Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

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vivek_ahuja
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 Oct 2008 17:49

Sorry about the delay guys.

Recently I had been bogged down by numerous projects, not least of which was a Military History project for SRR. I will continue the scenario in a few hours, but in the meantime, here's the link for an article I have contributed to the BR Security Research Review which is pretty related, even though it is based on something that happened fifty years ago...

The Kongka-La incident of 1959:
http://www.adl.gatech.edu/research/brmsrr/2008/SRRv7No1_KongkaLa_Ahuja080927.pdf

-Vivek
Last edited by vivek_ahuja on 07 Oct 2008 18:10, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby p_saggu » 07 Oct 2008 18:05

Delighted and Deleted
Last edited by p_saggu on 07 Oct 2008 18:19, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vipins » 07 Oct 2008 18:05

sir
minor mistake in the link..
http://www.adl.gatech.edu/research/brms ... 080927.pdf

“That, boys, were our orders to blow things up. Let’s move!”..
yes captain :D :twisted:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 Oct 2008 19:36

13TH GROUP ARMY A.O. (PLA)
NORTH OF THE MACMAHON LINE
EASTERN TIBET
DAY 3 + 0500 HRS


The command from the officers still ringing in their ears, the Chinese soldiers now picked up the first shells from the small dumps near each gun and loaded them inside the chamber in total synchronization that would have made any drill instructor proud. The gun azimuth and elevation was already set. The ammo dumps were ready to resupply and the first Chinese UAV crews awaited their orders to fly south and conduct joint BDA and FAC operations. With everything ready, time seemed to slow down and an eerie silence filled the skies in the northeast before it was disrupted by the shout from the battery commanders...

“Open fire!”

And with that the skies to the north of the Indian defenders struggling to recover their own artillery and wounded comrades from the smoke were beset by continuous flashes followed by a deep rumbling thunder...


ALPHA COMPANY
1ST BATTALION, 3RD INFANTRY COMBAT GROUP (AD-HOC)
HILLS NORTH OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0505 HRS


“Incoming fire! Take cover! Now!”
Major Kongara shouted as he picked up his rifle and ran from where he was standing towards the line of trenches that he and his men and dug for protection on the hill above the riverbank near the border. Even as he ran, the line of hills north of the border were silhouetted against the continuous flash of lights while the sounds of the incoming shells sweeping down through the skies were now becoming ever louder. Kongara and his men had barely jumped into their trenches when the ground shook violently and the dirt and smoke clouds enveloped the air around them in a massive show of light and thunder...

Kongara was crouching inside his trench along with his communications team even as the latter were contacting the Battalion CP further south. Contact was made with the Battalion Commander, Lt-Colonel Nath to the south amidst the thunderclaps and the dirt falling around and Kongara took the R/T from his comms officer:

“Three-Alpha, Three-Alpha, this is Quebec-One. We are under heavy fire from short range Chinese indirect artillery! Requesting priority counter-battery fire support! Over!”
“Roger, Quebec-One. Stand-by!” Lt-Colonel Nath replied over the R/T.


1ST BATTALION C.P.,
3RD INFANTRY COMBAT GROUP (AD-HOC), 5TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION
HILLS NORTH OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0510 HRS


Lt-Colonel Nath handed back the R/T to his comms officer and turned to face a Major who was on another R/T set talking to the Artillery commander of the battery of heavy guns responsible for providing support to 1ST Battalion positions. The Major was not too happy at what he was hearing and looked back at Nath and shook his head before speaking:
“Sir, the battery is still in bad shape. They say they need another hour to get back on their feet before they can be in a position to respond.”

Nath’s facial expression now turned to extreme anger as he stormed over to snatch the R/T away from the Major and speak with the other Major commanding the artillery battery:

“What the hell is your problem out there? I have men dying to the north under Chinese light artillery and you are telling me we cannot respond!”

“Sir, I am telling you the facts! We have taken serious damage from the Chinese attack. I am down to sixty percent manpower and thirty percent equipment levels here. My gun crews are working as fast as they can to get the guns back into action but they cannot work faster than they currently are!”

“God damn it!” Nath threw the R/T piece out of frustration on the table before turning to face his aide again:

“Where’s that MLRS Group?”

“The 3RD ICG MLRS Group?” the Major asked as his eyebrows went up in surprise.

“Yes, damn it! Where is it? Is it still operational?” Nath thundered back.
“North of Walong, sir. But that has not been deputed to us yet.”

“Doesn’t matter now. When Brigadier Malik and the Colonel have been found alive, we will return it to them. For now I am the senior officer present and am taking command of 3RD ICG. Contact the Group and inform them of the situation. Then contact the other Battalions and ask them what they need in terms of support. I am pretty sure they will be under a similar situation. Move!” Lt-Colonel Nath ordered the Major who immediately ran over to the communications section and started making calls. In the meantime Nath walked over to the other R/T section and spoke to one of the two lieutenants sitting there:

“Contact Division HQ and tell them that 3RD ICG is taking artillery fire from Chinese forces north of the border. Tell them we are under attack and that the attacks are a precursor to a major push southwards by the PLA 13TH GA towards Walong. God knows what’s happening further west of here but we will make our stand here. Tell him that I have taken over 3RD ICG until contact can be re-established with Brigadier Malik at his HQ. In the meantime all 3RD ICG Battalions will hold their ground.”

Nath now turned to the other officer: “You, contact Major Kongara and tell him to hold his ground and that help is on the way. Let’s see if we can rain down some steel rain on the Chinese guns...”

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Hari Sud » 08 Oct 2008 01:26

Vivek

Before you jump into the aftermath of missile attack by the Chinese, first you have to describe, where, how and how much damage the missiles inflicted.

There were 13o of these; wherabouts did they land.

Right now you are describing the aftermath of the attack in a piecemeal fashion e.g. one in the Walong sector.

Walong is closer to Lido Road of the Second World War. Chinese in their right mind will use Lido Road to get behind the Walong Defences. Right now you are descrbing a frontal assault; not very likely.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby JimmyJ » 08 Oct 2008 02:54

A few pics/maps may be a good idea... :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 08 Oct 2008 03:11

Hari Sud wrote:Vivek

Before you jump into the aftermath of missile attack by the Chinese, first you have to describe, where, how and how much damage the missiles inflicted.

There were 13o of these; wherabouts did they land.


This was already covered in the posts before. Please check the pages there.

Right now you are describing the aftermath of the attack in a piecemeal fashion e.g. one in the Walong sector.

Walong is closer to Lido Road of the Second World War. Chinese in their right mind will use Lido Road to get behind the Walong Defences. Right now you are descrbing a frontal assault; not very likely.


What frontal assault? :shock:

Though I would love to discuss this in detail, I am not sure how to answer this question without giving away the details entirely that would pretty much suck the whole fun out of my writing as well as viewers reading the posts.

But I will add that I get the feeling that you are experiencing what the enemy expects you to expect in the given situation... :)

Its the same problem for me every time. It would be better if everybody can wait until I can finish the scene or when the picture is pretty clear within the scenario before asking questions that force me to literally bite off what I want to say (just my views on the questions) in order to maintain the intensity of the storyline.

JimmyJ wrote:A few pics/maps may be a good idea... :)


Yes I know. Working on them but we will need to ask p_saggu or someone else to do the Google 3D stuff. I am barely getting enough time to write the posts as it is.

But I should have a 2D map uploaded sometime soon that can be updated as we go along.

-Vivek

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby andy B » 08 Oct 2008 03:35

Guys lets not be too demanding of Vivek...the guy doesnt owe us jack. I understand that we like details and thats fine but if that means that he has to put in even more time than what he has on hand to do this its quite unfair to him.

Just my 2 cents...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby JimmyJ » 08 Oct 2008 05:33

Anand Barve wrote:Guys lets not be too demanding of Vivek...


But isn't he our Master Blaster/Little Champ :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 08 Oct 2008 11:37

Hari Sud wrote:Vivek

Before you jump into the aftermath of missile attack by the Chinese, first you have to describe, where, how and how much damage the missiles inflicted.

There were 13o of these; wherabouts did they land.

Right now you are describing the aftermath of the attack in a piecemeal fashion e.g. one in the Walong sector.

Walong is closer to Lido Road of the Second World War. Chinese in their right mind will use Lido Road to get behind the Walong Defences. Right now you are descrbing a frontal assault; not very likely.


Hari,

Please stop telling Vivek what to do and what to not. Its the writers prerogative as to how he wants to tell his story.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 08 Oct 2008 11:38

vivek_ahuja wrote:
Hari Sud wrote:Vivek

Before you jump into the aftermath of missile attack by the Chinese, first you have to describe, where, how and how much damage the missiles inflicted.

There were 13o of these; wherabouts did they land.


This was already covered in the posts before. Please check the pages there.

Right now you are describing the aftermath of the attack in a piecemeal fashion e.g. one in the Walong sector.

Walong is closer to Lido Road of the Second World War. Chinese in their right mind will use Lido Road to get behind the Walong Defences. Right now you are descrbing a frontal assault; not very likely.


What frontal assault? :shock:

Though I would love to discuss this in detail, I am not sure how to answer this question without giving away the details entirely that would pretty much suck the whole fun out of my writing as well as viewers reading the posts.

But I will add that I get the feeling that you are experiencing what the enemy expects you to expect in the given situation... :)

Its the same problem for me every time. It would be better if everybody can wait until I can finish the scene or when the picture is pretty clear within the scenario before asking questions that force me to literally bite off what I want to say (just my views on the questions) in order to maintain the intensity of the storyline.

JimmyJ wrote:A few pics/maps may be a good idea... :)


Yes I know. Working on them but we will need to ask p_saggu or someone else to do the Google 3D stuff. I am barely getting enough time to write the posts as it is.

But I should have a 2D map uploaded sometime soon that can be updated as we go along.

-Vivek


Vivek,

Going forward do not reply to any such questions/suggestions.Just concentrate on posting scenario :D :twisted:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby SGupta » 08 Oct 2008 16:18

Vivek,

Great writing. I am enjoying your style of communicating the story and don't need the detailed picture or a map. Your time is limited, so for what its worth keep going the way you are.

Cheers,
Sanjay

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 08 Oct 2008 21:11

:) Hindering Vivek's writing is crime equal to treason in this thread and they tend to be shot. So, keep that in mind before distracting him, Or before being reason for his inability to write post on a day.

Every morning many people check/read this thread before checking their gf/boss mail on internet.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby rudradeep » 08 Oct 2008 22:21

Every morning many people check/read this thread before checking their gf/boss mail on internet.


So very true..... It has now become a addiction... to wake up every morning and first check if vivek has given us our daily dose....... :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 09 Oct 2008 11:02

C'mon Vivek,

Unleash HELL on the commies !!!

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 10 Oct 2008 12:56

EASTERN BANK OF THE LOHIT RIVER
NORTHEAST OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0525 HRS


The valley down from the border was more or less a straight line north of Walong. And right now the flashes of light erupting from hills south of the border were visible even as far back as the peaks near Walong thanks to the all enveloping darkness. Dawn was fast approaching and the first organized and brutal day of the war was about to start in earnest after a night of chaos and confusion...

The distant rumbling that followed the flashes on the peaks could be felt to the very bone for anyone and everyone in the region. Almost all forward deployed infantry units of the 3RD ICG were taking fire from Chinese artillery north of the border. And so far there was no return fire from the Indian side. But that was about to change.

Lt-Colonel Misra jumped out of the AXE transport he had drove in on along the ‘road’ from Walong and walked down to the edge of the rocky bank of the Lohit River as he stared northwards. Behind him three of the Tatra Kolos vehicles were rumbling into the flat patch of ground to the east as their drivers navigated the rough terrain using the onboard passive night vision systems. To the north a single Weapon Locating Radar or WLR system was silently and actively monitoring the Chinese artillery barrages. And further south of the three launchers themselves, several camouflaged trailers had been placed among the thick foliage of the region and contained the command and control equipment along with the rest of the men under Lt-Col Misra’s MLRS Group. At least, all those who had been left alive...Misra thought bitterly as he waited for his men to do their jobs behind him.

The 3RD ICG MLRS Group had taken some serious attention from the Chinese cruise missiles. It was obvious to anyone who appreciated the kind of destructive firepower that Misra had under his command, that the enemy would in fact try to put his unit of commission as soon as possible. And the Chinese had tried their best to try and catch the MLRS Group, like other Indian targets, off guard. But Misra was no fool. He knew the Chinese had been monitoring the location and movement of his unit’s vehicles for weeks before the actual attack a few hours ago. They had probably been using everything down from local informers in the region to high tech satellites to get an accurate description of the disposition of the unit.

And so the simple solution had been moving the vehicles around every odd hour to a new location somewhere else in the region. It had provided mixed results for Misra and his men when the Chinese missiles had struck. Most of the unit, consisting of one battery of six launchers and two attrition reserves had escaped destruction, though two launchers had been destroyed in a direct hit with cent percent casualties among the two crews. In addition, several support vehicles had been lost, including one rearming vehicle, which was a bad blow for the unit’s ability to sustain high intensity operations. Lt-Colonel Misra had thus been forced to deploy his full attrition reserve into the fight within hours of the war beginning, and it could only get worse, as everybody, including Misra, knew. He was not in a happy mood.

He shook his head and recovered from his thoughts after his radioman shouted out to him from the AXE troop transport. Misra turned back behind to see the three launch vehicles now dispersed and deployed out on the large field, silent and deadly. He walked over to the radioman to receive the call from his mobile CP that was coordinating with Lt-Colonel Nath to provide fire-support to the three 3RD ICG Battalions. Misra had enough confidence in the professional ability of his men to know when he was not needed around. But that time had now passed. It was his command, and the final orders were his alone.

Misra picked up the receiver and listened to the sit-rep from his officers before speaking:
“All BAKER elements, this is BAKER-ONE. A few hours ago the Chinese handed this unit their first casualties of this battle. They tried to liquidate this unit before the battle could even begin. They failed. The battle has begun, and we are still alive. Now it’s our turn to return the favour, and we shall not fail. We will make the enemy beg for mercy and hand them none. All BAKER Elements are now weapons free for counter-battery barrage...

Commence Fire!”

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 10 Oct 2008 13:12

C'mon Vivek.. one more plsssssss :wink:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 10 Oct 2008 13:13

EASTERN BANK OF THE LOHIT RIVER
NORTHEAST OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0540 HRS


The three Pinaka launchers now adjusted pod elevation and azimuth based on the data coming in from the northern WLR unit. The vehicle’s own sensors had already established outside atmospheric conditions that would affect the flight of the rockets and had compensated for it. The crewman inside the sealed front cabin of the Tatra Kolos vehicle had now fixed the launch data within seconds of the orders coming in. He, along with two of his other counterparts in the other launchers, now switched the launch mode to “Ripple” for the twelve rounds on each launcher.

The rockets themselves were armed for the required scatter on target. Finally, on command from the Group C3I control, the three crewmen depressed the launch button and the vehicle shuddered violently. Outside, the vehicle was already enveloped in a cloud of smoke while all neighbouring snow on the field had disappeared, with small steams of water now remaining.

Above the smoke cloud were streaks of light that were racing across the early morning sky as they headed north...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 10 Oct 2008 13:33

on which portion the hell is about to loose vivek? waiting...........

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 10 Oct 2008 13:45

NORTH OF THE MACMAHON LINE
DAY 3 + 0550 HRS


The attack was unexpected and the damage was total. The three Pinaka vehicles had individually targeted one Chinese Mountain gun deployment that had been dropping shells on the forward deployed Indian Battalions for quite some time now. These gun detachments had been well dispersed so that a single concentrated attack from Misra’s launchers could not suppress all of them at once, but since each launcher was now directed against each such target, there was sufficient concentrated firepower within the twelve rockets of each launcher to wipe out the detachments as a whole.

And that was exactly what happened. A few hundred feet above the ground the twelve rockets dispersed the smaller sub-munitions that carpeted a large tract of ground underneath them. With ripple fire inbounds, once the first rocket appeared over the Chinese guns, it was all over in just as many seconds as it had taken between the first and last rocket release for each launcher. A massive crumbling noise echoed the valley as hundreds of sub-munitions scattered red-hot shrapnel pieces all around the Chinese guns and crews and sympathetic explosions added to the devastation. By the time the last rocket from each launcher appeared over the target, the ground below was one big cloud of smoke...


ALPHA COMPANY
1ST BATTALION, 3RD INFANTRY COMBAT GROUP (AD-HOC)
HILLS NORTH OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0605 HRS


It stopped just as abruptly as it had started. The last shell slammed into the hillside that had been turned into a lunar surface by the Chinese artillery before the frightening howl of the incoming shells stopped. It took several minutes before the echoing noises receded and some more minutes before the ringing in the ears of the Indian soldiers receded. Major Kongara stood up from his trench and dusted off his uniform and weapon even as he looked around to check the status of the other soldiers. He wasn’t taking any chances that the halt in the attack was a feint designed to draw the victims out in the open to tend to the wounded and recover, only to begin shelling again and catch the opposing force off guard. But after several minutes it was clear even to Kongara that something else had happened...


EASTERN BANK OF THE LOHIT RIVER
NORTHEAST OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0615 HRS


Lt-Colonel Misra removed his binoculars and stared at the north to see with satisfaction that the flashes of light had now stopped. But the battle had only begun. His deadly strikes had warned the Chinese that he was still around despite their efforts, and that was unlikely to go unpunished. Misra walked back to his AXE troop transport and sat down in the front seat even as his driver pulled out of the rock and gravel laden river bank with a jerk. Behind him the three Pinaka launchers were already beginning to move out while their crews considered their next location, next reload and next attack...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 10 Oct 2008 13:59

only pinaka as of now :(( :(( no smerch in action :(( :((
We want to see BrahMos also in action. And mix it with IAF sorties across to deliver a deadly cocktail. :(( :((

Awesome writing vivek.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 10 Oct 2008 14:09

Nitesh wrote:only pinaka as of now :(( :(( no smerch in action :(( :((
We want to see BrahMos also in action. And mix it with IAF sorties across to deliver a deadly cocktail. :(( :((

Awesome writing vivek.


Have patience dude.

Vivek,

Thanks for the triple posts. You made my afternoon :D

Cheers.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 10 Oct 2008 14:09

1ST BATTALION C.P.,
3RD INFANTRY COMBAT GROUP (AD-HOC), 5TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION
HILLS NORTH OF WALONG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0630 HRS


Lt-Colonel Nath was also busy formulating his next movement plans. While his officers and men deployed to the north were feeling relieved to have ridden themselves free from the Chinese fire, it was only temporary. Nath was already looking at the bunch of papers in his hand that had arrived from Division HQ, Brigade HQ and his forward deployed companies.

His Company Commanders were reporting no actual sight of the enemy other than the shelling, but that was only temporary. Division HQ had forwarded along the first updated intelligence estimates regarding the 13TH GA movements just north of the border and sure enough, the real might of the PLA was only now approaching the fronts. And despite his tactical victory against the Chinese so far, the current deployment of the 3RD ICG Battalions and the single MLRS Group under Lt-Colonel Misra was unlikely to withstand the massed mobile artillery systems coming south towards the front within the next few hours. And his own reinforcements would take roughly the same time to arrive...including the new Brigade Commander, Nath realized as he checked the third report from Brigade HQ.

Contact had been re-established with the Brigade HQ at Walong in the last half hour. The news was not pleasant. The HQ had taken a brutal attack and had been mauled. Brigadier Malik was wounded and had been evacuated via helicopter to the south while the Colonel had been killed. Most of the staff officers among the team there had been wounded to some degree or another and their ability to provide the crucial administration control over the Brigade was now non-existent. And it didn’t stop there. Lt-Colonel Nath had been acting as the ad-hoc commander for the 3RD ICG for some time now, and unfortunately that would have to continue until the new Brigade CO had arrived and taken over the Brigade back at Walong.

Given his seniority, GOC 5TH Division had made Nath the acting commander of 3RD ICG for the time being, given the extraordinary circumstances. As the first rays of sunlight shined through the valley on the first morning of the war, Lt-Colonel Nath found himself commanding the Indian side in what was essentially the Second Battle of Walong...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 10 Oct 2008 14:21

Mihir.D wrote:
Nitesh wrote:only pinaka as of now :(( :(( no smerch in action :(( :((
We want to see BrahMos also in action. And mix it with IAF sorties across to deliver a deadly cocktail. :(( :((

Awesome writing vivek.


Have patience dude.

Vivek,

Thanks for the triple posts. You made my afternoon :D

Cheers.

You missed the :(( :(( :(( :(( :(( part
:lol:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Drevin » 10 Oct 2008 16:19

All he said was "Have patience dude". Who knows if he missed the :(( part or not :?: :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 10 Oct 2008 16:50

Drevin wrote:All he said was "Have patience dude". Who knows if he missed the :(( part or not :?: :)

Dude I am just saying that all i was doing is :(( :(( nothing else. :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Singha » 10 Oct 2008 21:40

I will add something to the pot. will not however interfere with the main story.

10:30pm

5km east of Jagiroad, Nagaon distt, central Assam
. the normally well lighted expanse of the paper mill was dark tonight. under orders telephoned to the every important institution, night blackout was in effect since the cruise missile strike. granted it was not a strategic project but there was no time for fine tuning the niceties, so the local police went around on scooters and bikes ordering all major buildings to observe blackouts. everyone sat indoors, watching TV and eating their dinner. a few of the die hard drunkards sat around in their bamboo shacks, nursing the last of their lao-pani. domestic animals lay quietly in their sheds except the ever alert
village dogs.

NH37 the vital road link to the eastern sector passed through the town and in front of the mill.

the road was thick with heavy and light trucks mostly heading east, a certain number heading
west to reload people and supplies being fed into the vast eastern sector.

the railway link that ran mostly parallel to the highway in this region had been snapped by
GLCM strikes on Lumding Jn in the north cachar hills to the south. as a result, the restoration
of railway link to Dibrugarh was still a couple days away and engineers were working by the
light of petromax lamps in lumding round the clock. Goods trains were piling up in western
assam sidings waiting for the go ahead. with buffer space exhausted, resupply trains were
being being help up further afield in orissa, west bengal and bihar.

NH37 was the only lifeline left to defend walong and other areas in eastern arunachal.

the Goc-in-C 4th Corps Tezpur had contacted his colleague in Dimapur and the Assam
Govt in dispur and ensured a strong force of police, assam rifles and crpf were deputed
to guard the numerous and long bridges over the dozens of flood prone rivers that
drained the region and finally fell into the brahmaputra. the hills were always green
and heavy with rain bearing clouds.

hundreds of stallion and tatra trucks with darkened lights rumbled on through the
night. thousands of pvt trucks comandeered for supply chain also crowded to the
highway, their drivers were not trained to observe war procedures and hence
were allowed for the sake of safety to drive as normal with lights on. It was felt
they were very dangerous with lights on and impossible to manage in the dark.

--------

Nakul Boro was 45 yrs old but looked in his late fifties. years of harsh physical
toil in the rice fields and his vegetable patch had left his skin wrinkled and
hair grey. His half bigha of land in the foothills near the paper mill yielded enough
produce to meagerly support his family of five souls - two children, his wife who
was always suffering from anemia and his aged mother. Years ago he was a
schoolteacher in the local primary school, having completed 12th std under the
patronage of a older person who had a steady govt job (flood control) and wished
to help out another human. but the assam govt had failed to pay teachers
salaries for 2 straight years until it became impossible to survive. so he had
sadly bid the school and its students goodbye and gone to farming as his
forefathers before him.

periodically, political leaders came and promised jobs and growth which never
came. the paper mill ran at a perpetual loss. lobbies to skim money proliferated.

for a time he worked as a mini truck driver for a merchant in nagaon but that
needed long days away the family and his wife was frequently ill.

with the land only producing rice and some vegetables, he reared a few pigs
for the meat and tried to supplement the food with small wild game.

it was for this reason he was walking today with his 9 yr old son arindom
through a patch of forest that overlooked a marshy lake beel near the NH37.
sometimes night birds could be found, sometimes a duck or two and very
rarely small deer or wild hogs. for his starving family, any meat was welcome.

no guns were ofcourse permitted to be owned, even if he could afford it.
handmade bamboo bows, string of pig gut and bamboo arrows split at the
end tipped with iron arrowheads made by the local blacksmith was his
weapon. stablization was through duck feathers.
his son he always brought along for company in the long dark
nights, to flush out bush birds and to teach him the craft because he didnt
forsee any improvement in the economic situation. the pigs in dispur would
make sure of that he thought bitterly.

12 midnight

Nakul took up a position overlooking the edge of the water hyachinth in the lake,
the moon was crescent and marsh heavy with mist. scratching at the mosquitoes
buzzing around he settled back to see if any ducks emerged from the water.
maybe a deer would come for a drink. he could put down a large target like deer
from 40mts, a tiny one like a duck he needed to creep up and take from 10mts only.

he took a brief look at the line of truck lights on the near horizon. the TV in village
doctor's office had informed the people of the war. uncertainty and rumors were
in evidence locally. some reports spoke of the horrors of 1962.

12:15am

he spotted some movement in the woods around 75m away, a rustling of the tall
grass and motioned to arindom to creep up in a circle and figure out what was
coming down to the water. he didnt want to bother changing his hide if it was
something unhuntable like someones cow, elephant or water buffalo.

arindom melted away into the night.

12:30am

no sign of his son. a little tinge of worry started to form in his heart.
was it a wandering leopard? surely he would have seen and heard some scuffle.

12:40am

growing seriously worried now but not wanting to scare any animal by shouting,
he traced arindom's path through the dark moist grass, using the faint marks
in the mud and bent stalks as a guide.

five minutes of slow progress deeper into marshy terrain and he spotted a
prone child's bare leg poking out from below a bush. feeling sick in
the stomach he controlled his fear and laying a hand on the still warm
feet he gently pulled out the body....knowing the answer even before
starting.

no visible bike marks or wounds. what manner of devil did this and how?
red marks around the throat, a protruding tongue and eyeballs.

he knew enough to know someone had quietly throttled and murdered
his dear son barely ten minutes ago. it was not the work of any
four legged animal.

which brought up the next problem - that devil could still be lurking
around, at this very moment stalking him for whatever reason.
was it a ghorapak - a demon who lured people near the water and
drowned them ? or a beera - a more mobile demon? damn you....
silently cursing and using his anger to curb his fear he took a furtive
360 look around and crawled into deeper cover.

12.50am

a few minutes of quiet crying and clenching his fists in the dark cleared
his mind. arindom was dead, his first born and heir to his blood. his
mother probably would not survive long from the bereavement.

he must find who did this and mete out the inevitable. there was no
other meaning left to life.

12.55am

bow raised and fitted with a pair of iron tipped arrows, with more arrows
clenched with the bow in his left hand he started to sweep through the
area, staying the shadows and keeping clear of the wet marshy patches
which emitted a sucking noise if your feet happened to drop in. movement
was by touch, experience and smell, surveillance was by noise and faint
moonlight.

he heard it. he smelt them. he was the night. he was the forest itself.

eyes half closed to focus on hearing he periodically stopped to listen and
moved on toward the faint noises his fennec like ears tuned by years of
subsistence hunting.

20m away from it, he could make out some quiet talking. a foreign tongue!
this was not assamese, not bengali, not hindi and not english either. he had
never heard any other language but it sounded vaguely familiar to some
engineers he had heard talking at the mill colony once...his friend had told him
they came from some placed called Korea far to the east.

instinctively he knew who they were and why they were here. the highway, the
key to saving his land. unlike the cowardly and arrogant urban elites, he
had nowhere to run and nowhere to hide, nobody would shower petals on
his funeral, his land was all he ever had.

and these people had killed his son and lay claim to his land. he felt like
taking a hammer to these devils.

they would pay the price now, he thought .... changing position in a circle
to approach through a shallow forest stream...never moving his feet out
of the water, always creeping inch by inch ... be one with the forest spirits...
as always he had taught his son and learnt from his father...the old ways
...the unchanging ways.

two shadows crouched among the bamboo grove, some type of
big radio with fancy dull lights on the ground, talking in the foreign
tongue.

dropping one arrow of the deployed pair silently on the ground, he
walked with a graceful calm into the grove....bowstring pre-drawn to
highest tension, he put the steel tipped projectile deep into the
first person rupturing the heart and one lung and half emerging
out of the back.

a gurgling scream of death.

to see was to act and the second arrow came into place by instinct
as he maintained his erect posture and turned on the second enemy
who had risen up and was pulling a rifle off the shoulder.

the second arrow went into the neck. the third followup a second later
into the heart.

the first enemy was still moving, he took pleasure in slowly unsheathing
his long hunting knife and cutting the devil's throat and watching the
murderer choke in his own blood.

two minutes later it was all quiet again. he took his son's body and walked
slowly back to the village.

2am

a runner from the village came by cycle to the nearest police post equipped
with a phone

5am - dawn

a police party reached the spot and confiscated the dead bodies and their
equipment. urgent phone call to dispur and from dispur to delhi. addl CISF
units released from reserve to protect road infrastucture.

evening TV news headline that day

in a piece of valiant policing, inspector thaneswar kalita of jagiroad PS
intercepted and shot dead two chinese army commandoes who were
monitoring the traffic on NH37 west of jagiroad. incriminating documents
in mandarin, some weapons and explosives and a advanced radio was
found in their possession. the home minister has congratulated the inspector,
and awarded him a out of turn promotion and 15000/- in cash award.
one villager nakul boro who informed the police has been granted an
ex-gratia of 1000/- for the loss of his son, who discovered the saboteurs
and was killed by them before the police could reach the site. an
exclusive NDTV interview with inspector Kalita will be there at 9:30pm,
followed by "walk the talk" with arundhoti roy on the future of secularism
in India and interview with prakash karat on the who is to blame
for his needless war.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Ankit Desai » 12 Oct 2008 01:49

Singha sir,

Its fascinating as always.Hope to get few spy scenario from you, once vivek will finish this.!?

Vivek good work, keep it coming.

Ankit

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 12 Oct 2008 14:38

Singha wrote:I will add something to the pot. will not however interfere with the main story.

10:30pm

5km east of Jagiroad, Nagaon distt, central Assam
.


Singha Saar,

Your scenario is in perfect sync with Vivek's. Keep them flowing. Butcher more of the commi commandos,

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Singha » 14 Oct 2008 10:57

I have started reading hawksleys dragonstrike on the office commute. unimpressive piece of work
but goes give some interesting details on the panda military and on the spratly and paracel
type reefs in south china sea. apparently some reefs are awash at high tide or cyclones and
structures have been erected on stilts where people eke out a miserable living flying the flag
and catching fish. its considered a punishment posting.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 14 Oct 2008 13:21

THE SKIES ABOVE MADHYA PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0700 HRS (L)


“All right people, let’s get started. There’s no time to waste.” The Defence Minister said as watched the Brigadier and a few other junior officers in front of him settle into their seats around him. There were four Tele-Conference-Display or TCD screens in front of the Minister that allowed him to conduct his briefing with important people not inside the room. At the moment that meant the senior Army Commanders. The Home Minister also walked inside the room a few moments later. The PM was not present. He had just finished his meeting with the Defence Minister and Home Minister who were physically present and also the three Service Chiefs and the External Affairs Minister via TCDs. The meeting had been preliminary at best and had been designed to get everybody on the same page as far as events so far had occurred.

The Indian response strategy was far from clear due to a variety of reasons. Firstly the damage caused to the communications in the northeast was still being repaired, with new reports pouring in to help build the larger picture. New Commanders were replacing dead ones and only now were these decapitated units recovering from the initial attacks. Secondly, the reports of Chinese ground offensives was unclear. With recovering communications still patchy, and with no “actual” ground offensives having taken place other than Company level engagements, the priority was to re-establish the ISR network in the skies above the northeast to determine what exactly was going on north of the border. Then there was the issue of retaliations...

Three of the four TCD screens lit up immediately to announce that the meeting was beginning. There were now three Generals “present” in the conference room. These included the COAS, General Yadav, Eastern Command GOC, Lt-General Suman and the IV Corps Commander, Lt-General Chatterjee. In addition, other Generals including the Northern Command GOC and XV Corps Commander were on standby in case their input was required. The Defence Minister started off the briefing with his usual optimism that concealed his professionalism:

“Good morning, gentlemen. Let’s get started. I know we have had a hell of a morning so far, but just so we are on the same page regarding the situation, let’s have a recap of the situation so far. General Yadav?” The Defence Minister now lay back in his chair as the General began his brief. The fourth screen shifted to show a digital map of the current situation in the Northeast.

“Okay, at 0130 today we absorbed a massive Chinese attack using cruise missiles along the entire northern border. Communications went down with many units in the northeast and we encountered large scale damage to road and rail infrastructure as well as equipment. Especially in artillery. The Air Force also lost contact with several main airbases that serve as part of our logistical nodes. We are in the process of recovering from this attack as of 0630 hours today.

“Region wise speaking, we have four sectors of the land border with China. These being in Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim, Uttarakhand and Laddakh when moving from east to west. As of 0630 hours there has been no aggressive activities from the Chinese in Uttarakhand and Laddakh, although the latter sector will open up by the end of the day as per our predictions. North of Sikkim we are detecting significant movement of enemy forces that suggest the front will open up in the next few hours. The Arunachal sector has already opened up.

“At 0500 hours the Chinese opened up with light artillery barrages along most of the border defensive positions in the Arunachal region, specifically the Lohit, Upper Subansiri and Tawang Districts. Our forces responded as best as they could under the circumstances and in several sectors were able to defeat, or currently in the process of defeating, the Chinese using available long range artillery systems. This action is ongoing as we speak. DIPAC detected further Chinese activity in central China which suggests further Chinese cruise missile strikes later today when they have completed BDA.” Yadav concluded for everybody. The Defence Minister now spoke up after a few seconds of absorbing the information given to him.

“General Yadav. What Chinese units are we facing in these sectors?”

“One PLA Group Army assembling in the Aksai Chin and one north of Arunachal Pradesh. Two Division plus forces are north of Sikkim. But you have to understand that except in Laddakh and opposite Sikkim, these units are not yet fully concentrated. It seems to have been part of the strategic aims of the Chinese. Their units are spread, or at least they were spread as of yesterday morning, throughout Tibet ostensibly to combat the current rebellion that was underway there. On our side the Government did not allow mobilization of forces to the border in fear of provoking the Chinese.

"So now both sides are rushing to the border. Whoever concentrates faster than the other will win the running battles. The only difference is that the Chinese infrastructure in Tibet as also the geography allows much faster concentration than our side, which has also now suffered some damage due to the Chinese surprise attacks to further slow us down.” Yadav said impassively, although the Defence Minister clearly saw the concealed bitterness within the Army Commander who was now having his avoidable predictions of the last several weeks being vindicated in front of him.

“Noted, General. So what kind of time-lines are we looking at for complete deployments in the field?”

“At the moment it is difficult to say. We need to get the ISR network back on its feet to determine what the Chinese are aiming for here. Once that happens we can calculate what we need to feed reinforcements into the region to plug any holes. For now, however, we are mobilizing across the board. XXXIII Corps is deploying all remaining Divisions to Sikkim and IV Corps is already fully in the field.

"III Corps is moving to reinforce from the south. We also have some other additional units earmarked for movement but what you have to realize is that we are not attempting to match the Chinese man for man. Its not about the numbers as much as how well we can supply what units we already have deployed. That’s going to be our main aim. The geography allows good defensive positions if only the units manning them have their needs met. Once that happens the Chinese can break their heads on the Himalayan rocks for all the good it will do them.” Yadav said.

“So it’s a race then. But we are lagging behind. We cannot run faster than we are now so the trick is to slow the Chinese down. How do we do that, General?” the Defence Minister asked.

“Okay, that brings us to the issue of Operation SNOW-THUNDER...”
Last edited by vivek_ahuja on 14 Oct 2008 13:33, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Nitesh » 14 Oct 2008 13:31

kick the pandas

The geography allows good defensive positions if only the units manning them have their needs met. Once that happens the Chinese can break their heads on the Himalayan rocks for all the good it will do them.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 14 Oct 2008 13:39

KASHGAR AIRBASE
SINKIANG AUTONOMOUS REGION
CHINA
DAY 3 + 0730 HRS (L)


The CRJ-200 touched down on the runway at Kashgar in the cool morning air and a minute later rolled off the runway while three fully armed J-10s waited their turn to take off. Colonel Feng peered out of the small oval windows of the aircraft to see the soldiers and personnel working feverishly in the cold but clear morning as the PLAAF swung into action north of Laddakh.

Feng looked back at the papers in his hand that had arrived for him to read during the flight. These dealt with the current air situation in the Aksai Chin region south of here and detailed a summary of the BDA achieved by the missile strikes of the night. In essence it labelled out the starting point for the PLAAF strikes. Feng was here to take over the role of chief of operations in this sector. As he read the documents in his hands Feng realized that the missile strikes had failed to achieve what they had been expected to. The IAF airbases had not been knocked out to the level required by the PLAAF commanders in order to push the IAF southwards. The accidental detection of the cruise missile launches had proven costly for the Chinese as it had allowed the IAF to prepare a heavy defence against the missiles, most of which never made it to their targets. Such were the luck factors of war...

So now it’s up to us to do the job... Feng thought as he rubbed his eyes and found the aircraft coming to a halt in front of the main terminal building. Feng knew that there were further missile attacks planned for the day, but that the surprise element had been lost for such measures. Now it would have to be done the old fashioned way...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Singha » 14 Oct 2008 15:53

minor nitpick - how did a Col come to be sort of theatre commander for such vital
sectors? is he the son-in-law of Hu, the chinese napolean or a General masquerading
as a Col for his own reasons?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Vaibhav » 14 Oct 2008 17:09

vivek_ahuja wrote:THE SKIES ABOVE MADHYA PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0700 HRS (L)


“All right people, let’s get started. There’s no time to waste.” The Defence Minister said as watched the Brigadier and a few other junior officers in front of him settle into their seats around him. There were four Tele-Conference-Display or TCD screens in front of the Minister that allowed him to conduct his briefing with important people not inside the room. At the moment that meant the senior Army Commanders. The Home Minister also walked inside the room a few moments later. The PM was not present. He had just finished his meeting with the Defence Minister and Home Minister who were physically present and also the three Service Chiefs and the External Affairs Minister via TCDs. The meeting had been preliminary at best and had been designed to get everybody on the same page as far as events so far had occurred.

The Indian response strategy was far from clear due to a variety of reasons. Firstly the damage caused to the communications in the northeast was still being repaired, with new reports pouring in to help build the larger picture. New Commanders were replacing dead ones and only now were these decapitated units recovering from the initial attacks. Secondly, the reports of Chinese ground offensives was unclear. With recovering communications still patchy, and with no “actual” ground offensives having taken place other than Company level engagements, the priority was to re-establish the ISR network in the skies above the northeast to determine what exactly was going on north of the border. Then there was the issue of retaliations...

Three of the four TCD screens lit up immediately to announce that the meeting was beginning. There were now three Generals “present” in the conference room. These included the COAS, General Yadav, Eastern Command GOC, Lt-General Suman and the IV Corps Commander, Lt-General Chatterjee. In addition, other Generals including the Northern Command GOC and XV Corps Commander were on standby in case their input was required. The Defence Minister started off the briefing with his usual optimism that concealed his professionalism:

“Good morning, gentlemen. Let’s get started. I know we have had a hell of a morning so far, but just so we are on the same page regarding the situation, let’s have a recap of the situation so far. General Yadav?” The Defence Minister now lay back in his chair as the General began his brief. The fourth screen shifted to show a digital map of the current situation in the Northeast.

“Okay, at 0130 today we absorbed a massive Chinese attack using cruise missiles along the entire northern border. Communications went down with many units in the northeast and we encountered large scale damage to road and rail infrastructure as well as equipment. Especially in artillery. The Air Force also lost contact with several main airbases that serve as part of our logistical nodes. We are in the process of recovering from this attack as of 0630 hours today.

“Region wise speaking, we have four sectors of the land border with China. These being in Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim, Uttarakhand and Laddakh when moving from east to west. As of 0630 hours there has been no aggressive activities from the Chinese in Uttarakhand and Laddakh, although the latter sector will open up by the end of the day as per our predictions. North of Sikkim we are detecting significant movement of enemy forces that suggest the front will open up in the next few hours. The Arunachal sector has already opened up.

“At 0500 hours the Chinese opened up with light artillery barrages along most of the border defensive positions in the Arunachal region, specifically the Lohit, Upper Subansiri and Tawang Districts. Our forces responded as best as they could under the circumstances and in several sectors were able to defeat, or currently in the process of defeating, the Chinese using available long range artillery systems. This action is ongoing as we speak. DIPAC detected further Chinese activity in central China which suggests further Chinese cruise missile strikes later today when they have completed BDA.” Yadav concluded for everybody. The Defence Minister now spoke up after a few seconds of absorbing the information given to him.

“General Yadav. What Chinese units are we facing in these sectors?”

“One PLA Group Army assembling in the Aksai Chin and one north of Arunachal Pradesh. Two Division plus forces are north of Sikkim. But you have to understand that except in Laddakh and opposite Sikkim, these units are not yet fully concentrated. It seems to have been part of the strategic aims of the Chinese. Their units are spread, or at least they were spread as of yesterday morning, throughout Tibet ostensibly to combat the current rebellion that was underway there. On our side the Government did not allow mobilization of forces to the border in fear of provoking the Chinese.

"So now both sides are rushing to the border. Whoever concentrates faster than the other will win the running battles. The only difference is that the Chinese infrastructure in Tibet as also the geography allows much faster concentration than our side, which has also now suffered some damage due to the Chinese surprise attacks to further slow us down.” Yadav said impassively, although the Defence Minister clearly saw the concealed bitterness within the Army Commander who was now having his avoidable predictions of the last several weeks being vindicated in front of him.

“Noted, General. So what kind of time-lines are we looking at for complete deployments in the field?”

“At the moment it is difficult to say. We need to get the ISR network back on its feet to determine what the Chinese are aiming for here. Once that happens we can calculate what we need to feed reinforcements into the region to plug any holes. For now, however, we are mobilizing across the board. XXXIII Corps is deploying all remaining Divisions to Sikkim and IV Corps is already fully in the field.

"III Corps is moving to reinforce from the south. We also have some other additional units earmarked for movement but what you have to realize is that we are not attempting to match the Chinese man for man. Its not about the numbers as much as how well we can supply what units we already have deployed. That’s going to be our main aim. The geography allows good defensive positions if only the units manning them have their needs met. Once that happens the Chinese can break their heads on the Himalayan rocks for all the good it will do them.” Yadav said.

“So it’s a race then. But we are lagging behind. We cannot run faster than we are now so the trick is to slow the Chinese down. How do we do that, General?” the Defence Minister asked.

“Okay, that brings us to the issue of Operation SNOW-THUNDER...”



Operation Snow Thunder!! Nice Name!!

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 14 Oct 2008 20:12

Singha wrote:minor nitpick - how did a Col come to be sort of theatre commander for such vital
sectors? is he the son-in-law of Hu, the chinese napolean or a General masquerading
as a Col for his own reasons?


He's not the theater commander. He's the operations chief for the theater commander under deputation from PLAAF General Chen in Chengdu. That being said, Chen had made it clear that the current commander was not up to the task, so while he commands the theater, Feng virtually commands operations. Refer the previous relevant posts for details on this part of the storyline regarding his presence in Kashgar etc. Thanks.

-Vivek

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 15 Oct 2008 11:35

Vaibhav wrote:
vivek_ahuja wrote:THE SKIES ABOVE MADHYA PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0700 HRS (L)


“All right people, let’s get started. There’s no time to waste.” The Defence Minister said as watched the Brigadier and a few other junior officers in front of him settle into their seats around him. There were four Tele-Conference-Display or TCD screens in front of the Minister that allowed him to conduct his briefing with important people not inside the room. At the moment that meant the senior Army Commanders. The Home Minister also walked inside the room a few moments later. The PM was not present. He had just finished his meeting with the Defence Minister and Home Minister who were physically present and also the three Service Chiefs and the External Affairs Minister via TCDs. The meeting had been preliminary at best and had been designed to get everybody on the same page as far as events so far had occurred.

Operation Snow Thunder!! Nice Name!!


Guys,
Please don't quote the whole post .. it only increases the page size and makes us feel Vivek has posted a new part :) .

Vivek,

Let the thunder strike at GodSpeed.

Cheers.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby mdhoat » 16 Oct 2008 01:32

Vivek your writing style has undergone a sea change in comparison with your last indo-Chinese scenario. Last time you were giving no insight into Chinese mindset, their formations, game plans and moreover the fight did seem one sided in sense that Indians didn't seem to make any mistake at all..like all the luck is always on Indian side.

Your current approach makes current scenario a lot more exciting and lively. Your endeavor in writing your own book is reflecting in your current scenario. :idea:

Please keep up the good word. Your fans are increasing by the seconds... :D :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Ajit.C » 16 Oct 2008 15:54

vivek_ahuja wrote:THE SKIES ABOVE MADHYA PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0700 HRS (L)


“All right people, let’s get started. There’s no time to waste.” The Defence Minister said as watched the Brigadier and a few other junior officers in front of him settle into their seats around him. There were four Tele-Conference-Display or TCD screens in front of the Minister that allowed him to conduct his briefing with important people not inside the room. At the moment that meant the senior Army Commanders. The Home Minister also walked inside the room a few moments later. The PM was not present. He had just finished his meeting with the Defence Minister and Home Minister who were physically present and also the three Service Chiefs and the External Affairs Minister via TCDs. The meeting had been preliminary at best and had been designed to get everybody on the same page as far as events so far had occurred. "



Hi Vivek, nice writing. Keep it up!!!

One small note

"THE SKIES ABOVE MADHYA PRADESH" - Guess the Defence Minister is in an aircraft above MP. If yes then would it not be a major risk in having the PM and Home Minister also on the same flight when the country is at war. Security wise they should be in different aircrafts in different locations.

username changed to 'Ajit.C'.
Rahul.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby neerajb » 17 Oct 2008 07:32

Vivek ji didn't get a fix since last 3 days :x . When are you giving the next dose.

Cheers...


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