few seconds and three other soldiers were lying motionless on the ground. Kongara spotted the Chinese officer through his rifle optics even as the latter was on the radio calling for support. Kongara switched to single round mode and dispatched a carefully aimed shot into the Chinese officer who was dead before he hit the ground. With their leader dead, the Chinese unit began to fragment and fall back.

Kongara was keeping an eye out for danger, and sure enough he detected the danger coming:
“Incoming fire! Take cover!”

The first mortar shell slammed into the rocks several meters away from the Indian soldiers and threw rock and gravel into the air even as the Chinese attempted to cover their retreat with mortar fire. Several more rounds slammed into the rocks on the hilltop and sent the Indian soldiers scrambling for cover. And then the shelling stopped almost as soon as it had begun. But by the time Kongara and his men made it back to their original positions, the only Chinese to be seen were a few soldiers running back north along the stream leaving the dozen odd dead comrades on the banks of the same stream further south.

Kongara stood up and dusted off his uniform and signaled the others to follow him as the group made their way down the slope to the stream to investigate what remained of “the battle” even as the sounds of first of the friendly Dhruv helicopters became audible...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 16 Sep 2008 15:17

so the action has finally begun.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 16 Sep 2008 17:37

Viviek can you add some images to your scenarios so that we could really visualise the action going on. Not for every post but for a specific scenarion or area of operations. I think u used to do that for your last scenario. It would be great if u could do that. Thanks :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby ashdivay » 16 Sep 2008 22:16

asbchakri wrote:
jamwal wrote:
ashdivay wrote:Why is Shankars scenario on the first page with rapid share link incomplete ? where can i get the complete sce. ?



Shankar Da posted more scenarios after these were uploaded. So some of his posts are missing.


Well i have the doc upto date of his scenarios. Send me your ID i'l send u the doc this weekend or when i get time before.


Sir i would be greatful if you could email me Shankar's Scenarios . My Email is ashdivay AT Gmail dot COM.
Thank you
Ash

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 17 Sep 2008 01:42

NEW DELHI
DAY 2 + 1430 HRS


“Planes shooting at each other, accidental gunfights, artillery shelling...” The Defence-Minister threw the file back on the table and slid it towards the three chiefs sitting across the table: “Where does that leave us? Or more to the point, where is it taking us?”

“To a conflict we cannot afford.” The PM said flatly from another chair before any of the Military commanders could speak. The three service chiefs were clearly uncomfortable at the statement: they thought they could afford the war, but not the policy of appeasement the country’s PM was offering the Chinese.

The Defence Minister understood the concerns as he watched the military commanders silently waiting for someone to ask for their opinion in all this. With this PM this kind of situation wasn’t new. But the problem in Tibet was severe. It had been turned by the Chinese into one large military base as they attempted to control yet another spasm of Tibetan revolts that had turned especially violent in the last few weeks. There were now more than three hundred thousand Chinese soldiers inside Tibet. And these were the acclimatised and battle-hardened ones. It didn’t even begin to account for the hordes of second-line combat troops that the Chinese could theoretically bring in should the situation at the Indian border turn nasty. With more numbers of artillery pieces in Tibet than the entire Indian army combined, and with enough supplies to fight a full intensity war at the border, the Chinese certainly had the numbers...

“What’s the latest count, General?” the Defence-Minister spoke up finally.
“Five Group Armies confirmed and elements of three other Group armies detected.” The Chief of Army Staff, General K. Yadav, said without looking at his papers. Those numbers had been in his head ever since his intelligence officers had spoken them out. Yadav turned to face the PM before continuing in a neutral tone: “That’s around three hundred and fifty thousand soldiers across the border from us. In the east we are outnumbered four to one at the present time.”

“What are their intentions, General?” the PM asked back.
That’s a good question. If I knew that, you think I would be sitting around wasting my time here? Yadav thought. Besides, why the hell are you asking me? I should be asking you!
“We are not sure, sir.”

“You mean you don’t know what their intentions are!” the PM continued, and everybody in the room could see where this argument was going. It had gone the very same way for the last few weeks...

“I mean we have no way of knowing that just from our side. Their units are spread all over Tibet trying to control the rebels. Having said that, it takes less than ten days for them to be redeployed at our border by which time it’s too late for us. They have a transportation infrastructure that completely outstrips ours. We have to be prepared for the worst case scenario.” Yadav continued his lonely battle from his end.

“Which is?”

“That this situation at the border spirals out of control and we are faced with a border war!”
“And why would it spiral out of control?” the PM asked again, but this time the Defence-Minister finally leaned forward in his chair as he rose to defend the COAS:

“It can happen due to a variety of reasons. Take this morning’s incident near Walong. It has been just a few hours since the event, so we haven’t seen the Chinese response yet. Chances are that they will let it go, or then again, they might not. They will certainly not accept the argument that their side opened fire first to which our troops responded. In this case if they choose to escalate the situation, we will have to respond in kind.”

“Not if we diffuse the situation diplomatically first!” the PM retorted and the Defence –Minister could already see why that wouldn’t work. He could already see the faces of the people in Beijing at the time when they would have heard that ten of their soldiers got killed at the hands of Indian soldiers. There was little diplomacy could do to reduce the anger, not that the Indian commanders cared a damn either way of course...

“That may very well be, but we have to be prepared for any irrational action that the other side might take on the ground. We have to think about our defences. If the General wants more troops at the border to feel more secure about that, then I think we should let him do that.” The Defence-Minister concluded, and was relieved to see the PM at least considering the issue. The PM finally turned to the General Yadav:

“So what kind of mobilization you are thinking about, General?”
Yadav raised an eyebrow in surprise: Are you kidding me? Total mobilization is what I had in mind!
“At least a Three additional Divisions need to be moved to the front in the eastern sector alone. I have the Divisions earmarked for deployment. I can have them moving to assist the existing three Divisions in Arunachal Pradesh by the end of the day today. That will double our current number of troops in the region and make the Chinese think twice about any rash military actions.” Yadav said in a more professional voice than before.

“That sounds like a lot of firepower, General.” The PM continued.
“Yes it is, sir. But compared to the Chinese in Tibet, it’s still a minimum required for a good defence.”

“And you don’t think it will be seen as a provocation on our part by the Chinese given the current situation in Tibet as well as today morning’s incident at the border?”
“It might be seen as provocation, but remember that they have three times that many troops in Tibet at this time engaged in combat.” Yadav continued as he saw the PM hadn’t changed.

“For which they have a just cause. What cause do we have for mobilizing these Divisions?”

How about defending our borders? Sound like a good enough cause, you idiot? Yadav bit off what he was actually wanting to say before finally speaking calmly: “Defending our borders, sir. I think that’s a just enough cause, isn’t it?”

********************

Fifteen minutes later the people in the room walked out one by one after the PM had decided to think about the issue. Finally the room was empty save for the Defence Minister and General Yadav. The Defence Minister waited for the door to close before he spoke again:
“How bad is it really, General?”

“Bad, sir. We are spread thin trying to control these border incursions. I have Battalion sized units spread over large areas to try and seal the border. The nearest reinforcement units are still at their bases in the plains to the south and it will take them several days at the very least to deploy. The logistics are going to be a nightmare even if we decided to surge out the other three Divisions into the hills. I have the IV Corps Commander calling me every evening to find out when the other Divisions are supposed to be deployed and today I will have to repeat the same story as yesterday evening.”

“We should have surged out these units weeks ago.” the Defence-Minister concluded.
“Yes we should have. But even now the situation is not too bad to try and reverse. But if we decide to take action when the shells start falling, it’s going to be too damned late.”
“What if the PM decides that the provocation bullshit weighs far too heavily given the current situation against moving of those Divisions?”

“Then if the Chinese decide to take decisive action, we will have a complete disaster on our hands... ”

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rahul M » 17 Sep 2008 01:51

How about defending our borders? Sound like a good enough cause, you idiot? Yadav bit off what he was actually wanting to say before finally speaking calmly: “Defending our borders, sir. I think that’s a just enough cause, isn’t it?”

one word, classic ! :mrgreen:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Baljeet » 17 Sep 2008 06:55

Vivek
Don't hold your fire back, put a face and a name to PM (Pi$$3r and Moaner) Neta of India. Make your scenario more real where Arunachal Pradesh is taken over by Chinese, Nagas rise against India for their freedom it spirals down to Mizoram, Manipur, Tripura. Make it more interesting ala 1962, IA repeats the history. Commies start celebrating, Nepalese start making incursions in Terai region, Maoist link up with them via bihar, orrisa, jharkhand. Seeing a great opportunity, beedies make move on assam and west bengal, Pakis make good on their promise of kashmir, Sikhs get their khalistan, tamils get their elam.

Not starting a flame war here, just presenting different side of coin based on current and future realities for forseeable time.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby jamwal » 17 Sep 2008 10:28

Cool down Baljeet jee
No need to get so charged up yet :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 17 Sep 2008 10:32

ashdivay wrote:
asbchakri wrote:
Well i have the doc upto date of his scenarios. Send me your ID i'l send u the doc this weekend or when i get time before.


Sir i would be greatful if you could email me Shankar's Scenarios . My Email is ashdivay AT Gmail dot COM.
Thank you
Ash


I'l send it to your mail this weekend. Guys i'l try to upload the whole set of scenarios on my personal sit from where you can download . I'l try this weekend to do so. If i not i'l try to upload in the site Rahul pruposed.

guys, whoever has the scenario kindly host it at someplace like mihd.net
I'm suggesting this one rather than rapidshare et al because it is hassle free (no timers,IP block etc even for free users).
otherwise we would have pages upon pages of email ID's and requests !

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 17 Sep 2008 11:04

Thanks for your views Baljeet. In my personal opinion, Vivek is already doing really great. Let's not alter his thought process.
May be other scenario writers taking note from your opinion, they might come up something like that.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby ashdivay » 17 Sep 2008 12:50

asbchakri wrote:
ashdivay wrote:
asbchakri wrote:
Well i have the doc upto date of his scenarios. Send me your ID i'l send u the doc this weekend or when i get time before.


Sir i would be greatful if you could email me Shankar's Scenarios . My Email is ashdivay AT Gmail dot COM.
Thank you
Ash


I'l send it to your mail this weekend. Guys i'l try to upload the whole set of scenarios on my personal sit from where you can download . I'l try this weekend to do so. If i not i'l try to upload in the site Rahul pruposed.

guys, whoever has the scenario kindly host it at someplace like mihd.net
I'm suggesting this one rather than rapidshare et al because it is hassle free (no timers,IP block etc even for free users).
otherwise we would have pages upon pages of email ID's and requests !


Ahhh ty sir. i shall be wating for your corrospondence .
Regards
Ash

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rahul M » 17 Sep 2008 19:46

for vivek:
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Figh ... 493057.cms

asbchakri, you can upload on mihd.net and post the links on your site. it could save you some bandwidth. :wink:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 18 Sep 2008 10:08

HILLS NORTH OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
INDIA
DAY 2 + 1630 HRS


“Awfully quiet...” Brigadier Malik said as he stared to the north. The peace and serenity in the hills was momentarily broken as two Dhruv helicopters flew overhead and disappeared behind down the valley to the south after turning around a bend.
“Yes sir, it is. Surprising.” Kongara said as he lowered his binoculars after scanning the peaks to the north. No activity there...

It had been several hours now since the gunfight between Kongara’s men and the Chinese patrol had taken place not hundred meters from where the two officers were standing now. And yet there had been no Chinese response. None whatsoever. No diplomatic protests, no localized military response to speak of other than a minor reinforcement and reshuffling of border units. Over the last few weeks such incidents had always led to either a Chinese military response via larger units in the same region where an incident occurred or a strong diplomatic protest. This time, there wasn’t a sound...

“Maybe information travels slower up their chain of command than ours.” One of Kongara’s junior officers commented offhandedly. Kongara turned around to face the man before speaking: “That’s the kind of assumptions that can cost us dearly. Always assume the enemy to be as good, if not better, than yourself. Trust me, the Chinese know what happened.”
Kongara turned to face the Brigadier before continuing: “Which is exactly what makes their silence so scary. More so than their guns, as a matter of fact. What the hell are they thinking?”

“Whatever it is, we can be sure of one thing: we won’t like it. We need to be prepared for the worst. Division thinks so as well. They have allocated round the clock UAV coverage for this sector for the foreseeable future. If the Chinese move a muscle, we will know it.” Malik said as he wore his gloves back on. The cold in the Himalayan Mountains after sunset was severe. Even when one could see the pink-red sky to the west, the temperature had already fallen by a rock than during the daytime.

Brigadier Malik commanded a Brigade in the 2ND Mountain Division (2ND MD) which was responsible for the defence of Walong. It was a large sector, but his was a large force with lot of independent firepower under his direct command. Yet for all that his force was spread thin thanks to repeated Chinese incursions in the sector. The government demanded action, and so instead of a large force of men concentrated to the rear, his units were down to Battalion sized formations ‘defending’ various smaller sectors of the border from incursions. But Malik was no fool. He knew exactly what the Chinese were doing...

It had taken a humiliating defeat fifty years ago at the hands of the Chinese during one cold winter to hammer home the lesson that the border with China in the east could not be defended right at the borders themselves, but at crucial choke points further south. Napoleon had once asked his commanders if his army units spread evenly along the border were meant for defending against smugglers, for that was exactly what the result was. A military force, however large, if dissipated to a certain degree, ceases to be a coherent force, especially in mountainous terrain like the Himalayas.

Malik knew it all to well, and his first plan of action in any major conflict with China was to pull his Battalion task forces back towards a common defensive line to the south, codenamed ‘Romeo-Line’. Here he would ensure his force regained the coherency required to fight the Chinese. After that they would advance to some of the several choke points within the passes in the region depending on where the Chinese were headed. Each of these locations was named with code name ‘Juliet’ followed by a numeral. If the Chinese pushed them off these locations then all forces were to fall back to Romeo-Line for regroup and counter-attack. If even this line fell, the last line of defence north of Walong was the Ragnar-Line.

After that, if need be, we will fight them house to house in Walong...Malik thought as he walked down the bank of the river towards the waiting Dhruv helicopter parked further down. Major Kongara followed the Brigadier along with his direct CO: the Colonel Commanding the Battalion responsible for this sector.

The three man crew of the parked Dhruv saw the Brigadier and his entourage approaching and immediately climbed back into the cockpit. A minute later the sounds of the turbines spooling up filled the ever darkening valley. The Army Aviation Captain flying the helicopter lowered his helmet mounted NVGs to help see the valley more clearly now as they prepared to head back to Brigade HQ in the northern outskirts of Walong. Even as the Brigadier climbed back into the cabin, the Colonel turned to face Kongara:

“Stay vigilant tonight. We can expect a night time incursion by a Chinese force seeking revenge on your unit. We will give every support we can muster, including UAV intelligence on inbound enemy units. But there is a possibility that the Chinese might sneak through, in which case, the last thing we need is a night time confusion filled battle. Report anything suspicious directly to me. Any updates and I will pass them back to you. Understood?”

“Yes sir. We will hold the line.” Kongara said even as he snapped off the salute and walked away from the chilling winds induced by the helicopter downwash. Thirty seconds later he watched as the helicopter flew down the valley and headed south before disappearing in the darkness. The sounds of the helicopter still echoed in the valley for more than a minute before the silence ensued. Major Kongara stood there and glanced back at the imposing darkened silhouettes of the peaks beyond the border to the north as if expecting to see the Chinese there.

A minute later he wore his own gloves and watched his breath as a small puff in the cold air before walking away to where his temporary Company CP existed on the southern slope of the peak from near to where he had ambushed the Chinese in the morning. His hundred odd men were now settled in for a long cold night...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rupesh » 18 Sep 2008 10:32

on the edge :!:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby amit » 18 Sep 2008 12:45

Vivek, I know no need for me to give you a certificate, but your writing is awesome. :D

I don't know what you do for a living but your writing style is certainly professional class. You've also got me on the edge. Please keep it coming.

Cheers!

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby sarabpal.s » 20 Sep 2008 21:57

:arrow: why we one step behind to chines always?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 21 Sep 2008 04:19

sarabpal.s wrote::arrow: why we one step behind to chines always?


That's a good question. Contact your local Babu for details.

Seriously: there is just one phrase to describe the reason for such a situation:Threat induced motivation.

Think about it.

-Vivek

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 21 Sep 2008 04:21

BEIJING
DAY 2 + 2130 HRS


Colonel Feng was sitting in his car as the official vehicle sped though the streets of Beijing back to the PLAAF Headquarters building and his temporary office. He was sitting in the back seat even as his driver raced down the streets as best he could. It was relatively easy driving given that almost everybody was on the way out of their offices while the Colonel’s car was one of the few vehicles going back into the complex. For now...Feng thought

Once the current issue had been cleared, it would be decided whether to bring them back or not. But for now the Colonel continued to read through the single page document that lay in his hands:

‘Priority category one message to all PLAAF MR Commanders:
Report combat readiness status to PLAAF Commander Department for immediate western deployments. All MR Commanders are authorized to recall inactive duty personnel and retain active duty personnel for indefinite periods.
All Operations Commanders are authorized to prepare action plans Alpha-Two-Five. Await further information and updates and standby for deployment orders.’


Feng folded that page and put it in his uniform coat pocket even as the car came to a stop in front of the Commander Department building where there was obvious frantic activity by the look of things. Dozens of mid-grade and senior officers were moving about in obvious urgency with their aides struggling to keep up with their files and documents. Colonel Feng got out of his car before his driver could step out to open the door for him like he normally did.

The Colonel nodded to him to move off even as another car came to a stop behind his. He recognized the person getting out of the car immediately. It was Lt-General Chen, the PLAAF Commander for the Chengdu region. Colonel Feng had just gotten to the building in time to meet his CO. It was a brief but warm welcome after which both men walked up the stairs and then through the main doors of the Commander Department followed by a horde of aides. Chen was not at all pleased to have been dragged back into office after a long day of work far from his real command in Chengdu.

He was one of the few commanders in the PLAAF who did not wish to be posted to Beijing. But current circumstances had seen him boarding a plane a few hours ago from Chengdu to arrive back in Beijing for an important briefing. Of course Feng still hadn’t been told what was going on. That changed when they entered the normally empty corridors of the Commander Department that were now somewhat crowded. General Chen was to the point in his talk:
“We are being mobilized. Every single unit across the board. Plan Alpha-Two-One.”

Feng was still not sure of the overall picture. Only this morning he had met the senior commanders and gotten approval for his plans for the Air-Defence of the south-western sector and had been told to be ready in ten days. Now he was being told that they were to be ready within for imminent action...

“Alpha-Two-One? But the message I got was for Two-Five!”
“That’s for the rest of the MRCs. We just got our owl little orders not five minutes ago. It’s Two-One for us Colonel, as it is for the PLA 13TH Group Army which is already swinging into Two-One mode as we speak. ” Chen said without turning to face the Colonel. They were now heading for the office of the PLAAF Commander. Feng was still absorbing the situation: The 13TH GA could afford to go ‘Two-One’, which entailed surprise strategic attacks on the enemy within D+1 days of activation and tactical operations within D+2 days. But they were already deployed the best they could and were near to their Area of Operations or AO.

The PLAAF could also go ‘Two-Zero’ in the eastern sector where most of their assets were based anyway. But Colonel Feng had seen for himself the disastrous possibilities on the western sector and he knew he wasn’t ready there for sure. Of course, now that his MR was in ‘Two-One’ mode, his plan would get all assets on absolute priority, which would reduce his preparation time down to three days or so. He was also sure the PLA Western Commanders would also be crying foul for their ‘Two-One’ status given that they were waiting for proper air protection before they were ready.

“Feng, tell me that we are prepared.” General Chen asked as they neared their final destination in the building.
“The eastern sector is ready, sir. The western sector is not. It will take three days or more to get them ready to face battle.”
“Not good enough, Feng. Get on it right away. Get on the ground there if need be and take Command of the local units. We cannot lose in that sector.” Chen continued without slowing down as both men strode down the long corridor.

Get down there? Take personal Command? Feng realized that the next few weeks were going to be very dangerous for him and his Command. But as Lt-General Chen and his Operations Commander entered the office of the PLAAF Commander, both knew that events had overtaken their plans...


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