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International Naval News and Discussion

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 03 May 2017 13:45

BAE Systems launched Audacious - the fourth Astute-class SSN Submarine for Royal Navy

http://navyrecognition.com/index.php/ne ... -navy.html

Image

Armed with Spearfish torpedoes and Tomahawk land attack missiles, the Astute class submarines are the most highly-capable submarines ever built for the Royal Navy. They can strike at targets up to 1,000km from the coast with pin-point accuracy, are equipped with a world-leading sonar capability and powered by a nuclear reactor. The first three submarines in the class, HMS Astute, HMS Ambush and HMS Artful, are now in service with the final three Astute class submarines are at various stages of construction at the Barrow site.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 03 May 2017 13:47

Astute class seems to have all kind of sensors on the sides , The size of Flank Array Sonar is huge covers the entire submarine ! :shock:

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 03 May 2017 15:47

i believe thales or marconi supplies a large distributed control system and sensors for these astutes.

regardless of british claims I would still take a few well honed used 688i boats over the astutes ... they are likely to be reliable and techniques fine tuned over a very large fleet. used 688i were a good bet for australia but they want to subsidize the french for 50 years so who can stop them

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 03 May 2017 15:51

^^ They were not offered the 688I any ways so you cant complain there , There was a choice of opting for German or French subs for better or worse they went for French.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby chola » 03 May 2017 16:28

We should post chini related stuff in international threads. Do not give lizard pride of place in their own threads. No more postings in China headlined threads, please.
Last edited by chola on 03 May 2017 16:35, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby chola » 03 May 2017 16:29

Possible new chini carrier aircraft.

http://www.popsci.com/j-31-stealth-figh ... -prototype


China's J-31 stealth fighter gets an improved prototype—and a potential future on a carrier
More government funding may be on the way.
By Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer May 1, 2017

Image
J-31 V2
The J-31 fighter second prototype has been increasing test flights in April 2017, with rumors of more government funding and a third prototype on the way.



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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 May 2017 14:51

Philip wrote:Incidentally,Boeing has dropped out of the USN air-launched naval anti-ship missile,sending Harpoon to Davey Jones' Locker.Terriobly inferior to even the Swedish dart what?



No it has not. Boeing has backed out of the Ship Launched OTH missile competition specifically for the LCS because the RFP requires a weapon that requires a level of maturity and milestone that their intended offering (Harpoon-ER) does not yet meet given where it is in terms of its testing. This would have forced them to offer a lesser capable variant of the Harpoon that would have had half or less range than the other two competitors and would not be a wise investment for this competition. Essentially, the version of the Harpoon currently in testing with NAVAIR could not be offered for the surface launched competition because of where it stands in terms of maturity. To quote Boeing's cruise missiles program lead -

"What it was going to force us to do was take so much capability out of the weapon system that we would be providing [Naval Sea Systems Command] a lesser capability than we are producing for [Naval Air Systems Command]," Rutherford said in a May 4 interview.


The Harpoon ER and other block II++ enhancements continue to get tested at Boeing and will be fielded by the USN as part of its air launched inventory along with other weapons such as the LRASM. It was very clear from the start of this particular program that the USN was not interested in fielding a weapon that required some level of developmental testing..They wanted something already operational and the only real option in this class was the NSM and perhaps the LRASM if they were willing to wait an extra few months. Contracting laws and the need to competitively acquire the weapon meant that they had to create a competition allowing both Boeing and Lockheed to offer their respective sollutions..

This was and is for Raytheon-Kongsberg to loose and is not going to be a particularly large contract (around 40 OTH fire control suites) since the main anti-surface warfare weapon contract that everyone is preparing for in the US is the OASuW Increment 2 where the requirements are still being finalized but could well ask for a dual use weapon with a range requirement well in excess of 1000 km (LRASM, LRASM-XR, TLAM territory). This particular OTH weapon competition is not for a VLS and the USN is not going to put a pure sub 1000 km anti-ship missile in a VLS
Last edited by brar_w on 05 May 2017 15:29, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 05 May 2017 15:14

Pentagon clears Navy's Air and Missile Defense Radar for initial production


The Defense Department has blessed the Navy's $5.9 billion project to develop and field a next-generation, surface warfare radar to transition from engineering and manufacturing development to low-rate initial production, a key milestone in the effort to upgrade the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer fleet.

On April 29, James MacStravic, the Pentagon's acting acquisition executive, presided over a milestone C review of the Air and Missile Defense Radar program and granted the Navy's request to proceed with initial production, Christianne Witten, a service spokeswoman, told Inside Defense May 3.

On May 1, the Navy exercised a $327 million contract option for low-rate initial production for a first batch of the new S-band radars, the latest action on a potential $1.6 billion contract the government awarded Raytheon in 2013.

"This modification will provide for the first three Air and Missile Defense Radar low-rate initial production units, including non-recurring engineering efforts in support of production," according to the contract announcement.The AMDR -- in development for the next variant of the Navy's Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, the DDG-51 Flight III -- will be the most powerful sensor of its kind in the Aegis fleet. The Flight III upgrades also give the destroyers increased shipboard power production -- to support the larger radar -- and hull enhancements.

Dubbed the SPY-6, the AMDR program is developing a suite that includes a new S-band radar capable of both ballistic missile defense and air defense as well as an X-band radar, the SPQ-9B.

The Government Accountability Office, in a March report on select major weapon systems, found AMDR's four critical technologies "are nearing maturity," including: digital beamforming, transmit/receive modules, multimission scheduling and discrimination software, and distributed receivers/exciters.

"Progressing to production is the result of a lot of hard work and dedication from our AMDR team of experts across Raytheon, the Navy, and our world-class suppliers. In just over three years of the Engineering and Manufacturing Development phase, we've gone from a technology demonstrator to a technically mature, highly advanced, functioning radar," Raytheon's Tad Dickenson, director of the Air and Missile Defense Radar program, said in a May 3 statement. "Production begins today -- which brings us one day closer to delivering this needed, and unprecedented, integrated air and missile defense capability to the Navy."


Next step would be to hold the AMDR-X competition which also has a GaN AESA requirement to replace the SPQ-9B.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 06 May 2017 16:29

Raytheon set to begin delivery of initial SPY-6(V) radars; Jane's Defence Weekly; 5-May 2017



The US Navy awarded Raytheon a USD327.14 million contract for the first low-rate initial production (LRIP) of the Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR), known as SPY-6(V), for the Flight III DDG-51 Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers.

Raytheon will initially deliver three radars, with the first set for 2019. The second and third systems will be delivered in 2020. All SPY-6(V) system deliveries will follow the USN's shipbuilding plan for the Flight III destroyers, Tad Dickenson, director of the Air and Missile Defense Radar programmes for Raytheon, told Jane's on 4 May.

The US Department of Defense announced the contract award on 1 May.

Following delivery of the first nine radars, USN will conduct another LRIP competition, Dickenson said.

"Following that, a few years in the future, will be full-rate production. That will be competed. That is what the original source selection laid out," he said.

The Engineering & Manufacturing Development (EMD) mode is currently at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) in Hawaii.

"We have to complete DT3 (developmental testing 3) so we still have a couple of BMD (ballistic missile defence) tests to finish, anti-air warfare, electronic protection, and surface testing that will go through to the end of July; that is the plan right now," Dickenson said.

Once those tests are completed, the EMD system will be moved to Lockheed Martin's Moorestown, New Jersey, facility for further combat system integration and testing.

With the EMD phase just about completed, Dickenson said there were some lessons learned from the effort.

"We do design for manufacturing and assembly where we find there are more producible ways to do things, for example circuit card [assembly]," he said.

The desire was to have the circuit cards assembled completely by machine.

"There were places where we did DFMA (design for manufacture and assembly) where the design is still the same, using the same electrical design, but we changed mechanical 'producability' just slightly to allow fully 100% automated production," Dickenson added. "Those changes have been implemented. That lowers the cost to meet our LRIP target cost."

Although both the EMD and LRIP systems are the same design and architecture, a few changes were made to the LRIP systems to account for component obsolescence and end-of-life parts, Dickenson said.

A good case in point is that Raytheon has commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) servers in the background; Dickenson said they are running next-generation X86 servers-type COTS servers.

"The overall front end, all the GaN (gallium nitride) is the same architecture, the same design. The intent in EMD was to build a production representative system. It lowers the risk going into production," he added.

The SPY-6(V) will replace the AN/SPY-1D radars that have been the system of choice for the USN destroyer fleet.

SPY-6(V) will be able to conduct simultaneous and continuous integrated air and ballistic missile defence.

Raytheon is also using technology developed for the navy's SPY-6(V) to develop the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar (EASR), a long-range air surveillance radar for aircraft carriers and large deck amphibious ships.



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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 16 May 2017 02:05

http://cimsec.org/role-cruisers-promoti ... time/28866

...

Unfortunately, the experience of both WWI and WWII showed that submarines alone were not enough in war time; furthermore, it showed they are only really useful in wartime. In ‘peacetime’ they are good for intelligence gathering, Special Forces operations, and practicing for war. Submarines are so limited in conducting presence operations because they are by their very nature stealth units, and the visibility required for presence goes against this fundamental attribute. Furthermore, due to the physical and technological sensitivity of their hull coats and sonic signatures, even port visits to the closest of allies are fraught with potential risks that are more sensibly avoided. The use of submarines in the presence mission, therefore usually comes at the point of it becoming focused towards ‘conventional’ deterrence16 – rather than just overt presence.

...

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 18 May 2017 15:09

What is the USN's CNO alluding to? Intriguing statement. We've seen in the recent past rail guns,laser weapons, and UCAVs emerge from the shadows.
last week,a super-secret US spy shuttle returned after a couple of years in space. Could this be linked? I think so. I feel that the US now has an enhanced networks system of targeting enemy sites in real time using all its surveillance assets esp. space. allied to the latest revolutionary weaponry being developed/inducted,including cyberwarfare. It my have also made a major breakthrough in sub detection/communications which would give it the advantage in undersea warfare.

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/10 ... al-warfare
Chief Of Naval Operations Alludes To A New Shadowy Revolution In Naval Warfare
CNO Richardson thinks he's on the cusp of some type of monumental transformation in the way America fights on the high seas, but he can't tell us what it is exactly.

BY TYLER ROGOWAYMAY 16, 2017

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson is making a big push for more ships, and wants to change the way ships are designed and procured. But that is nothing really new, what is new is a somewhat cryptic statement made by the admiral about some major revolution in naval warfare that seems to go beyond what has been discussed openly by Navy officials in the past.

Richardson told reporters the following on Monday:

“My sense is that we’re on the dawn of something very substantial in terms of naval warfare. Something as substantial as the transition from sail to steam, as the transition from wood to ironclad, as substantial as the advent of nuclear propulsion in terms of what it means for naval power.”

According to Defense News, the Admiral would not go into any detail about this grand revolution.

Richardson did continue to press for an immediate increase in shipbuilding to help confront growing threats from China and Russia, stating:

“We’re going to be targeting something in the mid-2020s. Exponential types of growth, rather than lineal types of growth, which would achieve this level of power decades beyond the 2020s... This increased naval power will involve more numbers... We are headed now to a fleet that’s about 310 ships, but if you look at the long-term forecast it’s clear that to get beyond that we’re going to have to start building. We’re going to have to build ships, and we’re going to have to look at extending the life of ships, and we’re going to have to look at – in just about every way we can--to increase our inventory of ships in the United States Navy.”

He also discussed how he would like to change the way ship's are procured, stating:

“I would challenge the assumption that it takes that long to design and build things... The hull and power plant will last ostensibly the life of the ship. But then to design the rest of it, to use the very latest technologies we have now, that’ll be a step forward. But also to step into the future faster, to modernize faster. We’ll be much more modularized, much more compatible. You can iterate your way into the future with faster steps. You’re got part of the ship built to last, and part of the ship that’s built to grow and be modernized.”

This modular concept of design is nothing really new. The Littoral Combat Ship was supposed to leverage this concept and has failed miserably at doing so. The Navy has shown little sign of injecting these concepts on a grand scale into its new Arleigh Burke Flight III class destroyers. Concurrently building a new ship around unproven systems that are still being designed and tested has also caused major issues with the Navy's new Ford class supercarriers, a reality that continues to make major news even as the ship enters sea trials.


LOCKHEED MARTIN
LCS-1 USS Freedom underway.
One could think that the Admiral's puzzling statement is talking about net-centric warfare, which includes remote targeting/cooperative engagement capabilities, distributed lethality and other advanced concepts, but those have been around for some time, and he even mentioned them as well in his comments on Monday, saying:

“There’s a new dimension, the power of networking, that allows adaptive combinations to emerge... It’s not all about the platforms.”

Air Force Chief of Staff Goldfein has made near identical remarks recently, but there is no reason why he wouldn't just explain that is what he was talking about when he teased some huge transformation in naval warfare.

This is not the first time one of the Pentagon's head honchos outright teased transformative capabilities that remain outside the public eye. Last year Defense Secretary Ashton Carter dangled a similar statement in front of the press regarding secret air combat capabilities.

So what exactly is the Admiral referring to? Is it some new type of technology, or a cocktail of technologies that will be packaged together. It it's the former, than why not just say so?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 18 May 2017 16:14

The current CNO is a sub-surface guy so that may offer some hint. On the other hand, he has identified around a couple of dozen ships, and around 300 aircraft worth of free capacity in the industrial base over the next 10 years and wants to move to procure that one and above the 307 ship Navy the previous POTUS was committed too.

The tabloid take on his speech aside by Mr. Hotdog man, below is the white paper that he released -

https://assets.documentcloud.org/docume ... Docx-2.pdf

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 18 May 2017 17:56

The F/A-18 SUPER HORNET E/F is part of Boeing's Global Strike portfolio, like the F-15 or EA-18G GROWLER. The US Navy (USN) is receiveing new F/A-18s at least until 2020, at the same time there are plans to extend the life of airframes in the forces. From 6,000 to 9,000 flying hours, at the same time there should be an upgrade to advanced capabilities. Another goal is reducing the costs per flight hour. According to Boeing, the F/A-18 has the lowest costs per flying hour under the tactical attack aircrafts, around $ 20,000 per hour (for the US fleet).

So far, the USN has not decided on a replacement of the F/A-18, so there will be a mix of F/A-18 and F-35 for a long while. At the moment there is a production rate of two per month. The USN bought 564 SUPER HORNETs and 160 EA-18G GROWLERs. Originally there was a requirement of 88 GROWLERs, but missions driven up the requirements.

The F/A-18 is designed to operate in the harsh maritime environment and fly out of aircraft carriers. The F/A-18 E/F is a new airplane with nee technology, e.g. AESA radar, a 360° protection, new weapon capabilities and much more.

There will be a production of 28 SUPER HORNETS for Kuwait – the contract is not signed yet though, FMS sale is still running. Canada, India (for the aircraft carrier) and Finland (60 SUPER HORNETS) are other candidates, Australia is a receiving customer.

The Australian airframes could be upgraded to a GROWLER later. The Kuwait and Canadian (18 SUPER HORNETS) airplanes will not have this option or did not asked for. According to Boeing, “Kuwait will get the most advanced SUPER HORNET,” with the BLOCK III version.

This includes the Raytheon AESA radar upgrade, advanced cockpit system, IRST Block I & II, conformal fuel tanks, IDECM Block IV and an enhanced engine (from General Electric with 18% more performance and a better reliability). It will offer battle-space situational awareness, long range counter stealth targeting, bigger range, increased acceleration and room for growth. “Block III” is the USN term, the other customers can choose from these options.

Deliveries could start 2020. According to the USN flight planning, Block III might not be the last variants. Every two years there is a software upgrade to integrate new capabilities (e.g. sensors or effectors). A wide band data link will be one of the main enablers for the future, to built up a tactical network (e.g. with F-35). Some of the new upgrades can/will also be part of an F/A-18 E/F upgrade.

Boeing stated: “The F/A-18 don’t try to be a F-35, but they can operate as a package, they can go so far together and stay the same time.”

The HORNET brings a lot of payload and different sensors in to be relevant.

The advanced EA-18G GROWLER is offering a full spectrum dominance. It has the AESA upgrade, an open architecture/advanced computing (DTP-N), next generation jammer, ALQ-218 upgrades, the Advanced Tactical Data Link (TTNT), the enhanced engine and the conformal tanks. Modification program will start next year and enhance the life time from 6,000 to 9,000 flying hours, the new airplanes coming out from production from FY2019 will already have a life of 9,000 flying hours.


http://www.monch.com/mpg/images/news/17 ... 154632.png

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 19 May 2017 18:33

Seems that the F-414 Enhanced Engine is close to becoming a reality -

Included in Block 3 are upgrades to the Raytheon AN/APG-79 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar; an Elbit Systems large area display (LAD) 'glass' cockpit and next-generation avionics; an infrared search and track (IRST); 'shoulder-mounted' conformal fuel tanks (CFTs); Integrated Defensive Electronic Counter Measures (IDECM); and new General Electric F-414-400 enhanced engines.

Burt said that Boeing expects to see USN budgeting to be allocated shortly to enable the company to begin the work needed for Block 3, though development of some aspects such as advanced datalinks has already commenced. "Production of Block 3 should begin in fiscal year [FY] 2019, with deliveries in FY 2020," he said. The plan is that all future Super Hornets will be built to this standard, while those aircraft already fielded by the USN will be retrofitted.

Further to the Super Hornet Block 3 enhancement, Burt noted that the company's Growler is also set for a major enhancement package dubbed Advanced EA-18G. Following the same timeline as the Block 3, Advanced EA-18G will comprise AESA upgrades; open architecture advanced computing; advanced cockpit; CFTs; Next-Generation Jammer; AN/ALQ-218 electronic support measures upgrades; Advanced Tactical Datalink; and the enhanced engines. Boeing is currently under contract to begin work on a service life extension programme (SLEP) for the US Navy to increase the airframe hours of the Super Hornet from the current 6,000 to 9,000.

The earliest aircraft to have been delivered to the USN are now reaching the end of their current service lives, which is two years ahead of the planned declaration of initial operating capability for the carrier variant Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft.

As well as the SLEP, the Pentagon's FY 2017 budget proposal will request up to 28 additional Super Hornets to try to offset any shortfall in the number of strike fighters available on the navy's aircraft carriers, and more are expected in the FY 2018 budget.


http://www.janes.com/article/70504/boei ... -platforms

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 20 May 2017 16:05

Navy Railgun Ramps Up in Test Shots

PENTAGON: Consider 35 pounds of metal moving at Mach 5.8. Ten shots per minute. 1,000 shots before the barrel wears out under the enormous pressures. That’s the devastating firepower the Navy railgun program aims to deliver in the next two years, and they’re well on their way.

“We continue to make great technical progress,” said Office of Naval Research program manager Tom Boucher. Boucher and an aide briefed me in the blazing hot courtyard of the Pentagon, which was hosting the annual DoD Lab Day — a kind of military-grade science fair.

Three years ago, then-Chief of Naval Operations Jonathan Greenert declared that railguns — which fire projectiles with electromagnetic pulses rather than gunpowder — had come so close to battle-ready that he wanted to test-fire one at sea. Since then the Navy has changed course, deciding that permanent land-based test sites would provide more and better data for fewer dollars than an ad hoc installation aboard a repurposed fast transport (variously known as JHSV or EFP). So on November 17, along the Potomac River at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Dahlgren, Va., a new 32-megajoule railgun built by BAE Systems opened fire for the first time. (See video above). A second railgun is being set up at the Army’s White Sands Missile Range in the New Mexico desert, where there’s enough wide-open space to fire the weapon at its maximum range of more than a hundred nautical miles.

While White Sands tests the long-range performance of the projectile, Dahlgren will work on the weapon itself. Previous test weapons were like medieval bombards, firing just a few times per day. The Dahlgren team is now making multiple shots per hour as they work out the bugs, and by the end of the year they expect to reach the goal of 10 shots per minute. For comparison, a standard 5-inch deck gun can fire 20 rounds a minute, albeit only for a single minute before its quick-reload drum runs empty; the 16-inch guns on battleships fired about twice a minute.

Once they’ve reached the 10-round a minute rate, Dahlgren will switch focus to barrel life. A decade ago, experimental railguns often wore out their barrel with a single shot. With new materials better able to endure the intense stresses, the barrels on the current test weapons can last for hundreds of shots before requiring replacement — roughly how long a battleship’s 16″ barrels lasted back in World War II. The goal is a barrel that lasts 1,000 rounds.

The next big question — beyond the scope of the current test program — is power. The current railguns fire a 16 kg slug at 2,000 meters per second (roughly, 35 lbs at Mach 5.8 ), which takes 32 megajoules of energy per shot. Pumping out 10 such shots a minute requires 20 megawatts of power. Unfortunately, the only ships in today’s Navy that have sufficient energy are nuclear-powered aircraft carriers — of which there are just 11 in service — and Zumwalt-class destroyers — just three.

Firing railguns off anything else would require expedients. One model might be Dahlgren itself, where the Navy has literally wired up several 20-foot CONEX containers full of batteries, good for fifty shots: Such an ad hoc power source could conceivably go in a cargo hold. Retired Navy strategist Bryan Clark has proposed just such a solution, converting EFP transports into expedient railgun platforms to shoot down incoming missiles.

In the nearer term, however, not only the Navy but also the Army want to capture some of the benefits of railgun technology in their current cannon. Sponsored by the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office, both services are testing Hyper-Velocity Projectiles designed for the railgun from existing 5″ inch naval guns and 155 mm (6″) howitzers. (The HVP itself is the same, but is wrapped in a different fly-away package called a sabot). Using gunpowder rather than electromagnetic impulses means the muzzle velocity is lower, which in turn means the projectile can’t escape the atmosphere to fly without friction over vast distances. Even so the 5″ gun firing HVP more than doubles its normal range, to about 30 nautical miles. (The Navy officials present didn’t have the latest figures on the Army tests).

Gunpowder-propelled HVP is not enough to replace the railgun in all aspects. The electromagnetically-launched weapon not only travels further but hits harder, rendering a high-explosive warhead unnecessary for many targets. But for crucial missions such as shooting down incoming cruise missiles, conventional cannon firing Hyper-Velocity Projectiles can play a crucial role as a second line of defense around 30 nautical miles out. Beyond that, out to 100 miles, the giant railguns can take over with crushing force.




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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby NRao » 20 May 2017 19:49

New U.S. Naval Aircraft Integrating for Longer Range Operations

The Navy has begun integrating its newest airplanes into the air wing and joint forces during training and finding that these platforms, including the EA-18G Growler and F-35C Joint Strike Fighter, are extending the range and increasing the sophistication of operations, the Navy’s Air Boss said.


As for F-35C integration, Shoemaker said the planes have come to Fallon a few times for testing.

“That’s been a very unique opportunity to start that fourth and fifth (generation) integration and understand what that really brings from a capability perspective,” he said. “Flying with Rhino (Super Hornet) and Growler, we understand the low-observable penetration capability of F-35, but when we look at the ability to fuse data, put it all together, both active and passive sensors, and share that with the other platforms in the air wing and joint force, give us long-range combat ID – that’s where I think the true value you’ll see in F-35.”In Naval aviation will rely on the JSF and Super Hornet into the 2030s, and Shoemaker said the future looks bright with these two platforms. {"Stealth" is cool, but the ability to ID at very long distances is even better}

“When you pair those two up together I think they bring a very good complement in terms of, if you call it a high-low mix and the low part of that mix is Super Hornet, we’re in a good spot,” he said.

The Air Boss noted the long-range ID aspect of F-35 but said the service is building sensors and weapons to bring this extended reach to other planes too.

“The key is the long-range ID, being able to ID at range in both a surface and air context – and that’s where the sensors and our integration of both manned and unmanned, joint, space, all domains, and really the networks that will bring all that information together and share it” will be important for future operations and extending the reach of the air wing well beyond what previous generations could have done.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 24 May 2017 19:55

CVN-78 departs for acceptance trials

The aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) has departed Naval Station Norfolk, VA, to begin acceptance trials, the Navy announced today.

"Acceptance Trials demonstrate to the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) the ship's ability to conduct operations at sea, and that the ship is constructed in accordance with contract specifications," according to a service statement.

Acceptance trials for the first-in-class Gerald R. Ford will last for "several days," according to the service.

Overseen by INSURV, Navy officials, and Newport News Shipbuilding personnel, sailors will operate the ships' systems and new technologies.

The service plans to accept delivery of CVN-78 by the end of the month.

Philip
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 25 May 2017 17:43

https://www.yahoo.com/news/russia-apos- ... 12190.html
Russia's Gigantic New Submarine Has Enormous "Wings"
Popular Mechanics

Kyle Mizokami
Popular MechanicsMay 24, 2017

Photo credit: H.I. Sutton/Covert Shore

A gigantic new research submarine designed by Russia will travel underneath ice floes, mapping its underwater surroundings with a pair of huge plane-like wings. The sub will help Moscow exploit its Arctic frontier as it prepares to harvest previously untouchable natural resources.

The Arctic Research Submarine was designed by the famous Rubin Design Bureau, which was also responsible for the Typhoon-class missile submarines, the largest subs ever built. This vessel will weigh in at 13,280 tons, making easily the largest civilian research submersible ever built, and will be 442 feet long. The sub will have a maximum speed of 12.6 knots and a crew of 40.

The most striking detail is the presence of two sets of wing-like sonar receivers that give the sub a futuristic appearance. The "wings," which retract into the hull like the blade of a pocket knife, are meant to receive sonar signals broadcast from the ship's hull. This allows the Arctic Research Submarine to image its surroundings in all directions as it cruises along underwater at a leisurely 3 knots.

H.I. Sutton, the analyst behind the Covert Shores submarine web site and book of the same name, says about the sub: "From analysis of the model displayed by the design bureau, the wing structures are close to 165 feet (50 meters) long, so it will have a wingspan of about 330 feet (100 meters). This is much greater than any aircraft that has ever flown." A graphic made by Sutton (see above) shows the submarine will have an even greater "wingspan" than an Airbus A380 jumbo jet.

Sutton doesn't believe the wings have any hydrodynamic use, however. "It is unlikely that the wings will be used to generate lift like an aircraft. That would be less efficient because it would have to constantly use its control surfaces to maintain a precise depth. This would also generate noise which could make the sonar less effective."

Although built to operate under the arctic ice, the submarine's sheer size will make navigating tough at times. "There will be many places in the Arctic where the submarine cannot go because its wings will make to too wide to navigate the many ice columns which protrude downwards from the ice cap, " Sutton explains. "These can extend downwards for hundreds of feet or even to the sea floor."

As a civilian survey submarine, the ship will be unarmed. It will incorporate the ability to deploy and fetch remotely operated vehicles (underwater drones) and be capable of operating at depths of up to 1,300 feet.

Russia is eager to secure mineral and energy mining rights in the Arctic, in areas becoming more accessible as global warming reduces the amount of pack ice. Moscow has made bold underwater territorial claims in the Arctic extending past the traditional 200 mile Economic Exclusion Zone claimed by all countries, including parts of the North Pole. In 2007, Sutton points out, Russia used mini-submarines to plant its flag on the sea bed 14,000 feet beneath the North Pole.


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