International Naval News & Discussion

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Austin
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 29 Jul 2015 18:47


Philip
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 30 Jul 2015 17:55

Two interesting news items:

Lurking in the Depths: Russia to Relaunch Counter-Submarine Helicopter
13:25 10.07.2015
Russia's defense industry said that it is ready to relaunch production of the legendary Mi-14 nuclear-capable submarine-hunting amphibious helicopter.

Defense manufacturer Russian Helicopters has announced that it would relaunch production of the Mi-14 helicopter, capable of both aerial and maritime operation.

The helicopter originally operated as a hunter craft which would drop deep-water 5F48 "Skalp" (Scalp) nuclear bombs on enemy submarines.
The charges would eliminate all enemy submarines within the radius of 800 meters if deployed underwater.

The helicopters were phased out in favor of Kamov Ka-27 helicopters in 1992 as part of the plan to downsize the Russian armed forces after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

The original Mi-14PL anti-submarine used the "Kalmar" (Squid) reconnaissance and sighting system which included a radar, a sonar station and computational equipment. The modernized Mi-14PLM had the improved "Osminog" (Octopus) system still used on the Ka-27 today.

So far, the manufacturer has offered to modernize existing Mi-14 helicopters and build new variants for both fire and rescue services and the Russian Navy.
Read more: http://sputniknews.com/russia/20150710/ ... z3hNeK7WCJ


US Navy to Commission Newest ‘Fast Attack’ Submarine
MILITARY & INTELLIGENCE
04:29 30.07.2015
Pentagon will unleash its latest next-generation stealth attack submarine during a ceremony this weekend.

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — The US Department of Defense will unleash its latest next-generation stealth attack submarine during a ceremony this weekend, the US Navy said in a press release.

“The Navy will commission its newest fast attack submarine, the future USS John Warner… Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015, at Naval Station Norfolk [Virginia],” the release said on Wednesday.

Warner is a next-generation submarine that showcases stealth, surveillance and special warfare capabilities to operate across multiple types of missions, the release explained.

Warfare Expansion: US Navy Launches Underwater Drone From Submarine
The Virginia-class submarines can hit targets ashore with precision and can conduct surveillance of land or sea-based forces, according to the release.
The vessel is also equipped, the release noted, for anti-submarine and anti-ship warfare, minefield mapping and delivery of US Special Forces.

US Virginia-class submarines weigh 7,800 tons and are 377 feet long. They are built with a reactor plant that will not require refuelling during the ship’s projected 33-year lifespan in order to reduce lifecycle costs, the release added.

The submarine is named after US Senator John Warner who served the United States as a Marine, sailor and the 61st Secretary of the Navy from 1972 to 1974, the release said.
Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/2015073 ... z3hNesAQZF

brar_w
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 30 Jul 2015 18:11

^^ The Virgina had a planned 30 year operational life with a Life-of-Ship Core that could provide the additional few years if required (life extended for the vessel). The Ford Class's Life-of-Ship core is designed around a 50 year operational life. The OCRP (Ohio Class Replacement Program) rlife-of ship reactor is designed around the 40-45 year expected service life of the vessel.

http://articles.maritimepropulsion.com/ ... 11273.aspx

http://defensetech.org/2014/01/24/navy- ... t-program/

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 31 Jul 2015 15:46

http://eandt.theiet.org/news/2015/jul/s ... brazil.cfm
Brazil-France submarine programme investigated for fraud
30 July 2015 By Edd Gent

Interesting details of how an N-sub (USN) is resupplied while at sea.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/res ... submarine/
How to resupply a nuclear submarine
BY Dan Sagalyn and Jamie McIntyre July 30, 2015

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 03 Aug 2015 07:40

Vietnam Commissions 2 more Kilo Class 636 submarine ( pictures )

http://bmpd.livejournal.com/1413356.html

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 03 Aug 2015 10:20

did russia have some nearly completed kilos to be supplying them so fast? are they new or refurbished ones?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 03 Aug 2015 10:24

No,the deal was signed in 2009,all 6 to be delivered within 6 years. Russia builds Kilos v. rapidly,more being built for the RuN.The latest avatar of the Kilos are even quieter than the Amur/Ladas (USN intel).
Vietnam paid just $300M per sub in 2009.

http://tuoitrenews.vn/politics/29575/vi ... submarines

Vietnam holds flag-hoisting ceremony for new Russian-made Kilo-class submarines
Tuoi Tre News

Updated : 08/02/2015

A flag-raising ceremony for two new Kilo-class submarines that Vietnam bought from Russia was held at a military port in a south-central province on Saturday.

The Vietnam People's Navy yesterday organized the ceremony at Cam Ranh Military Port, located in Khanh Hoa Province, to mark their admission of the two Kilo-class subs, HQ 184-Hai Phong and HQ 185-Khanh Hoa.

The HQ-184 Hai Phong is 73.8 meters long and 9.9 meters wide.

It has a displacement of 3,000-3,950 tons and an operation range of 6,000-7,500 nautical miles.

Rear Admiral Pham Hoai Nam is pictured handing over the national flag and Navy’s flag to captains of the HQ 184-Hai Phong and HQ 185-Khanh Hoa. Photo: Tuoi Tre

The vessel can travel at 20 nautical miles per hour and operate for 45 consecutive days with a crew of 52 members at an average depth of 240 meters, which can be extended to 300 meters at most.

The Saturday ceremony was attended by high-ranking officials from the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Vietnam, the Vietnam People's Navy High Command, and officers and soldiers of the Navy’s Brigade 189.

The captain and politics officers of the HQ 185- Khanh Hoa submarine are seen hoisting the national flag and Navy’s flag. Photo: Tuoi Tre

The two vessels will be handed over to the brigade.

Addressing the ceremony, Rear Admiral Pham Hoai Nam, Commander of the Vietnam People’s Navy, noted that these hi-end submarines will mark a new development stage of the Vietnam People’s Navy in particular and the Vietnam People’s Army in general.

The vessels will contribute greatly to safeguarding the country’s sovereignty over its seas and land, Rear Admiral Nam stressed.

The HQ 184-Hai Phong submarine is pictured during the ceremony. Photo: Tuoi Tre

The two vessels are the third and fourth of the six 636 Varshavyanka (Kilo)-class submarines that Vietnam contracted to buy from Russia when Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung visited the country in 2009.

Under the contract, worth nearly US$2 billion, all six submarines are to be built at the Russian Navy’s Admiralty Verfi Shipyard, according to news website Dat Viet (Vietnam Land).

The first submarine of the order, HQ-182 Hanoi, was delivered to Vietnam on December 31, 2013, while the second – HQ-183 Ho Chi Minh City – arrived on March 19, 2014.

The HQ 185-Khanh Hoa is pictured during the ceremony. Photo: Tuoi Tre

The four Kilo-class submarines are currently docked in line at Cam Ranh.

The fifth sub, HQ 186-Da Nang, was launched on December 28, 2014 and is being test-run.

The last of the six, HQ 187-Ba Ria-Vung Tau, started being built on May 28 last year.

Russia is scheduled to hand over the final two vessels to Vietnam in 2015-16.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Aug 2015 02:44

First time an SM6 engaged a ballistic-Missile in terminal phase of flight..

U.S. Navy uses Raytheon's SM-6 to Destroy Ballistic Missile Target for the First Time


In a first-of-its-kind test, the U.S. Navy fired a Raytheon Company Standard Missile-6, intercepting and destroying a short-range ballistic missile target at sea. The successful U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA) test proved a modified SM-6 can eliminate threat ballistic missiles in their final seconds of flight.

"SM-6 is the only missile in the world that can do both anti-air warfare and ballistic missile defense from sea," said Dr. Taylor W. Lawrence, president of Raytheon Missile Systems. "U.S. Navy commanders want both capability and flexibility to meet a wide variety of missions, and that's exactly what SM-6 offers."

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), U.S. Pacific Command, and U.S. Navy Sailors aboard the USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) successfully conducted a series of four flight test events exercising the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) element of the nation's Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). The flight test, designated Multi-Mission Warfare (MMW) Events 1 through 4, demonstrated successful intercepts of short-range ballistic missile and cruise missile targets by the USS John Paul Jones, configured with Aegis Baseline 9.C1 (BMD 5.0 Capability Upgrade) and using Standard Missile (SM)-6 Dual I and SM-2 Block IV missiles. All flight test events were conducted at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Kauai, Hawaii.

MDA Director Vice Adm. James D. Syring said, "This important test campaign not only demonstrated an additional terminal defense layer of the BMDS, it also proved the robustness of the multi-use SM-6 missile on-board a Navy destroyer, further reinforcing the dynamic capability of the Aegis Baseline 9 weapon system."

Event 1


On July 28, at approximately 10:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (July 29, 4:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), a short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) target was launched from PMRF in a northwesterly trajectory. The USS John Paul Jones, positioned west of Hawaii, detected, tracked, and launched a SM-6 Dual I missile, resulting in a successful target intercept.

Event 2


On July 29, at approximately 8:15 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (July 30, 2:15 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), a short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) target was launched from PMRF in a northwesterly trajectory. The USS John Paul Jones detected, tracked, and launched a SM-2 Block IV missile, resulting in a successful target intercept.

Event 3

On July 31, at approximately 2:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time, (8:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time) an AQM-37C cruise missile target was air-launched to replicate an air-warfare threat. The USS John Paul Jones detected, tracked, and successfully engaged the target using an SM-6 Dual I missile.

Event 4
On August 1, at approximately 3:45 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time, (9:45 p.m. Eastern Standard Time), a BQM-74E cruise missile target was launched from PMRF. The USS John Paul Jones detected, tracked, and successfully engaged the target using an SM-6 Dual I missile. The SM-6's proximity-fuze warhead was programmed not to detonate after reaching the lethal distance from the target, thus providing the ability to recover and reuse the BQM-74E target.



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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Cosmo_R » 04 Aug 2015 03:41

^^^Think they're sending a signal to PRC DF-31 'carrier killer' proponents?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Aug 2015 04:55

DF-31 is an ICBM, DF-21 is an ASBM..That has yet to be tested against a real target, out at sea (let alone a defended one). ASBM capability in the terminal phase was always something the SM6 was to possess and the main reason why the THAAD never really gained traction even though Lockheed proposed it a couple of time to the USN. It just entered service so they are moving through the various test points as they expand its engagement envelope and fully demonstrate capability. Of course with these sorts of weapons its not about just demonstrating, but the continuous annual launches at targets to continue to verify the envelope and performance. The first demonstrations were clearly meant at a mission set the SM6 will do the most of the time i.e. destroy cruise missiles over land or over water from afar..Its done that many times since it began testing (supersonic missiles, and subsonic cruise missiles etc)..The Baseline 9 of AEGIS adds capability so that probably allowed them to do terminal intercepts using the SM6.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby NRao » 04 Aug 2015 05:01

What would the Chinese missile be considered? Short or long range ballistic?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Aug 2015 05:06

Neither. Its a Medium Ranged BM. Do keep in mind that the AEGIS has a layered defense, SM3 takes out Short - Intermediate Ranged Ballistic Missiles outside of the atmosphere..THAAD is a half-n-half type of a thing with a big envelope against terminal phases inside the envelope, but a smaller one as an exo-atmospheric interceptor..It may just be the only one of a kind system that has demonstrated H2K both inside and outside of the atmosphere..But for the USN its better to have full exo-atmospheric capability with the SM3 and a dedicated interceptor for cruise missiles, aircraft (THAAD can't intercept aircraft) and terminal BM.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby NRao » 04 Aug 2015 05:40

Any news on boost phase?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Aug 2015 06:15

Boost phase intercept requires to be a lot closer to the launch site, basically something like an aircraft flying overhead targeting a BM as it is launches. They tried to explore that with the Aim-120 Derived N-CADE but the concept was too big a burden due to the sheer number of aircraft involved in order to put together a picket and be in range to quickly shoot down a boost phase BM that is traveling up at a very very fast pace. The YAL wold have been better but even then too big of a DEW without an SSL..Anyhow, its not a Navy mission.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 04 Aug 2015 06:48

they should export ABM missiles to taiwan, philipines and japan. that would set the cat into the henhouse.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Aug 2015 07:07

Japan already operates the SM3. The others can't afford to deploy a large magazine to develop any sort of meaningful deterrence. A netted AEGIS between US, South Korean, Japan when combined with NIFC-CA can ensure a credible deterrence but in the future it has to be augmented by Directed Energy Weapons and EM Railguns in the Anti-Missile role. DEW's and EMRG flip the cost-equation in favor of the defender for the first time in decades if not longer. Thats the true Asymmetric technology to go after with the next offset. While the Standard Missile family and THAAD are great at what they do withe excellent testing record - from a all out war capability they are still unfavorable (or any ABM with any other operator even one with a different cost-equation) when it comes to exchanging volleys, especially when you CANNOT arm a destroyer's VLS on the fly. The RFI for a production class EM-Gun contract was issued Today (Fbo). This is over and above the EM-Railgun that will conduct trials on board a JHSV next year. Also, as I have said and others commented in academia an anti-ship ballistic missile has NEVER EVER been launched at a floating target at sea in any credible fashion to demonstrate capability (let alone at a combat ship defended by soft and hard kill systems) while ABM's are fired at short to medium Ballistic missiles multiple types per year. Until they actually test out a DF-21 at anything even remotely resembling a floating combat vessel there will be plenty of skeptics about how credible the DF-21 threat is.

What some of these smaller nations with a limited budget need is an A2AD of their own. Here a Brahmos or better still a Nirbhay based AShM would be game-changing in that region if exported.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 04 Aug 2015 07:29

MRBMs with a ASBM seeker cannot be cheap. cost and multiple priorities might limit their affordability to the attacker unless they the soviet union way and put aside everything to produce just arms in the lakhs.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 04 Aug 2015 13:52

For a nation like China vs some of the smaller nations in the Pacific (economically anyhow), the cost equation means that China can affordably deploy salvos of these missiles while others cannot deploy large volleys of ABM's.

For US vs China, or anyone vs anyone where one force is using ABM's, on a ship the cost is a lot more than the ABM, SM3/6..its the cost of actually putting a SM3/SM6 out in the Indo-Pacific and deploying it. The Magazine cost is very high and will be for any operator of ABM's in such a context. You obviously have to deploy the missiles because the cost of the package they protect is extremely high as well but the adversary holds the economic advantage since he is launching from land, from home and he can augment his volley with cruise missiles with you still have to defend against at the same cost.

That is why I say in an A2AD context a Tomahawk/Nirbhay like Anti-Shipping Missile is far far more dangerous than a Brahmos or even USN's LRASM. While the later 2 missiles will be considerably more survivable in a shooting war than a slow, long range cruise missile (non stealthy one at that) a nearly 1000 nautical mile missile still forces the opponent to pack his VLS's with plenty of defensive missiles to fend off 1000 nm mile weapons from all over the places...Simply due to their range such missiles force the opponent to think totally defensively- even though those missiles may be easier to shoot down, they still need missiles to do so..and the more they have in the Anti missile role, the less they can carry in an offensive role.

The only way around the economic calculus, more so because you can't re-equip a VLS kitted AEGIS on the fly is to have an extremely deep magazine and that comes with DEW and EMRG. Hence no matter how good the SM3 gets, or how good the SM6 gets over the next 5 - 10 years the out of the box asymmetric advantage would always come form these two technologies, just like stealth gave you the advantage when it came to IADS....No matter how accurate the seekers get, or how many stages you add to the propulsion the issue of magazine depth, and magazine cost will continue to favor the side that is fighting from land, or a mix of land and sea..You can continue to play that game i.e. He designs a faster supersonic missile, I design a better Anti-Missile back and forth or you can step out and go down a totally different path..i.e. field a working Directed energy missile defense (Or an EMRG based round) and obtain a near unlimited magazine capacity, while being many times cheaper to deploy (EMRG round for missile defense is expected to be at $25,000 and a Laser based terminal short ranged system will be in the hundreds of dollars per).

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 06 Aug 2015 16:04

When all 6 are commissioned, and with training by IN submariners too,the Viet Kilos will be most useful advance guard assets in the Indo-China Sea ,assisting the IN in keeping watch over PLAN activities.

http://thediplomat.com/2015/08/vietnam- ... ing-china/
Vietnam Commissions Two New Subs Capable of Attacking China
Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Vietnam Commissions Two New Subs Capable of Attacking China
Armed with land-attack cruise missiles, these two new vessels could cause major headaches for China’s naval forces.

By Franz-Stefan Gady
August 06, 2015

On August 1, the Vietnamese Navy commissioned two new Russian-made Kilo-class diesel-electric submarines, according to Thanh Nien News.

The 184-Hai Phong and 185-Khanh Hoa were both commissioned during a ceremony held at Cam Ranh Naval in Khanh Hoa province, south of Hanoi.

The commander of the Vietnam People’s Navy, Rear Admiral Hoai Nam noted that this constituted “a major step of modernizing the Navy, and the People’s Army of Vietnam in general.”

He also emphasized that the acquisition of the two new vessels should not trigger a new arms race in the region or deter other countries but merely protect Vietnam’s sovereignty and help safeguard peace in the region.

The two new vessels will join the Submarine Brigade 189, which is already home to the Vietnam People’s Navy’s first two Kilo-class SSKs – the 182-Hanoi and 183-Ho Chi Minh. Vietnam is expected to field a fleet of six Kilo-class SSKs total.

Hanoi and Moscow signed a $ 2.6 billion contract for the modernization of Vietnam’s submarine fleet back in 2009 with the last two vessels to be delivered by 2016. The website naval-technology.com notes about the Type 636 Kilo-class

Type 636 is designed for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface-ship warfare (ASuW) and also for general reconnaissance and patrol missions. The Type 636 submarine is considered to be to be one of the quietest diesel submarines in the world. It is said to be capable of detecting an enemy submarine at a range three to four times greater than it can be detected itself.

As I noted before (See: “Vietnam Buys Deadly New Missiles Capable of Hitting China”), once the last vessel is commissioned, Vietnam will have the most modern submarine force in all of Southeast Asia. Its principal purpose will be to act as a credible deterrent force to Chinese “adventurism” in Vietnam’s maritime domain.

What will make the new vessels particularly dangerous for the People’s Republic of China is that they will purportedly be equipped with land-attack cruise missiles.

“Vietnam is in the process of acquiring 50 anti-ship and land attack 3M-14E Klub supersonic cruise missiles for its burgeoning fleet of SSK Kilo-class diesel-electric submarines,” I noted back in April.

I also stated that “[w]hile it is unknown whether the anti-ship variant of the weapon sold to Vietnam is the 3M-54E Klub-S (range 220km) or 3M-54E1 (range 300km) – both of which can be launched from submarines – the land-attack variant is almost certainly the 3M-14E (range 300km), capable of carrying a 450kg warhead.”

The Chinese naval base at Sanya on China’s Hainan Island and military facilities that Beijing is building in the South China Sea could be potential targets for the newly acquired subs and their deadly missiles.


Earlier report ,same link:
Vietnam Gets Fourth Submarine from Russia amid South China Sea Tensions
Another one of Hanoi’s Kilo-class subs arrives.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 06 Aug 2015 16:12

While "Charlie" rubs his hands with glee,with the arrival of their new Russian Kilos,the wizards of Oz wring theirs in this report.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinio ... 7471426779

Inferior submarines will make us sitting ducks


PUT the hottest question in national defence this way: would you buy an Australian television or a Japanese one?
Then why must the Abbott Government buy Australian submarines, not Japanese?

What is this mad campaign — fanned by Labor and the unions — that’s buckling even the will of the Government, which this week ordered nine frigates from Adelaide’s Australian Submarine Corporation?
Or put the issue another way.

Say it’s 2030. Say we’re in some conflict with China and send dozens of our sailors in our three new submarines to protect our vital sea routes, so we don’t run out of things like petrol.

There our sailors sit — half a kilometre under the ocean, as deep as they dare in a submarine running too noisily and running out of range, and facing what’s even today the world’s biggest submarine fleet.

They know that somewhere out there, perhaps even 200 metres below them, are updated versions of what China has now, the so-called “aircraft carrier killer” Type-093G, whispering on nuclear engines, able to stay down longer, and capable of firing supersonic anti-ship missiles vertically.

Outnumbered, outgunned and outperformed, our submariners are sitting ducks.
But with a brave smile the captain says: “Well, at least our subs were built in Adelaide.”

Yeah, right. So can we start to treat our national defence seriously?
A Japanese Soryu-class submarine. Picture: Supplied

We invest in submarines not to protect jobs but our lives. They are not meant to create work for the beggar state of South Australia but havoc for our enemies.

That means we need the best, the deadliest and as many as we can get for our money. Stuff who builds them, as long as they’re on our side.

True, I have no idea whether the ASC can cut costs to match the price and performance of the submarines offered by Japan, a world leader.

But I suspect the Government isn’t considering Japanese subs because it hates Australian workers.

I also suspect then defence minister David Johnston was not off his chump when, exasperated with the ASC, he snapped “I wouldn’t trust them to build a canoe” — even if that outburst helped get him sacked.

But go back to my hypothetical Australian sailors, sitting in submarines they know can’t save us or even themselves.

So why would they have only three subs, when this Government promised to spend a massive $49 billion for between six and 12?

Well, check the history of the ASC’s Collins-class submarines, which tells us that local submarines are likely to cost more and be out of action longer.

Here is the central finding of a 1999 report commissioned by the Howard government: “The essential and the visible problem with the Collins-class submarines is that they cannot perform at the levels required for military operations.

“The underlying cause is a myriad design deficiencies and consequential operational limitations relating to the platform and combat system.”

A Collins-class submarine at ASC in Adelaide.

Incredible. To save jobs in Adelaide we built submarines there that for years were simply not fit to defend us in war —— which is their whole point.

As the report admitted: “We have considered carefully whether the submarines could be ‘sent into danger’ ... In our view, the circumstances would have to be extremely serious indeed to risk the submarines in their present state.”

And why did we build submarines that were duds until they were fixed and upgraded years later at huge expense?

It’s partly because we just don’t have the experience of building these things: “To some extent it is inevitable in a new class of equipment as complex as a submarine that there will be design deficiencies ...

“That said, we have been astonished at how many there still are some six years after the first boat was launched, the range and extent of them, the seriousness of some of them, the areas in which they have occurred, and how slowly they are being remedied.”

Blame the government-owned and heavily unionised ASC for some of that.

As Lloyds Register concluded: “There appears to be an underlying atmosphere of confrontation and contempt for their customer’s wishes ... ”

Sure, that was 16 years ago, and perhaps the ASC has reformed.

Maybe that’s why the Government, facing the loss of key South Australian seats, this week gave the Adelaide-based builder the $20 billion contract to build more frigates.

Yet the ASC is still building us three Air Warfare Destroyers in a project now two years late and $1 billion over budget, with leaked defence documents complaining of “numerous defects” — such “large volumes” that one ship needed “significant rework”.

But at least they were built in Adelaide, right? Such a comfort to sailors in battle.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 06 Aug 2015 16:39

Nice Video inside the FREMM

On board FREMM Normandie Next Generation Multi Mission Frigate


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 06 Aug 2015 16:54

Came across a nice video of French Perle SSN on a visit to US for exercise.

This is the smallest SSN out there , Under water displacement of 2600 T , carries total 14 Torpedoes carries 80 Crew can you believe !

Check the video very interesting one


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 06 Aug 2015 17:14

Image
Image

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby member_20067 » 06 Aug 2015 18:28

http://news.yahoo.com/france-seeking-bu ... 38157.html

at $1.2 billion for two mistral (is that a typo) ---even if it is at $1 billion a piece --- sounds like a steal... will Indian navy be interested to quickly grab them..?

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 07 Aug 2015 09:11

.
http://news.usni.org/2015/08/05/3-virgi ... 234c8f82d4
3 Virginia Attack Boats Sidelined as Part of Investigation into Suspicious Welding

By: Sam LaGrone
August 5, 2015

Naval Sea Systems Command has restricted three of the newest Virginia-class submarines (SSN-774) due to questionable welding in piping instrumental in connecting the boats’ nuclear reactors to its propulsion system.

According to a statement provided to USNI News on Wednesday, NAVSEA confirmed USS Minnesota (SSN-783), USS North Dakota (SSN-784) and USS John Warner (SSN-785) are currently being inspected for faulty welding after contractor General Dynamics Electric Boat discovered three steam pipe elbows which required repair after “unauthorized and undocumented weld repairs” were performed on the questionable components.

The story was first reported by Defense News.

The inspections will result in restricted operations for the trio of attack boats — including Warner which was commissioned last week — until cleared.

A representative of Electric Boat reached by USNI News on Wednesday night referred all questions to NAVSEA.

According to the Defense News report, the issue pipe elbow issues was less the immediate safety of the boats but a concern of “long-term wear and tear.”

NAVSEA officials told USNI News the investigation was not related to one mounted last year over third party components found in the bow and the stern of North Dakota.

The following is the complete Aug 5, 2015 statement from NAVSEA provided to USNI News.

As part of an ongoing investigation into a quality control issue with a supplier, General Dynamics Electric Boat (GDEB) determined that three steam pipe elbows supplied by the vendor in question required additional testing and repair due to unauthorized and undocumented weld repairs having been performed on these elbows.

GDEB along with Huntington Ingalls Industries – Newport News Shipbuilding (HII-NNS) are performing additional inspections to bound the issue. Currently, USS MINNESOTA (SSN 783), USS NORTH DAKOTA (SSN 784), and USS JOHN WARNER (SSN 785) are impacted.

The Navy is committed to ensuring the safety of its crews and ships. High quality standards for submarine components are an important part of the overall effort to ensure safety


Said so earlier,we should pick up the Mistrals,and then.....lease one to Russia in exchange for a free lease of another Akula! :rotfl:

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 07 Aug 2015 19:48

documentary on French SSBN Le Triomphant class , though in french but can use English translator in the video , Gives a good dekho inside Le Triomphant

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6a1NZVWnWw

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby VinodTK » 10 Aug 2015 02:21

This Is How America Plans to Sink China's Warships
This week the U.S. Navy detailed its plans to rectify the advantage China holds in the area of sophisticated anti-ship missiles.

Starting in fiscal year 2017, the U.S. Navy will begin the Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare (OASuW) Increment II program aimed at fielding a more advanced anti-ship missile to replace the aging Boeing RGM-84 Harpoons the navy current relies on.

Speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC on Wednesday, Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, the deputy chief of naval operations warfare systems (N9), said that the Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) will compete with the new Tomahawk Block IV for OASuW II.

“What I would like to see happen is take those capabilities that we need and start inserting those into a Block IV [Tomahawk], and [compare that] to what we have with LRASM Increment 1, and have those two compete for the next-generation strike weapon,” Aucoin said, Breaking Defense reported.

As The National Interest has previously noted, the LRASM is a joint Navy-Air Force-DARPA program aimed at serving as a stop-gap measure before OASuW II comes on line sometime in the 2020s. The LRASM is manufactured by Lockheed Martin and has a reported range of 500 nautical miles while carrying a 1,000-lb. penetrator and blast-fragmentation warhead.

It is primarily designed to provide the U.S. Navy and Air Force with a precision-guided long-range stand-off capability that can survive in aggressive electronic warfare environments. To achieve this, it uses on-board sensors and a semi-autonomous guidance system to reduce its dependence on intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms, network links and GPS navigation. It also employs “innovative terminal survivability approaches and precision lethality” to avoid advanced enemy countermeasures while still reaching its intended target.

As USNI News points out, currently there is only an air-launched version of the LRASM, while OASuW II is intended to be launched from the Mk 41 Vertical Launch Systems (VLS) featured on many of the U.S. Navy’s guided-missile destroyers and cruisers. According to USNI News, Lockheed Martin is already doing internal tests of the LRASM from MK 41 VLS.

The Tomahawk, on the other hand, has been a staple of the U.S. Navy for decades, which uses the precision-guided missiles to attack land targets from ships. The missile, produced by Raytheon, has a range of about 1,000 miles and can survive in contested environments. On its website, Raytheon notes that “The latest variant (Tomahawk Block IV) includes a two-way satellite data-link that enables the missile to be retargeted in flight to preprogrammed, alternate targets. The Block IV design was initiated as both a cost savings and a capability improvement effort.”

It adds that “planned upgrades to the Tomahawk Block IV include: upgraded communications, a more powerful warhead, and a new seeker designed to hit moving targets at sea or on land in darkness and all kinds of weather.”

The ability to adjust its flight path is one of the new features of the Block IV missile, and is what gives it the capability of possibly being the answer to the U.S. Navy’s anti-ship missile woes. In a test in January of this year, a Tomahawk Block IV punched a hole through a moving ship container. Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work later called the test a “game-changer.”


Bryan Clark, a Senior Fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA) and former naval commander, agrees that pitting the LRASM against the Tomahawk Block IV missile is a good idea.

“Competing LRASM and TASM [a Tomahawk Anti-Ship Missile] for the OASuW mission may be a really good idea,” Clark told Breaking Defense. He noted that the TASM doesn’t have as much survivability as the LRASM, but it is a cheaper option.

Clark went on to point out that “Another option in the mix is [Norwegian firm] Kongsberg’s Naval Strike Missile, which has about the same range and cost as LRASM but is already in production.” Both cost about $2 million a missile.

Ultimately, Clark recommends that the U.S. Navy field the same missiles for land attack or anti-ship missiles so that ship captains don’t have to designate certain tubes for certain missions, but can rather use the missiles as needed for each mission.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby kmkraoind » 10 Aug 2015 10:50

Bigger and faster: Russia unveils designs to replace marooned Mistrals

Image

Though Russia did not got the actual Mistrals, they did got its drawings and design philosophy, now they can build their own Mistral class ships. In this case, French are the real losers.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 11 Aug 2015 13:27

http://news.usni.org/2015/08/07/report- ... =USNI+News
Report: Chinese Navy Warship Rammed Two Vietnamese Fishing Vessels

By: Sam LaGrone
August 7, 2015 3:52 PM
An undated photo of a Chinese Type Yuting II Type 072A tank landing ship (LST). PLAN Photo

A People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) amphibious warship allegedly rammed two Vietnamese fishing vessels operating near the disputed Spratly Islands in July, according to local press cited in an Office of Naval Intelligence threat to shipping report.

According to accounts of the fisherman, reported in the Nguoi Lao Dong newspaper, about 15 nautical miles off the western coast of the Spratlys on July 21 “a strange iron-clad Chinese ship numbered 994 suddenly appeared and approached [the fishing vessel] sounding its horn.”

The ship then sprayed the vessels with water cannon and precipitated a 30-minute chase.
“In order to avoid a possible collision, I tried to steer my boat away, but the strange ship still chased after and then rammed it on the right side,” captain Nguyen Nhat Ngoc said to the paper.

Ngoc descried the heavily armed Chinese vessel hit the ship twice more before breaking off the pursuit.

“Bui Thanh Ninh, another local fisherman, said his boat with 13 crew members suffered a similar attack also in the area on [July 23], by the same Chinese ship with code number 994,” reported Thanh Nien News.

According to the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) recently published PLAN and Chinese maritime law enforcement guide, the only vessel with the hull number 994 is the 4800-ton Yuting II Type 072A tank landing ship (LST) Daiyun Shan (994). The landing ship is more than 100 meters long.

Screen grab of ONI's Chinese ship identification guide. ONI Image

Reports of the incident were collated in the July ONI Worldwide Threat to Shipping (WTS) Report. The report did not connect the hull number to a PLAN ship.

Navy officials told USNI News on Friday the inclusion of the incident in the report — a collection of open source information — carried with it no change in the U.S. stance toward Chinese actions in the South China Sea.

Vietnamese fishermen have reported an increase in confrontations with Chinese coast guard and civilian ships since a standoff between Beijing and Hanoi over the presence of a Chinese owned oil-rig for two months in Vietnamese claimed waters in 2014.
“The flare-up in incidents of Chinese vessels ramming Vietnamese fishing boats in recent weeks has come as Vietnam increases high-level contacts with the United States,” reported the The Diplomat in mid-July.

On Thursday, Secretary of State John Kerry gave an unvarnished criticism of China’s growing expansion into the South China Sea and the ongoing campaign to restrict access in the region.

“Freedom of navigation and overflight are among the essential pillars of international maritime law,” Kerry told the East Asia Summit in Kuala Lumpur according to a report in Reuters.

“Despite assurances that these freedoms would be respected, we have seen warnings issued and restrictions attempted in recent months.”

In addition to the uptick in maritime presence, China has also continued a campaign of land reclamation in the Spratlys, most notably constructing a 3,000 meter runway on reclaimed land on the Fiery Cross Reef near the Philippines.

Philip
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 13 Aug 2015 18:43

http://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2015/08 ... om-russia/
Morocco to Acquire Submarine, Helicopters From Russia
Wednesday 12 August 2015 - 06:36

The report says that apart from Amur 1650t subs,ASW helos will also be acquired for Morocco's frigates and is designed to give a strong impetus to the development and quality of bilateral relations and to deepen the strategic partnership between Russia and Morocco.

"Astute",Wrongly named? :rotfl:
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scott ... ct-6243871

Royal Navy’s £10bn submarine project at risk from delays and over-spending warn Whitehall watchdogs
13 August 2015
By Ben Glaze

THE ambitious project is expected to cost another £87.5million more than planned last year – up from £558.1million to £645.6million

he new Royal Navy submarine HMS Astute

A £10BILLION project for a new fleet of Royal Navy submarines faces “substantial risks and challenges”, Whitehall watchdogs have warned.

Seven nuclear-powered Astute-class boats will spearhead Britain’s underwater protection in the coming decades, under a huge scheme to replace ageing Trafalgar-class subs.

But the state-of-the-art hunter-killer Astutes – which will be based at Faslane on the Clyde – have been hit by a string of delays and cost overruns since the first boat was ordered.

The mammoth project was expected to cost another £87.5million more than planned last year – up from £558.1million to £645.6million.

Just two of the 7400-ton 34mph subs have so far been commissioned into the Navy, with a third undergoing sea trials.

The first of the 318ft vessels delivered to the Navy – HMS Astute – ran aground during sea trials off the Isle of Skye in 2010. It was damaged when a towing boat slammed into it during a rescue effort.

And the latest Major Projects Authority report revealed that while the ambitious project remains on time against a revised schedule, major challenges remain.

The MPA rang alarm bells as part of their annual audit of big-spending Government schemes. They issued an “amber/red” alert for the deal, meaning “successful delivery of the project is in doubt, with major risks or issues apparent in a number of key areas”.

HMS Astute sails up Gareloch on the Firth of Cylde to Faslane

The authority warned: “The project remains a very technically demanding endeavour and the schedule to deliver the remaining five boats is challenging.

“Whilst the Ministry of Defence, shipbuilder and supply chain have all learned much from the construction of the first two boats, challenges remain, and a number of performance improvement projects, recommended by the MPA, have been established to address the main technical, logistical and management risks and issues.”

Other flaws in the subs reportedly included flooding during a routine dive that led to one being forced to perform an emergency surfacing, corrosion, the replacement or moving
of computer circuit boards because they did not meet safety standards and fears over the instruments monitoring the nuclear reactor, as the wrong type of lead was used.

The contract for the boats was given to BAE Systems and the subs are being built at Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. The latest cost overrun was blamed on the third boat, Artful, “remaining in
Barrow longer than originally scheduled”, according to the report.

Other factors include: “Early investment in activities to reduce risks in boats four to seven including batch buying of materials, outsourcing a greater quantity of production work, and increasing the volume of work above that originally planned; and investment in improving supply chain capabilities”.

An MoD spokesman said: “Submarine build programmes are extremely complex and significant steps have been taken to address the issues raised by the MPA.

“The Astute programme is progressing to deliver world-class submarines with the third, of seven, planned to enter service with the Royal Navy towards the end of the year.”

HMS Astute - the facts
•Top speed: 30 knots (34mph)
•Displacement: 7,400 tonnes
•Length: 318ft
•Crew: 98
•Diving depth: About 1,000ft

•Weapons: Spearfish torpedoes and Tomahawk cruise missiles


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 17 Aug 2015 17:47

http://www.janes.com/article/53643/russ ... e-doctrine
Russia's new maritime doctrine
Nikolai Novichkov, Moscow - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
13 August 2015

Russian president Vladimir Putin used the occasion of the Navy Day festivities on 26 July to announce the approval of a new 'Maritime Doctrine-2015' for the Russian Federation. Nikolai Novichkov assesses the key changes.

The last time Russia issued a maritime doctrine - which codifies the country's naval priorities, strategy, and procurement - was in 2001, so a new document was thus overdue. According to Russian deputy prime minister Dmitry Rogozin there were two main reasons behind changes the 2015 doctrine brings into play: the changed international situation and improvements to Russia's navy since the last doctrine.

Regional focus

Maritime Doctrine-2015 divides Russian naval policy between six regions: Atlantic, Arctic, Antarctic, Caspian, Indian Ocean, and Pacific. Within each region the doctrine assesses four naval functions: operations, transport, marine science, and the development of natural resources. The focus of the doctrine is on two of these regions: the Arctic and the Atlantic.

The national maritime policy in the regions is to be enforced by the navy's strategic and operational units of the Northern, Pacific, Baltic, and Black Sea fleets and the Caspian flotilla.

Rogozin notes the Atlantic has been emphasised because of NATO expansion, the need to integrate Crimea and the Sevastopol naval base into the Russian economy, and to re-establish a permanent Russian Navy presence in the Mediterranean.

Meanwhile, the Arctic focus is down to the growth of the Northern Sea Route, the need for free entry into the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and the wealth of the continental shelf.

To implement the doctrine's provisions related to the Atlantic and Arctic regions, the structure and performance of the Baltic, Black Sea and Northern fleets will be improved. Enhancements to the combat capabilities of the fleets are also planned. For example, the Black Sea Fleet's infrastructure in Crimea and Novorossiysk will be bolstered.

Shipbuilding strategy

The 2015 doctrine adds a new section to the mix: shipbuilding. This, the doctrine states, is due to the re-emergence of the Russian shipbuilding sector over the past 10-15 years.

Admiral Victor Chirkov, commander-in-chief of the Russian Navy states that the navy's priority is to develop and deploy advanced equipment to enable Russia to make up for lost ground (against rivals) and to become superior to them in certain areas. In addition to refitting the fleets, the navy is looking to build up stocks of weaponry and materiel; improve naval command and control (C2); integrate joint force C2 into the various theatres; and improve the navy's basing and support systems.

Among these, priority will be given to supporting Russia's ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and nuclear attack submarines (SSNs) within the Northern and Pacific fleets.

Additionally, the doctrine seeks to create a general-purpose marine force armed with long-range and high-precision strike systems capable of providing a non-nuclear deterrent.

The navy's future surface fleet is to be divided between long-range multirole vessels and short-range vessels with modular capabilities. Looking ahead, the service intends to field a multi-service naval strike force capable of quick relocation to threatened areas.

The doctrine also foresees the introduction of new and innovative technologies such as: artificial intelligence systems, unmanned aerial, surface and underwater vehicles (UAVs, USVs, UUVs), non-lethal weapon systems, and new weapon types such as directed-energy weapons.

Russia will now look to create a single, integrated, and jam-proof fleet-wide C2 system for use at all levels from the strategic to the tactical. This is intended to be adaptable and to form a single information control complex to enable network-centric command of diverse naval and joint-service assets in any theatre of operations.

In connection with the maritime doctrine, and amendments in some aspects of force development, the Russian Navy is expected to gain some additional resources because the creation of a well-balanced and equipped naval force is a long-term effort of 30-40 years. Considering this and the duration of ship design/construction work, the conceptual approach to the development of the navy will be an ongoing issue for 45-50 years.

To take account of the implementation time and existing/forecast resource and technology restrictions, the creation of the new-model navy has been divided into three phases: up to 2020; 2021-2030; and 2031-2050. The content of each phase was outlined by Adm Chirkov for the various elements of the navy.

Strategic nuclear forces

Up until 2020 the maritime strategic nuclear force will focus on completing the development and launching of its fourth-generation Borey-class (Project 955/955A) SSBNs, while maintaining its remaining Delta III/IV-class (Project 667BDR/667BDRM) SSBNs in operational service.

During the 2021-2030 phase work will proceed on replacing the Delta class with fourth-generation SSBNs. Within this second phase Russia will also work on developing a new ship-based (in fact submarine-based) strategic missile system and a fifth-generation SSBN class. The doctrine sets out that series production of the fifth-generation SSBN will then commence in the final 2031-2050 phase.

General-purpose force

The general-purpose marine force inventory will include in its first phase the creation of a strategic non-nuclear deterrent force, enhancements to its SSN and diesel-electric submarines (SSKs), the build-up of the inventory and capability of its surface forces, and the creation of the new marine rapid-response force. In the mid term the non-nuclear deterrent will be provided by Yasen-class (Project 885M) SSNs and Oscar-class (Project 885M) nuclear-powered guided missile submarines (SSGNs). Meanwhile, the capability of Russia's non-strategic submarines will be ensured by upgrading its third-generation SSNs and building a new generation of SSKs.

During the 2021-2030 phase Russia's existing SSN/SSK fleet is planned to be improved by adding unmanned technologies, while construction of a new-generation SSN class is also planned.

Surface fleet

In the first phase Russia's Admiral Gorshkov-class (Project 22350) frigates and Steregushchy-class (Project 20380) corvettes and their variants will become the core of the surface force for long- and short-range operations.

In the mid term a new-generation destroyer featuring advanced strike, air defence and missile defence capabilities will become the navy's main oceangoing ship. Between 2021 and 2030 a new class of modular multirole surface combat ship will be designed and enter series production as the successor to the Project 22350/20380 classes. It is envisaged that these will be armed with novel weapon systems and will carry unmanned vehicles of various sorts.

The marine rapid-response force is intended to be capable of conducting missions in the maritime, aerial and land domains in any part of the world. For this, new aircraft carriers will be the core of its capability, along with multirole landing ships. Work to design a new class of Russian aircraft carrier is to be completed before 2020, with construction and entry into service planned for the second phase of the doctrine (2021-2030).

Unlike the heavy aircraft cruisers of the previous generation of Russian aircraft carriers, the new carrier design will be multirole. It is envisaged to be equipped with manned and unmanned combat systems operating in the air, at sea, underwater and possibly in space. The carrier's air groups will include radar surveillance and C2 aircraft, alongside reconnaissance and strike UAVs.

Naval Aviation

For the Russian Naval Aviation the focus in the first phase will be the development and serial production of an advanced maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) by 2020.

Additionally, Russia will look to develop and produce a new shore/ship-based multirole helicopter (to replace the Ka-27) and acquire a ship-based combat helicopter (the Ka-52K). Russia will also seek to develop advanced airborne strike systems.

The second phase will see the deployment of the new Russian ship-based radar surveillance aircraft, ship-based UAVs, and ship-based strike aircraft. The 2021-2030 period will see the Russian Naval Aviation transition to optionally piloted aircraft, including those derived from existing manned aircraft. Obsolete aircraft are to be replaced by modern, multirole manned and unmanned aircraft. During the 2031-2050 phase naval aviation focus will switch to a new generation of multirole aircraft and UAVs and field a new generation of airborne precision weapon systems.

Coastal forces

The first phase of the doctrine concerning Russia's coastal troops and marine force aims to achieve: the completion of development of advance coastal-defence missiles and the issuing of them; and the enhancement of the marine brigade's ability to operate in different climates, including extreme Arctic conditions.

Between 2021 and 2030 the doctrine plans the introduction of a highly mobile amphibious combat vehicle for the coastal troops so that they can support the marines' operations. The marines are also earmarked to begin receiving unmanned platforms during this period, possibly armed with directed-energy weapons or powered by alternative energy sources.

Long term

The direction of the final 2031-2050 phase is currently being analysed, according to Adm Chirkov. However, it is envisaged that during this final phase the following will be undertaken: series production of new-generation submarines; ongoing series production of the new aircraft carrier class; the start of series production of the new multirole ship class; the creation of a new generation of multirole unmanned systems; and the arming of coastal defence troops with new-generation unmanned missile systems capable of striking air, surface, sub-surface and space targets.

Long-term plans (by 2050) also call for a transition to modular combat platforms for both surface ships and submarines.

Nikolai Novichkov is a JDW Correspondent, reporting from Moscow

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 19 Aug 2015 11:26

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/fri ... 592?page=2

A Frightening Thought: China Erodes America's Submarine Advantage

"The PLA Navy is poised to make a major push to improve its heretofore weak ASW capabilities."
Lyle J. Goldstein
August 17, 2015

In January 2011, the cover of the Chinese naval magazine 现代舰船 [Modern Ships], which is published by giant state-owned shipbuilding conglomerate CSIC, carried a simple and elegant headline: “056来了” [The 056 has arrived]. In an impressive display of shipbuilding muscle, Beijing has proceeded in the 4.5 years that followed in building nearly 20 of this new type of light frigate or corvette.

For an interesting comparison, the U.S. Navy has launched less than half that number of its own small surface combatant, the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) over a longer span of time. Never mind that LCS still lacks for an anti-ship cruise missile (ASCM), so it is quite clearly “out-sticked” by the Chinese variant. But what is really impressive about the Type 056 is its ability to fill in a much needed niche-capability in China’s naval arsenal: the requirement for a small, cheap, versatile, rugged and well-armed patrol ship to show the flag in proximate maritime disputes. One obvious lesson from the conspicuous buildup described above is to watch the cover of现代舰船 [Modern Ships] carefully.

Last year, two covers of that magazine were dedicated to “coming attractions” in naval aviation: new anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopters are in the pipeline and may well even enjoy prioritized development. One cover (4A) showed a modernized, ASW-optimized version, likely called “Z-18F,” of a large workhorse of Chinese naval aviation, the Z-8. Another somewhat more shocking design gracing the cover of Modern Ships last year (2A) was designated as “Z-20,” and seemed to be a near carbon copy of the SH-60 Sea Hawk, the frontline naval helicopter operated by the U.S. Navy in a variety of roles, including ASW.

Amazing weight loss secret is helping millions to get a tinier belly.
This edition of Dragon Eye will survey some recent developments in Chinese ASW development, emphasizing the surprisingly noteworthy future roles of the two new helicopter variants mentioned above.

But returning momentarily to our theme of Modern Ships magazine covers, yet another issue (3B) from early 2014 shows an illustration of a Type 056 from the stern quarter deploying a prominent variable depth sonar (VDS) as it hunts a nearby adversary submarine. A variety of sources took note of this major design adjustment for the Type 056 with the first of these ASW-optimized light frigates, featuring the much larger aperture in its stern for the VDS, appearing in late 2013.

It is true that Beijing has been experimenting with towed arrays since the 1980s. But most new surface vessels have deployed with long linear-type passive towed arrays. The new VDS will give the 056 additional active sonar capabilities (along with the bow array) that can “ping” more effectively from within or below thermal layers. According to the Modern Ships rendering, surface ships that “用主动模式工作,让潜艇无所遁形” [employ active sonar methods of operation will render submarines unable to hide]. Coupled with the possibility of new weapons, such as “火箭自导弹”[homing depth bombs] or even “新型反潜导弹”[a new type of ASW missiles], these forces promise a much more formidable challenge. Let’s not forget, moreover, that even as the Chinese Navy has been upgrading the sonars and ASW weaponry in its surface fleet, it has also been pushing ahead with an ambitious program to set up fixed sonar arrays on the sea bed in its proximate waters as well.

Undoubtedly, a Chinese move toward more regularized “far seas operations”—quite visible in a variety of realms—will require a renewed emphasis on airborne ASW. Quite simply, fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft make for highly potent ASW platforms because of their speed, range, search rate and near invulnerability to submarine-launched weapons. Despite these advantages, aerial ASW has long been an Achilles heel of the Chinese Navy—a fact widely acknowledged in Chinese naval circles.A decade ago, the PLA Navy may have had as few as a couple of dozen large Z-8 helicopters, progenitor of the new Z-18F. However, production was radically increased in the 2004-07 time frame, according to the 2014 covers story in Modern Ships, indicative of a new priority for naval aviation. The same article highlights the much more prominent surface search radar on the new helicopter’s chin. This radar is said to be capable of picking up submarine masts and periscopes at ranges of at least 40-70 km. A rather detailed article on the Z-18F appeared in another prominent defense magazine, 航空知识 [Aerospace Knowledge] in late 2014. This report seems to confirm a graphic that accompanied the Modern Ships report, which had previously suggested that the Z-18F could heft up to four ASW torpedoes—a significant improvement over its predecessor, the Z-8. Perhaps some skepticism is warranted on this point given perennial difficulties with Chinese helicopter engines. The same report also suggests that the Z-18F will likely have more sonobuoy dispensers than the U.S. Navy’s SH-60 Sea Hawk. The author says its size may imply that only the European EH-101 has comparable range and capabilities. According to this report, the Liaoning aircraft carrier is planned to have a complement of six Z-18Fs. More interesting still is the suggestion that each new Type 055 cruiser will carry two Z-18Fs. That may partially explain that vessel’s expected large displacement.

Even if the Z-18F can shoulder much of the ASW burden for China’s emerging carrier task groups, there still arises a definite need for a sturdy all-purpose helicopter than can fly off the decks of China’s expanding fleet of modern frigates and medium-sized destroyers (Type 052 variants). The 2014 cover article on the Z-20 confirms that the current standard bearer, the Z-9C, has proved disappointing, since it apparently is not capable of carrying all the requisite sensors and weapons. While Chinese analysts do note certain superior characteristics of the Russian Ka-28 even versus the American SH-60—for example, with respect to range—they maintain that its electronics and sensors are outdated. Thus, the claimed detection range of the Russian dipping sonar (6-8 km) is said to be half of what the Chinese Navy seeks at this point. In general, the Modern Ships cover story on the Z-20 cites the difficulty of continuously upgrading and also integrating an imported Russian helicopter into the evolving Chinese ASW system. This article is not shy about the close connection between China’s Z-20 and the American Blackhawk, which after all was exported to China back in the 1980s.

The Z-20 is said to have first flown back in late 2013, but the available photograph of the prototype does not clarify whether the naval variant has reached the testing stage. Curiously, neither the Z-20, nor the Z-18F, are discussed in the spring 2015 report by the Office of Naval Intelligence on “The PLA Navy: New Capabilities and Missions for the 21st Century.”

The initiatives described above should be sufficient to convince any analyst that the PLA Navy is poised to make a major push to improve its heretofore weak ASW capabilities. But there are other major fixed-wing programs including a large ASW-optimized maritime patrol aircraft called “Gaoxin-6” that was recently profiled on the front page of the major Chinese newspaper 国际先驱导报[International Herald Leader]. Another Chinese fixed-wing program that surely has an ASW component is an on-going Chinese effort to produce the world’s largest seaplanes. It is, moreover, highly likely that China will follow the American lead in preparing to deploy drones of all types in the ASW fight.

The above brief survey of recent Chinese writings on ASW force development provides additional evidence to support the apparently growing notion that U.S. undersea superiority could be a gradually, but steadily, fleeting advantage. An obvious policy recommendation may follow that the U.S. submarine force must be large enough that it can sustain losses in battle against improving adversary ASW capabilities. After all, U.S. submarines may well be extremely quiet, yet still vulnerable to detection by active pinging from dipping sonars deployed by helicopters. As Chinese aerial ASW improves, moreover, US submarines should perhaps be equipped with weaponry to strike back against the rapidly growing force of adversary aerial targets. For now, the United States still retains a significant advantage in undersea warfare, but Washington cannot permit superiority to result in complacency.


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 20 Aug 2015 16:35

Russia's latest research sub-conversion of a former SSGN. Russia's huge investment in UW warfare and research,with many secret projects which have never been revealed,should be emulated by the IN which has almost no R&D subs and submersibles for UW oceanic research. This is anb area which needs much improvement,especially with the advent of long-endurance UUVs and even UCAVs being launched from large mother subs.

One titbit in the repoprt ios the cost of Yasen class SSGN,approx $3B. Given its large size,an Indian SSN of approx 6-8,000t should then cost approx $1.5B. Our planned 6 SSNs would then cost about $10+B.

http://bellona.org/news/nuclear-issues/ ... t-16-years
Nuclear Russia, Russian Navy
Russia launches nuclear battle sub retrofitted for underwater research

Russia has released a rejuvenated nuclear submarine down the slipways at the Zvezdochka Shipyard after it underwent “in-depth” repairs that have been ongoing for the past 16 years, the portnews.ru portal reported.
Published on August 19, 2015 by Charles Digges
podmoskovye zvezdochka

Russia has released a rejuvenated nuclear submarine down the slipways at the Zvezdochka Shipyard after it underwent “in-depth” repairs that have been ongoing for the past 16 years, the portnews.ru portal reported.

Originally one of six ballistic missile cruisers of the 667BDRM class, the Podmoskovye has emerged from its long retrofit as a “special purpose” vessel, said the agency.

It was originally launched as a military vessel in 1986, but was ordered back to the Zvezdochka yard for remodeling in 1999. The news portal reported that financial difficulties resulted in the protracted, 16-year revamp.
zvezdochka

The Zvezdochka shipyard. (Photo: Courtesy of the Barents Observer)

The submarine will now undergo mooring tests, dive tests, and sea trials.

The new fixes on the vessel included removing its compartment for firing Sineva intercontinental missiles and replacing it with living quarters and facilities for scientific work, the official TASS agency reported.

Retrofits on the Podmoskovye also include equipment for allowing it to dock with other deep-diving submarines, said the agency.

Reports from the Svobonaya Pressa portal hinted at even further uses that could not be independently corroborated, but were in keeping with other newswire reports on the vessel.

According to that portal, the Podmoskovye, will service not only other deep water exploration submarines but potential undersea research complexes in the interests of “top secret” operations for the Russian Defense Ministry’s deep water study program.

The living quarters for what the news portal termed “hydronauts” led to a significant increase in the submarine’s length, though the agency did not indicated by how long.

Official news agencies like TASS also reported the Podmoskovye was now longer as well, but similarly gave no data.

The latest tweaks to the Podmoskovye, said the Barents Observer news portal, make it possible for the vessel to dock smaller deep-diving submarines so they can conduct long duration undersea operations, particularly operations documenting the extent of Russia’s continental shelf as Moscow strives to broaden Arctic oil exploration.

Among those operations could be support and transport of Russia’s AC-12, or Losharik, deep diving titanium hulled nuclear sub, the portal speculated.

The Losharik was in 2012 reportedly instrumental in charting the extent of the Mendeleyev Ridge along the North Pole’s seabed as part of Russia’s recent submission to the UN that it’s continental shelf includes the North Pole itself, said the Barents Observer.

The Losharik is one of Russia’s top-secret deep-diving bathyscaphes, and has never been photographed in any detail except by accident when a car magazine photo shoot caught the vessel at the surface of the sea,
the portal reported.
severodvinsk b-port

The Severodvinsk. (Photo: Courtesy of b-port.com)

The Russian Navy over the past few years has invested a staggering amount in rebuilding its Northern Fleet, much of whose derelict subs were dismantled in cooperative efforts with the United States and other nations for a fraction of the cost.

Last September, Russian President Vladimir Putin said this buildup was part of Moscow’s effort to “fortify” Russia’s position in the Arctic.

Russia has launched the lead mutli-purpose missile subs in two new classes, the Yasen and the Borei. The Yasen class’s $2.1 billion Severodvinsk sub, was launched for sea trials the same day Putin made his comments.

The next Yasen class sub, the Kazan, is expected to cost $2.9 billion.

Bellona Executive Director and nuclear physicist Nils Bøhmer has repeated expressed concern over the buildup.

“The building of new nuclear submarines shows that the Russian Navy has funding, and that they should use a larger proportion of that money on cleaning up its still evident Cold War mess,” said Bøhmer.

Philip
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 21 Aug 2015 15:55

The wait has been v.long,16 years. It could be that Russia had higher priorities ,new Borei SSBMs and Yasen SSGNs,now well into smooth series production,before converting the old Delta sub into a specialised research vessel. UW warfare and tech is the holy grail of modern warfare and the most exotic outside space tech. The most survivable leg of the triad is still the SSBN,which can glide quietly into the deepest parts of the world's oceans and lie in stealth waiting for orders to launch its deadly load of MIRV ICBMs.Just one Russian/US SSBN can carry upto 100 TN warheads.In the continuous competition to stay ahead of each other,both they US and Russia continue to devote huge sums on moolah on UW tech hence the development of specialized subs such as the new modernized and modified Moscow.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... arine.html
Red October Redux?
08.21.15

Russia’s Got a Mysterious New Submarine
It looks like the Moscow vs. the USS Jimmy Carter. But can the Kremlin afford the ship’s new technology?

On Aug. 11 at the port of Severodvinsk in northern Russia, a huge and imposing black shape emerged from a dry-dock, observed by ranks of uniformed dignitaries. The Russian navy’s latest submarine is 574 feet long, displaces no fewer than 18,000 tons of water and packs two nuclear reactors.

Named Moscow, she’s actually a refurbished, 1980s-vintage ballistic-missile sub that once prowled underneath the Arctic ice, cradling nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles, awaiting Armageddon.

Today, as best as any outside observer can tell, the Moscow has a new mission. She appears to be part science vessel, part spy ship, part commando transport, and part “mothership” for mini-subs and drones.

But no one outside of the Kremlin and the Moscow’s future crew knows for sure.

“There’s a lot of questions here,” says Eric Wertheim, a leading naval analyst in the United States and author of Combat Fleets of the World, the definitive naval reference guide.

She appears to be part science vessel, part spy ship, part commando transport, and part “mothership” for mini-subs and drones.

One thing is certain: Whatever her purpose, the Moscow is the most recent sign of Russia’s desperate effort to rebuild its dilapidated navy and, a quarter-century after the Cold War ended, once again challenge the U.S. Navy on—and beneath—the world’s oceans.

Special mission boat

Moscow began life as a Delta IV-class ballistic missile submarine, crewed by 135 sailors and armed with 16 intercontinental-range ballistic missiles, each with four independent warheads that can split off from the rocket as it plummets toward Earth, maximizing the city-destroying power of each missile.

In 1999, the Kremlin ordered the Moscow into dry-dock in Severodvinsk for rework initially costing 443 million rubles, or around $7 million. The plan—to remove the submarine’s missile tubes and replace them with new equipment for covert missions, transforming the Moscow into what navies call a “special mission” vessel.

Where ballistic missile subs haul atomic weapons and so-called attack submarines armed with non-nuclear missiles and torpedoes silently stalk surface ships and other subs, special-mission boats handle, well, everything else that an undersea warship can do: testing new technology; quietly transporting naval commandos on deadly secret missions; supporting deep-diving mini-submarines and free-swimming underwater robots; and, perhaps most provocatively, gathering intelligence—and preventing the enemy’s submarines from collecting intel of their own.

The United States is the world’s leader in submarine technology and possesses the most technologically advanced special-mission subs, including four converted ballistic-missile submarines plus the mysterious USS Jimmy Carter, a one-of-a-kind spin-off of the Seawolf class of attack boats.

Entering service in 2004, the $3-billion Jimmy Carter is one of the Navy’s most secretive warships. The sailing branch does not comment on the vessel’s features and deployments. But Owen Cote, a submarine expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said the ship probably has a “moon well,” a kind of floodable chamber that allows divers and undersea drones to exit and reenter the sub while the ship is submerged.

It’s unclear exactly what the Jimmy Carter does during her months-long deployments, but it’s possible she heads to the ocean floor so her divers and robots can place wiretaps on undersea cables, allowing U.S. intelligence agencies to listen in on intercontinental communications including Internet traffic. During the Cold War, U.S. special mission subs frequently penetrated Soviet defenses to bug Moscow’s communications cables.

These days there are better ways to tap into the fiber-optic cables that carry global communications. “I don’t think you need to use Jimmy Carter to do that,” Cote said. “It would be a waste of that asset.”

But one Russian ex-official insists that NATO, the U.S.-led European military alliance, still taps Moscow’s cables. “I note that every year a certain number of such devices is removed from our links,” retired admiral Viktor Kravchenko, former chief of the general staff of the Russian navy, told one Russian news site.

Indeed, Kravchenko claimed that the Moscow’s main mission will be to transport a nuclear-powered mini-sub that can descend to great depths to remove the wiretaps. The Moscow’s mini-sub could also place its own wiretaps, according to Valentin Selivanov, another retired Russian admiral and former submarine commander.

Like Cote, Norman Polmar—a naval expert who has advised the U.S. government on submarine strategy—dismissed all this talk of wiretaps. “There are very few Russian undersea cables that are tappable,” Polmar said. Besides, he added, “more stuff moves through the air.”

Cash is king

Still, Polmar cautioned against underestimating the Moscow. Whatever the submarine is for, it could be something American observers can’t even imagine. “Is there something surprisng in that submarine?” Polmar asked. “It’s possible.”

Polmar said he has visited, multiple times, all of the engineering bureaus that design Russia’s subs. “These guys are far more innovative than we ever were.”

But before the Moscow can take on secret missions, the Kremlin has to wrap up the submarine’s rework—a process that, so far, has taken a staggering 16 years… and might never get finished.

Russia’s naval shipbuilding industry still possesses impressive expertise, but has suffered from inconsistent and inadequate government funding ever since the Cold War ended. From a peak of hundreds of undersea vessels during the Soviet era, today the Russian navy can put to sea just a couple dozen submarines, roughly half as many as the better-funded U.S. Navy can manage.

“The trouble with all these naval issues is that, unlike some programs that are small, ships are systems of systems and require stable funding over a long period of time,” Wertheim said. And stability is the one thing the Russian economy—and by extension the country’s military budgets—definitely lack.

The Moscow left dry-dock on Aug. 12 but could still be years away from being combat-ready. A photo of her relaunch shows construction scaffolding on top of her hull. But Wertheim said he expects the Kremlin to push hard to complete the sub, despite the challenges. “They don’t want to lose that intelligence-collection capability.”

Vipul
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Vipul » 22 Aug 2015 17:49

^^^ Details of the Amur buy by Morocco.

Morocco and Russia are close to reaching a deal on the delivery of a Russian-made Amur-1650 (project 677E) submarine which would be the kingdom’s first submarine, World Tribune reported.

The contract is expected to be signed during King Mohammed VI’s trip to Moscow later this year. The two countries have been in talks on the issue in several stages since 2013, according to the media outlet. The sum of the deal may be €300 million ($342 million), Afrik.com reported.

During the DSA-2014 international arms forum in Malaysia, the Malaysian navy also expressed interest for the submarine.

"Malaysian navy commander visited our display and expressed interest in our Amur-1650 submarines," a Rosoboronexport spokesman told Rossiskaya Gazeta.

The Amur-1650 diesel-electric powered submarine was developed by the Rubin design bureau. In addition to an air-independent power plant, the submarine is equipped with a regular diesel generator and a set of accumulator plants. While surfaced it is propelled by the diesel-electric power plant, and by the accumulators and the air-independent power plant while submerged. Thus, the submarine has the technical specs close to a nuclear-powered one.

In comparison with its predecessors, the Amur-1650 submarine is capable of multiple missiles firing (up to six missiles at once) and has a hydroacoustic system with unique sonar for detecting low-noise targets at various distances.
The main feature of the Amur-1650 is its extreme quietness. According to experts, the new submarine outperforms the submarines of Varshavyanka (project 636) class which are now believed to be the most silent submarines in the world.

The Amur-1650 has a length of 66.8 meters and a beam of 7.1 meters. While submerged, the submarine can reach speed of 21 knots (39 kmh) at a distance of 650 miles. The submarine can submerge at a depth of 250 meters. The armament includes 18 torpedoes and 10 vertical silo-based missiles.

SNaik
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Posts: 506
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Location: Riga

Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby SNaik » 26 Aug 2015 17:59

Philip wrote:The wait has been v.long,16 years. It could be that Russia had higher priorities ,new Borei SSBMs and Yasen SSGNs,now well into smooth series production,before converting the old Delta sub into a specialised research vessel. UW warfare and tech is the holy grail of modern warfare and the most exotic outside space tech. The most survivable leg of the triad is still the SSBN,which can glide quietly into the deepest parts of the world's oceans and lie in stealth waiting for orders to launch its deadly load of MIRV ICBMs.Just one Russian/US SSBN can carry upto 100 TN warheads.In the continuous competition to stay ahead of each other,both they US and Russia continue to devote huge sums on moolah on UW tech hence the development of specialized subs such as the new modernized and modified Moscow.



Project 667BDRM "Podmoskovye" (Подмосковье) - could be roughly translated as outskirts of Moscow :)

Austin
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 07 Sep 2015 12:29

Pictures of VLS Shtil-1 from 1135.6 frigate

http://www.balancer.ru/sites/ru/up/uploads/s7/6kR1n.png
http://www.balancer.ru/sites/ru/up/uploads/s7/nLIo4.png
http://www.balancer.ru/sites/ru/up/uploads/s3/dG4gE.png
http://www.balancer.ru/sites/ru/up/uploads/s3/qEbKU.png

Looking at the pictures of VLS Shtil , it seems compared to Single Arm launcher it has lost its huge mid-body control surface and is now just relying on all movable Tail Fin and Propulsion TVC for manouvering

Philip
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 08 Sep 2015 19:58

"R" Defence going great guns what!
With the Saudis and UAE reportedly paying for Egypt's Russian birds, and a new thaw between Russia and Middle Eastern states,perhaps we could see Russian designed FFGs and DDGs being made at Pip? Pip has already been booked for the local manufacture of the next 4 modified Talwars.

http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/busine ... 46741.html
Reliance Defence in pact with UAE's ADSB for naval ship mfg
Reliance Defence in pact with UAE's ADSB for naval ship mfg

RDL is a fully owned subsidiary of Reliance Infrastructure Ltd while Abu Dhabi Ship Building (ADSB) is a leading provider of construction, repair and refit services for naval, military and commercial vessels.

Anil Ambani-led Reliance Defence Ltd (RDL) has signed an MoU with Abu Dhabi Ship Building to set up a strategic partnership for construction of naval ships, including frigates and destroyers to address the demands of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), over the next 10 years.

RDL is a fully owned subsidiary of Reliance Infrastructure Ltd while Abu Dhabi Ship Building (ADSB) is a leading provider of construction, repair and refit services for naval, military and commercial vessels.

"Under this MoU, RDL and ADSB are investigating the opportunity to set up a strategic partnership for the construction of naval ships including frigates, destroyers and other specialized vessels to address the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) over the next 10 years," a statement by the Reliance Group said.

The agreement could also see ADSB delivering maintenance, repair, overhaul and refit services to the vessels, in line with regional requirements, it said.

Reliance Group is likely to use its newly acquired ship-building facilities at Pipavav for implementation of this collaboration. The MoU signing follows the joint statement issued during Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to UAE on August 18 which highlighted "cooperation and manufacture of defence equipment in India".

Skills developed and the experience gained through this collaboration will further add to Reliance Group's capabilities and position it favourably as a strategic partner for Indian Navy's future programmes, the statement said.

The programmes include Combat Management Systems (CMS), Integrated Bridge Solutions (IBS), Combat System Integration (CSI), Integrated Platform Management Systems (IPMS) and staff training and development. ADSB is a major regional provider of construction, repair and refit services for naval, military and commercial vessels in the GCC region.

This potential collaboration could help both companies expand their market share and address new opportunities, it said. Headquartered in Abu Dhabi and established in 1996, ADSB was originally formed to support the repairs and refits of UAE Navy vessels and currently has a portfolio of construction and refit projects worth over UAE Dirham 3 billion. ADSB is 40 percent owned by Mubadala, 10 percent by Abu Dhabi's government while the rest 50 percent is publicly traded on UAE's stock exchange.

Philip
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Location: India

Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 10 Sep 2015 16:45

Russia'shttp://www.hngn.com/articles/127810/20150909/russia-buiding-nuclear-submarine-drone-pentagon-officials-warn.htm latest sub innovation in the works.

Russia Building Stealth Nuclear Submarine Drone, Pentagon Officials Warn
Russia's UUV, code-named by officials as "Kanyon", would be capable of firing nuclear weapons at the U.S.
By Jelani James | Sep 09, 2015

Kanyon UUV
An artists rendering of what the "Kanyon" would look like once it's through development. (Photo : Twitter Photo Section)

Russia is building a nuclear submarine drone that has the capacity to launch nuclear weapons against important U.S. harbors and coastal cities, Pentagon Officials revealed.

When deployed, the unmanned underwater vehicle, or UUV, would be equipped with megaton-class warheads capable of obliterating ports used by U.S. nuclear missile submarines, such as Kings Bay, Georgia, and Puget Sound in Washington State.

"This is an unmanned sub that will have a high-speed and long-distance capability," a Pentagon official told The Washington Free Beacon.

Officials do admit however, that the weapon is still in it's development stage and Russia is years away from finishing and testing a prototype.

The drone has been codenamed "Kanyon" by officials, an indication that the weapon is a structured Russian arms program, reported the Washington Times. Beyond that, details about the program has been tightly held by the U.S. government.

"The Kanyon represents another example of Russia's aggressive and innovative approach to the development of military capabilities against U.S. and Western interests," Jack Caravelli, a former CIA analyst who specialized in Soviet and Russian affairs, said in the report, according to Newsmax.

"The possible yield of the warhead, in the megaton class, clearly is an attempt to inflict catastrophic damage against U.S. or European naval facilities or coastal cities," he said. "Nations vote with their resources, and the Kanyon, along with an expanding number of other military modernization programs, indicates the priority [President] Vladimir Putin places on military preparedness against the West."

This report comes a few weeks after a report about Russia's new missile, the SSN-30A, was made public. It's possible that those long-range missiles will be utilized in conjunction with this UUV.


UK admits fishing boat/sub encounters in the Irish Sea are due to its own subs. Latest media reports indicate that another such incident has happened.

Phantom Submarine Provocation Against Russia ‘Did Not Work’
14:35 09.09.2015

The Royal British Navy acknowledged that it was their submarine that caused the damage to the trawler Karen in the Irish Sea during a NATO exercise. Earlier British tabloids suggested that it might have been a Russian submarine.

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/military/2015090 ... z3lKxwmgo9

NRao
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby NRao » 10 Sep 2015 22:04



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