International Military Discussion

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ldev
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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby ldev » 23 Dec 2015 19:09

From Wiki on the Vulcan configuration:
Initial configurations of Vulcan will use the same Centaur upper stage as the Atlas V, with its existing RL-10 engines.


So it will not really offer any cost savings over the Russian RD-180. But more as an insurance policy in case the pressure against Russian engines does not ease up as you have said. The BE-4 co-development is more of the same...a second option.


Even if they spend a third to have it ready for the next flight there are substantial savings. However, most of those savings will be 'profit-margins' for the commercial business (not so much military since there is a cap)

I was under the impression that SpaceX is paid more for military launches, in the $90-120 million per launch vs $70 million for a commercial launch of the Falcon 9.

He is now firmly in the assured launched business with the Pentagon so he'll also be getting assured long term contracts just like ULA.


That he is, I think going forward at this point in time, he is slated to get about 33%-40% of the military business.

The reason I say that space is a passion for him is that when he made his big money after Paypal went public, he put in all the money that he got, about $200 million into SpaceX and Tesla. Unlike all other Silicon Valley billionaires who never even put money from one successful venture into the next. They rely on their new found credibility to get other people to put up money and put in only a token amount themselves. Musk in contrast not only put in everything he had into it, but at one stage in the early days when the Falcon 1 had one failure after another, he was on the verge of being so short on money (because the $200 million was all gone) that he and his then wife made plans to move back into her parent's basement and he begged/borrowed money to make payroll at Tesla and Space X. As you probably know, Google almost bought Tesla during that time.

But he was always taken seriously by people in the power structure by his sheer brilliance. Michael Griffin (who headed the Q branch of the C...I....A, the US Gov. seed capital investor for crazy and brilliant ideas) was one of his earliest backers as early as when Musk was trying to buy decommissioned Soviet ICBMs from the Russians, as his first launch vehicle, one of his mad ideas. Years later Michael Griffin became NASA's administrator.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 23 Dec 2015 19:18

I was under the impression that SpaceX is paid more for military launches, in the $90-120 million per launch vs $70 million for a commercial launch of the Falcon 9


For military launches their costs are most likely higher. The $90 million figure may be for GTO. Also, there is a broader look at the industry profit margins for different lines of business in the Pentagon and they usually come down hard and keep the number as low as they possibly can while also keeping industry healthy. In fact the main barrier to entry within the DOD for a large number of commercial companies and silicon valley firms is the low margin compared to the commercial side where they live (mostly high tech). I guess Bezos would love the margins given Amazon's track record :)

That he is, I think going forward at this point in time, he is slated to get about 33%-40% of the military business.

The reason I say that space is a passion for him is that when he made his big money after Paypal went public, he put in all the money that he got, about $200 million into SpaceX and Tesla. Unlike all other Silicon Valley billionaires who never even put money from one successful venture into the next. They rely on their new found credibility to get other people to put up money and put in only a token amount themselves. Musk in contrast not only put in everything he had into it, but at one stage in the early days when the Falcon 1 had one failure after another, he was on the verge of being so short on money (because the $200 million was all gone) that he and his then wife made plans to move back into her parent's basement and he begged/borrowed money to make payroll at Tesla and Space X. As you probably know, Google almost bought Tesla during that time.

But he was always taken seriously by people in the power structure by his sheer brilliance. Michael Griffin (who headed the Q branch of the C...I....A, the US Gov. seed capital investor for crazy and brilliant ideas) was one of his earliest backers as early as when Musk was trying to buy decommissioned Soviet ICBMs from the Russians, as his first launch vehicle, one of his mad ideas. Years later Michael Griffin became NASA's administrator.


No doubt he has an incredible story and has been highly successful at what he has tried.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby ldev » 23 Dec 2015 19:31

I guess Bezos would love the margins given Amazon's track record :)

:rotfl:
Good one!!

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby TSJones » 23 Dec 2015 19:43

Space X has also leased launch pad A at the Kennedy Space center and are rebuilding that. They plan to do their manned launches there as well as their Falcon heavy launches.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby TSJones » 23 Dec 2015 23:01

Falcon 9’s Second Stage Restart was Just as Important as Sticking the Landing

http://spacenews.com/falcon-9s-second-s ... e-landing/

While Falcon 9's on-target landing garnered the most attention, it was the second stage’s performance that positions SpaceX to conduct commercial operations the way it has long intend.
​PARIS — SpaceX’s successful deployment Dec. 21 of 11 Orbcomm machine-to-machine messaging satellites and the apparently clean return and landing of the upgraded Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage also validated the ability of the redesigned second-stage propulsion system to restart in orbit after a coast phase, SpaceX said.

​The mission’s first two goals – deploying Orbcomm into low Earth orbit and especially the on-target return of the first stage to its landing zone – were the focus of most of the attention during and after the launch.

​At one point in the SpaceX webcast of the launch the moderator had to remind viewers looking at SpaceX employees whooping and hugging after the landing that the mission’s main objective, after all, was to deploy the Orbcomm fleet.

​But it is the second stage’s performance that will position SpaceX to conduct commercial operations the way it has long intended. SpaceX said the second stage engine performed the full re-ignition and burn sequence needed for geostationary satellites.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby govardhanks » 24 Dec 2015 09:56

I don't know how much this would be applicable in real life scenario, but it seems light based microchips have made there way into labs.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby hnair » 24 Dec 2015 11:02

Why should a rocket lug up all that fuel needed for a retro-firing for transonic deceleration and a final soft landing, when good old air drag was doing it for free all these years? Why cant the precision landing on that round pad be done with GPS controllable ram-air parafoil chutes, using only those snap out legs of this design? Would have been cheaper and more practical

I dont see a business reason other than a brochure point. This is going the route of the STS

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby TSJones » 24 Dec 2015 16:09

One answer that ULA and maybe ESA is looking at, is to have a detachable engine compartment for the first stage. That is where the money is any ways.

The compartment would detach and parachute down where it would snatched in mid air by a helicopter of some sorts.

Don't scoff.

Back in the 60's before the electronics were good enough, the US had its spy satellites drop film canisters from space and they would be caught in mid air.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconnaissance_satellite

I realize a rocket engine(s) is far bigger but wiser heads than me say that it can be done.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby NRao » 29 Dec 2015 00:19

Lockheed secures $1.17bn contract from US DoD for F-35 programme

The US Department of Defense (DoD) has awarded a contract worth $1.17bn to Lockheed Martin Aeronautics to obtain the necessary parts and materials for the production of the F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter (JSF).

Under the terms of the advance acquisition contract, Lockheed will buy long lead time materials, parts, and components for the planned production of the 11th batch of F-35 aircraft.

The contract will ensure the advance procurement of materials for a total of 80 F-35A aircraft that includes 28 for the US Air Force (USAF), six each for Norway and Japan, four for Turkey, eight each for the Dutch and Australian governments, ten for Israel and South Korea.

The contract will also cover the production of seven F-35B aircraft including six for the US Marine Corps and one for the UK and four F-35C aircraft for the US Navy.

Additionally, it includes an indefinite contract action for the production of two F-35A aircraft for the USAF and F-35C aircraft for the US Navy.

Work under this project will be performed at facilities in the US, UK and Japan, and is scheduled to be completed in December 2019.

Currently under development in three versions, the F-35 JSF is a fifth-generation multi-role fighter aircraft designed to conduct an array of ground attack, reconnaissance and air defence missions with stealth capability.

The aircraft is expected to achieve full operational capability with the USAF by 2021 or 2022.

The Lockheed Martin team for this project includes Northrop Grumman, BAE Systems, Pratt and Whitney and Rolls-Royce.


"The F-35 JSF is a fifth-generation multi-role fighter aircraft designed to conduct an array of ground attack, reconnaissance and air defence missions with stealth capability."


Image

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby NRao » 29 Dec 2015 00:40

Image

brar_w
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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 29 Dec 2015 01:24

^ Neat graphic what it fails to mention is the fact that the Growler cannot jam all those radars on a mission and until the Next Generation Jammer arrives it would essentially need to pre-program (on the ground) for a diverse threat. Most of the radars you want gone are in the S,C and increasingly X band. Your Early warning radars don't require as much jamming as - depending on their quality - deceiving them using other means (decoys etc.). What it does however illustrate is the importance of the Future Growler and the Increment 1 Next Generation Jammer. With PA's now allowing the mid pods to now cover all of S, and C and a large portion of X at substantial power it only become significantly easier now to be flexible at a pace faster than the threat. The new pods are essentially software programmable and computer controlled with gallium nitride allowing incredible amounts of wideband coverage not possible even with GaAs. Until they arrive 4-6 years from now, this graphic of Boeing speaks only half the truth i.e. you would have to know the threat ahead of time, and you would have to spend time on the ground to configure the growler to be able to deal with the threat. The Next Gen. Jammer also triples the power generation of the RAM turbine from the current 27 Kw per pod.

Ironically the one threat that the current Growler setup does pretty well against is the low band threat that resides mostly in the L, UHF bands (mostly L). The last bit of upgrades to the low-band pods as less than a decade ago. In the mid-band the older pods struggle against wide band AESA radars. They can manage for now given the slow pace of global (and particularly the threat emitters) radar upgrades but soon that will change hence the need to upgrade the Growlers.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby NRao » 29 Dec 2015 04:13

^^^^^

Errrrrr. "emerging threats"


________________________________________________________________

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 29 Dec 2015 04:20

Yeah to counter emerging threats because they wanted to lobby for more orders, but the point is that the current growler has limitations despite its power even in the current threat environment, as are all other EW solutions that aim at support jamming. However there are areas where even this graphic is stretching especially at the extremely lower and extremely higher bands in the graphic ;).

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby neeraj » 29 Dec 2015 08:26

TSJones wrote:Falcon 9’s Second Stage Restart was Just as Important as Sticking the Landing

http://spacenews.com/falcon-9s-second-s ... e-landing/

While Falcon 9's on-target landing garnered the most attention, it was the second stage’s performance that positions SpaceX to conduct commercial operations the way it has long intend.
​PARIS — SpaceX’s successful deployment Dec. 21 of 11 Orbcomm machine-to-machine messaging satellites and the apparently clean return and landing of the upgraded Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage also validated the ability of the redesigned second-stage propulsion system to restart in orbit after a coast phase, SpaceX said....


ISRO has done this with PSLV
http://gadgets.ndtv.com/science/news/is ... day-779156
Indian space agency Isro on Wednesday successfully tested restarting of its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket after its engine was cut off during the mission to launch six Singaporean satellites, a top official said.

"The restart test was successful. The engine was fired for nearly five seconds. We will be using this technology sometime next year," Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) chairman A.S. Kiran Kumar told IANS.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby Shalav » 29 Dec 2015 09:17

Inside a Saturn 1 kerosene fuel tank during flight.





One of the inside of a Hydrogen tank.


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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby SaiK » 29 Dec 2015 17:28

I am sure Bezos is thinking of fulfilling ISS orders with shipping equipment docking modules so that he can be the first to do so keeping the Russians out of business. Folks in ISS can order on amazon.com and S&H charged at rocket science price!

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby ldev » 31 Dec 2015 03:15

Even the Russians who had dismissed Musk as a "young boy" when he first wanted to buy 2-3 of their decomissioned ICBMs as his first space launch vehicle, now recognize his achievements.

Elon Musk `Stepping on Toes' in Space Race, Russia Official Says

December 30, 2015 — 4:19 AM EST

Elon Musk’s success in launching reusable space rockets means Russia must make its own projects cheaper as the cash-strapped country struggles to retain its share of the market, the country’s defense-industry chief said.

“The main goal today is to make space cheap,” Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, who’s in charge of defense, told Rossiya 24 TV in an interview on Wednesday in Moscow. “Competitors are stepping on our toes. Look at what billionaire Musk is doing with his projects. This is very interesting, well done, and we treat this work with respect.”

Rogozin’s comments follow the first successful liftoff and landing of a reusable spacecraft this month by Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies Corp. The South African-born mogul says the technology will dramatically cut the cost of space launches.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby habal » 02 Jan 2016 18:12

what is going on here, any ideas

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST6X0Ra7zOQ#t=65

Portal Opens Above CERN, something flies in.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 02 Jan 2016 20:07

10 minutes of the latest Red-Flag exercise at Nellis..


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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby TSJones » 02 Jan 2016 21:47

Russian space agency has been shut down amid charges of malfeasance and corruption.....

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2015/12 ... 451593589/

MOSCOW, Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Russia's space-based ambitions aren't going anywhere, but Roscosmos, also known as the Federal Space Agency, will soon be no more.

Earlier this week, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree dissolving the agency. December 31, 2015, is its last day in existence.

Starting January 1, Russia's space missions will be planned and executed by the Roscosmos State Corporation, a combination of the Federal Space Agency and United Rocket and Space Corporation -- an entity created in 2013 to renationalize Russa's space industry. The corporation will still be called Roscosmos.

Exactly what will be different about the new configuration isn't entirely clear, but Russia's leaders apparently thought a reshuffling and a fresh start was necessary for a space agency that suffered a number of embarrassing rocket, cargo capsule and satellite failures, as well as allegations of corruption.

Space officials in Russia hope the new consolidation will help diminish corruption and keep missions on schedule moving forward, but critics aren't so sure.


I'm not sure this will achieve a culture change that they want...........

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby TSJones » 07 Jan 2016 11:54

NASA has another new telescope in the works........

http://spacenews.com/nasas-next-major-s ... -february/

KISSIMMEE, Fla. — NASA’s next flagship astronomy mission after the James Webb Space Telescope will become a formal project in February thanks to increased funding and direction from Congress, even as the agency looks to make cuts elsewhere in its astrophysics program.

Paul Hertz, director of NASA’s astrophysics division, told astronomers attending the 227th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society here Jan. 4 that the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will enter its “formulation phase,” the beginning of NASA’s project management process, in February after the proposed space telescope passed a mission concept review in December.

That decision also comes after the passage of the fiscal year 2016 omnibus spending bill in December that provided $90 million for WFIRST, far above NASA’s request of $14 million. The report accompanying the bill adopted language approved by Senate appropriators in June directing NASA to move WFIRST into the formulation phase by early 2016.


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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby NRao » 09 Jan 2016 02:35

New T-50 T-X with a dorsal conformal module incorporating a boom-refueling receptacle and fuel tank

Image

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby NRao » 09 Jan 2016 02:40

botH Aviation week and Boeing turn 100 this year. So the two have teamed up to provide "Every Issue. Every Article. Every Photo". 440,000 pages have been digitized and will be made available on-line.

Till then, Click away ...................................

Image


Image
First CM.

October 2, 1918
Kettering Bug First Flight

The Kettering Aerial Torpedo, nicknamed the Bug, was Dayton, Ohio inventor Charles Kettering’s answer to a U.S. Army request during World War I for an unmanned flying bomb. Forerunner to today’s cruise missile, the Bug was launched from a four-wheeled dolly on a track and guided in flight by internal, preset controls. After a predetermined period of time, the controls could shut off the engine and jettison the wings, allowing the Bug to plunge to Earth, where its 180-lb. bomb would explode. Powered by a four-cylinder, 40-hp engine, the Bug had a range of 75 mi. and a top speed of 120 mph. It never saw combat, however, and budget limitations in the 1920s prevented further work on it.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby VinodTK » 09 Jan 2016 22:48

Japan’s 5th Generation Stealth Fighter to Make Maiden Flight in Early 2016
Japan’s Ministry of Defense Technical Research and Development Institute (TRDI) announced that a prototype of Tokyo’s first indigenously-designed fifth-generation air superiority fighter, the Mitsubishi ATD-X Shinshin, will make its maiden flight in February 2016 according to Sankei.com

The principal objective of the ATD-X Shinshin program is to develop a research prototype aircraft an–“advanced technology demonstration unit” to test the capacity of Japan’s defense industry to develop, among other things, a powerful fighter engine and various other indigenous stealth fighter aircraft technologies.

The program is meant to eventually produce Japan’s first indigenously-designed fifth-generation air superiority fighter, designated F-3, with serial production slated to begin in 2027, although various delays in the development of the ATD-X Shinshin prototype –scheduled to be fully developed by 2018– make a later date more likely.
Image
Image
The reason behind the development of the F-3 is the refusal of the United States to sell to Japan the Lockheed-Martin F-22 Raptor stealth air superiority fighter in the 2000s. According to some media reports, Lockheed-Martin is playing an undetermined role in the development of the ATD-X prototype.

Among other things, the aircraft will feature 3D thrust vectoring capability.

The aircraft will be fitted with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar. The radar will have capabilities for electronic countermeasures, communications functions, and possibly even microwave weapon functions. The Shinshin is planned to have a flight-by-optics flight control system.

One full-scale ATD-X prototype has been constructed. Back in 2011, Japan decided to procure 42 F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters, the first of which are scheduled to arrive at the end of 2016

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 10 Jan 2016 08:35

New T-50 T-X with a dorsal conformal module incorporating a boom-refueling receptacle and fuel tank


Some effort focused at making the aircraft more ugly :). Anyhow, KAI isn't going to win this program. The cost to develop a clean sheet aircraft is a very small percentage of the overall T-X cost given the requirements, and it is in the USAF's long term interest to A) Design something that is as per the requirements (as opposed to something that will have to be fitted in), and B ) get life-cycle cost savings, and performance advantage given maturity of technology since the time the T-50 was first designed. I wouldn't be surprised if before summer, Lockheed quietly dissociates itself from KAI and offers a brand new clean sheet design once it sees full RFP's.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby durairaaj » 10 Jan 2016 10:09

A new bie question:
Can someone with knowledge compare Kfir C-7 ($6 M) and LCA ($30 M). I understand that LCA is the latest. But for the role its going to play what is that a K-fir kind of low cost plane cannot achieve?
I am not suggesting to buy K-Fir. I very much want us to succeed with LCA and move on to AMCA and further.

My question is only to know what are the improvements, function wise, we achieved by using latest expensive technologies.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 10 Jan 2016 10:12

durairaaj wrote:A new bie question:
Can someone with knowledge compare Kfir C-7 ($6 M) and LCA ($30 M). I understand that LCA is the latest. But for the role its going to play what is that a K-fir kind of low cost plane cannot achieve?
I am not suggesting to buy K-Fir. I very much want us to succeed with LCA and move on to AMCA and further.

My question is only to know what are the improvements, function wise, we achieved by using latest expensive technologies.


From your link:

Israel Aerospace Industries announced in August 2013 it will offer pre-owned Kfir fighter jets to foreign customers, with a 40-year guarantee. Unit price is reported to be $20 million.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 10 Jan 2016 20:44

Israel's first stealth fighter jet enters advanced production stage

The first Lockheed Martin F-35 [dubbed Adir in the IAF] stealth fighter jet, due to be delivered to Israel later this year, had entered an advanced production stage.

To mark the event, the head of the Defense Ministry's delegation to the US, Aharon Marmaroush, visited Lockheed Martin's production plant in Fort Worth, Texas, and inscribed a message on the frame of the future IAF jet.

"The aircraft, designated as F-35A aircraft AS-1, officially began its mate process, where the four major components of the 5th generation fighter aircraft are joined together in the Electronic Mate and Assembly Station to form the aircraft’s structure. AS-1 will continue its assembly here and is expected to roll out of the factory in June and be delivered to the Israeli Air Force (IAF) later this year," Lockheed Martin said.

"This is a historic day for the Defense Ministry and the state of Israel," Marmaroush said. "F-35 jets from the advanced fifth generation, purchased by the Defense Ministry, will march the air force onward and upwards, and will significantly improve its abilities to protect the state of Israel from a wide range of threats," he added.

Jeff Babione, head of the F-35 program at Lockheed Martin, said the plane would upgrade Israel's tactical and strategic capabilities, and strengthen relations between the company and the IAF, Defense Ministry, and Israeli defense industries for many decades to come.

Israel has purchased 33 F-35A fighters jets at an average cost of 110 million dollars per aircraft. The first two aircraft are due to arrive at Nevatim airbase in the Negev in December this year, and the air force is preparing to integrate them into its operations.

The remainder of the planes are due to arrive in Israel by 2021.

Israel signed its first contract for 19 jets in 2010, and a second contract for the acquisition of 14 jets in 2014, with an option of buying another 17 in the future.

Israel has recently held talks with the US over the possible purchase of F-35B short take off and vertical landing variants, which would enable the IAF to use airbases even if their runways are damaged by enemy rocket or missile fire.

Elbit Systems manufactures the plane's Helmet Mounted Display Systems, while IAI is manufacturing wings for the aircraft.

Lockheed Martin and the F-35's engine makers, Pratt and Whitney, signed a contract in 2010 with the Defense Ministry for reciprocal purchases from Israeli defense industries worth 775 million dollars.



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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 10 Jan 2016 22:15

Budget Fighter PAC/Chengdu JF-17 Thunder Turns Heads at Paris Air Show 2015 – AINtv


Vertical takeoff seems impressive.

PAF JF 17 Promotional Video (HD)


HAL/ADA can we have some promotional campaign for LCA with some glitz please 8)

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 10 Jan 2016 22:49


member_23694
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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 10 Jan 2016 23:05

^^^^^^^^^
Enjoyed the video and the audio is super stuff :D

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 11 Jan 2016 06:29

SaiK wrote:It will deliver, but it surely has few problems.. they will overcome and look at certain missions with it. F35 does play its roles well.. the risk of flying light-weight afsars ejecting out issues must be resolved [which is not a big problem for LM].

There is always Amir Khan problems and there are always Russian problems in terms of chewing and spares. It is a trade off finally. nothing comes like your own a/c...#MakeInIndia no matter where it is designed, with no operational strings attached.

between Rafale and JSF, I would choose the later, on price/performance and it is a winner if #MakeInIndia is energized. The Amirs might open up! you are soon to experience some new waves. keep it watching., all depends on how the first squadron LCA Tejas is felt by IAF... things will be flowing inwards from then.

CMMI documents, plus technology IPR sharing is what is all the concern is, and not production engineering. There are give and takes. Currently, both these countries are worried about opening their backs. so, Russkies will find that as loophole and keep the tabs open.

we will see.. the game only begins when we announce we are equally capable and they get to see it! so, show our capability and they will come flocking with production engineering setup, and ToT immediately.. just to learn what we did. they are good at these. if we are game, and throw dharmic aspects outside the window.. we can emerge out of this rut brilliantly. we can begin our games very soon.


The Ejection seat issue has been way over played by the media. The requirements put into the Martin Baker seat had the most widest range in US fighter development history (some 40 odd KG to 111 odd kg). The only restcition currently in place is for the lighter side of this margin at around 61 kg. Seriously, there would be only a handful of pilots in that range in the 5 year roster for squadrons looking to take up the F-35. The US Navy and Marines don't even have a single fighter pilot with those restrictions. As martin baker has already come out and said, they'll carry the cost of any modification to the seat but its definitely not what is at most risk for delivering a jet.

The biggest risk is still software, and delivering full block 3F capability by the end of 2017 or early 2018. Any delay will add cost to the program, and we know the Congress hasn't spent a single dollar over its appropriations since the re-baseline so any delay or a prolonged software development/debugging campaign will have to be funded by deffering capability to future blocks. That however is a significantly less threat now given that a year ago the entire software team was working on 3 versions i.e. debugging block 2b, integrating block 3I, and developing block 3F. Fast forward to now, the entire team is working on just one development in the block 3F, the final version of the SDD phase.

Another issue is with ramping production, and of course lowering Life Cycle cost, which as per the JPO's estimates continues to be around 20-30% more than the F-16 it is replacing. Ejection seat, or a lighter helmet are far down the list and can be chalked up to improved follow-on versions that generally tend to benefit from technology progress.

The missions for the F-35 are the same for the primary aircraft it is replacing which is the F-16C, F/A-18 and AV-8 harrier. These mission involve, multi-role combat, strike however unlike the first two of those, the F-35 won't require specialized SEAD variants and will be rapidly mission configurable. For the first time the US Marines would have a STOVL aircraft that could accompany the F-16's and F/A-18's on missions while they used to rely on the F/A-18 to do those sort of missions earlier and kept the expensive Harrier fleets for CAS. In fact from a mission perspective, the F-35 isn't significantly different from the Rafale. Both are multi-role aircraft designed to leverage technology to deliver a wide range of PGM's and also perform air-air duties as needed.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 12 Jan 2016 16:27

Japan Mulls Thaad Missile Defense System Amid North Korea Threat

Japan is considering deployment of the U.S.’s Thaad ballistic missile defense system to counter any potential strike from North Korea, Defense Minister Gen Nakatani told reporters in Hawaii, Kyodo News reported Tuesday.
Nakatani’s comments come as the U.S. and China square off over the possible deployment of the anti-missile system in South Korea -- a source of tension between the world’s two biggest economies as they vie for influence in Asia.
Adoption of the technology by Japan could also agitate China, which has criticized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s bid to strengthen the role of Japan’s military, and chill a nascent recovery in ties between Asia’s two biggest economies. Abe told President Barack Obama last week that he supported U.S. naval patrols to assert free navigation in the South China Sea, where China has built artificial islands as a platform to assert its claims to more than 80 percent of the waters.
The Thaad issue has left South Korean President Park Geun Hye caught between the U.S, which maintains more than 28,000 troops in the country to defend against North Korea, and China, its biggest trading partner and ally in efforts to resolve historical and territorial disputes with Japan.
North Korea on Nov. 15 declared a no-sail zone off its eastern coast, suggesting the country may be preparing to test-launch a missile in the sea that lies between the Korean peninsula and Japan, according to Yonhap News. The test could involve a new type of proprietary ballistic missile that separates into several “sub-missiles” at high altitude, the South Korean news agency reported.


If they do go ahead they'll have a formidable layered defense system. The Block IIA SM3, Joint development really irked the Chinese given the system's extremely long range, and I bet if Japan acquires a couple of AN/TPY-2's (as opposed to US deploying them there for periods) the Chinese will be unhappy to put it mildly...

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby deejay » 12 Jan 2016 19:18

Is this the right thread?

https://www.rt.com/news/328632-ripples-waves-gravitational-einstein/

Scientists may have just discovered Einstein’s gravitational waves

Rumors are circulating that scientists have finally discovered gravitational waves – one of the most important variables in Albert Einstein’s understanding of how the universe works. If confirmed, the observations could become the biggest leap in physics in a hundred years.
When Einstein published his general theory of relativity in 1915, he propelled physics years forward and changed our understanding of how the universe works. He envisioned spacetime (a system containing three spatial dimensions and one time dimension) and gravity in a fresh way, showing us that spacetime was dynamic – not static – and that gravity warps spacetime in the presence of a massive object.

Einstein further predicted that gravity travels in waves. These ripples are like a net that reacts to space events – star explosions, galaxy collisions, anything on a massive scale. The events create ripples that warp the fabric of spacetime. The bigger the objects, the greater the ripples.

But the hunt for proof of the ripples has been on for decades. Einstein himself thought it would never amount to anything.

That is – until now (we think). Because when famed theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and policy advocate Lawrence Krauss himself tweets the following message, people in the science community know not to take his words lightly.
...

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brar_w
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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 12 Jan 2016 20:12

Philip wrote:PS:Saudis can't afford US frigates.Compare the cost and timeline with IN desi built equivs! This is where we score more.
http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /78610778/
The country’s western fleet, based in the Red Sea, is supplied primarily by France.

The SNEP 2 plan features four larger surface warships – the MMSC – along with six smaller corvette-sized ships, all operating Lockheed Martin Sikorsky MH-60R helicopters. A $1.9 billion deal to purchase the helicopters was announced in May. A number of smaller vessels and aircraft also are in the plan.

Negotiations have been underway between the US and the Saudis over the MMSC package, which includes weapons, logistics, training and other services. The Saudis declined the latest offer last week, sources said.

Reportedly, the Saudis balked at the price tag for the MMSC package – thought to be more than $3 billion but less than $4 billion – and were unhappy with the time it would take to complete detail design of the ships, carry out systems integration, build the vessels, deliver them and install infrastructure improvements in the kingdom.

One source thought the time to deliver the first ship would be around seven years, which the Saudis reportedly think is excessive.


The Saudi's have a weird habit of wanting customized variants of everything despite of the cost associated with these things. If they want a frigate, they have plenty of other options to buy them but they insisted on picking a project that involved considerable project management and design work to deliver, and they want the service concerned with nation to lead the design effort. There are plenty of frigates available from Europe that they can get off the shelf.

Same with their missile defense option, rather than go with the current integrated system (currently used by the US), or wait a few years for the IAMDCIBCS ( near term Future of US Patriot replacement) they want a customized integrated air and missile defense system comprising of PAC-3's, new sensors, AMRAAM-ER's, THAAD's etc. Both Qatar and Saudi Arabia could have had THAAD coverage by now, if only they had not gone down the road of a GCC common approach with a common set of customized integrated battle management and command and control. To Qatar's credit, they are going ahead with US version of THAAD and will integrate a new common command later but Saudi Arabia will probably spend 5 years and a ton of money using the US MDA to design a custom C2 for them all the while delaying a credible missile defense given their ageing patriot batteries and their delay in firming up PAC-3 interceptors.

Also your point about cost and timeline is WRONG. The Saudi's aren't buying off the shelf frigates. The version/frigate they want does not exist. The process involves -

- Saudi's developing reqirements for a frigate
- USN selects a design and set of technologies required to be developed, integrated, and built into a variant of the LCS
- A full scale EMD program follows
- A first in class ship is delivered
- Testing is conducted by the USN
- Ship is delivered to the Saudi's

They don't want a freedom class LCS. They want one a frigate based on the LCS with a mini-aegis radar, VLS and a ton of internal changes. There is very little common between what they want and what a normal customer would want so you cannot really compare since this deal has extremely unique cost elements to it (foreign nation service has design and test authority, lifetime-support from foreign navy, and foreign OEM etc).

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby NRao » 13 Jan 2016 04:26

[youtube]iI8t_0CSb1U#t=133[/youtube]

srai
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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby srai » 13 Jan 2016 05:00

NRao wrote:[youtube]iI8t_0CSb1U#t=133[/youtube]


Good video overall. Now only if Arjun MBT had the same kind of footage to be compiled ...

One thing missing in that video is Turkey doesn't have deserts like Thar for testing. If Pakistan were to acquire it, they would need to customize it for desert conditions.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby SaiK » 13 Jan 2016 06:47

33 jassoos on the way to Israel! the A variant with of course lotsa israeli parts like HMDS, composite parts, wings etc. An indic version could mean completely different comms and stores management along with israeli components.

per the new policies, if the design is not Indian, then 60% must components must be Indian.

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Re: International Military & Space Discussion

Postby brar_w » 14 Jan 2016 14:23

Park hints at THAAD deployment

President Park Geun-hye said Wednesday that the government will review plans by the U.S. Forces Korea to deploy an advanced missile defense system here, depending on how North Korea's nuclear weapons and missiles threaten security and national interests.

Her remarks came one week after the North allegedly conducted a hydrogen bomb test, which ignited calls for Seoul and Washington to deploy the terminal high-altitude area defense (THAAD) system on Korean soil.

"Taking the North's nuclear and missile threats into consideration, I will review the issue of deploying THAAD here based on security and national interests. That is the bottom line," Park said in a nationally televised address from Cheong Wa Dae.

It is no secret that the U.S. government wants to deploy THAAD here, with the Kim Jong-un regime modernizing its ballistic missile and nuclear programs. In 2014, the U.S. conducted a site inspection for the missile interceptor.

However, the Park administration has been reluctant to openly approve of the THAAD deployment because China strongly opposes its presence, claiming that it could be a threat to its security. China is the South's biggest trading partner.

The Chinese media kept a close watch on Park's THAAD comments.

The daily Huanqiu Shibao, a foreign affairs tabloid controlled by the Chinese Communist Party's flagship paper the People's Daily, said in its editorial that a deployment of U.S. military weapons on the Korean Peninsula following the latest North Korean nuclear test was aimed at containing China as well as the North.

It added that should the U.S. deploy THAAD in the South, it will threaten China.

The China Internet Information Center, a web portal authorized by the Chinese government, also said that the South Korean government has rejected previous U.S. calls for THAAD deployment due to China's opposition; but noted the situation was changing after the nuclear test.

Park's THAAD comments are also seen as a measure to get China to swiftly rein in the North's nuclear ambitions, with Beijing government keeping mum on possible sanctions over the fourth nuclear test, as such action could lead to the North's collapse and instability on its border.

Amid intensifying inter-Korean tensions, the Seoul government has limited the entry of its people to the Gaeseong Industrial Complex, a joint project in the North, twice, raising speculation that the South may close the joint factory park, but Park said that its future depends on the North's actions.

"At this point, I am not considering taking such an extreme measure. However, whether or not to shut it down is fully up to the North," she said.

A total of 124 South Korean firms are running factories with about 54,000 North Koreans working at the complex in the North Korean border city, which opened in 2004 as a symbol of inter-Korean reconciliation and has served as a valued source of hard currency for the impoverished North.

Also, the President called on China to play a necessary role as a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council in an international move to impose fresh sanctions on the North, saying that the best partners are those who can hold hands in difficult times.

"China has repeatedly stated that it will not tolerate the North's nuclear program, and is well aware that if such a strong statement is not followed by necessary measures, the North would carry out further nuclear tests, preventing peace and stability on the Korea Peninsula," Park said.

"We have closely discussed the North Korean nuclear issue, so I believe that the Chinese government will not allow the situation on the Korean Peninsula to deteriorate further."

Seoul-Beijing ties are at their best-ever, evidenced by six summits between Park and Chinese President Xi Jinping, thanks to Park's efforts to improve bilateral relations given that China is the only country that can exert influence on the North.

However, the two sides seem to remain apart over countermeasures against the North Korean nuclear test.

Following the claimed hydrogen bomb test, the U.N. is working to draft a new resolution for sanctions against the North, and Park vowed to make all diplomatic efforts to ensure that the reclusive state will be slapped with the most powerful sanctions yet.

"The government has coordinated with its allies, including the United States, on a draft resolution," she said.

The North's latest nuclear test is rekindling debate on whether the South should possess its own nuclear arsenal, but Park opposed the idea, adding that it would break the nation's commitment to the international community.

"I don't think we need nuclear weapons in South Korea," Park said.

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AIDC F-CK-1 Ching-kuo

Postby Avinandan » 17 Jan 2016 03:35

On regarding the LCA's export front, F-CK-1 Ching-kuo is another light fighter (along with Gripen and FA-50) which is also pretty close to LCA capabilities.
Wonder why Taiwan never tried to export it.
As per Wikipedia : 'The first fighter entered service in 1997. All 130 production aircraft had been manufactured by 1999.'
So in 2 years, they produced 130 :shock: :shock: Is there any truth in it ??


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