Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Nikhil T » 05 Jan 2012 13:27

Its been now 22 months that 6 Indians are being held captive on MV Iceberg, the longest ever ship hijacking. The report says that they're being held in a small enclosure and the crew is suffering from mental problems.

What stops IN MARCOS from ending this nonsense? How can our Govt be so utterly unconcerned?

http://gcaptain.com/crew-iceberg-abandoned-owners/?33512

He added that they had been locked up in a lower hold approximately five meters square for close to nine months.

Earlier reports indicated that the negotiations were in progress, but the crew members now tell Somalia Report that nothing good is going on except hunger and starvation. A crew member also said that there are currently three crew members suffering from psychological problems.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 05 Jan 2012 20:25

^^^ It is not so straight forward. Intervene and save 6 today, but what about the others? See the pirate 'sentiments' from this older article:

http://gcaptain.com/pirate-tactic-hunt-indians/?33265

The MT Asphalt Venture and eight of the 15 crew members were released on April 15th for $3.5 million in ransom, but the pirates kept the seven Indians, according to leader of the group of pirates.

“Yes, we still holding these seven Indian crew. We released their vessel after we got a ransom, but the Indian case is different from other hostages. We are hunting Indian crews from any hijacked vessel and we won’t release any Indian crews until the Indian government releases our friends in their jails,” said the pirate who asked to be called Farah.

“We will continue to release any hijacked vessel that pays a ransom, but will not release the Indian crews even if a ransom is paid,” the pirate told Somalia Report.

“There are a lot of our friends in Indian jails, including two of my sons and my nephew. None of the Indian hostages will be released until Indian government releases them,” said Hassan Jama, a pirate from the same group holding the seven Indians, in a video message the pirates released to local media in Mudug region.

Bazal Sien, one of the Indian hostages, begged the Indian government for help.

“We have been here for six months. The climate is so hot and pirates are threatening kill us if our government does not release their pirate friends,“ said Bazal Sien in the video.

...

MV ICEBERG 1 – 24 crew (6 are Indian)

MV ALBEDO – 23 crew (2 are Indian)

MV SAVINA CAYLYN – 22 crew (17 are Indian)

MT FAIRCHEM BOGEY – 21 crew (21 are Indian)

MT ASPHALT VENTURE (vessel and 8 crew released) – 7 Indians being held in Harardhere

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Nikhil T » 05 Jan 2012 22:31

^^^ It is not so straight forward. Intervene and save 6 today, but what about the others? See the pirate 'sentiments' from this older article:


There has to be a middle-ground somewhere. This is a hijacking. And its been going on for not one or two weeks, but 22 Months!! If we're so concerned about pirate sentiments, why don't we just stop all pirate ship interdiction ops in the area?
How about we do one MARCOS op right and then pirate sentiments will change to not attacking Indian crews?

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby narmad » 26 Jan 2012 01:55

Good article bringing out the hidden, non-glamorous challenges behind the Anti-Piracy


The Indian Naval Dilemma on Piracy
by Joseph Fonseca Jan 25, 2012, 11:58AM EST

In the event of having to engage the pirates in any ‘skirmish’, there is always the haunting apprehension of limitless charges and accusations being leveled by insurers, P & I clubs, ship-owners, seafarer’s unions, cargo owners, and others. What then is the possibility of coming out with a clean-chit after such an engagement and, what if there happens to be some mishap?
To put it more succinctly, when approaching a suspect ship it is expected that the naval vessel will generally fire a warning shot at the suspect. If the pirate vessel refuses to respond then another shot is fired across the ship’s bow. Still no response! Then the next plan of action would be to disable the ship. But this means the strong possibility of the navy landing in a big mess with charges being leveled by all and sundry. What follows could be an explosion of allegations / demands.
The grilling session starts thus - the ship owners (even though the navy has saved his vessel): ‘Who authorized you to damage our ship?
The exporter or importer: What right did you have to destroy my cargo?
The insurers: Who is responsible for the damage? The list goes on.

“It isn’t exactly the way one thinks, however. What happens when we approach a suspect ship and challenge those on board? We have to determine whether there are hostages on board or not. If we determine that there are hostages the new position is that we will now refer the matter back to the shore authorities through our immediate command who will instruct us accordingly. There are therefore many ways of tackling the situation.”

Consequently, the government of India gives full freedom to the Indian Navy but it does not give the freedom to its commanding officers to enjoy very large latitude by a corollary he avers. The Government of India will not allow a situation where collateral damage to human beings or to cargo is left entirely to the discretion of the person in command. That is achieved because fire has been delivered on the investigating ship.
There is also the paradox which the Navy faces. “In 1950 if the Indian Navy was asked to defend India’s international trade it was possible to do so,” says Vice Admiral Chauhan. “But today with only 8 per cent of India’s foreign trade being carried on Indian bottoms and the rest by foreign flag ships, I don’t know how to go about defending our trade.”

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby arnabh » 26 Jan 2012 03:57

INS Chakra
http://idrw.org/?p=6537

Just when the Russian nuclear-powered Akula-II submarine joins the Indian Navy as INS Chakra on a 10-year lease at a cost of over $one billion, the moot question is: does it contribute to India’s sea-based nuclear deterrence?

To put matters in perspective, India in 1988 had procured the Soviet Charlie I class nuclear attack submarine, renamed INS Chakra on a three-year lease. The vessel came without strategic weapons, with the sole purpose of familiarising naval personnel on training and maintenance of nuclear-powered submarines. The rules of engagement spelt out that INS Chakra would not be used in war. The hidden part of the deal was that Soviets would help India in its indigenous Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV), both materially and intellectually. While the promised assistance to the ATV programme which culminated in the launch of 80MW nuclear reactor S-2 vessel (to be called INS Arihant on commissioning) by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on 26 July 2009 came in fits and starts, the technology of the 6,000 tonne vessel is between first and second generation vintage. By comparison, the U.S. has ninth generation nuclear-powered subs which do not require refuelling throughout their lifetime.

FOLLOW-ON VESSELS
The Russian Akula sub, given the same name, INS Chakra comes with similar purpose and rules of engagement. Like the earlier deal, the undisclosed understanding this time is that it is part of the Gorshkov package (INS Vikramaditya) and includes Russian help in the follow-on indigenous nuclear-powered vessels. While S-2 vessel began sea-trials in January (could last 12 to 18 months), India has planned follow-on S-3 and S-4 vessels based on the S-2 design. As all three vessels have similar hull and nuclear power plant, capability enhancements will be meagre. It is only when the S-5 vessel with a new design and a powerful nuclear reactor is launched, which could be two-decades away, can India hope to have a semblance of sea-based deterrence against China. The S-2 and the coming S-3 and S-4 vessels will lack adequate capabilities in three key areas of stealth, reactor design and missile range to become a deterrent ballistic missile armed nuclear-powered submarine (SSBN) against China, which with its Jin class subs is at least four decades ahead. India’s S-2 vessel armed with 700km K-15 missile will have difficulty in even deterring Pakistan as, given its limitations, it would be required to be positioned closer to hostile shore.

Against this backdrop, a retired chief of naval staff had told me that the coming of Akula four years late, when the S-2 vessel is already undergoing sea-trials, serves little purpose. While still in office, he had written to the government to review the leasing of Akula programme. According to him, there is a case to dispense with the S-3 and S-4 vessels which will consume enormous time and finances. India, after all, is still on the technology understanding curve and not ready for production. Therefore it should leap-frog to work on S-5 vessels which would entail imagination and initiative. Given improved relations with the U.S. and France, why cannot India seek advanced reactor technology from them? Developing long range ballistic missile would have to be an indigenous effort as it comes under global restrictive regimes. Why cannot ISRO with capabilities to propel rockets up to 10,000km help DRDO make 8,000km ballistic missiles? These hard questions need to be examined to produce credible sea-based deterrence.

(The writer is editor, FORCE newsmagazine. Email: pravin@forceindia.net)

**********

Chakra, the filler of strategic space

A strategic posture of a nation is a declaration, more by deed than articulation, of its orientation, will and intent. It purports to mould and shape a future that would benefit its larger objectives. The process is fraught with the hazards of conflicting interests and therefore it demands the weight of the nation’s comprehensive power both soft and hard.

In an era when the face of soft power is that of an Assange and its voice, that of Gandhi, Gibran, Che and Osama; a critical instrument to uphold posture is the State’s military power and the talent to distinguish between the maintenance of armed forces and their use.

The operational canvas is a transient that abhors futuristic force planning. So it was, year-after-every-five year the planner was condemned to an exercise that perceived threats and building force structures to cope.

‘INTIMIDATION AND ACCRETION’
It was, therefore, the ‘instantaneous intimidation’ that drove plans and consequently resulted in ‘a tail chasing’ accretion of forces. Unfortunately to some, this inspiration continues to be the pretender that fills strategic space. The case of our strategic maritime posture as a function of the declared ‘Look East’ policy is a study in point. Here the need for a theory to make transparent the complexity of the problem and invite the necessary intellectual rigour to not just ‘chart a course’ but also to analyse and cater for the hurdles that may beset policy is the first imperative.

As Julian Corbett so eloquently put it, theory may not be a substitute for judgment and experience, but is a means to fertilize both.

Significantly, the recent acquisition on a 10-year lease of the ‘Chakra’ (Russian Akula II class nuclear attack submarine) is an extremely perspicacious departure from the past for it is a concrete step towards the translation of the theory and realisation of the larger strategic maritime posture that serves policy.

LONG GESTATION
Admittedly, the gestation period has been long; it is recognised the process has been challenged by a fragmented approach (the Chakra in its first avatar came to us in1988) and plagued by the economics and the geopolitics of the times. But these are challenges that any strategic project must expect to face and defy.

The nuclear attack submarine (SSN) being completely independent of air for propulsion frees it from the need to surface frequently, the enormous power generated permits a bigger hull to operate at high speeds with large payloads for durations that is limited by human fatigue and replenishment of consumables only (reactors require refuelling at intervals of 25 years). In real terms, it is critical to understand what the Chakra represents. Working the submarine to our operational challenges and demands is just the tip of the iceberg, training and building a bank of specialised personnel; creating the necessary infrastructure to maintain nuclear submarines; unique logistic management practices; development of doctrines and procedures; generating design feature for the indigenous programme and, most importantly, building an ethos of efficient and safe nuclear submarine stewardship and exertions, these are the 8/9th submerged part of the iceberg. Strategically SSNs in numbers provide a vital element of a riposte to any “sea control strategy” that an adversary may contemplate or a “denial strategy” that we may plan.

STATE OF ART
In terms of the platform, the Akula II represents the state of art in SSN design, the programme having been launched in the mid 1990s. The nearest in terms of design vintage is the British ‘Astute’ class also of the mid 1990s,but in terms of capabilities it is smaller and less accomplished; while the American Los Angeles class predates the Chakra by a decade. Also, the design philosophy harmonises with the orientation of our strategic nuclear submarine project.

As far as the economics of the matter is concerned, $920 million for a 10-year lease with certain support features attached must be viewed in perspective of what the SSN represents and the fact that a new SSN of similar capability with a 30-year life would have a price tag of about $3billion and a through life cost of (thumb rule) $9 billion would suggest that the deal is a sound one.

As any nation that has committed to operating maritime nuclear force will fully appreciate that kudos are due to our planners who visualised a theory, saw a form and translated it to a force plan and now have given substance to each step of the way.


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 29 Jan 2012 23:51

http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-new ... 99148.aspx

First Published: 01:35 IST(19/1/2012)
Last Updated: 01:37 IST(19/1/2012)
Free legal aid for 120 Somali pirates

The state government has provided free legal aid to 120 Somali pirates captured by the Indian Navy last year, against whom charges are yet to be framed in a fast track court. Senior inspector Pandurang Doke of Yellowgate police station told HT on Wednesday that advocate Amol Phuke has been appointed by the government to represent the pirates. HT had, on Tuesday, reported about a letter written by the Yellowgate police station to legal aid authorities about appointing a lawyer to appear for the pirates so that charges can be framed in the fast track court.
Doke said the police had intimated the court about the lawyer’s appointment and the charges are likely to be filed on January 23. On the Yellowgate police’s request, the process of engaging four Somali students from Pune University to interpret the charges to the pirates, who know little or no English, has begun. DCP, Port Zone, Tanaji Ghadge told HT that on the government’s request, the university authorities have agreed to provide the students, whose remuneration for the service has been finalised.

Earlier, the Somali government had not responded to the Mumbai police’s request of providing legal aid to pirates.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Kailash » 30 Jan 2012 12:03


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Kailash » 15 Feb 2012 11:06


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 16 Feb 2012 22:51

http://www.eaglespeak.us/2012/02/indian ... ds-on.html

Utterly bitter experience at sea for some of our fishermen. This incident was bound to happen one day or another, ever since ships started taking armed guards on board:

Image

We saw ICGS Samar, ICGS Lakshmibhai, INS Kabra and one ICG Do-228 involved in the operation to intercept the runaway MV Enrica Lexie.

See what the comments say:

seamarshalFeb 16, 2012 04:45 AM

That was a military protection unit on board the vessel from the San Marco Battalion, and not a private security company as reported in the AGI.it news paper in Italy.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby harbans » 22 Feb 2012 21:16

Cross posting from the India-EU thread..

The argument that it's an Italian flag ship in international waters, so Flag State (Italian) jurisdiction is what comes about..does not hold. The Crime was committed on the Indian flag fishing vessel, not the Italian flag vessel. So the Italian argument does not hold. Since the murder happened on the Indian flag ship, Indian laws will apply on the perpetrators. If an Indian national was murdered by a foreign national and escaped to foreign shores, extradition treaties exist to get the person back for trial. In this case extradition is not necessary as the Ship is held and the perpetrators under 'arrest'.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Brando » 23 Feb 2012 14:27

An interesting tit bit from the International Media:

WSJ : Italy, India Clash Over Ocean Shooting

Indian ships, too, have faced attacks by Somali pirates, whose reach stretches across the Indian Ocean, and India's Navy has detained scores of Somalis in the past few years. But there is also evidence of homegrown piracy off the coast of Kerala.

On Feb. 15, the same day the incident involving the Enrica Lexie occurred, a Greek crude oil tanker at anchor just 2.5 nautical miles off Kochi, a city in Kerala, called the International Maritime Bureau to say that about 20 armed men had tried to board but aborted the attack.


I wonder what these "homegrown" pirates would do with a hijacked vessel ? Sail it 2700km to Somalia or berth it next to the Navy Base in Kochi ?? :wink:

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby chetak » 23 Feb 2012 14:42

Brando wrote:An interesting tit bit from the International Media:

WSJ : Italy, India Clash Over Ocean Shooting

Indian ships, too, have faced attacks by Somali pirates, whose reach stretches across the Indian Ocean, and India's Navy has detained scores of Somalis in the past few years. But there is also evidence of homegrown piracy off the coast of Kerala.

On Feb. 15, the same day the incident involving the Enrica Lexie occurred, a Greek crude oil tanker at anchor just 2.5 nautical miles off Kochi, a city in Kerala, called the International Maritime Bureau to say that about 20 armed men had tried to board but aborted the attack.


I wonder what these "homegrown" pirates would do with a hijacked vessel ? Sail it 2700km to Somalia or berth it next to the Navy Base in Kochi ?? :wink:



More "evidence" from the kerala cardinal type of journos!!

The game is afoot as Sherlock Holmes would say!

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya_V » 23 Feb 2012 15:46

We seem to have a reputation of a soft state, see the comment from a guy who has been a captain of Oil Tankers in Merchant Navy


Indian Ocean Mistake: Armed Guards on Italian Cargo Ship Shoot at Fishermen, Kill 2


esseFeb 17, 2012 08:33 AM
I am a Tanker Capt and for the last 8 years have been on the PG far east Trade . The area in question off the kerela coast has a lot of fishing vessels , which often pass close to large commercial vessels and are so busy with their fishing related activities that the do not follow the steering rules. While this is often annoying and inconvinent for large vessels, it is not a excuse for shooting at people . If vessels under my command had followed the same rules as the Lexie we would now have been guilty of a few hundred deaths. It sounds to my mind that the guards were not familar with the area and normal fishing vessel behaviour i wonder if the Master of the Tanker was in the loop when the order to fire was given .
This has all the makings of a international Incident , the incident has taken place just outside indian waters but in the EEZ so the flag state should have jurisdiction however as 2 indian nationals have been killed india will assert jurisdiction . It is also the most convinent forum . Having seen the italian govt statements it is quite clear that a fair trial cannot be held in Italy as without any investigation they have already exonerated the Guards .
Being a fellow Mariner and Tanker Capt who has been attacked by Pirates twice normally my sympathies would e with the Ship however in this instance it appears that a tragic mistake as been committed .If this leads to some action on the Piracy front some good may come of it Yet . This was something just waiting to happen , on at least 2 occasions i have personnaly heard radio messages reporting pirate attack which later turned out to be False alarms .



esseFeb 17, 2012 09:10 AM
Gary -I have sailed world wide and as mentioned have had 2 brushes with pirates one off indonesia and once off oman . Both time we avoided boarding due to early detection and evasive maneuvering .The problem is very real and serious . As a result people are jumpy and scared.
I feel the fact that the security detail was Italian army not private probally contributed to the firing . I think its no secret that service personnel dont take kindly to taking orders from civilians . The security detail was probally 4/5 privates headed by a seargent if i know how these things work. ( Army Family) . Members of the San marco Battalion are no doubt well trained but likely young and gung ho .
That coupled with not knowing the waters and normal behaviour of fishing boats is what lead to this tragic accident . Now the Italian Govt is in the unenviably position of trying to defend their young soilders. They are lucky those killed were indian not Chinese or Korean or heaven forbid American , In either of the cases i can assure you
the Capt and crew would have been behind bars without benefit of any credible legal
process
.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby shukla » 25 Feb 2012 05:59


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby shukla » 25 Feb 2012 06:06

X-post

India needs strategic planning in maritime affairs:Navy chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta
Firstpost

On tackling piracy in Gulf of Aden, he underlined the need for making proper laws. On whether India is moving slowly to make anti-piracy laws, he said, “Actually, everybody is going slow for some reason or the other. Nobody has got a law to take pirates back in their country and try them… Countries need to make their laws and may be United Nations can have a bigger charter over there.”

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby VinodTK » 25 Feb 2012 06:23

Indian, US warships to take part in ‘Malabar war games’
:
:
The Malabar drills run the gamut from training with the US navy on antisubmarine warfare and advanced naval combat to maneuvres emphasising coordinated anti-piracy exercises. Exercise Malabar, as it is known, may seem routine at first glance. But in the context of recent tensions in the Asia-Pacific region, as well as last year’s intensifying rhetoric among countries with interests in the South China Sea, Exercise Malabar is assuming greater significance.
:
:


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Arav » 01 Mar 2012 05:57

To tackle piracy, go on the offensive write Bharat Karnad in DC

Large navies with great deal of capital invested in them these days prepare not for great fleet battles but for the infinitely less taxing anti-piracy operations. When this role is devolved by governments to shipping companies who, in turn, pass on the authority to privately-owned vessels guarded by naval commandos, what you get is the incident off the Kerala coast.

A couple of Italian Navy master sergeants on-board Enrica Lexie took pot-shots, it would seem, at medium range, slightly mobile, targets bobbing on water they identified as pirates. The crucial question to ask is whether this identification was made instantaneously or with deliberation, and on what basis, before the shooting started? Or, was the labelling of those killed as pirates done, ex-post facto, as it afforded a convenient rationale and cover for the extra-legal killings once the Italian ship captain realised his men had fouled up and he had a problem on his hands?

If the Lexie was within the 12-mile Indian territorial limits, then the claim of eliminating persons perceived as pirates packs no credibility whatsoever and is ipso facto untenable. If, on the other hand, the Italian vessel was in international waters — the farther out the better for it, then the claim would surely require evidence of provocation offered by the fishermen or of some actions taken by them that could be interpreted, however remotely, by the Lexie crew as not just suspicious but actually threatening.

But whatever the extenuating circumstances, the conclusion cannot be avoided that this was a case of “recreational shooting” indulged in by a couple of bored non-commissioned officers of the Italian Navy with itchy fingers, cocked rifles with, perhaps, telescopic sights, or sub-machine guns (which, can easily be determined by the wounds on the dead fishermen), and inadequate knowledge of the ramifications of gun-slinging.

Moreover, common sense should have suggested to the Lexie commander and his gunmen that so close to the tip of India was too far for the pirates to venture. Do the Italians really think they can sell the shooting as action to pre-empt a forcible takeover of the ship? To Italy, all of Arabian Sea is piracy-zone; it is so designated by many other countries as well. In the event, the Italian naval guards were primed to expect that Keralites and Somalis are one and the same.

That said, this incident reveals the larger truth that, fed up with the menace, many countries are dealing with suspected pirates with extreme prejudice. Not so long ago, Russians captured some pirates, shackled them to their “mother ship”, and then proceeded to blow up the boat. This episode was filmed and uploaded on YouTube, there to serve as warning and deterrent to Somalis to keep off Russian merchant vessels. It has worked. There have been no cases reported since of Russian ship hijackings off the Gulf of Aden and proximal waters. By last count, some 750 sailors of different nationalities and scores of ships are prisoners of the numerous pirate combines holed up on the Somali coast. Of these, some half a dozen merchant ships and nearly 100 crew members comprise the Indian complement.

The US government has chosen commando raids to rescue American hostages, most recently on January 25 this year when Seals attacked the Somali base at Harardheere, killing all nine of the Somalis involved and freeing a US aid worker. Earlier, in April 2009, the special forces freed the Maersk Alabama and its crew from the clutches of Somali sea brigands. Indeed, forcefully taking out the pirates seems to be an effective mode for the navies of the world to adopt, a ready solution for the scourge of piracy.

Indian Navy ships on anti-piracy patrols, each with a couple of marine commandos on board are, however, restrained by the Indian government from taking any offensive action. Pirates are captured and dutifully handed over to non-existent Somali authorities, ensuring their return to the same work in next to no time. This much was clear at the recent London Conference that ended February 23. The President of the transitional Somali government, Sheikh Sharif Ahmed, and master of only the municipality of the capital city of Mogadishu, courtesy the African Union peace-keeping force in town, confessed he was “scared”.

Actually, the real problem is the powerful transnational mafia financing the pirate network and facilitating their activities. This mafia passes on authoritative information such as names of ships, the course they’ll take, value of cargo and insurance cover.

Ships under the Indian flag are viewed as easy targets because the Indian shipowners ultimately pay up and because there is no danger from on-board sharpshooters, or from Indian Marine Commando suddenly dropping in on the scene to spoil their game. The Indian government, as usual in its do-nothing mode, is relying on the UN Contact Group on Piracy to alight on a, presumably, “responsible” solution. In the meantime, more Indian ships and sailors will pass into Somali captivity, even as, for obvious reasons, US and Russian carriers are left well enough alone.

Were the commanders of Indian naval ships authorised to take out pirates on the high seas and to destroy pirate strongholds along the Somali coast, or, alternatively, Indian merchantmen were permitted to carry if not small detachments of armed Indian Navy personnel doing guard duty, then armed private guards, the incidence of piracy against Indian vessels would decline markedly. If, further, the Navy’s Marine Commandos were now and again tasked to free Somali-held Indian ships, it would fuel fear and uncertainty among the pirate fraternity. But imposing a new risk calculus on the pirates requires the Indian government to act aggressively in national interest, something the Manmohan Singh regime avoids doing. It forswears use of force except, apparently, in the dead of night against unarmed people sleeping peacefully at Delhi’s Ramlila Grounds!


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Singha » 01 Mar 2012 21:25

the police and paramils being useless in maintaining any sort of coastal patrol equipment is well proven. Capex is done without any thought to running cost, spares chain, logistics of training etc. as a result the grandly announced projects end up in this state.

only the CG should be given equipment and the police should stick to landward patrolling. coastal police should be disbanded or merged into CG.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Sachin » 03 Mar 2012 21:46

Singha wrote:only the CG should be given equipment and the police should stick to landward patrolling. coastal police should be disbanded or merged into CG.

+1 to that. Many of the coastal police stations do not have police men who are trained in "driving" (?) the boats or navigating it in the sea. Kerala has a fair share of coastal police stations, but the media on regular basis high light the deficiencies.


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 24 Mar 2012 09:04

Sachin wrote:
Singha wrote:only the CG should be given equipment and the police should stick to landward patrolling. coastal police should be disbanded or merged into CG.

+1 to that. Many of the coastal police stations do not have police men who are trained in "driving" (?) the boats or navigating it in the sea. Kerala has a fair share of coastal police stations, but the media on regular basis high light the deficiencies.


The ICG like the Navy, is exclusively a sea borne force. The coastal police as to attend to many issues and crimes that are land based. In that sense, the current arrangement where coastal police is responsible for the first 12 NM is a reasonable.

Secondly, one has to remember that the coastal police is an arm of the state police, while ICG is a central force with powers to arrest. It is best that this power be used for crimes done beyond the shores.

Nevertheless, there is an unavoidable overlap between all 3 agencies - hopefully complementary.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 24 Mar 2012 09:19

OT post:

http://www.dailymirror.lk/news/16508-wi ... ithaa.html

Friday, 03 February 2012 17:25


.
Maintaining that she was working towards protecting the livelihood of fishermen, Tamil Nadu Chief Minister J. Jayalalithaa on Friday said she would not ‘stop’ till Katchchatheevu, an islet in the Palk straits now under the control of Sri Lanka, is retrieved.

"The attacks on Tamil fishermen by the Sri Lankan Navy can be stopped only by retrieving Kachchatheevu," she said in the state assembly.

Replying to CPI member Arumugam, Jayalalithaa said her case on getting back Kachchatheevu from Sri Lanka was in the Supreme Court. The Tamil Nadu government too had passed a resolution on this effect.

"Now, the state finance ministry is also attaching documents for this.I am working towards protecting the livelihood of the fishermen and I will not stop until Kachchatheevu is retrieved," she asserted.

Kachchatheevu was ceded by India to Sri Lanka under an agreement in 1974. (Source: PTI)


http://www.dailymirror.lk/news/16409-de ... heevu.html

Monday, 30 January 2012 17:20

CHENNAI: Tamil Nadu Governor K. Rosaiah today reiterated the state government's resolve to regain Katchatheevu, an island ceded to Sri Lanka through an accord, to restore the lost rights of the fisheremen.

Delivering his maiden address to the State Assembly, Dr. Rosaiah said the government was deeply concerned about the continuing attacks and harassment of fishermen of the State by the Sri Lankan Navy. ''Despite our protests, such incidents are being repeated'', he said, and urged the Centre to take up the issue with Sri Lanka in strong terms.

Observing that all efforts would be taken to protect the traditional fishing rights of Tamil Nadu fishermen in the Palk Bay area and ensure their safety and security, the Governor said the government would take all steps to regain Katchatheevu and restore the lost right of the fishermen. (Sources: Agencies)


As governor, does his view represent GOI?

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Sachin » 29 Mar 2012 17:06

Aditya G wrote:Secondly, one has to remember that the coastal police is an arm of the state police, while ICG is a central force with powers to arrest. It is best that this power be used for crimes done beyond the shores.

In principal (and on papers) this arrangement would work. But practically I dont think this is working fine. Many state police forces do not have enough "sea trained" police men in its ranks. In many cases, the superior officers (SIs and above) are generally moved in from other non-Coastal police stations. Their motivation to patrol the seas may also be not very high*.

Now if it comes to raising an exclusive coastal police wing, many states would start whining. Men recruited to such force can only be used at coastal police stations (which are very less in number).

* Coast Guard etc. from day one, it is understood that they would be spending time at sea. That is not the case in the current recruiting structure in the police.

Aside: Local news papers report the rampant misuse of the Marine VHF sets which have been provided to the fishing vessels in South India. These are chinese sets which can be cracked, and then it can operate on any frequency betweem 134 to 175 Mhz. Their authorised channel/frequency is 156.800. Fisher folks misuse this, get on any frequency they want. Amateur Radio Operators (and in some case police forces too) have found that their authorised frequencies are getting intruded into.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Kailash » 29 Mar 2012 19:19

Bolivian ship hijacked off Maldivian coast

A Bolivian cargo ship was on Monday hijacked, apparently by Somalian pirates in the territorial waters off Maldives, officials said on Monday, even as Maldivian forces have sought Indian Navy's help for its rescue.

The Bolivian ship was hijacked inside our territory in the morning, 7 miles inside our exclusive economic zone, which is just 193 miles from the shore, Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) has said.

MNDF media official Colonel Abdul Raheem said that the boat was hijacked northwest of Ha.Hoarafushi. He said that the incident took place this morning and MNDF received information in the afternoon. Neighbouring countries have been requested for assistance following this incident.

Indian Navy is also helping MNDF in the rescue mission.


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 31 Oct 2012 00:09

CISF to provide armed personnel for Indian ships at sea; though somewhat consistent with CISF's overall mission, the Coast Guard would have been more appropriate. They have power of arrest (unlike the Navy) and at same time is a specialized sea borne force.

http://khabarsouthasia.com/en_GB/articl ... feature-02

...

"The Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) has decided to train 100 personnel to accompany and protect the Indian merchant vessels in the piracy infested waters, especially in the area off the coast of Somalia," Harendra Singh, CISF deputy commandant and public relations officer, told Khabar South Asia.

Details of the pilot programme, he added, are being finalised and the squad should be operational by year's end.

...

As many as 6,900 CISF personnel will deploy to guard the country's 14 major ports, including Mumbai, Chennai, Visakhapatnam, Kolkata, Haldia, Kandla, Goa, Paradip, Mangalore, Tuticorin, Kochi and Ennore. Meanwhile, elite troops will accompany merchant vessels as they sail past the piracy-affected Somali coast.

The commandos, armed with sophisticated long-range weapons instead of standard-issue 5.56mm rifles and pistols, will be fully prepared to counter any incidents of piracy. At least five will be deployed on each ship, Singh said.

...


http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/ind ... 031684.ece

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 03 Dec 2012 20:45

:roll:

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/new ... 130313.ece

...

New Delhi, Nov 24:

The Kerala Chief Minister, Oommen Chandy has asked the Centre to immediately consider releasing some detained Somali pirates to facilitate the release of seven Indian sailors being held captive for last two years.

Taking up the issue with Shipping Minister G K Vasan and External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid, Chandy expressed anguish over the delay in swapping of the Somali pirates lodged in Mumbai jails for the Indian hostages — a demand made by pirates in Somalia.

“I don’t think there is no other way out to save the lives of Indians who have been held hostages since September 28, 2010. What is the use in keeping these pirates in our jails?” Chandy said here.

Pirates, who hijacked ‘MV Asphalt Venture’ from Kenyan waters, had released the ship after its owners paid ransom. ...

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 24 Dec 2012 08:11

Finally an end to the immense suffering that Iceberg I crew has gone thru:

http://www.dnaindia.com/world/report_so ... hs_1781054

Published: Sunday, Dec 23, 2012, 23:25 IST
Place: Bossaso | Agency: Reuters


A ship and its crew of 22 sailors held by Somali pirates for almost three years have been freed after a two-week-long siege by maritime police, the government of the breakaway region of Puntland said on Sunday.

The sailors aboard Panama-flagged MV Iceberg 1, from the Philippines, India, Yemen, Sudan, Ghana and Pakistan, were held for longer than any other hostages in the power of the pirates, who prey on shipping in the region, according to the president's office of the northern Somali enclave in a statement Maritime police laid siege to the vessel on December 10 near the coastal village of Gara'ad in the region of Mudug. "After 2 years and 9 months in captivity, the hostages have suffered signs of physical torture and illness.

The hostages are now receiving nutrition and medical care," said the statement. The ship originally had a crew of 24, but two had died since the roll-on roll-off cargo vessel was seized on March 29, 2010, some 10 miles from Aden, pirates said. One of the pirate leaders said they only released the ship after negotiation with Puntland officials and local elders. "They kindly requested the release of the ship we held for three years. Puntland forces had attacked us and tried to release the ship by force but they failed. We fought back and defeated them," the pirate known as Farah told Reuters. Farah did not disclose whether any ransom had been paid for the crew and the ship, owned by Azal Shipping in Dubai with a deadweight of 4,500 tonnes.

Pirates rarely release ships without ransom, and usually raise their demands the longer they hold a vessel, because they charge for their expenses.

International navies have had some recent success containing piracy in the Indian Ocean. Although more than 100 hostages taken off Somalia are still being held captive, the number of hijackings of ships dropped to seven in the first 11 months of this year compared to 24 in the whole of 2011. Separately, Puntland said a group of eight Puntland soldiers responsible for briefly trying to sail away with a North Korea-flagged vessel, MV Daesan and its 33-member crew were jailed by a Puntland military court on December 22. MV Daesan, a North Korean ship ferrying cement to Somali capital Mogadishu, was impounded by the Puntland auhtorities and fined last month by Puntland authorities who accused it of ditching its cargo off Somalia's coast. The soldiers had taken the vessel on December 18. "Puntland Government managed to return the vessel back to the port within 24 hours; the soldiers were arrested and will be brought to justice," the authorities said.


Puntland forces were proscribed by the UN recently. But they have come good in recent operations.

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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 14 Nov 2015 18:07

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/featur ... 58304.html

Pirates of the Bay of Bengal

Armed Bangladeshi gangs are kidnapping Indian fishermen for ransom, wreaking havoc, and threatening livelihoods.

Sanjay Pandey | 16 Sep 2015 09:00 GMT | Abductions, Poverty & Development, India, Bangladesh, Crime

Hem Nagar, India - A gloomy sky pregnant with rain clouds hung heavy over the placid waters of Raimangal River, mirroring the mood of the villagers.

A group of boatmen in loincloths was busy loading provisions and fishing gear onto small, wooden, charcoal-black boats on the Hem Nagar Islands of the Sundarbans.

The region, located on the porous, riverine border between India and Bangladesh, is characterised by mangrove forests that are a haven for Bangladeshi pirates.

The men's wary wives stand on a muddy embankment giving the customary farewell to their husbands before they embark on a week-long trip to the "sea of uncertainties".

Standing at the far end of the queue, Sita Mandal's dark eyes started welling up again. Suddenly, she ran down the steep stairs, clutching the loose end of her sari between her teeth.

Her husband, Ramesh Mandal, follows her in tow.

"This is the last time I am going to the seas. I will quit this job forever and migrate to Tamil Nadu [to work as a construction labourer]," the 40-year-old told his wife.

Kidnapping

His wife's fears are well-founded: In April, he was kidnapped by Bangladeshi pirates while fishing the creeks and canals of the Sundarbans. More recently, pirates opened fire on another group of fishermen in the Kendo Islands, near the Bay of Bengal.

Unlike those fishermen, Mandal and his crew were not sailing on big trawlers, so they were unable to escape when a group of 14 pirates with weapons swooped down on them in April.

They had gone to collect honey and catch crabs deep in the jungles of the Sundarbans.

"On our way back, the pirates kidnapped us at gunpoint. Then they took us to the Bangladesh side of the Sundarbans," recalled Mandal.

"They held hostage three people, including me, and sent out a ransom message through three people they released. Our families were asked to pay a ransom of 100,000 rupees [$1,510] each if they wanted to see us alive."

Through continued pleading, the families managed to bring the ransom amount down to 50,000 rupees ($755) for each person.

"They kept us in captivity for a week until a total of 150,000 rupees [$2,260] was deposited into their accounts through a hawala system [a method of transferring funds]. After confirming that their six accounts had received 25,000 rupees [$375] each from India, they released us," said Mandal.

RELATED: The hungry tide: Bay of Bengal's sinking islands

Mandal's wife recalled how difficult it was for her to raise the ransom money.

"I sold off my only ornament - a silver chain - and a goat at a dirt-cheap price. Unable to raise the ransom amount, I took a loan from my neighbours at an exorbitantly high rate. Now, we don't know how to pay back the debt," she said.

As it is, going into the jungles is a dangerous affair because of the risk of tiger and crocodile attacks. But recurrent kidnappings by pirates makes it economically unviable, too.

"What you earn in two years, you end up paying as ransom in one day," said Mandal's wife, arguing they should migrate to a big Indian city in search of a better life.

Although Mandal's work is risky, he said it is necessary to meet their basic needs.

"We have a hand-to-mouth existence here. If we don't go to the sea, the hunger pangs will kill us before the tigers, crocodiles or pirates get us."

Their neighbour Nagen Mandal has also been attacked by pirates - three times.

"You can fight against wild animals and shoo them away, but only a fool would think about fighting these armed robbers. A little resistance and a bullet would pierce through your head," said the 48-year-old.

A dangerous job

The fishing season, which starts in mid-June and lasts until mid-September, sees about 150,000 fishermen set out for the Bay of Bengal.

As the fishermen search for the prized hilsa fish, a Bengali delicacy that sells for 1,200 ($18) a kilogramme, the pirates also become active.

Though most of the pirates are Bangladeshis, experts say they have a support base on the Indian side, too.

"It cannot be possible to carry out such piracy activities without having proper information about the movements of the fishermen," said Pradip Chatterjee, secretary for the National Fishermen Forum (NFF), adding that "the pirates know about their plans a week in advance".

In the past year, Bangladeshi pirates have kidnapped at least 20 fishermen, said the NFF.

The Border Security Force (BSF) and coastguards "turn a blind eye to the problem", alleged Chatterjee, and the pirates intrude as much as 20km into Indian territory to attack the fishermen.


But Manturam Pakhira, West Bengal's Sundarbans affairs minister, told Al Jazeera despite violent incidents, attacks against fishermen have decreased.

"There have been instances when the pirates take our fishermen to the Bangladesh side at gunpoint... The Indian fishermen have been attacked and even killed by the Bangladeshi pirates... But since the Mamata Banerjee government came to power, we have taken every possible step to ensure the safety of the fishermen," Pakhira said.

RELATED: In Pictures: Otter fishing in Bangladesh

There are about a dozen pirate gangs active in the Sundarbans, according to Baki, leader of the pirate gang Noah Vahini.

Raju Vahini and Jehangir Vahini - each of which includes nearly 100 pirates - are the most dreaded groups.

Baki, who only goes by one name, told Al Jazeera on the phone from Bangladesh that the gang does kidnap fisherman for ransom, but the amount they get is "nominal".

"We don't snatch away their fishing net or their catch like our rival gangs," Baki explained.

His aide, Babla, 32, told Al Jazeera in an interview from the Indian side of the Sundarbans he hopes to "eventually settle down here".

"Acting on the intelligence given by our local contacts, we attack their boats and take them hostage," Babla said.

NFF and the West Bengal Fishers Association (WBFA) have demanded an immediate crackdown on the pirates, and asked for permission to equip the fishermen to protect them against such attacks. But they allege West Bengal's government has ignored their proposal for years.

WBFA secretary Joy Krishna Haldar said there are "several loopholes in the surveillance by the BSF and the forest department. The pirates take advantage of the situation [and] cross over to the Indian side".

Complicating matters, Chatterjee explained it is against the law to enter core areas of the Sundarbans forest, a world heritage site, and as a result, some fishermen prefer not to report incidents because they fear they will get into legal trouble for trespassing.

Back in Hem Nagar, unable to convince his wife he should return to the sea, Mandal finally gives in to her plea to retire.

"I won't go into the jungle any more. I will be leaving for Tamil Nadu in a few days. You guys carry on. May God bless you," he told his fishing mates.

Follow Sanjay Pandey on Twitter: @sanjraj

Source: Al Jazeera


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dArQsouJP8c


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Re: Indian Navy and International Anti-Piracy Ops

Postby Aditya G » 20 Apr 2016 14:45

Indian Navy P-8I Neptune thwarted a piracy attempt on MV Sezai Selah:

Image

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 899029.cms


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