International Naval News & Discussion

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ArmenT
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Postby ArmenT » 20 Sep 2015 09:22

This documentary is from the early 2000s, but has some nice details about the Typhoon (Akula) class subs. The sub featured in this programme is the Severstal (TK-20). The documentary is about 55 minutes long, so grab a nice drink and watch.


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 23 Sep 2015 16:28


Singha
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 23 Sep 2015 16:58

will be useful in whatever muddle comes next in libya, nigeria and kenya, all of which are facing escalating islamic war with isis/aq, boko haram and al shabab.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Prem » 23 Sep 2015 22:49

Zumwalt: The Navy's massive, high-tech destroyer is here (pictures)
http://www.cnet.com/pictures/zumwalt-th ... up-thenews

Few good pictures.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 23 Sep 2015 23:08

Austin wrote:So Egypt bought those two Mistral

France Confirms Sale of Two Mistrals Built for Russia to Egypt


I can bet there is a mistral purchase file in MoF in MoD being exchanged by babus as we speak. It should come to the RM within 1-2 years.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Prem » 24 Sep 2015 02:04

Aditya G wrote:
Austin wrote:So Egypt bought those two Mistral

[url=http://www.sputniknews.com/business/20150923/1027393230.html]France Confirms Sale of Two Mistrals Built for Russia to Egypt[/urI can bet there is a mistral purchase file in MoF in MoD being exchanged by babus as we speak. It should come to the RM within 1-2 years.


3 Rafales have already arrived in Egypt. They seems to be in rush.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby member_22539 » 24 Sep 2015 05:38

Aditya G wrote:I can bet there is a mistral purchase file in MoF in MoD being exchanged by babus as we speak. It should come to the RM within 1-2 years.


:rotfl: One instance that we can be glad about the slow process in MOD. These white elephants are better off with the egyptians who have khan and barbarians funding such nonsense.

To think this deal has the specialty of bringing two price gouging masters together, namely france and russia. One gouges after the purchase (russia) and one before and after the purchase (france).

Good luck to the egyptians. Hope the baksheesh keeps coming to them.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 24 Sep 2015 06:31

zumwalt will proof all techs needed for next gen AAW DDG (smaller than zumwalt).
I dont see the zumwalt itself being more than a limited run expensive seawolf ssn thing.

bombarding some tents in somalia doesnt need this.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Nick_S » 25 Sep 2015 07:50

I guess Zumwalt will probably be used for testing rail-gun at some point.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 27 Sep 2015 18:28

Caught! probably some sort of fire aboard or loss of power,even in worse=case scenario ,it could be a problem with her reactor,as all her hatches are open. If there was a nuclear incident though,there would be a host of specialized vehicles,etc. at the quayside.
Ck the link for the video clip.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -Iran.html
Stranded: Ageing British nuclear submarine in top-secret mission is undergoing repairs off the coast of Iran
By Mark Nicol Defence Correspondent For The Mail On Sunday

23:32 26 Sep 2015,
•British nuclear submarine spotted at dock in the Emirati dock of Fujairah
•Port is situated less than 100 nautical miles from the coast of Iran
•A 650ft-long metal barrier covers the submarine to avoid detection
•It is believed to be one of Britain's four Trafalgar Class submarines

A British nuclear submarine has been caught on camera after it apparently became stricken with technical problems while on a top-secret mission in one of the most dangerous parts of the world.

Satellite images show the Royal Navy vessel undergoing repairs at a port less than 100 nautical miles from Iran.

The nuclear-powered submarine is pictured docked at Fujairah, one of the United Arab Emirates, in the politically sensitive seaway of the Gulf of Oman.

Scroll down for video:


The nuclear-powered submarine is pictured docked at Fujairah, one of the United Arab Emirates, in the politically sensitive seaway of the Gulf of Oman

The nuclear-powered submarine is pictured docked at Fujairah, one of the United Arab Emirates, in the politically sensitive seaway of the Gulf of Oman

Blue cabling on the quayside apparently provides electrical power to the vessel while it is being repaired.

The images also show a 650ft-long barrier constructed from metal containers which appears to have been erected in an effort to shield the 300ft vessel from public view and protect it from a terrorist attack.

Designed to provide surveillance of enemy installations, it is one of Britain's four Trafalgar Class submarines – HMS Talent, Torbay, Trenchant or Triumph – which entered service 30 years ago and have suffered from increasing problems due to their age.

Last night, nuclear expert John Large said: 'This is a very rare sighting in these waters as they usually remain submerged for thousands of miles while performing their surveillance and listening roles in the Gulf. To be pictured on Google Earth is unfortunate from her commander's point of view.'

The images also show a 650ft-long barrier constructed from metal containers which appears to have been erected in an effort to shield the 300ft vessel from public view and protect it from a terrorist attack

'Something must have gone seriously wrong with her to port there now, publicly announcing her presence in the Gulf of Oman which is effectively a war zone in these troubled times.

'The lack of a surface support vessel or any Special Boat Service commandos in dinghies patrolling the waters around her, or a boom separating her from the rest of the harbour, suggests this visit was forced upon her.

'She has what seems to be an emergency electrical and ventilation hook-up from the quayside, with all of her hatches open.'

The image has been stamped with a 2015 copyright marking on Google Earth, and a UK defence official admitted last night that a Royal Navy submarine had visited Fujairah earlier this year. The official said it was 'routine' for submarines to obtain shore services such as electricity and air-conditioning.

In 2013, The Mail on Sunday revealed how the ageing Trafalgar submarines had been issued with 'Code Red' safety warnings after inspectors found radioactive leaks.

The report by the Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator found that cracks in reactors and nuclear discharges were directly attributable to the Trafalgars remaining in service beyond their design date.

The Trafalgars are powered by nuclear reactors and are supposed to stay at sea for up to three months. They are equipped with Tomahawk cruise missiles and sonar equipment that can hear enemy vessels sailing more than 50 miles away.

The submarines have a typical complement of 120 to 130 personnel, up to 20 of them officers. The Trafalgars are being replaced by Astute Class nuclear submarines.

A Ministry of Defence spokesman said: 'We do not comment on submarine operations.'

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 27 Sep 2015 19:13

Is this report accurate,about the PLAN CV in the Meditt at tartus? No other major mediawallah has carried it. Such a deployment would have all major news channels reporting it.

http://www.debka.com/article/24909/A-Ch ... y-buildup-

What is clear is that there is a increasing Russian involvement in Syria with another warship,the flagship Moskva,a Slava class CG from its Black Sea fleet entering the Meditt heading for Syria.
Videoclip here.
https://www.rt.com/news/316609-flagship ... sian-navy/

Xcpt:
Our military sources find evidence that the Chinese forces are digging in for a prolonged stay in Syria. The carrier put into Tartus minus its aircraft contingent. The warplanes and helicopters should be in place on its decks by mid-November - flying in directly from China via Iran or transported by giant Russian transports from China through Iranian and Iraqi airspace.
This explains the urgency of establishing a Russian-Syria-Iranian “military coordination cell” in Baghdad in the last couple of days. This mechanism, plus the Russian officers sighted in Baghdad, indicates that the Russian military presence is not limited to Syria but is beginning to spill over into Iraq as well.

The coordination cell - or war room - was presented as necessary to begin working with Iranian-backed Shiite militias fighting the Islamic State in both places. But more immediately, it is urgently needed to control the heavy traffic of Russian, Iranian and Chinese military flights transiting Iraqi air space.

Our sources report that the Chinese will be sending out to Syria a squadron of J-15 Flying Shark fighters, some for takeoff positions on the carrier’s decks, the rest to be stationed at the Russian airbase near Latakia. The Chinese will also deploy Z-18F anti-submarine helicopters and Z-18J airborne early warning helicopters. In addition, Beijing will consign at least 1,000 marines to fight alongside their counterparts from Russia and Iran against terrorist groups, including ISIS.
debkafile’s counterterrorism sources point out that just as Russian marines will be instructed to single out rebel militias with recruits from Chechnya and the Caucasus, the Chinese marines will seek out and destroy Uighur fighters from the northern predominantly Muslim Chinese province of Xinjiang.

In the same way that Putin has no wish to see the Chechen fighters back in Russia, so too Chinese President Xi wants to prevent the Uighurs from returning home from the Syrian battlefields.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 28 Sep 2015 16:16

A tender which the IN should watch carefully. Specs "on paper",are one thing.operating the type is another.The Pakis famously found out that after their "specs superior" US arms lost out to humbler Indian Soviet and British wares in both '65 and '71. The cost aspect is another issue which OZ learnt the hard way operating the Collins,a too ambitious sub programme. An IN admiral once told me that he advised the OZ navy not to buy the Collins but they did...!

What Oz lacks is numbers of subs to be able to defend its large maritime interests and extensive coastline. Even the US ,India have only two seaboards to defend,but OZ uniquely has a 360 deg. threat.It would require at least 16 subs in all,and a larger patrol requirement for its northern and western Pacific seas. In the Indian Ocean,it faces no threat at all.India is no enemy and Indo-Oz relations are fast improving with the first ever naval exercises began this month. In the south,there's only Antartica.Therefore 4 subs each on the eastern and western seaboards plus 8 in the north,to be able to patrol the Indonesian-Phillipine region and Indo-China Sea,

http://thediplomat.com/2015/09/is-austr ... arine-bid/

Is Australia's New Prime Minster Bad News for Japan’s Submarine Bid?
Will Australia’s leadership change throw a wrench into Japan’s odds of winning the Collins replacement deal?

By Ankit Panda
September 28, 2015

The recent unexpected leadership shake-up in Australia raises several questions about how the country’s foreign affairs will be conducted under a new prime minister. After a leadership spill in the Liberal Party, Tony Abbott is out and Malcolm Turnbull is in. For Japan, whose Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. and Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. are in the running for Australia’s largest-ever defense contract—to replace the $20 billion Collins-class submarine—the change will be a topic of great interest. The Japanese firms, manufacturers for the Soru-class diesel-electric attack submarines, are competing with Germany’s ThyssenKrupp AG and France’s Direction des Constructions et Armes Navales (DCNS) Group.

On first glance, it appears that Turnbull’s ascent to the helm of the Liberal Party and, consequently, the prime ministership, will not factor in Japan’s favor. Malcolm Cook has a helpful post over at the Lowy Institute’s blog in which he highlights the close personal rapport that Shinzo Abe, Japan’s prime minister, and Tony Abbott had established over the past two years. Abe returned to power for a second term as prime minister, leading the Liberal Democratic Party in Japan, in December 2012, and Abbott became prime minister in September 2013. Turnbull, of course, isn’t the only new figure to appear at the top of the Australian government — Abbott’s defense minister, Kevin Andrews, has been replaced as well, by Marise Payne, the first woman to hold the post.

Strategic bilateral ties between Australia and Japan were better than ever during the two years of Abbott’s prime ministership: the two countries concluded a free trade agreement (JAEPA) and consulted on security issues, both independently and trilaterally with the United States. Japan even participated in this year’s Talisman Saber U.S.-Australia military exercise, held in Australia.

Despite Abbott’s personal affinity for the Soryu and the option of working with Japan, domestic political factors led to the early 2015 announcement that the Collins-class replacement project would be open to a competitive international bidding process, with the possibility of constructing the new submarines in southern Australia. Incidentally, ahead of the announcement of the competitive bidding process, the Liberal Party held a leadership spill that ultimately failed to displace Abbott. Though the Collins project wasn’t a major cause of the leadership turmoil within the party, Abbott’s reframing of the issue was ultimately designed to assuage domestic constituents that the $20 billion defense deal wouldn’t lead to a hemorrhaging of jobs out of Australia. As Cook recounts, after the failed February spill motion, “the process for choosing submarines was hurriedly revised at a rushed news conference in Adelaide where the defense minister was surrounded by the Liberal members of parliament from South Australia, the self-named ‘Defense State.’”

It wouldn’t be a great surprise if Turnbull were more sensitive to domestic political factors than Abbott. Of course, this means that the Soryu could be in trouble. Recently, both members of the Liberal Party and the opposition Labor Party wrote the new prime minister to emphasize that the Collins-replacement must be built in Australia.

However, in a sign that may be encouraging for the future of bilateral Japan-Australia strategic ties (if not the Soryu bid in particular), Turnbull has kicked off his term as prime minister by citing China as one of the greatest security threats to the Asia-Pacific region. Turnbull additionally said that, in the South China Sea, “China would be better advised, in its own interest frankly, not to be pushing the envelope there.” The Abbott government continued the measured approach to China that had been laid by his predecessors. Turnbull hasn’t suggested a major strategic shift, but his comments didn’t go unnoticed in China; the Chinese foreign ministry described his remarks as “counter-productive” and suggested that Australia stick to its tried-and-tested approach of not taking sides on territorial disputes.

Beyond Australian politics, Japan isn’t doing itself any favors with the Soryu sale lately. As I’ve written before for The Diplomat, though the Soryu appeared to be a technical slam-dunk for Japan, outclassing its German and French competition on most counts in a spec sheet comparison, Japan still has a challenging task ahead of it. First, after emerging from decades where it did not sell offensive weapons to other states under a self-imposed weapons export ban, Tokyo’s sales savvy has been somewhat lacking. In a competitive bidding process, Tokyo’s French and German competitors, with more experience on the sales side of these sorts of deal, may be gaining an advantage. Second, the cost of the Soryus has become an issue lately. Coinciding with the leadership spill in Australia, reports emerged that several prominent former Japanese military personnel had cautioned Australia that the costs of the Soryu would balloon beyond current estimates. Many of these same officials questioned the ability of Australian shipyards to handle the construction of the Soryus.

Australia is expected to award a contract for Collins-class replacement project either by the end of this year or early in 2016. For Japan and Abe, seeing the contract awarded to Mitsubishi and Kawasaki would be a major coup as Tokyo moves toward becoming a normal participant in the global defense industry. But regardless of the Australian government’s decision, there is little reason to think that under Turnbull, Tokyo and Canberra will strategically diverge.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby TSJones » 28 Sep 2015 17:41

^^^^^

you conveniently forgot America's third coast: the Gulf of Mexico including the Florida Straits and portions of the Caribbean.

there are a number of German subs sunk there, one a few miles from Louisiana coast as well a whole lot of US shipping during WWII. Thanks to Admiral Ernest King who was only concerned about Japan initially. He lived and breathed only for the destruction of Japan after Pearl Harbor. The Germans called it their "Happy Time" in operation Drum Beat..

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 28 Sep 2015 18:18

Not conveniently forgot,but it was considered a two-ocean war.Read "At dawn we slept",the best book written on the Pearl Harbor attack and the search for scapegoats,etc. as to how and why the US failed to prevent the attack,despite a lot of advance diplomatic and mil info and intel that was incorrectly analysed.Adm.Kimmel and Gen Short,in charge of the defence of Hawaii never expected the attack and were the principal offenders,along with the US State Dept. and White House.But there was so much of intel "noise" that Clauswitze's famous "fog of war" applied to the information war that was lost,despite the US breaking the Japanese code!

King was appointed commander of the U.S. Fleet following the Pearl Harbor attack. He felt that the Congressional investigations "had merely produced scapegoats to satisfy the popular demand for fixing the responsibility for the Pearl Harbor debacle. It seemed to him that Admiral Kimmel and General Short had been sacrificed to political expediency."


Fundamentally,the US failed to understand the psychology and paranoia of the Japanese/Oriental mind. It still fails to understand the different mindests and cultures around the world,why its diplomacy and mil expeditions have been utter failures as we are seeing today in the MEast. The greatest danger today is that the US will misunderstand the mindset of the PRC which will lead to catastrophic results not just for Asia but the whole world. The PRC are the potential Nazis of the 21st century.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby TSJones » 28 Sep 2015 18:41

The PRC are the potential Nazis of the 21st century.


oh good grief.......anti-democratic, top down, hierarchical, with an ax to grind about western colonialism and Japanese war crimes but not genocidal.

my fourth grade teacher was a POW under the Chinese in Korea War,. He said they treated him OK compared to the North Koreans.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby TSJones » 28 Sep 2015 18:49

and by the way, you certainly don't seemed too concerned about the Russians selling military gear to the Chinese.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby kit » 29 Sep 2015 01:31

http://new.thelastamericanvagabond.com/top-news/nuclear-submariner-blows-wikileaks-whistle/

On her majesty's nuclear submarine .. a pretty damnING report on some of the "worlds most sophisticated submarines"

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby kit » 29 Sep 2015 01:33

One wonders how many nuke submarine accidents are not reported ..especially the much vaunted western ones !

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Kashi » 29 Sep 2015 05:53

TSJones wrote:oh good grief.......anti-democratic, top down, hierarchical, with an ax to grind about western colonialism and Japanese war crimes but not genocidal.


Not sure if Tibetans and the 30 million who were sacrificed during the 'Cultural revolution' and 'The Great leap forward' would agree.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 29 Sep 2015 07:00

here is the british sub docked in fujairah

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Fujai ... e830267bf7

you can see her rudder and pumpjet propulsor in the clear water. the reactor must be shutdown or off the electric grid as there seems to be a commerical type generator supplying minimal hotel power via that blue cable. looks undamaged externally.

bartania will likely have to lease a ship carrying vessel to cart it back to old blighty.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... S_Cole.jpg

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby shiv » 29 Sep 2015 07:28

kit wrote:http://new.thelastamericanvagabond.com/top-news/nuclear-submariner-blows-wikileaks-whistle/

On her majesty's nuclear submarine .. a pretty damnING report on some of the "worlds most sophisticated submarines"

This reads like a worthless leak - but it only sounds disastrous to someone who has no idea what submarine life is like. I am no submariner but I do recommend an absolutely fantastic book on Indian Foxtrots written by Indian Navy Commodore Franklin. It is a charming account of stories from all the Foxtrots condensed into a fictional Indian Navy Foxtrot called "Vanshali" using one letter from each of the names of all of India's Foxtrots - humorous and eminently readable while offering a wealth of information about submarines to an absolute newbie like me.
Foxtrots of the Indian Navy
Much of the stuff in that "leak" can be understood by simply reading about submarine life - some of the stuff in that leak is nothing extraordinary - and sounds like a presstitute on a sub visit

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 01 Oct 2015 10:10

Hectic competition for the OZ sub contract between the Japanese,germans,French and Swedes.Rront runners are the Japanese and Germans.With a new PM,less inclined to gift the deal to the Japanese,the Germans see a window of opportunity which they are swiftly trying to enter. Offering a potential frigate design to be bult in Oz,would give the Germans an added advantage as the Japanese do not have a suitable FFG for sale and have no experience of exports of the def wares.

http://indaily.com.au/news/2015/09/30/g ... ubs-talks/
German heavyweight jets in for subs talks
Tom Richardson | 30 September 2015
An Air Warfare Destroyer under construction at ASC. Photo: Nat Rogers/InDaily

ADelaide | The head of Germany’s navy will tour Adelaide’s ASC shipyards tomorrow, headlining a glut of European delegations jetting in this week as international jockeying for lucrative defence contracts heats up.

Vice Admiral Andreas Krause, Germany’s Chief of Navy, is in town today with an entourage for high-level talks to press his country’s case for consideration in the contentious Future Submarine Competitive Evaluation Process.

He’ll also emphasise Germany’s interest in overseeing Australia’s replacement frigate fleet, which the Federal Government has pledged will be largely built in South Australia.

A separate delegation from Danish shipbuilder Odense Maritime Technology is also visiting Adelaide ahead of a “competitive evaluation process” for the $39 billion frigate program.

And DCNS, the French contender for the submarine contract, will host a public forum at the Convention Centre tomorrow to outline its Future Submarine vision, after a Japanese delegation conducted a similar public relations exercise last month.

The forum will be opened by Defence SA CEO Andy Keough.

Krause will dine tonight with Acting Defence Industries Minister Kyam Maher, ahead of a formal meeting.

Over the next two days, both the German and Danish contingents will tour the Techport facility at Osborne, which has already hosted a conga-line of touring delegations in recent months.

“The delegations continue the heightened global interest in SA’s maritime capabilities, which has seen several foreign government and industry delegations this year,” Maher said in a statement.

“The visits are a wonderful opportunity to reinforce first-hand our readiness to partner with the Federal Government’s preferred international partners for both the Future Submarines and Future Frigates programs.”

He said SA was “fully engaged” with Germany, France and Japan, the three potential partners in the submarine program, all of whom have indicated a willingness to build the vessels locally.

The head of Germany’s Navy is in Adelaide this week – and he will register that country’s interest in both submarines and surface ships.

In recent days, the Federal Government has indicated a preference for a local build, although its understood this position had been reached prior to the recent leadership spill and subsequent reshuffle, which saw the defence portfolio handed to Marise Payne.

However, the industry remains concerned that the original 12-vessel submarine procurement plan will be whittled down to eight when the Defence White Paper is finally published later this year, and could be as low as six.

InDaily understands a contract for “six to eight” submarines is favoured, which could mean an initial six-vessel build with an option for two more.

But Chris Burns, chief executive of SA’s Defence Teaming Centre, says the “history of governments exercising options is that they don’t”.

He argues on neither the Oberon nor Collins class submarine was an option for further work taken up, nor was it exercised for a fourth Air Warfare Destroyer.

“Based on that history, if they come out and say ‘we only want eight in a contract’, the industry can only set up for eight,” Burns said.

“And if you’re only buying eight, that can’t get a continuous build, which means we’ll fall back into the old pattern of the ‘Valley of Death’ peaks and troughs, and the workforce will dissipate.”

He said the continuous build was not about guaranteeing employment, but about maintaining and enhancing expertise.

It’s not about making sure you’ve got to keep people employed

“There’s a point where you become export competitive, because you get so good at it,” he said.

“That’s why countries like Japan just build a sub every year – it’s industrial policy, so they can be efficient and effective…and become export capable.”

He said Australia needed to develop a “strategic plan” not just for defence but for general shipbuilding, so that the industry could become a world leader and bid for more international contracts of its own.

But Burns says the industry is nonetheless more confident with the Commonwealth’s recent rhetoric, after an offshore build appeared almost certain at this point last year.

“We’re definitely more heartened…all three contenders have come out and said they’re willing to build in Australia and in some cases would prefer to,” he said.

“It looks like we’ve got a Prime Minister who understands the economics of it.”


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 07 Oct 2015 16:35

Mi-14
Russia Set to Unveil Upgraded Anti-Submarine Helicopter Production Project
19:06 06.10.2015

Andrey Shibitov, the Russian Hellicopters' deputy CEO, said that a respective engineering note has already been prepared for the Russian Defense Ministry, containing a description of new Mi-14 and an outline of the company’s approaches to the project.

MOSCOW (Moscow region) (Sputnik) – The Russian Helicopters company is ready to start research and development (R&D) activities for the resumption of manufacturing of the Mi-14 counter-submarine helicopter in 2016, the company’s deputy CEO said Tuesday.

The legendary Mi-14 nuclear-capable submarine-hunting amphibious helicopter can be used in both aerial and maritime operations.

"We are ready to start conducting R&D for the resumption of [production of] Mi-14-class helicopter [NATO reporting name Haze] on a new technological level in 2016," Andrey Shibitov told RIA Novosti.

According to him, a respective engineering note has already been prepared for the Russian Defense Ministry, containing a description of the machine and an outline of the company’s approaches to the project.



A Mil Mi-8 helicopter

© Sputnik/ Vladimir Baranov

Russia's Mi-8 Helicopter Ready for Arctic Duty
Two scenarios for the project's development are currently being considered, either upgrade with local modernization of the system or a substantially updated Mi-14, with conceptually new equipment and new avionics, as well as blades and Russian VK-2500 turboshaft engines boosting a more powerful TA-14 auxiliary power unit, he added.

The company is currently participating in the Innovation Day of the Russian Defense Ministry exhibition that kicked off on Monday at the ministry’s exhibition center in Kubinka, close to Moscow.

The Mi-14 helicopters were phased out in favor of Kamov Ka-27 helicopters in 1992 as part of a plan to downsize the Russian Armed Forces after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/russia/20151006/ ... z3nsnhE6ef

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 09 Oct 2015 20:02

http://news.usni.org/2015/09/30/chinas- ... 234c8f82d4
China’s First Domestic Aircraft Carrier Almost Certainly Under Construction

By: Sam LaGrone
September 30, 2015 7:09 PM • Updated: October 1, 2015 11:35 AM

An April image of a ship that is almost certainly China’s first domestic aircraft carrier at the Dalian shipyard in northern China obtained on the Chinese language Internet.

China has quietly begun construction on its first domestic aircraft carrier in the same northern Chinese shipyard that refurbished the People’s Liberation Army Navy’s current Soviet-era carrier, USNI News has learned.

Several sources confirmed to USNI News that an unknown shipbuilding project — first noticed publically by Jane’s in late February — is almost without a doubt the bones of the PLAN’s first domestically-built carrier.

Sources pointed USNI News to an April photograph that emerged on the Chinese language Internet of a ship under construction at the Dalian yard believed to be the super structure of the PLAN’s second carrier.

Further late September satellite photographs published by Jane’s last week show a ship that corresponds to the dimensions of the refurbished Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier Liaoning — a ship with a beam of about 115 feet and a length of 886 feet.

Jane’s stopped short of a definitive determination that the mystery ship at Dalian was a new carrier — the Type 001A — but did compare the construction methodology of the ship to Soviet-era builds on the original Kuznetsov in the 1980s.

The interest to what is in the Dalian dry dock — once the home for Liaoning’s refit after China purchased the carrier — has been a hot topic of conversation for international naval watchers.

One, retired U.S. Navy Capt. Chris Carlson, told USNI News given how quickly the Dalian yard builds commercial ships the timing of construction pointed toward a military platform.

“We’re talking eight months from March when they say the initial sections began going up,” he said on Wednesday.
“If it was commercial ship it would be done already.”

Carlson said the Jane’s photographs indicate the ship is being built without a well deck which would likely rule out a big deck amphibious warship.

“The logical explanation is that it’s a carrier,” he said.

China’s Four Carrier Navy

China’s intent to start it’s own domestic carrier program has been hinted at in official documents and scattered state-controlled press reports but the central government and the PLAN have been far from explicit in expressing a complete carrier vision.

If the construction of the first domestic carrier has commenced it confirms the rough outline naval analysts have constructed around the effort.

“For the past several years, analysts have believed that China plans for a force of around four full-sized aircraft carriers — including the active Liaoning,” Eric Wertheim author of U.S. Naval Institute’s Combat Fleets of the World told USNI News on Wednesday..
“If the hull now under construction does in fact turn out to be a new Chinese aircraft carrier being built at Dalian shipyard, it confirms the PLAN’s commitment to carrier based naval aviation and illustrates their growing desire for more power projection capabilities.”

The first public inkling China was set on creating a a domestically-built carrier fleet emerged about five years ago as a minor footnote to a voluminous 2010 Ocean Development Report.

“In 2009, China put forward an idea and plan for building aircraft carriers. These indicate China has entered the historical era of building a maritime superpower,” read a translation of the report.

The buried reference came two years before China commissioned Liaoning.

In early 2014 a hastily deleted report in Chinese state-controlled media quoted a regional official saying the PLAN had their sights set on four carriers.

Four carriers would mimic the U.S. legacy deployment model for carriers —one carrier deployed for three in training or maintenance. It wouldn’t be the first time China has operated like the U.S. The PLAN has borrowed several other carrier tropes from the West down to dressing Liaoning’s flight deck sailors in the same corresponding bright colors as the U.S. Navy.

While the ship in the Dalian dry dock is — with infinitesimal doubt — the Type 001A domestic carrier, several questions remain as to what features the new carrier will bring.

Liaoning has been an effective tool for Chinese blue-water navy aspirational messaging but it’s less effective as an actual warship. The combination of the skip-jump configuration of the carrier’s flight deck and the reportedly underpowered engines of the Shenyang J-15 Flying Shark fighter have led to assumptions that the J-15s would only be able to launch from Liaoning with a limited lethal payload — if any weapons at all.

China would be able to mitigate some of the J-15 weight issues with a catapult- assisted take-off but arrested recovery (CATOBAR) system on its future carriers, however its unclear is China has the technical wherewithal to include the scheme on its ships or if the Kuznetsov design could be modified to accommodate a CATOBAR system.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 13 Oct 2015 19:55

11356 Ships similar to Talwar class under Sea Trials , VLS Shtil-1 SAM with range 70 km is fitted for first time on this type


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Paul » 13 Oct 2015 19:58

My gut feel is that Indian navy will hold off decision on INS Vishal until the first Chinese carrier is pushed off the dock. This will give the Navy a feel of the opponent's size and girth

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Singha » 13 Oct 2015 20:17

the 054A PLAN ships have had VLS Shtil for some years now. they have churned out a huge number of these FFGs.

the keel size of the carrier itself will give a good indication of its size to those who know. we need not wait another 5 yrs to get that info.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby srai » 14 Oct 2015 03:47

Paul wrote:My gut feel is that Indian navy will hold off decision on INS Vishal until the first Chinese carrier is pushed off the dock. This will give the Navy a feel of the opponent's size and girth


By which time the Chinese will be well underway to build a handful of carriers while India will be building just one more of a new design and waiting a decade to induct it. Carrier quantities gap is going to widen over the next decade.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 14 Oct 2015 10:44

Singha wrote:the 054A PLAN ships have had VLS Shtil for some years now. they have churned out a huge number of these FFGs.


The chinese use HQ-16 which is a clone of BUK-M1 has a range of around 32 km.

The Shtil-1 VLS is based on BUK-M2 and has a range of 50 Km and can attack 12 targets from IMDS
In St. Petersburg, will show the ship's air defense system "Calm 1"


Scientific and Production Enterprise "Start", which is part of the holding "Aviation" will show at the VI International Maritime Defense Show (IMDS-2013) in St. Petersburg, the new ship's anti-aircraft missile system "Calm 1" mid-range. This is stated in the press release of the holding "Aviation" Received "Heathcliff". IMDS-2013 takes place from 3 to 7 July.

Complex "Calm 1", created as a replacement for outdated defense systems "Hurricane", includes modules with launchers of anti-aircraft missiles and fire control systems. Each set may comprise one to three combat rockets modules 12 each. "Calm-1" is designed to be installed on ships of various sizes. Own radar air defense system does not hold information on the purpose it will receive from the three-axis radar ship.

"Calm 1" is able to destroy air targets at ranges of up to 50 kilometers and at altitudes up to 15,000 meter. It is capable of firing up to 12 air targets simultaneously. The missiles are equipped with complex fragmentation warhead and can hit targets flying at a speed of up to 830 meters per second. "Calm 1" is designed to protect the ships from anti-ship missiles, aircraft, helicopters and small-sized vessels.

In St. Petersburg, will show the ship's air defense system "Calm 1"


Image
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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 14 Oct 2015 17:09

http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news/cont ... 3&cid=1101
China seals deal with Pakistan for eight submarines
Staff Reporter 2015-10-14
China's Type 039A submarine, of which the S-20 is an export version. (Internet photo)

China has finalized its largest ever arms deal, which will deliver a total of eight new submarines to Pakistan.

Pakistan's minister for defence production, Tanveer Hussain, confirmed that the US$4-5 billion deal was sealed recently while opening a new exhibition center at the country's Defence Export Promotion Organization last week.

Four of the submarines will be built in China, with the other four to be constructed in Pakistan as part of a technology transfer agreement. Construction will take place simultaneously in both countries, though Hussain did not indicate when it would commence. Pakistan will also build a submarine training center in Karachi, the country's main port city, Hussain added.

Neither side has revealed the model of the new submarines, though most analysts believe they will be the air independent propulsion (AIP) equipped variant of the S-20, an export version of China's Type 039A/Type 041 class diesel-electric submarine.

According to US-based political news website Duowei News, China has been transferring weapons technology to Pakistan for some time, starting with aircraft, then helicopters and now submarines. The two sides have also co-developed the PAC JF-17 Thunder (or FC-1 Xiaolong) multi-role combat aircraft, which made its first overseas sale to the Sri Lanka Air Force earlier this year.

The new deal will modernize Pakistan's submarine fleet, which currently has eight subs, including three French Agosta-class 90-B subs and two Agosta-class 70-B subs.

Tom Waldwyn, research analyst in the Defence and Military Analysis Programme at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, told the US-based Defense News that the capabilities of Chinese submarines are not something which can be easily determined as it benefits countries on both sides to keep this a secret.

Waldwyn notes that if the subs are indeed AIP S-20s, they would give Pakistan "greater operational flexibility through increased endurance."

Military analyst Brian Cloughley on the other hand notes that Pakistan will remain reliant on China for arms even with the transfer of technology. "It is in the interests of both parties to have as much as possible manufactured in Pakistan, but of course the really high-tech systems will have to come from China, as it's simply not cost-effective for Pakistan to gear up to make them," Cloughley said.

China's nationalistic Global Times tabloid said China has now overtaken Germany to become the world's third-largest arms exporter.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby uddu » 15 Oct 2015 21:59

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=91501

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (NNS) -- China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) midshipmen training vessel Zheng He (Type 679, Hull 81) arrived at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Oct. 12 and is expected to stay until Oct. 16.

As part of a planned series of military-to-military exchanges between the two nations, Zheng He will be hosted by the guided-missile cruiser USS Chosin (CG 65).

Chinese and U.S. naval officers will conduct dialogues to build confidence and mutual understanding.

According to Capt. Eric Weilenman, chief of staff of Naval Surface Group, Middle Pacific, the visit is a good chance for both navies' Sailors to interact with one another.

"It's a great opportunity for a mil-to-mil exchange, to develop trust, build confidence in each other's abilities, a great opportunity for the midshipmen to experience Hawaii and to interact with the host ship Sailors," said Weilenman. "They've planned soccer games, tug-of-war, basketball games -- basically an opportunity to interact with our Sailors."

According to Capt. Kevin Brand, commanding officer of USS Chosin, during the ship's visit, U.S. and Chinese Sailors plan to engage in deckplate level events, giving both navies the opportunity to exchange professional knowledge.

"While the Zheng He is here, we'll be doing some naval planning exercises on board. We're going to do a search and rescue planning event -- a table-top exercise -- to show them how we go about planning a search and rescue," said Brand. "We'll also do a recovery exercise where we'll actually put a man in the water to show them how we would recover on board the ship and do some medical care. In addition to that, we're also going to do a damage control exercise, where we're going to share some of our best practices."

The Chinese and U.S are visiting and training with each other. No problem not even a mention of any media report. From tomorrow onward the Malabar 2015 will be broadcasted by the Indian Media. Look at how many times China China will be mentioned.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 16 Oct 2015 10:36

The sinking of the Israeli destroyer Eilat by the Egyptian navy in the late '60s by a Soviet missile boat,was the most stunning naval development since WW2. The development of the rail gun,lasers and UCAVs which will in the future operate from the decks of CVs ,are technologically the most significant in the 21st century.However,tactically and strategically,the Caspian Sea cruise missile attack is as significant as the sinking of the Eilat,as it demonstrates the enormous reach of the Russian Navy and the striking capability of its small corvettes,let alone larger warships and subs.US Tomahawk capability has been well known for a couple of decades.This has given it a signal advantage over the rest of the world's navies. But it relies primarily upon its carrier battle groups to weild power anywhere on the globe. This capability is now being called into question.

http://sputniknews.com/analysis/2015101 ... emacy.html
Has Russia Now Demonstrated Its Ability to Challenge US Naval Supremacy?
21:24 14.10.2015
Mexican journalist Alfredo Jalife-Rahme believes that the success of the Caspian Flotilla's recent operation to attack ISIL targets in Syria with cruise missiles has demonstrated Russia's growing ability to challenge the US's global naval supremacy.

Is the Caspian Sea Fleet a Game-Changer?
In an article for Mexican daily newspaper Le Jornada, Jalife-Rahme cited Moscow-based political analyst Rostislav Ishchenko, who recently wrote that the launch of Kalibr-class missiles by the Caspian Flotilla last week caught Washington completely off-guard, and that with this move, Russia "thus put an end to the US's global naval supremacy."

"Perhaps someone might consider my assertion to be rash," Jalife-Rahme commented, "but it is probably no coincidence that two days after the launch of the Russian cruise missiles, the US aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt suddenly left the Persian Gulf, where it had been deployed since April of this year."

And with this, the analyst noted, "now, for the first time since 2007, not a single US aircraft carrier is left on duty in the Middle East."

Kalibr-NK: The Russian Cruise Missile That Shocked the World
Jalife-Rahme recalled that "the USS Theodore Roosevelt, with its five thousand sailors and 65 combat aircraft, had arrived in the region in late April, serving as a springboard for US aviation's (rather ineffective) attacks against Islamic State positions in Iraq, Syria and [against militants] in Afghanistan."

"The Pentagon says that air strikes are now being carried out from bases in Turkey, home to about half-a-dozen USAF F-16s, but this is clearly not enough to close the gap formed by the departure of the aircraft carrier," the analyst continued.

Late last week, commenting on the Caspian Flotilla's attacks against ISIL positions in Syria, Ishchenko had suggested in an analysis for RIA Novosti that prior to the strikes, "not only the Caspian Flotilla, but also the Black Sea and Baltic Fleets, were considered by the US as potential enemy forces capable of only of defending their assigned coastal territories, catching smugglers and poachers, and conducting amphibious operations in their enclosed waters." Now, the analyst argued, US planners will be forced to revise their assessments.

Jalife-Rahme noted that "perhaps Ishchenko is being braggadocious when he says that the launch of 26 Kalibr-class cruise missiles has deprived the US of global maritime superiority for many years to come. However, their use in combat did demonstrate to the world that to destroy their adversary, the Russian Navy no longer needs to be close to the Eastern Mediterranean, in the Persian Gulf, in the English Channel, off the coast of Norway, in the North Atlantic or in the Pacific Ocean north of Hawaii."

Russia’s Tiny Missile Boats Pack Huge Punch – Military Expert
Commenting on the implications of the Russian demonstration of force, the journalist suggested that "we will have to wait for the opinion of the heirs of US navy admiral and geostrategist Alfred Thayer Mahan," who once asserted, at the beginning of the last century, that no one in the world could ever challenge the advance of US naval power.

The journalist recalled that US military planners had earlier assumed that in order to destroy one carrier strike group of the US Navy, the Russian fleet would have to fire a volley of not less than one hundred missiles, which would require the concentration of almost all the ships (missile cruisers, missile destroyers, and multipurpose nuclear attack submarines) of either the Northern or Pacific Fleets.

Furthermore, strategists had earlier believed that each of the two Russian fleets not trapped in an enclosed sea could, in the worst case scenario, cause some (perhaps even significant) damage to only one carrier group, after which they would virtually cease to exist, with the supremacy of the remaining US forces along the world's oceans assured.

These assumptions, in the journalist's view, were fundamentally challenged by last week's missile launches in the Caspian, with even the smaller of the Russian Navy's ships proving capable of launching deadly volleys from distances of several thousand kilometers.

Missile ship Dagestan enters service in Caspian Flotilla

Cruise Missile Strike on ISIL: Success for Russia, Troubles for NATO
Citing Beijing's reaction to the missile strikes, Jalife-Rahmne noted that the launch of the Kalibrs could be "interpreted as a warning to the United States. Thus, the Kremlin is sending a signal to the White House that it is time to sit down at the negotiating table to begin a discussion aimed at defusing tensions over events in both Syria and Ukraine." It is a suggestion with which the journalist, for his part, agreed.

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/analysis/2015101 ... z3ohrZFynp

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Austin » 23 Oct 2015 16:40

Iranian warships arrive in Russian port of Astrakhan (Video)

The small ship seems to have big EO system

https://www.rt.com/in-motion/319429-ira ... ian-fleet/

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby brar_w » 23 Oct 2015 20:24

Nick_S wrote:I guess Zumwalt will probably be used for testing rail-gun at some point.


Zumwalt already has the technology that would be refined that would allow future vessels to house the EMRG. The electric architecture is that aspect that is an enabler. The Rail Gun will be tested aboard the Joint High Speed Vessel next year, and the Zumwalt may get the weapon as a permanent fixture further down the road. Its much simpler and cheaper to test the weapon on the JHSV than on an operational ship that itself would be going through the pains of a first in class vessel. It is no big secret that the Zumwalt class is a leading class for the next destroyers largely based on the design and that fact is pretty much the only thing that allowed the USN to keep a 2 or 3 ship class alive. That program is probably about 8 years from launch while they may decide to put an EMRG on one of the Zumwalt ships while the next destroyer is designed and developed.

Here is a JHSV with a rail-gun mounted on it. Tests will begin in the summer of next year.

http://i1.wp.com/news.usni.org/wp-conte ... 69-010.jpg

http://news.usni.org/2015/04/14/navsea- ... sv-trenton

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Manish_P » 24 Oct 2015 19:46


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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 26 Oct 2015 18:44

The RN's latest DDG,the Type 26 "frigate" details are below.They will cost a whopping $1.36B each.Their costs and weaponry must be compared with our next batch of P-15s and the Kol class P-15As,which are broadly similar. From a casual dekko,the Type-26s are more heavily armed than our P-15s,with a greater loadout of missiles and anti-air/missile guns and BPDMS.Our P-15A/B designs also have a lot of extra space/combat potential which should materialise in the future.

http://www.strategypage.com/dls/article ... 5-2015.asp
Type 26 Secret Revealed
by James Dunnigan
October 25, 2015

After several years of silence Britain finally revealed the cost of their new Type 26 frigates. Each of the 13 new 8,000 ton ships will cost $1.36 billion. The original (2010) cost per ship estimate was less than half that ($536 million). That explains the reluctance to discuss costs over the last few years.

Construction on the first Type 26 begins in 2016 with the first one entering service in 2021. These ships are 148.5 meters (487 feet) long and have a top speed of 52 kilometers an hour. Range is 13,000 kilometers (at 28 kilometers an hour) before refueling and resupply is necessary. The crew of 118 also operates a large number of electronic and weapons systems including 72 VLS cells, 48 with anti-aircraft missiles and the other 24 with anti-ship or anti-submarine missiles or cruise missiles for land targets. There will be several tubes for anti-submarine torpedoes. There will be one 127mm (5 inch) gun, two 30mm autocannon and two 20mm Phalanx cannon anti-missile systems. There will be two 7.62mm six barrel rotating machine-guns and four medium (7.62mm) machine-guns mounted where needed. One or two helicopters can be carried, each of which can carry four anti-ship missiles or two anti-submarine torpedoes. If one helicopter is carried it is possible to carry two or more smaller UAVs.

There are accommodations for 60 more people (troops, commandos, other specialists or civilians or more sailors) than the crew. Electronics include the usual air search and targeting radar, sonar and fire control systems for a ship of this size. Note that a ship of this displacement would be called a destroyer in the United States (and in Europe a few decades ago) but the less menacing designation “frigate” is now preferred in Europe.

The Type 26 replaces 13 smaller Type 23 frigates. These 4,900 ton ships were armed with eight Harpoon anti-ship missiles, a 114mm (4.5-inch) MK 8 main gun, 30mm close range guns, several types of 7.62mm machine-guns, four torpedo tubes (and 24 anti-submarine torpedoes), and the Sea Wolf anti-aircraft missile system. There was also one helicopter. Adjusting for inflation the Type 23s cost about $300 million each. These ships entered service between 1991 and 2002 and had smaller crews (185) than were normal for a ship that size. What made this work was a new system that provided additional maintenance personnel when the ship returned to port, to get the work done that the smaller crew could not handle at sea. But between when this plan was approved and when the ships entered service the navy budget suffered unexpected cuts and the special maintenance program was one of the items that disappeared. The understaffed crews were ordered to do the best they could, but the Type 23s always suffered from maintenance and crew morale problems. Because of this the Type 26 had more automation and accommodations for more sailors as well as a better thought out program for regular maintenance at sea.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby John » 26 Oct 2015 20:22

Phillip,
GCS carries CAMM missiles which are slightly bigger than Barak 1 and are much smaller and shorter ranged than Aster 30 or Barak 8. Considering Delhi carries 32 Barak 1 not sure how you can say former carries bigger weapon load? But overall GCS is impressive ship design and bigger than Kolkata in displacement.

But imo an over kill a great example of scope creep, hope we avoid the same with P17A. If anyone thinks these are going to cost less than 1.5 bill each by the time the construction begins they are fooling themselves. Considering RN can easily purchase or build Burke clones for slightly less which is far better alternative.

That said P 15 family is starting to show its age as we had discussed before and IMO the future DDG design will likely be streched version of P 17a. If cost is not a factor a brand new 10k ton destroyer design similar to what chinese are doing.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby member_24684 » 27 Oct 2015 08:26

.
Computer illustrated images of RN's Type 26

Image

Image

Image

Impressive

72 VLS cells, 48 with anti-aircraft missiles and the other 24 with anti-ship or anti-submarine missiles or cruise missiles for land targets. There will be several tubes for anti-submarine torpedoes. There will be one 127mm (5 inch) gun, two 30mm autocannon and two 20mm Phalanx cannon anti-missile systems. There will be two 7.62mm six barrel rotating machine-guns and four medium (7.62mm) machine-guns mounted where needed. One or two helicopters can be carried, each of which can carry four anti-ship missiles or two anti-submarine torpedoes. If one helicopter is carried it is possible to carry two or more smaller UAVs.

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Re: International Naval News and Discussion

Postby Philip » 27 Oct 2015 12:29

What can China do? The region and islands are hotly disputed. China's claims to the rest of the world are absurd. If "XI Gins" and his gargantuan ego want to underscore his authority over the islands,he should remember Chairman Mao's dictum,that "a loud fart is better than a long speech".Methinks that China and XI Gins have already blinked. No amount of ranting and raving from the mandarins of Zhongnanhai will stop the USN from plying in "harm's way".[b]XI Gins may have got a ride in the Queen's gilded coach in Blighty,but in the Indo-China Sea he is not the "Almighty"!


https://www.rt.com/news/319813-china-us ... r-islands/
[/b]
China furious after US Navy destroyer passes disputed islands in S. China Sea
Published time: 27 Oct, 2015
The US Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen © John Hageman

China has slammed the US for ignoring repeated warnings and allowing one of its destroyers to sail close to artificial islands created by Beijing in the South China Sea. It said the USS Lassen’s actions “damage peace and stability in the region.”

"These actions of the US warship are a threat to the sovereignty and security of China, and safety of people living on the islands; they damage peace and stability in the region. In this regard, the Chinese side expresses extreme dissatisfaction and strongly protests," the statement posted on China's Foreign Ministry website says, according to Interfax.

A US defense official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told AP on Monday that a US Navy ship had sailed near the artificial islands. The Navy was planning to send one of its destroyers on a patrol route that goes within 12 sea miles of the islands, previous reports stated. The US vessel could have been accompanied by one or two US Navy surveillance planes, which have repeatedly conducted reconnaissance flights in the area, an unnamed US official told Reuters. According to the US Navy, additional patrols could follow in the coming weeks.

The USS Lassen destroyer was scheduled to pass by the Subi and Mischief reefs, which belong to the Spratly archipelago, over which China claims sovereignty. Both reefs were initially submerged before China took up an ambitious dredging project aimed at turning them into islands.

READ MORE: US plans to send destroyer to China’s artificial islands – reports

Chinese authorities monitored and followed the US warship when it “illegally" entered the waters near the disputed islands, the Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday.

The statement stresses that the passage of the American destroyer was made "despite repeated warnings" from Beijing.

"China consistently respects and defends the freedom of navigation and flight of any country in accordance with international law. However, it firmly opposes any country harming [China's] sovereignty and security under the pretext of freedom of navigation and flight," Beijing said.

It added: "China resolutely defends its sovereignty, security and rights in the maritime space. The Chinese side is ready to give an appropriate response to any country's provocations."


The Foreign Ministry noted that China hopes the US "react properly to this stance, will immediately correct the committed mistakes, and won’t resort to provocative actions that threaten the sovereignty and security of China."

The US has sent its vessels on similar patrols, which strayed near parts of the Spratly reefs previously built up by Vietnam and the Philippines, Reuters added citing the US Defense Department.

The incident comes weeks ahead of several Asia-Pacific summits scheduled for the second half of November. Both US President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping are expected to attend. Under such circumstances, the patrol carries with it a risk of aggravating tensions between the two countries.

China is building several artificial islands in the disputed territory, to host radar stations, airstrips and other facilities. Critics insist they are for military purposes. Beijing argues the military aspect of its reclamation program is minimal and that the islands’ purpose is mostly civilian.

China believes the islands to be its sovereign territory, and strictly considers the 12-mile zone around the islands to be exclusively its territorial waters.


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