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International Naval News and Discussion

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Apr 2017 23:34

vasu raya wrote:DARPA's autonomous ships to track DE subs, lets call it the persistent tracker, one can see a P-8A doing a surveillance and say picked up a track in a remote ocean region, how do they expect to link up this persistent tracker in that region, it can only sail and maybe takes few days to reach the track.

if it is a choke point like Malacca straits, then its probably easier to position the persistent trackers in a staging area.


It is clearly not a "one solution fits all problem" system and hasn't been designed as such. It will likely be permanently forward deployed and perhaps provide capability to a CBG and of course it will be great at setting up defensive pickets where it will act as a force multiplier. It is also right now designed around a continuous trailing mission. Since the operator has now taken control of the program (DARPA will pass it on to ONR this summer) expect more robust CONOPS to emerge as they fit it into their existing and planned operational constructs.

http://www.darpa.mil/program/anti-subma ... ned-vessel

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby vasu raya » 04 Apr 2017 23:51

Tx., I liked this statement,

The objective is to generate a vessel design that exceeds state-of-the art platform performance to provide propulsive overmatch against diesel electric submarines at a fraction of their size and cost.


how are they ensuring unrefueled range of months? I believe they initially toyed with the idea of using only sails.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 Apr 2017 00:01

The current Leidos prototype carries 40 tons of Diesel for a notional 70 day cruise. You can refuel or scale up for longer deployments.

The full load displacement of Sea Hunter is about 140 tons when hauling 40 tons of diesel fuel. The composite vessel is powered by two diesel engines that can reach a top speed of 27 knots (31 mph) and is designed for a notional 70-day mission.


http://www.afcea.org/content/?q=Article ... sea-hunter

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby vasu raya » 05 Apr 2017 08:49

one of the risks identified was someone towing it to a foreign port, could be state sponsored pirates, from the schematics it seems it uses a sort of bow mounted sonar and not a dipping sonar or a trailing sonar, in any case loss of a sonar is not a good thing, while they want it to go where a manned ship is at more risk, sort of orthogonal. so it would have some level of aerial cover, not by the MPA which is probably employed elsewhere now that the tracking job is offloaded.

They also plan to assign mine sweeping duties to it.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 05 Apr 2017 11:17

Spain does not have enough money for the construction of S-80 submarines

April 5th, 0:02
According to the French resource « opex360.com " in the publication « Pour-le Moment, la marine espagnole n'a pas assez de budget pour ses of sous-marins the S-80 " for replacement of available as part of the Spanish fleet of four diesel-electric submarines Agosta type boats , the Spanish Navy in 2004 commissioned a shipbuilding company Navantia task of building a series of new submarine S-80 project. The cost of the program then was estimated at 2 billion euros.

However, the trouble is not slow to appear. And the most important of which jeopardized the entire program: at the head submarine construction, the Spanish engineers understand that the submarine was having a significant structural overload, resulting in lower reserve buoyancy underwater.

Madrid suddenly turned to the US company General Dynamics Electric Boat to find a solution to the problem. But the paper was simple: it was necessary to increase the displacement of the boat due to the elongated body. But on the other hand, the execution of planned it was much more difficult, and more technically than financially.

On during parliamentary hearings last week, Spanish Defense Minister Augustin Conde (Agustin Conde) explained that the funds available to finance the construction of only one submarine of four planned.

According to him, "the completion of construction of the remaining buildings in the plan, forcing to increase the budget to the amount by which the Ministry of Defense and Navantia have not reached a compromise." However, he clarified that the first boat of type S-80 will be handed over to the Navy in late 2021. To date, the original amount has already been spent 1.8 billion euros.

Delays in the program to build a new generation of submarines led to another result for the Spanish Navy: if the fleet wants to keep his part of the submarines, it is necessary to modernize the remaining three types of submarines Agosta, in active military, to prolong their useful life.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 Apr 2017 14:49

DDG-51 Flight III and SPY-6 (AMDR) update from yesterday :

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Last edited by brar_w on 05 Apr 2017 14:59, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 05 Apr 2017 14:52

In 2017....Seems like cheen is trying to outmatch the usn of 2007 while usn is moving far ahead to 2027

There is a clear 20 yrs of gap in the technology being put up at both ends.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 Apr 2017 15:12

vasu raya wrote:one of the risks identified was someone towing it to a foreign port, could be state sponsored pirates, from the schematics it seems it uses a sort of bow mounted sonar and not a dipping sonar or a trailing sonar, in any case loss of a sonar is not a good thing, while they want it to go where a manned ship is at more risk, sort of orthogonal. so it would have some level of aerial cover, not by the MPA which is probably employed elsewhere now that the tracking job is offloaded.

They also plan to assign mine sweeping duties to it.


These are things you can very easily address in the concept of operations when you hammer out the details on how you deploy. Give it an armed reaper escort if you must in high threat situations. It will likely be operating under the umbrella of armed USN vessels and MPA cover (Either P-8 or Triton) so no one is likely to come in and easily "steal" this thing away. It isn't something you are going to deploy by itself halfway across the globe without addressing any of these things. Think of it as a force multiplier in the ASW context (at least initially). Like all force multipliers you would naturally have to invest adequately to protect them.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 Apr 2017 18:53

Navy League 2017: USS Gerald R Ford heads to sea trials



The US Navy's (USN's soon to be commissioned first-of-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Gerald R Ford (CVN 78) has completed builder's trials and is headed to sea trials according to Vice Admiral Thomas Moore, commander of the US Navy's Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA).

"It depends on what we find, but the delivery timeline would be pretty quick after [sea trials]," Vice Adm Moore told reporters at the Annual Navy League conference in National Harbor, Maryland, on 3 April 2017. "First you go on the trial, and then - depending on what we find - two, three, four weeks after that we'll get the ship back for the acceptance trial with the Board of Inspections and Survey. If that goes well we can get the ship delivered in the late April/May timeframe, and we can move on to commissioning."

Commissioning is mainly ceremonial, Vice Adm Moore explained and the schedule generally depends on the availability of dignitaries. "On the timeline that we are on," he said, "if things go as expected, we'll get the ship delivered here in the next month or so...


From yesterdays Program Office Briefing on the Ford Program

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 Apr 2017 19:27

chola wrote:
Ah yes, the follow-on to the Wasp, the America class. An even bigger monster of a ship at 44K tons than the Wasp! They are still wringing out the lead ship though. They have three Americas in total planned (the USN currently has 8 of the Wasp class.)


There are two LHA's (LHA-6 and 7) currently operational or under construction. the third, LHA-8 is in the FY17 budget after advanced procurement began a couple of years ago. Beyond these they will continue to furnish all LHA requirements so fleet replacement (including Wasps) and growth will be met by them. The fourth will be paid for starting 2022. This is the new class going forward.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 05 Apr 2017 20:36

U boats had milch cow u boats and disguised sub tenders.
Fleet can certainly drive these into welldecks of Lpd ships for upkeep and refuel underway or halted alongside

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 06 Apr 2017 10:57

India should participate in Taiwan's submarine project.

Approach them and ask what if anything we can be contracted to build.

-------------------

Taiwanese industry commits to submarine project

Taiwan's National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology (NCSIST) has outlined a commitment to develop submarines for the Republic of China Navy (RoCN) but indicated that foreign technologies will be critical for the programme.

In a hearing to the Legislative Yuan's Foreign and National Defence Committee on 5 April, NCSIST representatives said the agency is currently in talks with Taiwan's naval shipbuilder CSBC Corporation about developing mission systems for the submarines.

The NCSIST and the CSBC Corporation were awarded a contract by Taiwan's Ministry of National Defense (MND) in March to design and construct the indigenous submarine fleet. The initial design of the submarine is expected to be finalised by early 2018.

http://www.janes.com/article/69315/taiw ... ne-project

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 07 Apr 2017 23:50

Navy League 2017: Electric Boat makes headway on common missile compartment development for US and UK future SSBNs ;Jane's Navy International

General Dynamics Electric Boat (GDEB) is making rapid progress on building the first four-tube 'quad pack' for the US's future nuclear-powered ballistic missile (SSBN) submarine under the joint US-UK Common Missile Compartment (CMC) programme, with its second construction readiness review planned to take place in the coming weeks.

The review will assess GDEB's readiness to commence missile tube outfitting prior to installing in the quad pack.

The quad pack missile tubes and associated equipment form a key element of the CMC for the future US Columbia and UK Dreadnought SSBNs. The CMC, which will carry the UGM-133 Trident II nuclear missile, will effectively spread costs over the two strategic deterrent programmes, thereby helping to bring down costs for both nations. The United States and the United Kingdom have co-operated on strategic deterrence since 1963 under the Polaris Sales Agreement.

Speaking at the Navy League's annual Sea-Air-Space exposition, Vice Admiral David Johnson, principal military deputy to the assistant secretary of the navy for research, development, and acquisition, said the US's partnership with the UK was a key parameter in the Columbia-class programme.

"The US must meet the UK's Dreadnought-class timelines," he stated. "For both of the common missile parts design and the missile tubes, the SSP [Strategic Systems Programs] and PEO [Program Executive Office] submarines have structured the Columbia programme to minimise the UK timeline programme risks by building test facilities in China Lake, procuring missile tubes off a production line and building the first missile compartment section war tubes, a quad pack, ahead of the UK's first production quad pack."

GDEB successfully completed its first construction readiness review to authorise start of construction of the US first article quad pack in May 2016, with the UK Ministry of Defence and US shipbuilder BAE Systems attending the review. GDBE then commenced the first US article quad pack construction in August that year, on schedule, and is now on track for the planned completion date of August 2018. BAE Systems personnel are being trained along with the GDEB personnel and will be onsite during the quad pack construction to capture lessons learned, VADM Johnson said.The CMC design and construction differs from the Ohio-class SSBN missile compartment, which required workers to drill 24 holes in the top of hulls to insert the missile tubes one by one. Construction of the boat was then completed around the tubes.

The Columbia-class missile tube construction is intended to be accomplished in groups of four (quad packs) in the shop and manufacturing process. GDEB will then join and test the quad packs at its facility in Quonset Point, Rhode Island, before shipping the missile compartment as a single unit to the shipyard for incorporation into the hull during final assembly.

The USN's Ohio replacement boat is expected to have four sets of quad packs. The United Kingdom's Successor programme requires only eight operational tubes, although engineering dependencies and a drive to ensure maximum commonality with the United States have led to a design incorporating three quad pack sets.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 09 Apr 2017 04:13

CVN-78 Ford , Sea Trials have begun

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby NRao » 09 Apr 2017 07:45

US navy strike group to move towards Korean peninsula, official says

The US navy will move a strike group towards the western Pacific Ocean to provide a presence near the Korean peninsula, a US official said on Saturday.

The Carl Vinson strike group, which includes an aircraft carrier, will make its way from Singapore, according to the official, who spoke to Reuters on condition of anonymity.

The news followed a Friday report by NBC that the National Security Council had included the return of nuclear weapons to South Korea in options presented to Donald Trump for dealing with the threat posed by North Korea. Killing North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, was also presented as an option, NBC reported.

On Saturday the White House said the US president had spoken to the acting president of South Korea, Hwang Kyo-Ahn. North Korea, meanwhile, called the US missile strike on Syria on Thursday night “an intolerable act of aggression”.

Rising tensions between North Korea, South Korea and the US and the North’s nuclear ambitions were chief among subjects discussed by Trump and Chinese president Xi Jinping at Mar-a-Lago in Florida this week.

The White House said on Saturday Trump spoke with Hwang about the strike in Syria, launched in retaliation for a suspected chemical attack on civilians by Bashar al-Assad’s government.

The two leaders agreed to stay in close contact, the White House said, regarding North Korea and other issues of mutual concern.

Analysts have said the Syria strike contained a clear message for Pyongyang that the US was not afraid to exercise the military option, and there had been speculation as to how the North would respond.

Trump has recently threatened unilateral action against Pyongyang if Beijing fails to help curb its neighbour’s nuclear weapons programme. Pyongyang’s response on Saturday suggested the reclusive state was determined to continue with its nuclear weapons programme.

“Swaggering as a superpower, the US has been picking only on countries without nuclear weapons and the Trump administration is no exception,” a foreign ministry spokesman said, according to the KCNA news agency.

The comments were Pyongyang’s first since Trump ordered the strikes on an airbase in Syria.

“The US missile attack against Syria is a clear and intolerable act of aggression against a sovereign state and we strongly condemn it,” KCNA quoted the spokesman as saying.

“The reality of today shows that we must stand against power with power and it proves a million times over that our decision to strengthen our nuclear deterrence has been the right choice.

“The Syria attack thoroughly reminds us the fact that it is absolutely dangerous to have any illusions about imperialism and only military power of our own will protect us from imperialistic aggression.

“We will keep bolstering our self-defensive military might in various ways in order to cope with the ever-intensifying US acts of aggression.”

The North has carried out five nuclear tests – two last year – and expert satellite imagery analysis suggests it could well be preparing for a sixth.

Pyongyang has shown no sign of reining in a missile testing programme ultimately aimed at securing the capability to deliver a nuclear warhead to the continental US.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 09 Apr 2017 14:54

Video: Carrier Gerald R. Ford Gets Underway





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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 12 Apr 2017 08:10

Some More. The DBR will take a bit getting used to compared to the Nimitz but it does look neat the way it is integrated into the island...




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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Kartik » 14 Apr 2017 01:58

Indonesian Navy receives pitch for Type 214 submarine from Turkish Golcük shipyard

The Indonesian Navy (Tentara Nasional Indonesia - Angkatan Laut, or TNI-AL) has received an offer from Golcük Shipyard to supply a variant of the Reis (Type 214)-class diesel-electric submarine (SSK).

Multiple TNI-AL sources have confirmed with Jane's that meetings and presentations on the Type 214 class were conducted from early 2017 by a team of Golcük Shipyard and TKMS officials at the TNI-AL headquarters in Cilangkap near Jakarta.

The meetings will be followed by a visit of TNI-AL officials to Golcük Shipyard's facilities near Istanbul, where they will observe construction work on the Turkish Navy's first Type 214 boat, Pirireis (S 330). This visit is currently scheduled to take place from 7 to 12 May 2017, in parallel to the IDEF 2017 exhibition.

The Turkish Navy is anticipating the delivery of six Type 214 submarines from Golcük Shipyard. The first of-class is slated for launch in 2019, and all six boats are expected to be commissioned by 2025.

According to Jane's Fighting Ships , the Reis-class SSK features an overall length of 67.6 m, an overall beam of 6.3 m, and a hull draught of 6.0 m. The platform, which can accommodate a crew of 27 including five officers, has a top speed of 20 kt when dived, and 12 kt when surfaced.

The boat is equipped with bow, flank and towed array sonars, and eight tubes that can launch 533 mm torpedoes including the Raytheon Mk 48 Mod 6, and the Atlas Elektronik DM2A4.


Couldn't India have also bid for the requirement, with DCNS and Mazagaon Dockyard pitching the Scorpene? After all, we claim its a Make-in-India success story.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby NRao » 14 Apr 2017 02:11

Malaysia perhaps. Indonesia? Do not know. I see them as part of the axis of evil, HQed due north of them. Turkey fits into that group.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 14 Apr 2017 15:35

Indonesia is a good friend of India.
There are looking for tie-ups with Tata and other Indian companies for the production of military vehicles in Indonesia.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 14 Apr 2017 20:33

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Future USS Gerald R. Ford completes successful builder's sea trials, begins preparations for acceptance trials

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The future USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) returned from Builder's Sea Trials to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia on April 14 after seven days at sea.

During this initial at-sea period, Ford's crew, representatives from Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding, the Navy's CVN 78 Program Office, the Navy's Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair and various technical subject matter experts demonstrated many of the ship's capabilities including tracking aircraft using the Dual Band Radar, conducting "no load" cycles using the new electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) and small boat operations.

As is typical with sea trials, the Navy and shipbuilder learned a great deal about the ship's performance during the extensive testing. Analysis continues, and any identified corrective actions will be addressed.

CVN 78 remains on track to conduct acceptance trials and delivery to the Navy this spring.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 15 Apr 2017 06:08

Japan's X-2 fighter plane called "Shin Shin" (what a name!).

Apparently it means "Spirit of the Heart".

This is what the babuz are hoping the AMCA will turn out to be...except we are about a decade behind.

Japan has spent just $332 million to get to where it is with this plane - which sounds incredibly low! Although they are no doubt starting with a lot of off-the-shelf or carry over stuff.

Nevertheless, the lesson here is on how to spend little and yet achieve results.

Lockheed would have added another couple of zeros to the end of that figure.


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 15 Apr 2017 08:33

Looks like a mini pakfa

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 15 Apr 2017 15:37

Singha wrote:Looks like a mini pakfa


It is one of those videos where they post a fake, morphed image so that people click and watch the whole thing :). The static image they have used is a photoshopped PAKFA in the X-2's colors.

https://s29.postimg.org/n86x2c713/X-2.png

Japan's X-2 fighter plane called "Shin Shin" (what a name!).



The X-2 is a technology demonstrator and not a fighter aircraft. It is merely a technology test bed for some of the things that may or may not end up into their eventual next fighter which they may or may not sanction. At the moment they are looking for international consultant partners and have signed an agreement with the UK and have invited global participation from aerospace companies to assist in development if and when they decide to sanction the project.
Last edited by brar_w on 15 Apr 2017 18:20, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 15 Apr 2017 18:09


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 15 Apr 2017 18:16

Those are just paddles to quickly develop and test TVC aided agility much the same way the X-31 did.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 20 Apr 2017 21:51


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 21 Apr 2017 10:02

7 days is awesome quick for a ship of vast size and complexity. vikramaditya was on sea trials for months and months.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 21 Apr 2017 14:59

This was the builder trial phase. Next step is to have the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) hop onboard and begin the acceptance trials. Those can last anywhere from weeks to a couple of months before the ship comes back to port and the Navy/builder team work at rectifying any errors discovered during either of these trials. Once that is done the board will certify corrections and the ship will begin preparing for commissioning which is currently estimated in late summer or early spring.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 22 Apr 2017 13:01

A spot where IN warships and subs must make regular port calls.WE should have somewhere in the Indo-China Sea,our equiv to Gwadar.

http://www.economist.com/news/asia/2172 ... ew-friends
Dock and cover
Vietnam uses an old naval base to make new friends


Cam Ranh Bay is welcoming American warships again
Apr 20th 2017 | CAM RANH BAY
NEAR the point where Vietnam bulges deepest into the South China Sea lies Cam Ranh Bay, perhaps the finest natural deepwater harbour in South-East Asia. France based a fleet there in colonial times. Russian ships made use of it in the Russo-Japanese war, Japanese ones during the second world war and American ones during the Vietnam war.

After the American withdrawal and communist triumph, the government of the newly reunited Vietnam leased the naval base to the Soviet Union. Russia gave up the facility in 2002. Today it is Russian tourists who flock to Cam Ranh International Airport, with its American-built airstrip, on their way to the beaches of nearby Nha Trang.

These days Vietnam ostensibly follows a policy of “Three Nos”: no military alliances, no foreign bases and no joining with another country to fight a third. Nonetheless, adjacent to the Vietnamese naval base at Cam Ranh is a facility that receives foreign military vessels. In theory it is a purely commercial venture, open to the ships of any country willing to pay for the maintenance and refuelling it provides. But it also serves a strategic purpose: sending a defiant message to a resurgent and expansionist China by allowing Vietnam to strengthen military ties with an increasingly diverse group of countries.

Anti-Chinese sentiment runs deep among ordinary Vietnamese. Vietnam fought wars against both America and China in the 1970s. But these days Americans, by and large, are received with affection, whereas many Vietnamese remain convinced that China still has territorial designs on their country.

In 2014 China sent an oil rig to a disputed part of the South China Sea, sparking anti-Chinese riots in Vietnam. Since then both sides have been careful not to stoke tensions. China has called off the drilling; Vietnam has made mollifying noises about solving disputes bilaterally, as China prefers. But for Vietnam, the underlying problem is unchanged: how does a small, poor country defend itself against a bigger, richer one?

The Philippines, under Rodrigo Duterte, has pioneered one approach: apparent capitulation. In exchange for massive investment in infrastructure, Mr Duterte has decided not to press China over their territorial dispute. Vietnam, using Cam Ranh Bay, is trying something else: diversification. Since the foreign-vessel facility opened a year ago, it has received 19 ships from 10 countries. China and America tie for the most visits, at three each. But every other visit save one has come from countries that have shown some form of opposition to China’s expansive maritime claims, including France and Japan. Vietnam appears to be reminding China of just how many friends and suitors it has—and just how well it can look after their warships.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 22 Apr 2017 16:39

More on the "Big" ticonderoga replacement concept for Fleet and Surface BMD..


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 22 Apr 2017 17:44

Nice . I always felt the fast DDG51 class was a bit wasted and undesigned for the BMD mission which is all about height , aperture size , cells and big 2-stage missiles.

I am not so hot on the railgun and laser potential for BMD...not for a large area bubble .. seems more suited to point defence ? a railgun shell is just a hypersonic unguided KE weapon?

solid valued based old school east coast engineering, vs west coast product managers selling IoT juicers and cloud analytics :mrgreen:

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 22 Apr 2017 17:56

The Flight III sports the AMDR which is essentially AN/SPY-1 +15dB so a tremendous gain in terms of quality and area coverage when compared to the current AEGIS without significant increase in radar size. This effectively means half the warhead RCS being detected at twice the distance of the current AEGIS ships. This is obviously fueled by better digital processors (plus element level digitizations) and much higher power, higher efficiency GaN T/R modules compared to the decades old SPY-1.

But beyond, as they move to the larger cells that enable larger diameter, longer ranged missiles they would need even larger radars. With some low risk VLS modifications and Navy's changes in regulations allowing for SM3 Block IIB these sensors would very much come into play. Same with the larger 30 foot radars. We are then reaching into ICBM defense territory or carrying larger diameter, heavier KKVs and MOKVs. This is where the BMD mission begins to demand a larger platform hence this concept.

But the DDG 51 has to do a lot more than BMD and the Navy would be happy with a larger vessel since they have a global strike mission on top of other missions.

Singha wrote:I am not so hot on the railgun and laser potential for BMD...not for a large area bubble .. seems more suited to point defence ? a railgun shell is just a hypersonic unguided KE weapon?


The Hypervelocity Projectile and DEW are for organic defense against all types of incoming targets. You can use them for extending reach of your close in systems, anti-cruise missile defense mission, and even taking on incoming warheads in lower atmosphere when they are slower. These technologies are still a good decade away but the idea is to share the burden of these missions with the VLS allowing the VLS to gain flexibility and focus on area defense. Given that ESSM Block II is entering the SRBM defense mission you are taking out a cell that is available for area defense every time you put an ESSM in there so the idea is for these technologies to share this burden so that you trade off some ESSM's for SM6 and 3s.

It's not much of a concern for this particular vessel proposal however since the Navy won't need that many VLSs so there will be plenty of room for future growth. 280+ MK41 are a $hit load of cells.


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