International Naval News & Discussion

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 18 Jul 2018 22:04

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 18 Jul 2018 22:07

3rd above is type45 UK - S1850 search radar + SAMPSON aesa ,
4th is the franco-italian horizon (2x76mm oto aa under bridge) - some thales radar + EMPAR
5th looks like german sachsen class - SMART-L + APAR
6th looks like spain F100 class with a downsized SPY1F radar (vs 1D on the ddg51/kongo/atago)

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 18 Jul 2018 22:14

Image

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby chola » 18 Jul 2018 22:19

Singha wrote:and this is navantia/bazan with vast experience in tfta ships like F100 AAW DDG , juan carlos LHD etc.
the U214 subs for greece, turkey and Soko also ran into major troubles.

about kockums A26 gripenSSN hawa mein teerbaazi less said the better. that one did not weigh anchor off the drawing board even.

and yet the old hats massa and bear continue to churn them out - big, fast and quiet.


Yes, amazing how Navantia with its vast experience can miss the dock size for its reworked sub! They’re the partners with L&T on our LPD project so hopefully they don’t goof up this time.

Just shows how hard making this stuff is.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby chola » 18 Jul 2018 22:22

Singha wrote:the lineage of the aegis ships. missing is the spanish F100

Image


Nice posts.

I like the Korean one and Unkil’s Burke Flight III (shielded funnels) the best as the most visually appealing.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 19 Jul 2018 12:29

RIMPAC-2018: What Makes It So Special This Year?

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07- ... ecial-year

It involves 46 surface ships, five submarines, 18 national land forces, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel from twenty five nations. Defending sea lanes is the main mission and there are always political connotations.

This is also the first time a US newly created regional command is overseeing the exercise. On May 30, Secretary of Defense James Mattis announced that US Pacific Command (PACOM), which oversees all US military forces in Asia, had changed its name to be called the Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) to reflect “the increasing connectivity between the Indian and Pacific Oceans,” as well as America’s determination to remain the dominant power in both.

Now the main thing – China’s RIMPAC invitation was revoked in May. China first participated in the RIMPAC exercises in 2014. The formal reason given by US military is the “militarization” of artificial islands in the South China Sea. Secretary Mattis said he did not expect countries to choose between the US and China "because a friend does not demand you choose among them." The Chinese Navy has sent a Type 815 intelligence gathering ship to observe the exercise.

The list of nations invited to the RIMPAC-2018 obviously reflects the US desire to strengthen its military ties with states on China’s perimeter in an effort to confine it. The US opposes China’s ambitious “One Belt, One Road” economic initiative and encircling the country with US-friendly actors is a vital component of the policy to counter it.

The US is testing its combat capability in the two oceans and is doing it with numerous partners. This month, USS Essex amphibious assault ship (jump-jet carrier) with Marine Corps F-35Bs onboard sailed into the Pacific – the second ever deployment of small-deck flattop with the new the aircraft onboard. The F-35 aircraft is known for its stealth design and advanced sensors and controls. Israel was the first nation to ever use the F-35 in combat. This year, it sent the stealth aircraft to attack Iranian training bases and weapons depots in Syria. The plans to sell F-35s to Taiwan are under consideration in the United States. If the deal goes through, the relations with China will greatly deteriorate - the eventuality RIMPAC is taking into account. The voices inside Congress are calling for approval of the sale.


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 19 Jul 2018 21:16

Spain's New Submarine Is Too Big To Fit In Its Dock

El País reported on Wednesday that Spain’s struggling new S-80 submarine procurement programme had run into another problem. After previously being found too heavy to resurface, the boats, which are 81m long and weigh 3,000-tons, were now too long to fit in the submarine pens at the Cartagena naval base, meaning millions would need to be spent extending them. The submarines were lengthened—and re-baptised the S-80 Plus—to fix the weight problem.

“The MoD will have to make the docks at the Cartagena base bigger because the new submarine doesn’t fit”, the paper headlined, reporting the new €16 million overrun would go into the nearly €4 billion project cost, or nearly a billion euros per submarine.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07- ... t-its-dock

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 19 Jul 2018 21:23

China Building 8 Submarines For Pakistan, As China-Pak Projects Flourish

Chinese shipbuilders are constructing eight new submarines to protect its ally Pakistan with an aim to counter India. Currently, Pakistan’s Navy has ten subs, which suggests their submarine fleet could expand by 80 percent upon delivery, expected in the mid to late 2020s. Relations between both countries are incredibly complex, as the Kashmir conflict and the numerous military disputes on the Line of Control (LoC) have intensified in recent years.

According to unnamed sources, as quoted per Zee News, under Project Hangor, China’s shipbuilding industry could soon be delivering over eight new subs to Pakistan. India’s underwater warfare program is perceived to be far superior to Pakistan. As of now, India has sixteen submarines while Pakistan has about ten. However, China wants to scale up Pakistan’s underwater warfare capabilities to defend the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

In addition to submarines, China successfully launched two remote sensing satellites for Pakistan last week, which could help both countries monitor India and CPEC infrastructure. The satellites were on-board the Chinese Long March (LM-2C) spacecraft, while the PRSS1 – Pakistan’s first optical remote sensing unit – was developed by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST).

Furthermore, the fiber optic pipeline project connecting Pakistan to China was completed in June which now provides a direct link between Pakistan, Middle Asia, and East Asia and reduces the possibility of disruption to international traffic. This is amongst the only information and communication technology project under the CPEC. The project started in March 2016 and concluded last month. The cable extends over a distance of 509 miles and has 26 microwave transmission nodes from Rawalpindi to Karimabad and 106 miles of aerial fiber cable from Karimabad to Khunjerab as a back-up.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07- ... s-flourish

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 19 Jul 2018 22:55

their AIP system with flammable hydrogen looks dodgy to me, vs the soothing Li-Ion plans of the Soryu++ :)

Wiki:

The AIP (air independent propulsion) implemented on the S-80 is completely different from the French MESMA (Module Energie Sous-Marin Autonome) project. The S-80's AIP system is based on a bioethanol-processor (provided by Hynergreen from Abengoa) consisting of a reaction chamber and several intermediate Coprox reactors, that will transform the BioEtOH into high purity hydrogen. The output feeds a series of fuel cells from UTC Power company (which also supplied fuel cells for the Space Shuttle).

The Reformator is fed with bioethanol as fuel, and oxygen (stored as a liquid in a high pressure cryogenic tank), generating hydrogen and carbon dioxide as subproducts. The produced hydrogen and more oxygen is fed to the fuel cells.

The bioethanol-processor also produces a stream of highly concentrated carbon dioxide and other trace gases that are not burned completely during combustion. This gas flow is mixed with sea water in one or more ejector venturi scrubber and then through a new system called SECO2 (or CO2 Removal System), developed by Bionet, and whose purpose is to dissolve the "bubbles" of CO2 in water to undetectable levels.[8]

The oxygen and fuel flow rates are directly determined by the demand for power. The AIP power in the S-80 submarine is at least 300 kW.[8] A permanent-magnet electric motor moves a fixed propeller of a special design, that doesn't create cavitations at high speed.


--

With the project also suffering with an underperforming AIP system (which was to allow the submarine to stay underway for 28 days but was only managing 21 days) the Spanish Defence Ministry announced in June 2013 that Navantia has signed on the US company General Dynamics Electric Boat to help solve the excess weight.[22] In September 2014, the detected overweight was reported to have been resolved and the construction work to be ready to resume in late October 2014.[23] In November 2014, Navantia again reported having completed the redesign work to address the problem of overweight. In all, the hull will be lengthened by seven metres, and the displacement increased by 75 tons. As of January 2018, the intended delivery date of the first submarine is September 2022.[24] In January 2017, it was reported that the AIP system would not be ready in time for the delivery of the first submarine.[25]

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 19 Jul 2018 22:57

electric boat co of groton as the worlds bleeding edge SSN builder seems to be fixer of choice when things head south and people get in over their heads

the aussies collins underwater noise and hull issues were also fixed by electric boat.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby abhik » 20 Jul 2018 19:01

Singha wrote:3rd above is type45 UK - S1850 search radar + SAMPSON aesa ,
4th is the franco-italian horizon (2x76mm oto aa under bridge) - some thales radar + EMPAR
5th looks like german sachsen class - SMART-L + APAR
6th looks like spain F100 class with a downsized SPY1F radar (vs 1D on the ddg51/kongo/atago)

I think it is the Dutch De Zeven Provinciën-class frigate, very pleasing to the eye.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby abhik » 20 Jul 2018 19:53

Singha wrote:their AIP system with flammable hydrogen looks dodgy to me, vs the soothing Li-Ion plans of the Soryu++ :)

...

+1, Hydrogen fuel-cells might have sounded cool 10-15 years ago but they have long lost the battle against Li-Ion batteries in commercial applications (automobiles etc.) and is only going to get worse in the future with battery technology improving due to huge investments being made and fuel cells being relegated to niche roles. Chemical fuels still have an advantage of being more energy dense than batteries (some thing like 5x) but the complexity of converting that energy via fuel cells is insane. I mean WTF how do you replenish a sub with cryogenic oxygen?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 21 Jul 2018 20:52

Walrus Class Submarine

Image

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 21 Jul 2018 21:54

abhik wrote:
Singha wrote:their AIP system with flammable hydrogen looks dodgy to me, vs the soothing Li-Ion plans of the Soryu++ :)

...

+1, Hydrogen fuel-cells might have sounded cool 10-15 years ago but they have long lost the battle against Li-Ion batteries in commercial applications (automobiles etc.) and is only going to get worse in the future with battery technology improving due to huge investments being made and fuel cells being relegated to niche roles. Chemical fuels still have an advantage of being more energy dense than batteries (some thing like 5x) but the complexity of converting that energy via fuel cells is insane. I mean WTF how do you replenish a sub with cryogenic oxygen?


as a footnote, read this glowing prediction of fuel cells for consumer use from 2004 https://www.forbes.com/2004/06/22/cx_ah ... e026634f0b

fujitsu toshiba , sanyo etc had come up with fuel cells for laptops :shock:
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 21 Jul 2018 21:59

de zeven provincien and sachsen do look similar with thales apar + smartL

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 07 Aug 2018 23:28

Pauline Hanson asks if pump-jet submarines can only stay underwater for 20mins :rotfl:


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Lisa » 08 Aug 2018 00:42

^ Probably one of the cruelest videos I have seen. Hang another medal on that sailor!

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 09 Aug 2018 07:41

video of the SM2 fire on the sachsen
https://www.popularmechanics.com/milita ... n-missile/

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 09 Aug 2018 08:24

Yasen-M: Destroyer of the Depths. Potent electronic weapons & supersonic missiles



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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Sep 2018 00:13

Cruise missiles and aircraft are increasingly gaining a stronghold in the region as China modernizes its air-force. The current SM6 is quite a versatile weapon capable of long-range AAW (stated range of 200 nautical miles / 350+ km), Ballistic Missile intercept (up to MRBM class) and even surface warfare.

Given that Japan is an SM-3 Block II customer and dev. partner, the SM6 block IB (being funded by USN) with its 21" rocket motor and body (borrowed from the SM3 II) will look quite atractive. Should easily move the missile into an IRBM-interceptor class and extend extreme long range intercepts (AAW..cooperative target) to well beyond 450 km. This will be a major pain in the a$$ for China especially since Japan is an AEGIS, E-2D and F-35 operator which lends itself nicely to having a similar capability to what the US Navy enjoys with NIFC-CA with its ability to do OTH intercepts.

Japan’s Improved Atago-class to field SM-6 air-defence missiles


The Ministry of Defense (MoD) in Tokyo has decided to equip the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (JMSDF’s) two Improved Atago-class destroyers with Standard Missile 6 (SM-6) air-defence missiles, an MoD spokesperson told Jane’s on 3 September.

The revelation comes just four days after the MoD asked for JPY11.1 billion (USD99.9 million) in its 2019 budget request to procure an undisclosed number of SM-6 interceptors, and JPY2.1 billion to acquire additional ones for testing.The decision follows the launch of Maya (with pennant number 179) on 30 July, the first of the two Improved Atago-class destroyers. The 170 m-long vessel entered the water at the Japan Marine United (JMU) Corporation’s facility in Yokohama and is expected to be commissioned in March 2020, while the second ship is expected to enter service in March 2021.

The vessels will be equipped with the US-developed Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) system, which will enable the destroyers to act as part of a wider ‘grid’ of sensor and weapon platforms that allows other CEC-equipped ships to share surveillance and targeting information.

The ships, which are 5 m longer than the Atago-class destroyers, will also field SM-3 Block IIA missiles designed to intercept short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles.

The MoD is advancing Japan's integrated air and missile defence (IAMD) capabilities through the combined use of Aegis-equipped vessels, early-warning aircraft, radars, and other equipment.

Maya is expected to use the Aegis Baseline J7 supported by the Lockheed Martin AN/SPY-1D-series radar.

At the Yokosuka naval base in Kanagawa Prefecture the US Navy’s 7th Fleet has already deployed CEC-capable Aegis ships that can launch SM-6 interceptors.

The commissioning of Maya in 2020 is expected to facilitate data-sharing with US warships and enhance the interoperability between the Japan Self-Defense Force and the US military.

The latest revelation comes six days after Tokyo referred in its Defense of Japan 2018 White Paper to North Korea’s ballistic missile programme as an “unprecedentedly serious and imminent threat to Japan’s security”.

Japan is promoting a ‘cross-domain strategy’ aimed at establishing superiority in the air, at sea, on land, and in outer space as well as in electronic warfare and cyber space. The SM-6 system will be part of this strategy as well as part of the IAMD initiative.

For example, SM-6 missiles will be used for protecting the two land-based Aegis Ashore ballistic missile defence (BMD) systems set to be operated by the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force.


Once Maya is commissioned in 2020 the JMSDF is likely to carry out an interception test in the United States using SM-6 missiles. It is usual for the JMSDF to conduct such test in the United States.



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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 Sep 2018 16:07


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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Neshant » 11 Sep 2018 22:10

Chinese Fishermen Wage "Hybrid War" On Asian Seas

Image

The U.S. Department of Defense’s annual report to Congress, released in August, detailed military and security developments of the Chinese armed forces and drew attention to the “People’s Armed Forces Maritime Militia” (PAFMM), a weaponized fishing fleet funded by Beijing - a new asset for low-intensity maritime confrontations, and a forward screen for its growing military force in the South China Sea.


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-09- ... asian-seas

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Lisa » 19 Sep 2018 03:40

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03lb1fn

Nice programme on how submarines operate.

"Know Your Enemy
The Silent War Episode 1 of 2

For decades, Britain and America's Cold War submarines waged a secret war of espionage against the Soviet navy. Deep in the ocean, crews were locked in a game of cat and mouse as each side battled to gain the tactical and technological advantage."

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Austin » 30 Sep 2018 21:22

US could use Navy for ‘blockade’ to hamper Russian energy exports – Interior Secretary

US could use its Navy to prevent Russia’s potential energy supplies to the Middle East, Internal Secretary Ryan Zinke said, Washington Examiner reports. The blockade would actually mean an “act of war,” Russian Senator fired back.
Zinke alleged that Russia’s engagement in Syria – notably, where it is operating at the invitation of the legitimate government – is a pretext to explore new energy markets.

"I believe the reason they are in the Middle East is they want to broker energy just like they do in eastern Europe, the southern belly of Europe,” he has reportedly said.

And, according to to the official, there are ways and means to tackle it.

"The United States has that ability, with our Navy, to make sure the sea lanes are open, and, if necessary, to blockade ... to make sure that their energy does not go to market," he said.

Zinke was addressing the attendees of the event hosted by the Consumer Energy Alliance, a non-profit group which styles itself as the “voice of the energy consumer” in the US. He went to compare Washington's approaches to dealing with Russia and Iran, noting that they are effectively the same.

"The economic option on Iran and Russia is, more or less, leveraging and replacing fuels,” he said, while referring to Russia as a “one trick pony” with an economy dependent on fossil fuels.

Zinke’s statements provoked an angry response from Moscow, which equated a potential maritime blockade to an “act of war,” while calling the internal secretary’s assumptions “nonsense.”

“A US blockade of Russia would be equal to a declaration of war under international law,” Russian Senator Aleksey Pushkov said, commenting on Zinke’s words. Russia does not currently export any energy to the Middle East, which itself is a major oil exporting region. The whole idea is an “absolute nonsense,” the Senator argued.

The comment from the US Interior Secretary come as Trump administration has been on a mission to boost the export of its liquefied natural gas to Europe, replacing Russia, the far cheaper option for European consumers. For that effect, the Trump administration officials, including US President Donald Trump himself, try to persuade Germany to pull out of the “inappropriate” Nord Stream 2 pipeline project, which according to Trump, made Berlin Moscow’s “captive.”

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Singha » 01 Oct 2018 16:36

https://turkishnavy.net/2018/09/07/turk ... elicopter/

turkey has sent a a400m loaded with uuv and crew to help TSPN locate the wreck of a crashed sea king which went into arabian sea 2 months ago.

--
could have been carrying a drug shipment for some higher up to attract so much attention.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Manish_P » 12 Oct 2018 17:07

From twitter - Nammo @Nammo

NAMMO - The Bullet That Swims Through Water

Ammunition that can be fired into water, without stopping or changing course. Look closely, and you can see the tracer still burning! Already in full production for both the US Navy and Army.


From the NAMMO website - link

While traditional ammunition is either stopped or deflected when it hits water, Nammo’s 30 mm Swimmer (APFSDS-T MK 258 Mod 1) swims straight through water, thanks to a groundbreaking design on the supercavitating projectile developed in cooperation with the US Navy.


The Swimmer round falls into the category of sub-caliber kinetic energy penetrators. These can most easily be described as arrows made out of very heavy materials that use the force of the impact rather than explosives to punch through armor. Traveling at speeds of more than 1 km per second, the energy generated by the impact melts the armor of the vehicle into a fluid and the arrow “swims” through the armored side of the vehicle. In the case of the Swimmer, the force of the arrow is sufficient to defeat anything except main battle tanks.


Nammo’s penetrators, both for vehicles and other types of armor piercing ammunition, are made out of a super tough tungsten alloy, also known as wolfram. More than two times as heavy as steel, it has the second highest melting point of any element, making it ideal for use in armor piercing ammunition.


What makes the Swimmer unique, however, is the combination of powerful armor penetration and its ability to swim straight through water. This effect has until now been considered impossible to achieve by ammunition fired from air through water.


This enables the Swimmer to be used in defense of either ships or coastal areas against submerged and surface mines, small underwater vehicles, torpedoes and even small fast attack crafts that might be concealed by waves. This is valuable not only for naval vessels, but also for land vehicles defending harbors, bridges or other key locations.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Vips » 23 Oct 2018 18:00

France begins deliberations on new aircraft carrier.

France will make a decision on the replacement of its flagship aircraft carrier the Charles de Gaulle at the start of 2020, its armed forces minister said on Tuesday. The carrier has been in service since 2001 but Paris is looking to build a vessel that would take into consideration expected technological advances post-2030 and be capable of carrying a planned new Franco-German fighter jet.

“The Charles de Gaulle will need a successor,” Florence Parly said in a speech at a defence exhibition in Paris. “The first step, which starts today, is the study phase to determine what and how we want our future aircraft carrier to be. We have given ourselves 18 months,” she said.

Three other Western aircraft carriers have been built since the Charles de Gaulle was first deployed. The U.S. Navy’s Gerald R. Ford and America, and the British Royal Navy’s Queen Elizabeth, which cost about 3.1 billion pounds ($4.03 billion). Parly said the study will assess the size requirements, propulsion options – both conventional and nuclear – and aircraft-launching capabilities.

A number of French defence firms, ranging from Rafale warplane maker Dassault to systems’ contractor Thales, are among companies involved in the study phase.

The French navy recently completed an 18-month mid-life upgrade of the Charles de Gaulle. Its most recent activity was as part of support operations against Islamic State militants in the Levant region and its battle group is due to return to sea in the first quarter of 2019.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby chola » 09 Nov 2018 12:25


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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Chinmay » 14 Nov 2018 10:55

Update on above

Norwegian Aegis frigate sinks

The Royal Norwegian Navy's frigate Helge Ingstad has almost completely sunk in the waters near the Sture oil and gas terminal outside of Bergen Norway. Norwegian authorities insist they still intend to salvage the warship, which suffered serious damage and was intentionally ran aground after colliding with the oil tanker Sola on Nov. 8, 2018, but the vessel's future looks increasingly bleak


A complete hull loss of a primary surface combatant in a small navy looks quite bad. At least no lives were lost.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby chola » 14 Nov 2018 13:09

Image

Image

It has a SPY-1 and is nearly 6K tons. This is a small Aegis destroyer by any other name!

Very bad loss for a small navy.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby dinesh_kimar » 14 Nov 2018 19:43

^ If they use a Chinese salvage firm, the "improved" SPY-1 clone can still make its debut by 2020, in time for the Paris Air Show.

OT, the Chinese must be wonderous engineers indeed, to clone C-130 planes, S-70 helicopters and AEGIS Radars, which even the Russians, with superior grit, determination, intelligence and technical resources fail to match.

Recently a Chinese company, a reputed mining firm, has brought out a Predator like drone.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Pratyush » 14 Nov 2018 20:21

Ships have been salvaged from such situations for decades. I am not sure about the electronics of the boat.what shape they will be in after being submerged.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 14 Nov 2018 21:21

chola wrote:Very bad loss for a small navy.


Yeah very bad indeed and a big loss for Norway. But if there is one country in Europe that can afford to recapitalize it is probably Norway.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 15 Nov 2018 01:48

USN to keep Columbia line going after delivering planned submarine numbers
Jane's Navy International
Michael Fabey
09 November, 2018


The navy wants to keep the line going not only to possibly build more strategic submarines – should US Strategic Command (STRATCOM) determine more of the vessels are needed – but also to potentially develop a new kind of undersea vessel, Rear Adm Tammen said on 8 November during the Naval Submarine League Annual 36th Symposium and Industry Update.

“We’re going to keep the Columbia line hot after the last Columbia is produced,” he said.

“If STRATCOM needs more than 12, we can produce more than 12,” he said. “If STRATCOM doesn’t need more than 12, we’re looking at what we call the large-volume host platform. We haven’t nailed down the concept yet, but we’ll take that centre section; there will be payload volume. We’ll have the ability to host vehicles aboard inside that centre section.”

The Columbias are scheduled to cease production after 2036, but USN and Trump administration officials have suggested the potential need for more strategic submarines to meet future requirements.


If there is no future requirement for additional strategic submarines, USN officials have been discussing using the Columbia-hull design to develop large-volume host vessels similar to the navy's guided-missile submarines (SSGNs).

A new Columbia-sized submarine, Rear Adm Tammen noted, would have substantial volume for extra payloads beyond, for example, what a Virginia-class attack submarine (SSN) might offer.

The extended Columbia line option is part of the USN’s Tactical Submarine Evolution Plan (TSEP), which also focuses on the development of advanced next-generation attack submarines, which, Rear Adm Tammen said, will “put the ‘fast’ back in fast attack”.



Last edited by brar_w on 15 Nov 2018 03:10, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 15 Nov 2018 02:28

^^^^ For anyone who does not know what the Columbia is, it is the Khan's next generation SSBN to replace the Ohio Class SSBN. It is America's next gen strategic deterrent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia-class_submarine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio-class_submarine

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 15 Nov 2018 02:40

^ It makes sense to keep on buying SSGNs after the dozen SSBNs are fielded. That the first CPS weapon on a US submarine will go onboard the Ohio Class SSGN sometime in 2021-2022 time-frame and with the capability to also host more than 150 Tomahawks having a few of these around is great way to bring a lot of firepower including conventional hypersonic weapons like the CPS and its offshoots during time of need. Gets you around basing requirements in the Pacific and adds survivability compared to relying on ships.

https://news.usni.org/2017/11/03/navy-c ... ss-boomers

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 15 Nov 2018 02:47

Phase 2 of the F-35B Ship Integration on the HMS Queen Elizabeth began earlier this month. These will be focused on further envelope expansion.

https://www.portsmouth.co.uk/our-region ... -1-8690864

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby SaiK » 15 Nov 2018 03:51

Seawolf: The 1 Submarine the Navy Wants to Keep Ultra Secret
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/ ... cret-36032

...the nearly $3-billion-per-copy Seawolfs have been fitted with hundreds of millions of dollars in unique equipment and

They deploy for months at a time often without any public notice. The wife of a Seawolf sailor described the boat as “ unpredictable.”

I think this is well planned move. It would only take few days for these wives to cheat :rotfl:

The Russians want to know what America’s subs are doing, too.

Hot!

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Singha » 17 Nov 2018 15:30

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a VLCC 250m long tanker did this to a Nansen class AAW destroyer SPY1F kitted up .... first it tore a hull on the warship and escaped clean with barely a scratch...the crew beached it on some rocks to avoid sinking and cables were arranged to hold it in place....but later the cables snapped and the ship slid back into deeper water :shock:

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/11/17/euro ... index.html

fully loaded these tankers are upto 250,000 tons and ride low in the water but with massive buoyancy due to oil lighter than water and double hulls all around. container ships which ride higher up are even more deadly as they move fast and have a high main deck towering over any DDG....the USN 7th fleet found that out the hard way


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